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>> Home > Forum > Hobby Chit Chat! > another daft question
another daft question
(1062 views)
Author Message
marky
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 260
18th Feb 2018 11:09  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/38838

While the paddle tug is at the fitting out stage I decided to start a puffer ,rather than do planking on frames I can get lots of scrap blue polystyrene from my work I thought about putting it between the frames and shaping it ,I read somewhere on the forum about covering it in card and then using easy coat to seal it ,I am making a jig at work to joogle the card and make rivet like dents to make the plates overlap and look as if their riveted, does this make sense or am I on a wild goose chase. Cheers Marky👍

Colin H.
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 302
18th Feb 2018 13:05  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/38841

Sounds brilliant, am looking at making a butty barge by a similar method but using polystyrene packing boxes, for towing with my tugs. Hope all goes well with your build, looking forward to posts. Cheers Colin.


Fair winds and calm waters,
COLIN.
Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1527
18th Feb 2018 19:02  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/38856

Hi marky
Sounds like an interesting concept. Why don't you do a build blog and show us how you progress.


Live long and prosper

Dave
Bryan-the-pirate
(Captain)





Forum Posts: 59
22nd Feb 2018 20:51  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39014

yes a build blog would show us all


Shiver my Timbers and Splice the mainbrace
terrymiff
(Petty Officer)





Forum Posts: 7
23rd Feb 2018 02:12  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39028

Please help me. What is involved in the 'joogle' process? I have never heard the term.

Colin H.
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 302
23rd Feb 2018 07:27  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39029

I think that it should read JOGGLE. Which means to put a Z type fold along the edge so that the plates lay flat but overlap to form a joint ready to rivet together.


Fair winds and calm waters,
COLIN.
RNinMunich
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 2037
23rd Feb 2018 09:36  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39032

Spot on Colin 👍
I've often wondered how it also came to be used for the 'saw tooth' cuts in deck edging boards to lock the decks board ends into place!
Cheers Doug 😎


Attached Files - Click To View Large


Young at heart - slightly older in other places 😉 cheers Doug
Grant me the Serenity to accept things I can't change,
the Courage to change things that I can, and
the Wisdom to know the difference!
Dave M
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 1527
23rd Feb 2018 09:49  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39034

Depends what we are talking about.
Doug, Colin
I agree if we are referring to a metal joggle used to bend two metal sheet edges so they lay flat for riveting or welding.

On a ship the planks are joggled (cut) into the edge plank to make a neat joint.
Many fine models are spoilt by having the deck planks incorrectly cut at the angle of the edge plank.


Live long and prosper

Dave
RNinMunich
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 2037
23rd Feb 2018 10:00  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39035

Hi Dave, totally agree on the 'spoilt' models👍
Curiously all dictionaries I have or can find never mention deck plank joggling; only metal bending or daft games!😉
Cheers Doug


Young at heart - slightly older in other places 😉 cheers Doug
Grant me the Serenity to accept things I can't change,
the Courage to change things that I can, and
the Wisdom to know the difference!
mturpin013
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 48
23rd Feb 2018 19:08  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39082

Interesting article in Model Boats web site which mentions joggling, however I'm still none the wiser.
http://www.modelboats.co.uk/forums/postings.asp?th=119534
and in addition an interesting article on decking in the Titanic Research and Modeling Association web site.
http://titanic-model.com/db/db-02/bruce-1-db-02.html
after some more research I found this comment by Ian Gardner
"I find, when joggling planks into the waterway or king plank, it is useful, if you have the facilities, to grind a chisel the width of the joggling to chop out the recess in the waterway. This is usually one third the width of the plank being used if memory serves. The chisel can be made from a an old needle file and hardened after grinding."
and pictures of joggled joints It appears its cutting into the waterway or king plank.
In a way you can see the reason its called joggling as it gives the same profile as in metal joggling eg "Z"


Attached Files - Click To View Large

marky
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 260
23rd Feb 2018 19:40  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39083

in the bad old days when i had to put on the overalls and graft for a bob or two we used a lock former to joogle light sheet metal some times we used to get repair work in the yard and had to fold a joogle in 1/4"plate by putting a piece of flats bar on the leading edge and using the 50ton folder to press a joogle into the plate a.will do a sketch and post it when I can find a pencil which have all mysteriously gone walk about a.Cheers Marky👍

Colin H.
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 302
23rd Feb 2018 21:07  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39084

The other alternative method on heavy plate was heat and hit with a sledge hammer, as used when I had to repair a barge at canal side. using flat bar under leading edge and steel slab on topside. Hard work but so satisfying to see the finished job floating without leaks.


Fair winds and calm waters,
COLIN.
marky
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 260
23rd Feb 2018 23:21  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39088

how we used to joogle 1/4"plate some of these could be 20ft long with holes punched for rivets later on we used a break press with a former ,hope the drawings make sense .Cheers Marky


Attached Files - Click To View Large

Colin H.
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 302
24th Feb 2018 08:15  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/39092

Hi Marky,
Perfect sense to a fellow plater. Our 300 ton Cincinnati press made short work of jobs like that forming and punching at the same time. Nearly sent me deaf.
Cheers Colin.


Fair winds and calm waters,
COLIN.