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>> Home > Boat Building Blogs > H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/40884
H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER Print Booklet
Author: RHBaker   Posts: 21   Photos: 43   Subscribers: 2   Views: 5044   Responses: 104   |   Most recent posts shown first   (Show oldest first)

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mdlbt.com/40885
H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER - Posted: 8th Apr 2018
Thinking of a future project and decided upon another launch type vessel. My earlier Daman 4207 project gave an interesting model with good performance.
The Brave class of FPBs (Fast Patrol Boats) caught my attention. Can remember the incredible performance they offered when entering service. Only two of the class were used by the RN, although variants were used by other navies.
Have decided to use proprietary Glass fibre hulls in future as they probably cost little more than building from scratch using wood and resin. They give a robust and watertight hull, but one which still requires thought to complete properly.
There are several companies that offer a “Perkasa” hull, a Brave class derivative with an almost identical hull. From previous experience have decided to limit my models to 40” long, larger vessels become difficult to transport and handle. After much research considered the hull offered by MTB Hulls in Gibraltar met my requirements best.
The inquiry to MTBHulls was well handled; the quotation acceptable, so placed an order. Was pleasantly surprised at the shipping costs. From the UK these often approach the cost of the hull, but from Gibraltar they are much more reasonable. Delivery only took 7 days.

Attached Photos - Click To View Large

Response by boaty on the 10th Apr 2018
Good to mention the 40 inch length hull ref ease of transportation.

I adhere to this as well due to there not being much room in the car. Back in the 1960s I had a very large pond yacht which we struggled to get into the back of dad's Austin A40. To add to all this we had to remove the rigging so it would fit in the back.

Things got worse when dad was at work and grandad and I used to take it on the bus.

Cant do that now as health and safety has taken over and we don't want passengers contacting a "no win no fee" solicitor.

Boaty😋
Response by RHBaker on the 10th Apr 2018
My only experience of a vacuum formed hull was a slightly smaller Tyne class lifeboat. Was satisfied with it, but glass fibre seems more robust, stiffer and stronger.
Imagine a Vac formed hull will need full size stiffening bulkheads, which can be avoided with the GF version. Weight is very much a concern on this model and whilst Vac formed is probably lighter, this advantage may be offset by the additional structure.
Response by nick on the 23rd Sep 2018
A little anecdote to add to this build is that I was used to seeing both Swordsman and Boarderer in both Portsmouth and Portland whilst I was in the RN. (1960 "s}
In fact we gave one of them a "lee" ie. got to windward of her in foul weather and helped her into Portland. She had some sort of mechanical problems.
The stories one of them was moored on the smaller, walled wharf that they used away from the big one we on HMS Aurora used.
As I said it was another rough night, most were in Portland . A yachtsman had crept during the night and tied up behind HMS Boarderer.( restricted area)
Capt. told number one to go get the yachtsman to move his boat. Time was about 0400. Very tired yachty told no.1 to F off.
No. 1 came back onboard and relaid to the skipper who went down reraised the yachty and got the same message!
Skipper came back onboard and contacted the engine room and as it happened got a 'wet" start on the turbines.
The loosely stowed sails on the yacht melted rather well!!
Moral to the tale, Never tell a sailor to F off!!
Bye the way both these boats had a top speed in good conditions , of in excess of 80 knots and in theory could circumnavigate uk in 12 hours. I remember that the always ran very flat on the water at planing speed.
Regards, Nick.

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