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    Phantom Tug
    by Black Shoe πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
    πŸ“£










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    4 Posts 9 Comments 0 Photos 20 Likes
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    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    22 days ago by Black Shoe ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Eleven (a)

    The window screens seemed to work out and Ms Maud the cook insisted she get a couple of screen doors for her galley as well. Everybody that's ever been to sea knows that second only to the Captain the cook is the most important person in the crew. They are a prime source of morale - or lack of it - they are the source of news both real and rumor (hence the term "Galley News" being a rumor.) They hear things said at the Captain's table and may or may not share it.
    Anyway, when Ms Maud "asked" for door screens the request may as well have come from the skipper!
    The construction methods are the same as the window screens.

    Photos;

    1 & 2 Maud showing off her new screen door. (There is
    one coming for the starboard side.)

    3. What she has to do with passing judgment on the
    drying deck, I don't know, but the deck hands seem to
    be waiting for the verdict.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    22 days ago by Black Shoe ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thank you Stephen,

    Ms Maud is the type that if she likes you she likes you, but you really don't want to cross her! She's somewhat of a prankster too. She put a glass eye in the stew one time and just waited in the galley with a smirk on her face to see who hollered. Evil!
    I think she thinks this is her boat!

    Maud is printed, but the rest of the crew are "American Diorama".
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    22 days ago by stevedownunder ( Midshipman)
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    Hi Black Shoe,

    Looks like Ms Maud was not going to take no for an answer.
    Lovely work and I love the 3D printed figures.

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Eleven

    Apologies, I seem to have made a hash of this blog by changing the "Subject" line. Originally this thread was "Phantom Tug", then I settled on a name and continued with that which I suspect has the site believing that it's two different blogs and going back to the original name hasn't reconnected the thread.
    I've submitted a request to admin to consolidate the two as I'm surely not clever enough to do it.

    At any rate, here's another excursion into the unnecessary. I suspect this boat being a harbor tug may have been called on to perform all sorts of tasks even perhaps hauling a garbage scow out to sea from a major city. The scow couldn't be towed on a hawser because control in the harbor would be paramount, so the tug would be made up on the scow's hip. Being that close to the refuse must have been a trial, particularly for the cook. (I'm not suggesting the scow was his/her source of sustenance!! 😊)

    At any rate, screens for windows were invented in the middle/late 1800's, so it would be possible that a version could have found it's way shipboard and consequently into the galley windows of this tug. I anticipate a screen door for the galley, but won't outfit the entire boat for the fore-seeable future.

    The material for these (keeping in mind this build is 1:18 scale,) is the gossamer - looking ribbon that may be found on a bouquet of flowers, or perhaps a fabric store like JoAnn's here in the US.

    Very simple although tedious.... Making a frame out of 1/16" styrene strips that is a very slight interference fit with the window frame will keep the screen in place. (I didn't want to glue in the frame in case the screen got damaged and didn't want to deal with cutting out the frame - the interference provides the friction to hold it in place.)
    Making sure the "screen" is dead flat on some waxed paper, a couple of tiny drops of glue are placed on the bottom corners of the inside face of the frame, then the frame laid on the screen being certain the screen weave is vertical and horizontal, not on a bias. Turning the frame and screen over a couple of tiny drops of glue are placed on the top of the frame. The screen wants to be just taught, but no strain. Then the sides glued in a couple of places - this material is so light a continuous bead of glue isn't necessary. After the glue cures the screen is trimmed to exactly the frame's size. I found that painting the frame was problematic because of the thickness of the paint. What did work was using a "Magic Marker" pen. These come in all colors, are easy to use, and in most cases indelible.

    The photos:

    1 - 3 Gives the idea of how light and thin the material is.

    4 & 5 The screen in the window frame.

    6. Deciding if it's worth the effort.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thank you Steve.

    I personally think figures help tell the story of a model. There's everything from people to dogs, cattle, and even chickens to complete the image.

    The builds are mostly 1:18 scale (5/8" = 1 foot), and the figures are "American Diorama" found on Ebay. They're designed mostly for the diecast automotive hobby, but are easily modified for our use. They are also available in 1:24 scale.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Phantom Tug
    1 month ago by stevedownunder ( Midshipman)
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    Very nice work Black Shoe,
    I like the use of scale people adds another dimension to the photo.
    Are the 2 people 3D printed?

    Cheers,
    Stephen.
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    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Ten

    Just a short update this time.
    The timberheads are all in, the bulwarks painted, deck laid and sealed, so it's on to the cap rails.
    There was no way to bend a flat piece of wood sideways to the curve of the hull, and knowing these would be painted, I opted for a lamination.
    To scale, the caps are 2" thick, and a foot wide.
    Ripping down miles (?) of 3/16 square poplar and soaking several pieces at a time, I wanted to establish the shape before they were glued together to eliminate any built-in stresses that may cause splits or failed joins later.
    Laying waxed paper over the top of the bulwarks and clamping up the wet strips then gluing once dried provided the curved pieces required. This was particularly critical around the radius of the stern.
    After the cap rail itself was built, the outside edge and inside fashion piece were added. Sanding everything, sealing and painting then brought it all together.

    Photos:

    1. The soaker tube is a 5' length of 2" plastic piping with
    a cap glued to the bottom. I occasionally use ammonia
    added to the water. After the soaking process is
    completed I dump the water (66 oz) and leave the pipe
    empty so nothing grows in it.

    2 & 3. Clamping the wetted pieces to shape until they dry
    completely.

    4.& 5 Strips waiting to be soaked and a scarf joint.

    6. thru 9. Different perspectives of the installation.

    10. The finished look that the interior fashion piece
    provides. (the vertical strake just under the cap rail
    covering the timberhead tops.)

    11. Cap rail installed and sanded standing by for paint.

    12 & 13. The bow with the breast hook included, and the
    stern before the drying rack.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Tug Fort Valley
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Thank you all!

    MTurpin, that may have been my fault...I started out calling this the "Phantom Tug" because I hadn't decided on the name. It's a scratch build of no particular tug, just a class of old steam tug. I should have continued with "Phantom" because I suspect the site thinks this is a different boat.
    I'm not savvy enough to consolidate the two, but open to any suggestions....πŸ‘
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Tug Fort Valley
    1 month ago by mturpin013 ( Rear Admiral)
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    Hi black shoe, have I missed something on this blog, the two entries visible are numbered nine and ten where is one to eight? I love to see the build.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Tug Fort Valley
    1 month ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    Excellent job on the railsπŸ‘, model's looking great!

    JB
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Tug Fort Valley
    1 month ago by Graham93 ( Captain)
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    Really nice job on the laminated cap rails πŸ‘ and the scarf joint looks spot on.

    Graham93
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    πŸ“ Phantom Tug
    1 month ago by Black Shoe ( Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class)
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    Nine

    Laying the deck on this build was a little out of the ordinary. I had incorporated a false deck to stiffen everything and minimize the chances of introducing a twist to the hull while the planking went on. Even with the deck and the shear strakes installed I was constantly checking the trueness until there were five or six strakes on both sides. Even then I'd check occasionally just to be sure.
    Once the hull was planked and the outside sanded, filled, sanded again, and 'glassed, the false deck had to be cut off so the inside could be tended to.
    'Glassing part of the inside and epoxying the rest was un-eventful. Placing the mounts for the electronics, motor, and battery followed.
    After the house size was determined, the coaming built and installed, the false deck was cut to fit the coaming and reinstalled.
    The waterways were soaked, bent to shape and glued in.
    Next the timberheads were placed inside the bulwarks, then all of it was sealed and painted before the deck and cap rails were built and added so the paint cutting in wasn't so tedious.
    Rather than waterproof the false deck with epoxy I cut and laid a layer of .018 styrene plastic over the entire area to be planked with decking. My theory (and perhaps flawed,) was/is that if I ever wanted to add, repair, or modify anything on deck the epoxy under the deck would make everything from the deck planks all the way through to the sub-deck one solid piece. The styrene would waterproof the false deck, but would serve as a good barrier should any water ever get under the deck boards.
    The decking wasn't nibbed as I told myself this was a working tug, not a yacht. Using poplar for the planks provided a good base for painting which I had intended to do, but after scraping and sanding thought what could go wrong with staining? Intending to paint it anyway, if the stain didn't work nothing was lost.
    I had a stash of Rit fabric dye in gray, brown, and black which I used to stain the dock piles on a couple of previous builds which although water based didn't raise the grain to an alarming rate so why not try it here?
    A couple of coats of stain allowed to dry, then followed up with a scrubbing with a bronze-wool pad provided (to me anyway,) a plausible work deck color. Adding copious amounts of sealer, and a couple coats of MinWax dead flat coating has provided what I think I'll go with at least for the time being. Should the deck get boring, there's still the paint option.😊

    Photo's:

    1-4 Laying the deck with poplar wood, onto styrene, with
    CA.

    5,6, and 7 the deck after the stain, scrubbing with the
    bronze wool, and the sealer/finish coats.
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    πŸ’¬ Re: Tug Fort Valley
    1 month ago by jbkiwi ( Admiral)
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    That's looking greatπŸ‘

    JB
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