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>> Home > Forum > Electrical Related > receiver voltage output
receiver voltage output
(1129 views)
Author Message
octman
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 84
9th Aug 2016 08:15  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23161

I have just ordered one of Alan Bond's 16 channel sound effect units for my tug. In the instruction PDF on the Forge Electronics site it states IN RED!!! - Maximum supply voltage is 5.2v ' systems with 6v BECs or 6v battery packs must NOT be used. As I can only get battery packs that produce 4.8 or 6 volts how do achieve 5.2 volts. Some sort of electricory with resistors? Do I take it that 6v into a receiver will produce 6v at the pins?
Permanently confused!!!

Chris

Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1227
9th Aug 2016 10:40  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23162

Hi Chris
Modern receivers usually have a built in BEC that reduces the battery input volts to 5v or less. The output current is usually sufficient for one or two servos under load but adding the unit may overload the output.
I was not familiar with Alan's unit but I have looked at the instruction manual and the unit requires 500 Ma so you probably need a separate BEC circuit to supply the module or a 4.8v receiver battery.
You will need to remove the ve connector from the plug and connect it to your BEC or battery ve (red) and also make a connection to the -ve (black) wire The plug still goes to your rx with just the signal and -ve wires. It may be easier to buy an extension lead and make the adjustments to the lead. Just make sure you break the ve connection to the rx. You may also want to fit a switch to your separate supply as it will be on whilst connected.
Good luck with the installation. Will you be posting a video with sound?
Dave


Live long and prosper

Dave
octman
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 84
9th Aug 2016 12:53  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23167

Hopefully, eventually. Things usually take a bit of time with me i'm afraid.

Haverlock
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 386
9th Aug 2016 13:21  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23168

5v BEC


http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Hobbywing-3A-UBEC-5V-6V-MAX-5A-Low...

BUT are you feeding your receiver from your battery pack? Most ( not all) ESC units provide a reduced voltage making radio installation simple. This voltage is usually around 5V.


"that's not a bug its just an undocumented creature."

Sir Terence David John "Terry" Pratchett, OBE (28 April 1948 - 12 March 2015)
Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1227
9th Aug 2016 16:44  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23170

Haverlock
The sound unit is powered from the rx so the ESC 5v power (current) will be limited by the rx BEC. The on-line manual warn against this possibility so either a separate battery or BEC supplying the unit is required.
Chris
If the ESC gives a suitably high current output is would be possible to take a feed from the leads ie before they go to the rx but many ESCs do not have a high output and also may be higher than 5v.
The UBEC suggested would meet all the power requirements for a model and if 2.4Ghz equipment is being used should eliminate the brown outs caused by the voltage dropping too low because of too high a current demand.
Dave


Live long and prosper

Dave
Haverlock
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 386
9th Aug 2016 17:27  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23171

yes that's why I included a link to a 5V BEC sorry if I didn't make myself clear.

The rest was just my musing about 6v being used directly to a RX. As a rule of thumb I try to not use more that 5V to a RX some 27MgHz sets I know were safe at 7.6V but even so I have always tried to have a regulated voltage to a RX.


"that's not a bug its just an undocumented creature."

Sir Terence David John "Terry" Pratchett, OBE (28 April 1948 - 12 March 2015)
octman
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 84
9th Aug 2016 20:39  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23173

I have two ESC's (mtronics Viper Marine 15)and a P40 mixer from Action Electronics. Because of this the motors have their own batteries, 7.2volts, and the receiver has it's own 6volt supply. Neither of the ESCs provides power to the receiver, although they are obviously connected to it, the central wire is removed from the connector and taped back, out of the way, so could I use one to supply the power for the sound unit? The mtronics spec for this BEC unit is 1.2A but the voltage is not mentioned.

Chris

Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1227
9th Aug 2016 22:21  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23174

Hi Chris
I suggest you check the voltage on the centre pin from your Vipers. If they are both giving <=5volts then they should be OK for the sound unit. You could just join the two disconnected red wires from one ESC and your sound unit.
If the voltage is greater than 5 volts I would not use.
Dave


Live long and prosper

Dave
onetenor
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 121
10th Aug 2016 01:13  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23178

I have an unknown Rx No name on it but could be Sanwa. It is marked 35 Mhz. My prob is how do know which is the battery connection? It's 6 channel if that matters .also are the outputs Preordained or can I use whichever for whatever? Sorry to ask such a basic question but I usually have had the info on this up to now. 😯 🙄 Thanks for reading peeps. Best wishes John

Haverlock
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 386
10th Aug 2016 09:30  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23187

35MHz is ( or was) reserved for aircraft. So before you use it in a surface craft I would check the situation.

The usual connections have ve ( positive) as the centre pin, signal and -ve (negative) the two outside pins.

Most receivers take no harm from confusing negative and signal connections so you can experiment.

If however your asking which input is for power, any of them the ve and -ve ( pos and neg) are common to all of the connectors. This is why you can take the power output from an ESC to power the receiver ( and servos) while its connected to the throttle channel.


"that's not a bug its just an undocumented creature."

Sir Terence David John "Terry" Pratchett, OBE (28 April 1948 - 12 March 2015)
onetenor
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 121
10th Aug 2016 12:09  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23190

Thanks for that H. Very helpful Re 35 Mhz I think it can be used for both although I stand to be corrected He He

octman
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 84
10th Aug 2016 15:53  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23192

Getting back to my original query, if I take power from the BEC connector of one of the 2 ECS, using the ve and -ve wires only, I still need to send the required signals to the sound unit to make it function. Can I therefore take a connection from the signal pin of the channel I want to use, or is that too simplistic to work? Also is it OK to connect a voltmeter across the ve and -ve wires coming from the BEC connector test test the voltage is correct?

Chris

Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1227
10th Aug 2016 16:42  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23194

Hi Chris
Yes you need to connect a voltmeter across the ve and -ve wires from the ESC to test the voltage is OK (<=5v).
Your sound unit should be plugged into the chosen rx channel with the red ( ve) lead disconnected. You then need to make a connection from this lead to the disconnected red ( ve) wire from the ESC which is plugged into its chosen channel. The -ve connection will be common to both the sound unit and ESC via the rx plug connections.
Dave


Live long and prosper

Dave
Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1227
10th Aug 2016 17:04  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23196

Hi onetenor
If your Sanwa has black plugs it is the earlier variety, modern sets have blue plugs which do follow the standard configuration as advised by Haverlock.
The old variety had ve and signal on the outside pins with -ve on the centre pin. They will not stand reverse polarity. The plugs were also thicker than the modern type. Also the wiring did not have a red wire and had a striped black wire but I can't recall the polarity.

The official UK body on frequency control is at http://www.ukrcc.org/index.html. Using the wrong frequency could invalidate any third party insurance you have should there be any claim for damages.

Dave


Live long and prosper

Dave
onetenor
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 121
10th Aug 2016 23:45  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23201

Thanks Dave Yes it is an older one and plugs on servos are thicker I see. Can the thinner plugs be used with packing or something or are thick ones still available ? I will check that site Thanks again Regards John

Haverlock
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 386
11th Aug 2016 00:18  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23203

Ok Re your connecting the sound sys

have a look at the picture no Picasso but should make it a little clearer


Attached Files - Click To View Large


"that's not a bug its just an undocumented creature."

Sir Terence David John "Terry" Pratchett, OBE (28 April 1948 - 12 March 2015)
octman
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 84
11th Aug 2016 07:15  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23207

Thanks H, that makes sense,

Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1227
11th Aug 2016 09:47  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23208

Hi John (onetenor)
Yes the original Sanwa plugs are still available and you can buy adaptor leads to allow connection between old and new systems. Modern style plugs will fit but the original plugs are too big to fit modern rx. Don't forget that the Sanwa rx has the different polarity connection so you need to swop the connector leads if using say an ESc with BEC.
Dave


Live long and prosper

Dave
onetenor
(Commander)





Forum Posts: 121
11th Aug 2016 13:14  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23209

Correct 35 Mhz is aircraft only thanks . No probs as I do planes too . Thanks also for the heads up re polarity.Could I put a diode in the neg lead as a precaution or is there no point? John

Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1227
11th Aug 2016 20:20  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23215

Hi John
A diode would have to be in the rx to be of any use. If you buy conversion leads your current other rc gear will be ok so if you intend to make use of this set that is probably the best option.
Dave


Live long and prosper

Dave
abbygelber
(Apprentice)





Forum Posts: 1
18th Oct 2016 17:20  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/23968

Hi..i am a new user here. As per my experience the output current is usually sufficient for one or two servos under load but adding the unit may overload the output.
I was not familiar with Alan's unit but I have looked at the instruction manual and the unit requires 500 Ma so you probably need a separate BEC circuit to supply the module or a 4.8v receiver battery.