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>> Home > Forum > Hobby Chit Chat! > CNC boat kits...?
CNC boat kits...?
(412 views)
Author Message
DodgyGeezer
(Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 82
8th Jan 2019 12:40  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49486

Anyone into CNC, or perhaps looking to get into it?

I am wondering about putting my plans out as G Code, and it would be useful to have a discussion about the practicalities. For instance, what bed size do people use?

Model boat plans are a bit specialist for most CNC boards. They worry about cutting hard materials - we mainly use balsa and ply. Their machines are usually square - ours would need to be long and thin. They use big commercial routers and spindles - we could get away with smaller motors and dental burrs.

I picked up one of these over Christmas, and am currently going through the learning curve. But it doesn't seem to be all that difficult....

https://amberspyglass.co.uk/store/index.php?seo_path=eshapeo...

Delboy
(Sub-Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 33
9th Jan 2019 08:54  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49509

Our local Makerspace has just acquired a laser cutter. The accuracy and clean nature of the cut are breathtaking. The edges are razor-sharp and the cut width is in the order of 0.1 mm.

I know there are a few fossils out there who will huff and puff about new technology and extolling the virtues of half a Gillette razor blade but heed them not. Google Makerspace, find your local branch and join-up. If they haven't got a laser cutter they'll have a lot of other machinery which will enable to do far more than you can manage on your kitchen table.

DodgyGeezer
(Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 82
9th Jan 2019 09:28  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49511

It's surprising what you can manage on your kitchen table nowadays! Laser cutters are readily available - I could mount one of these on the eShapeoko -

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/60W-CO2-Sealed-Laser-Engraver-Tub...

- but the associated safety provisions would mean doing the cutting in the shed rather than the kitchen.... and the cost is not extortionate.

At the moment I'm more interested in getting up to speed with the technology and the associated costs. Open Source is a wonderful invention - it means that all of your software is free, and the hardware is low-cost because there has been no R&D investment associated with it. I reckon that you can get a cutter with a 1 sq ft bed for 300-400 pounds at the moment, and the prices are coming down all the time....

Delboy
(Sub-Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 33
9th Jan 2019 10:28  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49513

Have a look at the Banggood website. They are selling A3 sized laser cutters for less than £200. It is sold as an engraver with a 2500 mW laser but this can be upgraded. It should cut ply up to 3mm albeit with multiple passes

It comes as a kit with "Chinese" English instructions so you will need your modelling skills to assemble it.

They are fairly flimsy as a stand-alone, but, if fixed to a stout MDF board, it should be sturdy enough

Delboy
(Sub-Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 33
9th Jan 2019 12:33  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49519

Having built (well, assembled really) i am currently building a small CNC router with 3D printed parts. See https://reprap.org/wiki/Cyclone_PCB_Factory. Currently redesigning to be driven by GT2 belts and pulleys as I have some reservations about using 3D printed gears from the point of view of back-lash and wear.
The stepper motors are driven from an Arduino Mega running the GRBL g-code interpreter.
There are a host of free g-code generator tools to be found on the internet. Some of them are a bit "knife and fork" but there are some useful ones out there and there is lots of helpful information too.

DodgyGeezer
(Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 82
9th Jan 2019 17:40  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49525

I'm doing the eShapeoko - I wanted a more rigid machine for general purposes, and I liked the fact that you could specify the X and Y axis lengths. For cutting model boat parts you rarely want something as wide as 1 foot - but you often want items of length greater than 1 yard. The eShapeoko has standard sizes as extreme as 15 inches by 60 inches, and can easily be extended. I've gone for 18 x 36 inches - should be fine for EeZebilts...

One of the things that's a bit annoying with GRBL is that it doesn't currently do tool radius compensation. I'm using an arduino with grbl as well, and if I cut my plans as drawn they will all be a tool radius out. I am currently looking to use a 0.5mm tool so the effect will be small - but if you know of a better driver interpreter...?

Delboy
(Sub-Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 33
9th Jan 2019 18:06  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49526

Which is where laser cutting leaps to the fore with a tool diameter around 0.1 mm.

The Cyclone is a pcb cutter which uses a taper-point tool so there is no offset.

The goal is to mount a laser rather than a Dremel.

Point taken on the smaller parts . My initial thought was that, with a larger platform, you could cut multiple parts from a larger piece of material in one pass. Unfortunately, you can't walk away from a laser cutter to let it get on with things as you can with a 3D printer. You are looking at a potential bonfire and the bigger the job, the longer you have to stand and watch it.

DodgyGeezer
(Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 82
9th Jan 2019 19:24  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49527

I'll probably go for a laser cutter in the end. A big CO2 one - but these are powerful tools, and i'd like to have a reliable cutting bed before experimenting with something that might cut the shed in half!

The obvious answer is to use some driver software that does handle tool radius compensation - I understand that the Tiny board firmware is now open source with a new name - G2Core. I think it needs a bit more poke than an Arduino Uno, though.

I intend to simply slot sheets of balsa into it and crank out kit parts - which means a single pass cut. One issue is how to hold the sheet of balsa down without interfering with the cut. I was wondering about a vacuum base.

If you want to observe a laser cutter safely, I hear that the Yank modellers are sealing them in enclosures, and viewing progress through a webcam, which is one answer....

marky
(Fleet Admiral!)





Forum Posts: 282
9th Jan 2019 19:47  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49528

Retired now but when I worked at the College the CAD Technicians just held material in place with masking tape they were cutting anything from silk to 12mm hard woods

DodgyGeezer
(Lieutenant)





Forum Posts: 82
9th Jan 2019 19:55  
>> Permalink
mdlbt.com/49529

That could, indeed, be the simple answer..!