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    23

















    Followers
    The Vosper 46” RAF Crash Tender Kit By Vintage Model Works
    by mturpin013 πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ ( Sub-Lieutenant)
    πŸ“£










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    55 Posts 160 Comments 402 Photos 469 Likes
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    πŸ“ Suction hose fittings
    8 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Well what can I say about suction hoses other than thanks to Rob for doing all the leg work to a great standard, all the drawings are well done and easy to follow. I’m a retired engineering toolmaker so the components are quickly machined, as Rob says the hardest part of this job is filing the square holes of the underwater part, which has the stainless steel mesh inside.
    One tip for drilling the 4 holes around the periphery is to leave the finished component on the parent material, this allows the component to be held in a vice or dividing head on a drilling machine or milling machine table without any damage to the finished surface, they can then be parted off when drilling operation is finished.
    I decided to drill the holes to a depth rather than through to make it accurate when fitting the four turn handles. The small handles were machined with a small ball end and parted off to an exact length.
    The fitting of the handles was a dilemma; should I solder then in or use an adhesive. I knew solder would be secure but cyno needed to be tested, so a dummy handle and hole were glued and after a few minutes I tried to pull it out, all I managed to do was destroy the handle and snap it. The solder option would result in some amount of cleaning up after with little chance of getting all the visible solder removed without an awful lot of fettling.
    I decided to use cyno being the quickest and cleanest, each handle was cleaned/degreased and a drop of cyno down each hole then quickly push the handle home (hence the accurate length of handle and depth of hole).
    Finally the stainless mesh was fabricated into a tube to slide inside the body, the end was formed using a 10mm flat bottomed hole, and an 8mm punch, and this was then formed in the press to form a cup. The end was then pressed into the body and both secured with a drop of epoxy.
    Now all the parts are finished they all get a coat of spray clear lacquer. Next on the list are the pipes.

    adhesive
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    8 days ago by robbob ( Commander)
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    Hi Mike.
    Nice lathe workπŸ‘πŸ‘
    I pleased the my drawings were good enough for you to work from.
    I didn't lacquer my fittings and they are in need of a polish now but when I do I'll give them a coat or two.
    Rob.

    polish
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    8 days ago by MouldBuilder ( Warrant Officer)
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    Quality. They look perfect.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    8 days ago by stevedownunder ( Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Beautiful workmanship as usual, good choice with the cyno, an other option for securing the pins might have been Loctite excess adhesive wipes off easily. This is not a criticism just a thought.
    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    7 days ago by jbkiwi ( Warrant Officer)
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    Nice work, makes life easy when you have the proper tools. Dividing head has been on my shopping list for a while.

    Dividing head
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    7 days ago by Martin555 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Nice bit of machine work.
    Approximately what size is it?

    Martin.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    7 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Steve your right I did think of this but "too late" next time Ill do some planning before sticking!
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Suction hose fittings
    7 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Here is one of Robs original drawings
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    πŸ“ The ladders
    16 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Next in the line of adornments in the aft deck are the ladders, these were made from 2mm mahogany to the plan included in the kit. To make sure that all parts were identical I cut pieces to slightly longer and wider than required then clamped them together and drilled two 0.4mm holes through them all and tapped a 0.5mm brass pins through to hold them all together for machining. I made use of the Lidl disc sander and shaped the sandwiched block to the dimensions/profile taken from the drawing. I now disassembled the four pieces in preparation for drilling the holes which will determine the position of the stair runs. I need only to mark out one side piece so I can set the drilling machine stops to hold (by hand) each piece for drilling a single hole, then reset for the next hole/s until all pieces have a set of 4 identical holes. Next the stair pieces need to be made, again to the correct sizes as marked on the drawing (out with the sander). Having made the hole position of the sides so precise the same needed to be applied to the pre drilling of the stair runs, so I made a small jig to drill the pilot holes, just clamping each piece under the aluminium angle and spotting through each hole. Some final sanding of the individual pieces and then the assembly was put together using cyno adhesive. I wanted to include a brass stair lip on each step, so using some small angle brass, these were cut to extra length and then again using a small jig they were sanded to exact length; (trimming this small section brass is difficult for all the available sections so using the sander and an appropriate jig give a great finish). The brass pieces were stuck on each stair front using cyno. The ladders now need to be fitted in place, I used some brass angle on the rear of each step and then drilled and tapped the rear of the step 10BA. I could now drill a hole in the rear wall to clamp each step in place.

    kit
    cyno adhesive
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    πŸ’¬ Re: The ladders
    16 days ago by robbob ( Commander)
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    Hi Mike.
    You're making excellent progress and the removable tub is a good idea if you think you might be running in rough conditions.
    I've not had any water get in the rear well at all but then I'm usually running on smooth and calm water up to now.
    The disc sander is a great bit of kit....didn't know that IKEA sold them too πŸ˜‰
    Rob.

    kit
    emoji-container
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    πŸ’¬ Re: The ladders
    15 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Sorry Rob, (and any others wishing to purchase) IKEA don't sell disc sanders but LIDL do that's where I bought itπŸ™„
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    πŸ’¬ Re: The ladders
    8 days ago by Colin H ( Lieutenant Commander)
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    Superb detail, keep up the wonderful work.
    Cheers Colin.πŸ‘
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    πŸ“ Re visit Rear upper deck & Aft cockpit deck
    18 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I have decided that the rear upper deck and the rear aft cockpit will be a one piece unit. After see another boat with a similar set but not both decks were joined. This means that the upper deck and lower deck and the sides of the cockpit will all be joined forming a box. This has a number of benefits these are:-
    1. It makes a water tight compartment which can be emptied if required. (except for the removable hatch I did in the initial build, this will have to have an β€œo” ring type seal)
    2. It makes it easier to get to the servo area without taking all the smaller parts out e.g. foam tanks ladders etc.
    3. Fitting the ladders made easier with a single 10 BA bolt
    Disadvantages
    A lot more work!.

    Because the individual parts are already made and in some cases painted I need to make sure that all surfaces that will require gluing are suitably abraded before applying any type adhesive. Additional work will be required around the top edge of the cockpit to give a lip to stop any water from entering the servo area. I decide this would look nice in mahogany to match the floor edging, along with some corner pieces in polished brass this edging will also add substantial rigidity to the whole structure.
    The mahogany was cut from a spare piece of old table top to 9mm by 6mm and then a 1.5 mm x 2mm deep groove was cut along the length to slot onto the top of the box section. The corner brass pieces were fabricated from 0.5 mm brass sheet and the joints soft soldered with a strengthening piece underneath.

    The box section sides were already made and painted so had to have their edges prepared for gluing by removing a 2mm wide strip along each edge. The area where the box fits had to be prepared with spacers of 0.6 mm card and strips of baking sheet to stop the glue sticking to the sides of the boat. This method ensures that the box fits exactly in its hole.
    After epoxying the box section to consolidate the Rear upper deck & Aft cockpit deck I could then glue the mahogany rail to the top along with the brass corners this was left to set overnight. The top rail was then radiused to finish it off and a first coat of varnish applied


     

    hatch
    piece
    baking sheet
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Re visit Rear upper deck & Aft cockpit deck
    16 days ago by stevedownunder ( Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Magnificent workmanship!
    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ“ Paint prep
    26 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    It’s time to start looking at some paint preparation as this is something that can be done alongside some of the remaining jobs. I have spent hours glassing the hull and deck and the cabin roofs and then finishing to a standard for the first coats of primer, this was achieved by progressing through various grades of wet and dry from 400 to 800. This gives a good adhesion surface for the first primer coat. As I have said in previous posts I made as many parts detachable as was practical, so on the forward cabin roof (which is in itself detachable) all parts are removed leaving a relatively flat surface to prepare, the underside was masked and then put in the queue for painting. Mid cabin and rear cabin roofs - again all parts were removed and placed in the queue/turntable,
    Spraying is a hazardous process whatever type of paint you use, so it’s essential that some sort of extraction is used and an appropriate face mask ( I use a P100 rated mask because it gives the highest level of protection in the widest variety of situations and will filter out 100% of both oil-based and non-oil-based particles.). This can also be used for most of my wood working activities, however; if this isn’t an option for you then I suggest you spray outdoors. My spray booth is made from an old cooker hood mounted in my workshop with a table below. On this I used plain sheets of hardboard which I made temporary fixings to hold a box together. The extraction element was a piece of old clothes dryer flexible 4” pipe which when I’m spraying hangs out of the window.
    Back to spraying, I use a compressor and small spray gun for this size of work so I purchased a litre of grey primer and 5 litres of thinners. I am no professional sprayer but have sprayed a number of cars in the past and I have learnt that once again ”Less is more” so a number of light coats is better than one thick coat that runs, meaning lots of sanding and a repeat performance of painting. First three coats of grey primer applied and I’m pleased with how it’s going. I took the opportunity to spray some of the other parts that were finished while the gun was full of primer. Spraying is one of those jobs which is over before it’s begun yet the preparation seems to take weeks but it always pays off in the end.
    Next will be a top coat of Appliance White.

    sprayer
    primer
    box
    turntable
    gun
    spray gun
    clothes dryer
    compressor
    cars
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Paint prep
    25 days ago by robbob ( Commander)
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    Hi Mike.
    I think you've got the basis there for a very good finish, keep up the great work πŸ‘.
    Will you be able to fit the hull into your spray booth though?
    Rob.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Paint prep
    25 days ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Rob you've heard of a tight squeeze, well this is it. however its not really a problem as I also have a larger spray area in my garage with extraction so ill probably do it in there especially with the prospect of some warmer weather on its way.
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    πŸ“ Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    2 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Been away on holiday for a few weeks so not been doing much but back at it again -

    Pulley blocks
    The mast has a small pulley block on each end of the cross bar, but I wanted to have a go at making them so using some 0.5mm I marked out the profile and then bent the flat pieces into a channel this was followed by drilling an 8BA clearance hole through both sides. Next I machined the centre pulley out of brass with a 2mm rad to suit the rope I will be using; I also did an extra round dummy pulley in steel to use as the template to file the radius on the frame and use as a guide for the width of the block. Using a smooth file I carefully filed the radius on each piece using the dummy pulley as a guide and trimmed the width, this was followed using wet and dry paper to finish. To fasten the blocks to the cross bar they need a screw fastening on the top, this was done by soldering an 8BA nut on the top. Finally the brass pulley wheel was secured in place with an 8BA nut and bolt, with a threaded stud in the top.


    Deck rigging screw eyes - can be bought, but again, I had to have a go, so first I ground a tool to form the end ball which would also part the piece off after it had been turned and threaded. The bar was turned down to the thread o/d and then using an 8BA die the diameter was threaded. I then used the form tool to produce the ball end, this worked OK but could be improved on as the final turned finish wasn’t as good as I’d hoped for, but I don’t have time to spend on this as I only wanted six eyes so the diameters will be finished with a small file and wet and dry. Turned pieces finished, next I set up a gang of slitting saws to mill the flats, holding each part in a split threaded clamp in the machine vice the flats were milled in parallel. Finally using the same clamp jig the ball was drilled with a 2mm hole again to suit the 2mm rope. There’s some final dressing to do before the parts are clear lacquered.

    pulley
    nut
    2mm rope
    machine
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    2 months ago by figtree7nts ( Commodore)
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    Great workmanship, Michael!

    Cheers, Ed
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    2 months ago by stevedownunder ( Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Beautiful workman ship.
    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    2 months ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    Excellent stuffπŸ‘
    And a great tutorial as well.
    Thanks Michael😊
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    2 months ago by Mariner85 ( Leading Seaman)
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    Beautiful workmanship! Great job.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    2 months ago by MouldBuilder ( Warrant Officer)
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    Superb workmanship as usual.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    15 days ago by jbkiwi ( Warrant Officer)
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    Nice job, I can see you've done this before !?
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    πŸ“ Radio Aerial and Loud Hailer
    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    On the cabin roof is the radio aerial, the kit supplies a base in white metal, but to accommodate my aerial design I decided to machine my own out of brass. I wanted the pole to be tapered and with it being only 2mm dia I found the easiest way was to support the piece in a wooden block at the same height as the Dremel laid flat on the bench. With the piece rotating, I used a smooth file and grades of wet & dry to taper down to 0.75 dia. Next I machined the 2mm end down to 1.5mm to accept the spring, this spring will be soldered to a lower piece which then goes through the base and into the cabin where it’s bolted in position. I decided to incorporate a spring to make sure it does not get accidently bent.
    Soft soldering was chosen, as the silver solder would have tempered the spring. The result was really better than I could have imagined.

    Loud Hailer
    Another heavy item, first job hollow out with the Dremel and then fill with polystyrene and top with Milliput and sculpt the shape –result, the weight was halved. Next I made a frame in the same way as the one I did for the search light – (see search light)

    All the cabin furniture has to be mounted on the roof which is curved! I found the best way was to use Milliput. The method was as follows,
    1 Drill the hole for each item in the appropriate place
    2 Make sure the fastening method for each piece will hold the piece upright (I tapped the hole 8BA)
    3 Make a dividing piece from PTFE baking sheet circular for most items but oblong for the mast feet
    4 Roughen the surface where the items contact the cabin roof
    5 Place the divider on the items base
    6 Mix a small amount of Milliput
    7 Place a circular amount under each item
    8 put some Vaseline on the securing bolt so it doesn’t stick
    9 Pull the item down to the desired height and fasten in position then trim around the bases
    10 When dry remove the item and the baking sheet, paint as required
    11 sorry if this is common knowledge

    kit
    items
    cabin furniture
    Milliput
    baking sheet
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Radio Aerial and Loud Hailer
    3 months ago by figtree7nts ( Commodore)
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    Excellent work as always!
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Radio Aerial and Loud Hailer
    3 months ago by MouldBuilder ( Warrant Officer)
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    Another super job. By the way, the detail is really helpful for us students. Thanks.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Radio Aerial and Loud Hailer
    2 months ago by Rookysailor ( Chief Petty Officer 1st Class)
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    Well written build doc, nice and easy to understand,
    looking forward to the next postπŸ‘

    Peter
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    πŸ“ Mast assembly
    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    The supplied mast is of white metal and although OK it has a number of minus points for me.
    1- The mast does not lend its self to being hinged.
    2- It really needs navigation light on top and the supplied casting is not suitable for this.
    3- wiring needs to be hidden, not easy with the casting
    4- it’s quite heavy
    Having said all that it’s ok if you don’t want my wish list. So on with the manufacture of a replica, I chose brass as the preferred material because it’s easy to silver and soft solder.
    The main legs are made from 6mm round tube, which I squeezed in my machine vice to an oval shape to look like the castings, each of the ends were then squeezed again at 90 degrees to allow then to join to the cross mid-section. I made some brass inserts for the hinged end from 2mm brass sheet, which are bent by 25 degrees to allow the hinge mechanism to sit at 90 degrees to the cabin roof, these are drilled and tapped 8BA. These pieces actually block the end of the oval tube and need to have a 2mm slot milled in them to allow the wires to exit the tube; these are soft soldered in place later. Two feet were made from two pieces of 2mm brass plate the base plate being slotted to accept the upright and finally silver soldered together.
    (A point here for silver soldering is to use as little solder as possible and allow it to flow with the heat around the joint this means that no filing is needed. I find it’s also good practice to quench the part when nearly cool to break the glass like residue of the flux then just steel wool is required to clean the parts).
    The feet upstands were then drilled 8BA clearance and the base fixing holes drilled the same size. The cross mid-section is made from 1mm brass sheet and is bent through 360 degrees whilst placing a 6mm round bar in the centre to create a hole for the top mast. A small wooden former was used as the piece was pressed together in the machine vice, this was then silver soldered to give stability and then filed to shape. This piece has to accommodate the wires passing through, so again a 2mm slot is milled from each leg location to the centre to create passage up to the top mast. The top mast is just stock tubing which then has a turned top with four 5mm holes machined at 90 degrees to accommodate the LED. This is a 5mm Flat top wide angle LED this will direct the light out of the four holes. Finally the cross piece, again stock tube with small ball finials at each end soft soldered in place and tapped 10 BA for the pulley blocks.
    All pieces now made, it’s time to assemble the parts using a combination of soft soldering and epoxy resin. The wire that I used was silicon sheaved, and when I soldered the legs to the mid-section and lower hinge piece I made sure there was enough wire to pull through to check if the process had damaged the wire, but it hadn’t. So having soldered the LED, the top was epoxied to the upper tube and the tube epoxied to the mid-section. Finally the mid-section was filled using Milliput but first putting some Vaseline on the wires to avoid them being stuck should I ever have to rewire the unit. Next the cross beam was added and epoxied in place. The bottom of the legs looked plain compared with the cast version so I have made some thin gauge brass covers with mock bolts as per the original. The whole assembly was cleaned up ready for a first coat of etch primer, and white primer, followed later with a final coat of appliance white

    cabin
    white metal
    paint
    parts
    navigation light
    wiring
    epoxy
    wood
    primer
    drill
    roof
    stability
    resin
    former
    chine
    wooden
    cabin roof
    soldering
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    epoxy resin
    brass tube
    navigation
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    πŸ’¬ Mast assembly
    3 months ago by RNinMunich ( Fleet Admiral)
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    360Β°?πŸ€” Weren't you back where you started 😁
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    πŸ’¬ Mast assembly
    3 months ago by figtree7nts ( Commodore)
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    Excellent Work!
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Mast assembly
    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Your correct 360 degrees does get you back to where you started, so fold a piece of brass sheet through 360 and you get what is in pic, a folded in half piece of brass.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Mast assembly
    3 months ago by MouldBuilder ( Warrant Officer)
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    Thanks. Another Master Class. I will need more paper to print out this blog as my build guide.πŸ˜‰
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    πŸ“ Servo Mount
    4 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Servo mount
    I have looked and better looked for a decent servo mount but could not find one that suited the position I wanted to put the servo, so I decide to make my own. I bought some aluminium channel, which would act as a platform and base for the standard servo. Space in terms of height is at a premium and so some material had to be removed from the keel area to make sure the servo arms did not catch on the underside floor of the rear deck. As the space tapers in height from stern>forward then the best position for the servo would be next to the forward bulkhead

    stern
    bulkhead
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    keel
    wanted
    channel
    servo
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    πŸ’¬ Servo Mount
    4 months ago by robbob ( Commander)
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    I'm curious to know why you opted for the 'push - pull' arrangement for the linkages?.
    Nice piece of metalwork, and polished to a mirror finish too...dazzling 😎
    Rob.

    servo
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    πŸ’¬ Servo Mount
    4 months ago by reilly4 ( Warrant Officer)
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    The aluminium servo mount is similar to what I have used, but the quality here is a step above excellent. πŸ‘

    I use aluminium angle sections as well, so they can be made into a Z section depending on the application. I use 2mm to 3mm diameter bolts and drill and tap into the sections to secure the servos. This method can be used on any size of servo as they come in various sizes.

    I have also noticed that some modellers put two linkages on rudder servos. if both linkages worked in tension only (ie both pulling), then this is necessary, but if the linkage is a rod that works in both tension (pulling) and compression (pushing) then there should be no need for duplication. None of my models have this arrangement.

    model
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    πŸ’¬ Servo Mount
    4 months ago by robbob ( Commander)
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    The servo mount on my Crash Tender came from China, unfortunately I don't have the machinery or skills that Mike has.
    I found the single linkage to be more than adequate.

    reilly4.
    I note that your motors have fans attached (first 'photo), are they standard on those motors ?

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    4 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Two reasons for a double linkage, firstly with a single linkage the pressure exerted on the servo from the rudder during a L/H turn will put the linkage in tension, and when doing a R/H turn then the linkage will be in compression. is it possible this could have an effect on the electronic mechanism in the servo?, not that I have any expertise in this area, however with two linkages this is equalled out.
    Secondly, and the main reason, is that it may not be necessary, it may be overkill, but I like symmetry, and the servo arm has two arms maybe for a reason?
    At the end of the day it's personal preference and it’s good to foster debate and you may find a lot of the parts I make may not be necessary to most people but I enjoy engineering, wait while you see the mast!

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    3 months ago by reilly4 ( Warrant Officer)
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    Robbob,
    This was my first venture into using brushless motors so I was a bit uncertain on cooling. I made the fans from aluminium and bolted them on at the existing 2mm bolt locations. Someone told me they wouldn't rev fast enough but I think every bit helps. I also have water cooling at the front plate of the motors. The end result is that the motors never get warm, even after an hour of sailing around the lake at good speed.

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    3 months ago by robbob ( Commander)
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    Hi reilly4.
    Thanks for your response.
    I didn't think it was a standard feature, it does seem to work though and I did note your water cooled motor mounts too.
    Hi Mike.
    Sorry to hi-jack your thread πŸ˜‰.

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    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Just moved these two posts that were posted further down my blog by mistake as they are significant to the discussion and bring back the subject as I think its important as I would like to know if any others have a view. the photo is Johns

    Response by JOHN on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify βœ“ Like This Post ( 2 )
    hi there
    With regard the servo rudder linkages - I was advised that it is always best to use the 'push/pull method' of linkage - as this has two strong points in its favour.

    The first problem it alleviates is - sometimes if on a single connection between rudder and servo and it is not set up quite right - a servo movement can force the rudder tiller arm to come back on itself under certain circumstances - i.e. when the distance from the centre of the servo to the outer hole on the servo arm isn't equal to the centre of the rudder post - to the centre of the linkage arm on the rudder.


    The second problem - you can get an odd strain on the gearing in the servo, because on some models there is a fair bit of force on the rudder blade - whilst the model is in motion & turning to port or starboard. The way to think of this, you are riding a pushbike and holding the handlebars with one hand and you are trying to turn a sharp corner - think of how much strain and effort you have to put in. Now, if you have a double linkage to either side of the tiller arm from your servo - that strain now is balanced and is evening out the strain in the servo. Admittedly, this problem where you wear the servo out only happens on very rare occasions - but - as the old saying goes 'belts and braces/better be safe than sorry'.


    John

    Response by RNinMunich on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify βœ“ Like This Post ( 1 )
    In the wrong post but sensible stuff John.πŸ‘
    Hadn't considered it before but it certainly makes sense to me that a dual linkage will help cancel the backlash from the rudder. And hence stop the servo motor having to fight it. That would reduce potential 'hunting' of the servo and also take the strain off the gearing.
    Probably not a noticeable problem for short term rudder commands or in small, light models.
    But could be in the heavyweights with big rudders I suppose. like Mike said (sort of); makes yer think!!
    More power to yer servos Gents.
    Cheers, Doug 😎
    PS Dual linkage not possible in some situations, see pic of cramped space in my Sea Scout. Had to lay the servo on it's side.😲

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    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Two reasons for a double linkage, firstly with a single linkage the pressure exerted on the servo from the rudder during a L/H turn will put the linkage in tension, and when doing a R/H turn then the linkage will be in compression. is it possible this could have an effect on the electronic mechanism in the servo, not that I have any expertise in this area, however with two linkages this is equalled out.
    Secondly, and the main reason, is that it may not be necessary, it may be overkill, but I like symmetry, and the servo arm has two arms maybe for a reason?
    At the end of the day its personal preference and it’s good to foster debate and you may find a lot of the parts I make may not be necessary to most people but I enjoy engineering, wait while you see the mast!

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    3 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Accidently deleted posts -
    Response by JOHN on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify βœ“ Like This Post ( 3 )
    hi there
    With regard the servo rudder linkages - I was advised that it is always best to use the 'push/pull method' of linkage - as this has two strong points in its favour.

    The first problem it alleviates is - sometimes if on a single connection between rudder and servo and it is not set up quite right - a servo movement can force the rudder tiller arm to come back on itself under certain circumstances - i.e. when the distance from the centre of the servo to the outer hole on the servo arm isn't equal to the centre of the rudder post - to the centre of the linkage arm on the rudder.


    The second problem - you can get an odd strain on the gearing in the servo, because on some models there is a fair bit of force on the rudder blade - whilst the model is in motion & turning to port or starboard. The way to think of this, you are riding a pushbike and holding the handlebars with one hand and you are trying to turn a sharp corner - think of how much strain and effort you have to put in. Now, if you have a double linkage to either side of the tiller arm from your servo - that strain now is balanced and is evening out the strain in the servo. Admittedly, this problem where you wear the servo out only happens on very rare occasions - but - as the old saying goes 'belts and braces/better be safe than sorry'.


    John

    Response by RNinMunich on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify βœ“ Like This Post ( 1 )
    In the wrong post but sensible stuff John.πŸ‘
    Hadn't considered it before but it certainly makes sense to me that a dual linkage will help cancel the backlash from the rudder. And hence stop the servo motor having to fight it. That would reduce potential 'hunting' of the servo and also take the strain off the gearing.
    Probably not a noticeable problem for short term rudder commands or in small, light models.
    But could be in the heavyweights with big rudders I suppose. like Mike said (sort of); makes yer think!!
    More power to yer servos Gents.
    Cheers, Doug 😎
    PS Dual linkage not possible in some situations, see pic of cramped space in my Sea Scout. Had to lay the servo on it's side.😲

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    πŸ“ Roof magnets
    4 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    I had from the beginning I had intended to hold all the hatches down with Neodymium magnets however as you work on, these things seem to get forgotten, so now it’s time to do some of the not so exiting tasks. I had bought some 10 x 5x 1.5 magnets so I need to machine the slots into the roof cabin quadrants. These needed to be mirrored by a quadrant that can be epoxied into the corners of each cabin area. Using the trusty Lidl disc sander I produced 12 quadrants and then after making a simple jig to hold them in place I machined the corresponding slot in each one taking note of left and right hand variants. The next job is to glue all the magnets into the roof spaces and then when they are set glue the magnets into the quadrants making sure the orientation is correct. To make sure the magnets are set into the cabin sides at the correct depth I made a temporary balsa wood frame around each cabin to rest the quadrants on while they set.
    Another small job complete

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    4 months ago by robbob ( Commander)
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    Mike.
    As you saw at the London show I've use magnets extensively on my Fire Tender and the Police Launch, they're the ideal solution for concealed fixings.
    Rob.

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    4 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Where do you think I got the idea from.
    (Robbob - posted - Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! - Posted: 9th Jul 2017)
    Thank you very much RobπŸ‘

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    4 months ago by Joe727 ( Chief Petty Officer 1st Class)
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    Thanks for posting the jig with the cam action, nice simple and looks pretty effective. I will have to try that soon on some current work. Cheers, Joe

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    πŸ“ Cabin detail part 6 panel light
    5 months ago by mturpin013 ( Sub-Lieutenant)
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    Cabin detail part 6 panel light
    The panel light presented a difficult challenge in that I assume the real one has a tubular light fitting in it, difficult in 1/12 scale. However, creating the tube assembly was not difficult using some annealed 1/8” brass tube and making a bending jig, (simply a 1/8 grove milled using a ball ended slot drill into a piece of hardwood I formed the tube into the required shape. I used the back of the jig to hold the piece while I filled the tube half way through along it top inside edge @ 45 degrees this is where the LED tube will fit. The LED tube is from one of the new type LED garden light bulb that use a small solar panel to illuminate it during the during dark hours. Smashing the bulb leaves 4 filaments which can be used independently, these are very delicate and need the wires attaching very carefully finally feeding it into the brass tube and then after all this fiddling, if it still lights, epoxy it in place. The next job is to make some brackets to fix it to the instrument panel. The bracket was made from 1/8” bore tube and some 0.010” brass shim I drilled some holes in the sheet prior to cutting to size, this was done using only a 1/8” dia centre drill and then enlarged with a clock makers reamer until the tube fitted snugly through this was then soft soldered in place. The whole unit was then epoxied in place on the instrument panel. All the wiring for the panel LEDs can now be completed ready for connection to the random flashing circuit board. (this came as a kit for just Β£3:90) The circuit board is fastened to the panel with a sub-board made from a scrap piece of ply with PCB supporting pillars in the corners, when this is completed I will post a video of it working.
    The LEDs on the circuit board are only for testing and will be replaced with the panel LEDs.

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    5 months ago by robbob ( Commander)
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    Hi Mike.
    You described this detailing to me at the Ally Pally show, and it's even better than I imagined.
    Superb work as always.πŸ‘πŸ‘
    Rob.

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