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>> Home > Forum > Hobby Chit Chat! > Spray painting hulls.
Spray painting hulls.
(301 views)
Author Message
Colin H.
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 297
28th Mar 2018 22:48  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/40539

Hi guys, I spray my hulls using various systems. I have an industrial 120 litre 3hp compressor, with devilbiss spray guns which are for larger areas. I also have Badger air brushes and compressor with 2litre tank for the smaller hulls and detail work.
I sometimes use cans, which I usually get mixed at local automotive paint supplier. I try to stick to R.A.L. paint codes. Most automotive paint from my supplier is acrylic or water based. But I always try to use good quality synthetic lawyer. I recently tried a polyester based laquer but it didn't thin down very well. But whatever method is used for painting it's the preparation that makes the end result, and that's 90% patience and 10% skill. I certainly have more patience than skill as I've only been doing it for 50+ years. Cheers Colin.


Fair winds and calm waters,
COLIN.
Westquay
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 447
13th May 2018 17:57  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/41734

A synthetic Lawyer, Colin. Ain't they all, mate, ain't they all?

I always use enamel as I hate anything water based except my tea. I have a middling sized compressor and tank and use a spotting gun. I could use a bigger spray gun, but I'm too tight with paint wastage. It's silly expensive stuff. Having said all that i just primed my sailing model of Vanity with a brush. Went on a treat, but the final gloss coat of good old British yacht Black will be sprayed.

Martin

Colin H.
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 297
13th May 2018 18:30  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/41735

Well done Westquay, you spotted the deliberate mistake.
No seriously it should have said lacquer, but was written whilst on brain numbing pain killers, my personal favourite paint was always cellulose. Although recently have been experimenting with thinned down Gel Coat, sprayed over extra fine glass cloth. Will let you all know when I get it right. Cheers Colin.


Fair winds and calm waters,
COLIN.
Westquay
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 447
13th May 2018 18:55  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/41736

Ah, cellulose, of blessed memory. I still have some, come to think of it, but forgetfully, I bought black gloss enamel for Vanity and some enamel primer for it also in black First coat on today. But I will definitely experiment with spraying the final coats. I sprayed an old pre-War Marblehead with enamel and it went on well. You can still get cellulose if you can convince the dealer it's for your classic car. My son has a 1951 Renown so I could always quote all IT'S details to get it, but I don't think they'll post it and I'm nowhere near any suppliers geographically.
I couldn't see the point in paying for epoxy tissue so I bought a huge bag of J cloths from Poundland and used that with epoxy. Slarred the epoxy on the mahogany hull (made from old chair legs my Grandad had made a dining suite with) and then laid the J-cloth on the tacky epoxy and slarred more on with an old credit card. All my credit cards are old now and a damned site more useful as epoxy squeegees than they ever were before. Got a few ridges where they overlapped, but filler sorted that out. The hull is still very light, so will need all the large lead weights on the end of a long fin keel (removable) as it carries a big rig, (see avatar).

Good luck,
Martin