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    Response
    Re: Almost finished
    Stuart the ply base jig you've made looks ideal, however you need to support the uprights so they cant move this can be done using small crocodile clips the type you get with a heavy cast base for electronics work. Deal with one joint at a time and silver solder the joint making sure your pieces are spotlessly clean (don't use abrasive paper, as the
    adhesive
    used to retain the grit can contaminate a clean joint) use fine grade steel wool 0000 grade. flux the joint, clean the solder and dip in flux. Heat the joint slowly watching for the flux bubbling and then becoming transparent this is then followed by the Joint starting to turn dull red. this is the point you start to introduce the solder to the heat - gently touch the joint with the solder and it should immediately melt onto the joint, remove the solder immediately. move the next joint. Stuart if you want more instruction send me a PM
    14 hours ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Glue
    M EK will join most plastics but the best
    adhesive
    I've found is Plastic Magic. It even joins so called impossible plastics. I don't know of one it won't join
    7 days ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Glue
    I think this is a subject that many of us have pondered and discussed. I where possible try to use a single material for a particular structure so that the
    adhesive
    used is the recommended one for that material be it wood, metal, plastic, or glass plus the many variants of each. Then comes the issue of joining dissimilar materials for example styrene to wood styrene
    adhesive
    , so a contact
    adhesive
    or a specific epoxy could be suitable. However now you should also consider the type of joint you are using and the resultant forces that will be applied to the joint as this will greatly affect the
    adhesive
    used. I have uploaded a couple of charts which are just very basic concepts of joint type and possible
    adhesive
    s but this is a subject that cant be covered in a simple blog PS Gorrila glue makes some interesting claims🙈🙉🙊 good look
    12 days ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Good buy from Lidl
    Hi Marky, Have you managed to source the
    adhesive
    sandpaper discs the machine uses? I have not enquired at Lidl yet, but will next time I am there. cheers Peter🤔
    3 months ago by Rookysailor
    Response
    Aerokits/Jotika Sea Queen
    Titebond 3 is a high performance PVA. We can't get Titebond 3 here in South Africa. Gorilla/Gator glue you which is a polyurethane based glue have to Work using Rubber Gloves and have a bottle of rubbing Alcohol handy as it sticks like mad and you won't be able to get it off your hands. I still have Cascamite! Been using a Sika PVA
    adhesive
    but the bulwarks were fitted with ZAP 30 minute Epoxy. I have found an eight hour epoxy to fix the stringers to the bulkheads with with. Why is it we make short worktime
    adhesive
    s is beyond me. I have always found that the quickset glues are prone to be brittle. The only one I haven't found to be brittle is ZAP. Going to epoxy the inside of the boat before fitting the skins
    4 months ago by Ianh
    Blog
    Model Smoker Build
    Hello, Yesterday, I showed a Model Smoker that I built, I have had requests to share details. This blog will walk you through what I did. Please note that this was built from ideas gathered from the web, I did not invent this. Also, anything that has voltage and anything that creates heat can be a hazard, I am not responsible for any damage caused. Again, just sharing information. First, I researched the web and saw how others made a smoker, then I just wanted to cobble together one mainly from parts I have. You can see this on a variety of searches and videos. First, Collected parts required. 1. Thrift store hair dryer 2. Wick lamp or Tiki torch, or similar wick 3. Wire crimps 4. 18 GA wire 5. Box, enclosure, container 6. 5v -12v fan, direction pushes air into box. 7. Foil, had copper sheet of aluminum foil 8.
    adhesive
    , used CA 9. Mint tin or other Since I did not photograph the original, I will put together some build steps and sketches. More to come, see photos for parts used. Joe
    4 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    The bow blocks & outer keel
    The bow of the boat has a compound curve and to create the shape a single block of hard balsa is supplied in the kit, although in my pre-production prototype this had to be formed by laminating some pieces of thick balsa together to the required size. Rather than laminating up a single block separately I did the laminating and glueing in situ on the hull to ensure a solid tight block, and after the glue had cured I set about shaping it. Initially I used a razor saw to roughly remove the surplus at the sides and bottom and then began the process of shaping it to the final form. My sanding plate proved invaluable for the final stages of making the block flush with the hull sides. The underside of the blocks were very carefully shaped with a combination of the sanding plate and abrasive paper around a series large round formers. I was careful not to just use abrasive paper over fingers as this can create grooves and unevenness in the soft balsa. I had already created a concave shape in the bulkhead former F1 and with the ply bottom skins in place it was relatively easy to extend the contour into the bow blocks being very careful to ensure symmetry on both sides. A line was drawn on the blocks that extended the curve of the hull strakes to define the shape. I also used the outer keel as a template throughout the shaping process to make sure that I was not removing too much material. it would be very easy to remove too much material so it pays to do this slowly and carefully, checking all the time for symmetry. Finally when I was happy with the shape I formed a slight flat on the blocks for the outer keel to sit on, using a back light helped greatly with this, and the whole hull was given a light sanding with a detail sander. The prototype kit was supplied with keel components made from thick balsa which would easily be damaged in use so I recreated this in thick ply laminations to the required thickness and shaped it so that it was completely flat and square on the inner edges and with a curved profile on its outer edges. The keel was checked for fit on the hull throughout so that only a minimum amount of filler would be required to blend it to the hull. It was fixed in place with epoxy
    adhesive
    and firmly pinned until it fully set and very little filler used to finish it. The kit, which is available now from VMW, includes a single piece bow block and ply keel parts as standard, which makes construction much quicker and easier. I’m glad that bit is over and I’m very pleased with the result. Next stage will be glass fibre cloth and epoxy resin….
    4 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Day Two Springer
    Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both
    adhesive
    and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate
    adhesive
    . Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    5 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug
    Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both
    adhesive
    and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate
    adhesive
    . Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    5 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Cabin roof hatches
    adhesive
    s are a combination of Epoxy for the structural joints and aliphatic for non structural joints unless the type of material is an issue eg white metal fittings adhered to wood would be epoxy and canopy glue for transparent components.
    7 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Julieth 4 French fishing boat
    Just the thing for two projects I have lined up. Which
    adhesive
    did you use? All the best. NPJ
    7 months ago by NPJ
    Response
    Bit of a problem.............
    I believe it should be black Neville. I would also correct the number. All the Fireboat and similar builders on the site know where to get the decals. Check out the Build Blogs / Discussions. I've started printing my own on
    adhesive
    Decal Paper, but I'm just like that 😉 Cheers, Doug 😎
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings...
    Leaf is a bit fragile. Bare Metal Foil is less so, but still a bit difficult to use, but Sellotape aluminium is good stuff, especially as it's self
    adhesive
    and the glue doesn't show, whereas foiling with thinner (Kit Kat wrapper) foils and leaf glue can show the glue if you're not careful. For something like a cutwater, Sellotape would be ideal as it isn't being asked to round anything too extreme, but yet it is tougher for that application. Martin
    9 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings...
    Best for our purposes, Doug, would be Sellotape aluminium tape. it's self
    adhesive
    and very malleable so can be persuaded round all sorts of shapes. I am currently foiling a 1/48th scale Airfix Lightning jet, my favourite Cold War jet. Yes, even I make up the occasional kit and it IS a belter. But silver paint won't do, so I use all sorts of cooking foil, turkey foil, Kit Kat wrappers, etc. Martin
    9 months ago by Westquay
    Response
    Range Safety Launch?
    Post 2 Range Launch? The bath test has shown up a leak……………….. Have not tried to find where yet but it is hopefully in that small bay as it did not flow over the rib section. Strange I had not thought leaks to be much of a possibility in a boat! Wishful thinking again. Anyway it has put work back a bit. You will notice that the bath water was ‘used’ condition. I was not allowed to waste water due to the shortage so had to use the bath with Radox and herbal Oils in it. I trust it does not affect the paintwork…………… Any opinions on Leak Checking? I did check how it ‘sat’, and the waterline at its current weight. There is something in those images that RN Munich will pick up on! Have received some of the parts………….just like Christmas for me. ( I was a spoilt only child). Two issues strike me. a. It may be of interest if I give sources of the parts b. I think I have a problem with ‘scale’………….. Currently the purchases fall into two groups, electrical and deck fittings. The electrics are not posing a problem yet, but the size of deck fittings certainly is! Taking the larger ‘electricals’ first, I have gone for pre built units. Someone with more ability could build the units themselves. Kits are available. Also far fewer units could be used to start with and added later if needed. As a result of my previous, though small, experience with the Richardson Tug I used Action Electronics and Component Shop in Bangor, Wales for almost all of the electrical bits. They are helpful and efficient with good quality products. I am still using Mtroniks DigiSound for the sound unit, but Action Electronics now makes one as well. I have used a new source for the transducers/exciters. I have previously used Dayton Audio, sourced through SoundandVision Netherlands and costing around £35.00 for a pair of TT25’s plus mail. This time I used Mr RC for similar item, made by them for about £53.00 the pair mail free. They too came from the Netherlands! Not tried yet, but have noted that the Dayton Audio ones had a foam ring on the face which was self
    adhesive
    and easy to place. Mr RC require Gluing in place. Going to look for the leak. Next post should be on the electronics which I hope will have arrived by then. BTW, The 46 Firefloat Mk2 blogg by ‘Elsrickle and Fire Boat (Crash Tender) on our site are great sources of information. NPJ.
    10 months ago by NPJ
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Hi Pete, That was just a selection of my larger 350 scale kits! Forgot HMS Prince of Wales battleship😉 I also have a vast collection of everything from 720 to 72, including the Revell Flower Class corvette. I started an XL spread sheet to keep track of them with scale and size data, number of shafts, and where practical and already measured max load capacity! Re: wood decks; I have them on my Graf Spee and HMS Belfast both 1:128, and have bought them for Hood, Bismarck and the corvette. In my experience the self
    adhesive
    starts to pull up at the edges, always in the most awkward place to get to to fix😡 I learned to use a gel type gluper sue for first time fitting and thin runny stuff for repairs so it creeps under the edge a bit. Yes please, the info on the decks would be useful especially Titanic. i have a premium version with lots of etch parts but no wood I think. Why do we do it? Cos we're nuts! Prerequisite for scale modelling 😁 Happy modelling, Cheers, Doug 😎 PS my favourite carrier photo attached; Capn of the Nimitz wanted to go water skiing 😁😁
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Doug: Why do we do it? So many kits, so little time. I just looked at my list...736 kits, not counting the last year’s worth of purchases. I’ve convinced myself that it’s a nest egg. My downstairs stash of 1:350 ships also has the Tamiya HMS Hood, Big E & USS Missouri. I’ve got the RMS Titanic, too & the RMS Lusitania as well. Subs of all types, a resin USS Long Beach & Bainbridge to compliment the Big E. Remember the famous “Nuclear Navy Trio” photo? I’ve attached a copy in case anyone hasn’t seen it. The 1:350 Normandie is an astounding resin cottage industry kit that I got at a very good discount but it still cost twice as much as my first car! I can send you the link to it if you like, but make sure you’re seated before you look at the price. BTW, I found sets of pre-cut, self-
    adhesive
    wood decks for the Titanic & Hood, too, I believe, & a few others, but I can’t remember which ones. They really make a model pop, for sure, but I’d be inclined to use contact cement or something so they don’t “pop” off the model. if you’re interested I can send info about those to you, too. Pete
    10 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Response
    Totnes Castle 1894
    Companionway & skylights. I took a strip of clear plastic, this cam off packaging of some sort. Strips of wood stuck on with contact
    adhesive
    . (evo stick) Scored the corners bent around fitted in place. it fits so will remove & paint wood white. Then stick hard wood strips on the out side.
    10 months ago by hammer
    Blog
    Fibreglass the hull- continued
    Now the Chine rubbing strakes are fitted, dry and filled and I have attended to the minor lumps and bumps the next job is to give another coat of resin, taking the issues of the first application into account I intend to apply a thin coat, this has the effect of filling in the pattern of the glass cloth. Another two days have passed and it’s time to do some rubbing down. I have found that the surface is very hard, more so than I recall some of the other fibre glass projects I have done but these have been using Polyester resin. it’s a first for epoxy, so is epoxy a better choice than Polyester? According to my mini research –  Epoxy is more versatile  Epoxy has fewer fumes  Epoxy is stronger  Epoxy shrinks less Conclusion Epoxy is the better choice for repairing/covering either wooden hulls or repairing fiberglass boats. it has excellent
    adhesive
    qualities, wets out fiberglass fabrics and it is tough. it has great thin film cure characteristics, cures in cool temperatures. After the first coat I wasn’t 100 % happy with the finish but I just thought that some dust had landed on the surface before the resin had dried, (this was proved not to be dust but because of the matting pattern still been visible it disguised the real problem) however this was easily sanded out with wet & dry. Now the hull and deck were looking really smooth with very little sign of the matting pattern it was time to give a final coat. I had decided to coat both the deck and the hull in one go so I mixed enough resin to do the lot. Starting with the deck I started to apply the resin but to may horror it started to pin prick all over the deck surface, panic, panic what was causing this? So was it the brush which I had previously washed out with cellulose thinners after applying the last batch of resin. I decided to remove the resin and use a new brush (I had 90 mins cure time to do this) so cleaning of with paper towel and finally with a wipe with thinners I started to apply resin again – but it happened again as I sat in despair I looked into the pot of resin wondering where to go next when I saw a film on the top of the remaining resin it was then I noticed a ridge in the cups side. it was the wax coating that had melted into the resin and subsequently appeared as pin pricks in the newly applied surface. At this realisation I removed all the resin again and took a breather hoping I had found the problem. Another day and a light rub down of the deck to make sure the surface is ready to receive its final coat. Resin weighed (in a glass container this time) and well mixed I started to apply again and fortunately it was OK and all surfaces were coated.
    11 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Vanity, Victorian Cutter
    Thanks, I used to make top end model furniture for the Home Miniaturists. it's my way of finding a connection with my cabinet maker Granddad, who was a big model boat fan too, in fact he was a founder member of the Victoria Model Steamboat Club. She is 48x9x11 plus bowsprit. Height of rig is about 4 feet also. And yes the fitting on the keel is a piece of ally box section cut in half so it becomes U section, drilled through at equal spacing for the fin keel. Then the U section is screwed with brass screws and Marineflex sealer/
    adhesive
    to the keel, which is all solid hardwood. I did my sums and gave up, so once she was waterproof I put her in my son's fish pond and kept piling stuff in until she floated on her marks. Rigging won't be that heavy, but I made an allowance for it. Once it was floating right it turned out to need 14 1/2lbs. of ballast. BUT, that's inside. On the end of a 15" inch(ish) fin it will be less. I have 2 half bulbs cast by my other son in his back garden from my patterns. They will be bolted to the fin and faired in. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Final fitting of cabin roof skins
    Now that the internal detail of the cabin has been finalised and fixing points made for each of the panels and floor pieces (all parts of the cabin detail are to be removable) I can now finally fit the cabin roof skins. Since the leading edge has an overhang which because of the lifting design hasn’t the same framework support I have decided to reinforce the joint with stainless steel pins.to ensure a perfect fit, I made a tiny jig out of brass angle that ensured all the holes in each piece lined up. I then placed pieces of silicon sheet on the parts I really didn’t want the skins to stick to the cabin framework. Fist all the pieces were position and pinned to ensure a good fit, they were then removed
    adhesive
    applied and the skins finally placed and pinned, most of the pins will be removed when it’s dry. The centre panel has an opening for the hatch so this was put in prior to fixing. After a day’s drying it’s time to see if the whole thing works as envisaged, thankfully it does. The roof will now have to be dismantled so further work can be carried out it, will also get a covering of glass matting to add overall strength.
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER
    Whilst waiting for the ice to melt, decided to make up the deck and transom flaps. The deck was made from styrene sheet, again for lightness. Made the deck beams out of square styrene sections to avoid traditional, heavy, full width bulkheads. Hoped the stiff MTBH hull would resist twisting without bulkheads. First impressions are that this is the case and when the deck is finally bonded to the hull, should be even better.. The transom flap was made from thin aluminium plate and added simulated stiffener ribs in styrene. Understand that about a 2 degree flap down inclination works best on this model. My original plan was to operate the flap using a servo with another radio channel, however once the best plane is achieved it is unlikely the flaps will need further adjustment. Unlike the real vessel, the operating weight will remain fairly constant. So, abandoned the servo idea to use adjustable bottle-screws instead. The flap angle can still be adjusted, but not in motion. These screws are much simpler, lighter and cheaper than a servo. One challenge was to make the very small hinges required for an adjustable flap. After much thinking and investigation, decided the simplest and neatest way would be to use thin, self
    adhesive
    aluminium tape, as used on forced air heating ducts. Would stick the self
    adhesive
    surface to the underside of the flap and then onto the inside face of another thin aluminium sheet, which could then be fitted to the transom using double sided tape and small screws. This seems to work so far, it also avoids drilling through holes into the transom .
    1 year ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    wood glue
    I use EVERBUILD 502 ALL PURPOSE WEATHERPROOF WOOD
    adhesive
    . very good and good value £ 5.48 a litre
    1 year ago by BigAlio
    Forum
    HMS HOOD by Trumpeter
    Not received yet Steve, but had an email telling me it's on it's way along with tracking details. Looking forward to getting it though, yours looks brilliant, is the
    adhesive
    very sticky, or can you position it before making permanent ? Peter
    1 year ago by Rookysailor
    Forum
    Glue
    Hi All, Any one suggest a glue that can be used for tacking assemblies together so I can test fit them, see how they look etc. And then remove and disassemble allowing adjustments to be made, allowing the glue to be easily removed when required and the permanent
    adhesive
    to be applied.Masking tape not always suitable. Thanks.
    1 year ago by glyn44
    Blog
    Cabin detail Pt 1
    I wanted to try and recreate the detail as per the available photos and drawings that I had so the first thing was to try and make the cabin have walls and a door, so previously I had cut away bulkhead B2 and extended CF2 to the bottom skin and put the door opening in. Now for the actual piece of cabin floor, the entry is slightly strange as there appears to be an inset step from the from the sick bay up into the cockpit but then it is relatively straight forward, it was made from 2mm ply. Planking was something I have never done so a lot of research was done prior to starting. I decided to use a lime wood plank with a black 0.3 black card divider (caulk) all glued with aliphatic
    adhesive
    . I found the process quite enjoyable and the results on the test piece for a first attempt were quite pleasing. I then wanted to reproduce the nailing of the planks so I devised a small tool to ensure a consistent pattern its simply a piece of obeche with four holes, 4 brass pins and a black divider line, this is simply placed on the join line and then tapped with a light hammer and filled with the tip of a black pen. The first attempt looks slightly misaligned but proved the system worked, I have made a more accurate one for the real floor. After the planks were set it was sanded flat which unfortunately leaves the wood grain blackened by the black card dust, however using a plastic eraser it’s easily removed ready for sealing. I thought that the door opening needed some sort of finishing/dressing so I decided to manufacture a mahogany door frame and handrail around the cabin.
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Formers in-planking starts!
    Always good to hear of different makes of
    adhesive
    that others use. in a warm room most of these types of wood glue set very quickly to a hold state, developing full strength over 12 hours. A far cry from the days of Cascamite! which I recall seemed to take 24hrs, a lifetime when you are 5 years old.
    1 year ago by Dave M
    Response
    Formers in-planking starts!
    nice to see im not alone in using ever build 502
    adhesive
    i find very good and bonus is its cheap. Just looked it up on ebay £5.48 a litre delivered item no. 112586677548
    1 year ago by BigAlio
    Forum
    happy hunter
    Hi Doug I agree the commercial stuff is not nice. I was suggesting the hobby plastic weld solvents freely available and used by fine scale modellers for joining plastic kits etc. It is sold under a variety of names, the SHG catalogue lists: PLAS1 Plasweld – Liquid Polystyrene solvent
    adhesive
    Plasweld special solvent weld will bond Styrene, ABS, Butyrate, Acrylic and other types of plastic materials. Easy to apply using a brush. Bonds in seconds. The Ultimate Plastic Building Tool , 50ml bottle 2.00 POLY3L Precision Poly cement 28ml with needle applicator 3.25 POLY4 Polystyrene Cement 12ml tube 2.00 POLY4L Mek Poly Liquid Polystyrene Cement 30ml Bottle 2.75 PLAS7 Plastic filler. Special filler for plastic modelling 2.50. There are many other suppliers in the UK and overseas. Like most glues it is recommended that you work in a well ventilated area and avoid breathing the vapours as far as possible. I do hope you weren't exposed to the substance for too long!
    1 year ago by Dave M
    Forum
    happy hunter
    Spitfire With plasticard it helps to heat in warm water when forming curves. Make a wooden (Balsa) template heat the plasticard, bend to shape and hold in place until cool. I recommend you use MEK plastic
    adhesive
    with plasticard, the merest touch will allow capillary action to carry the liquid between the joints, I use a fine (old) paint brush. The glue is quick drying and actually welds the joint. Like superglue a little is best, too much and you risk melting the whole job.
    1 year ago by Dave M
    Forum
    Too Powerful Brushless ?
    I have to agree with Peter's comments. I would also suggest that you look at the coupling and fitment of your prop shaft. it could be that the whole unit is seizing together. You also need to check it is true and free running. You need a prop and locknut followed by a thrust washer then at the inboard end a thrust washer locknut and coupling. There should be a gap between the thrust washer and bearing of a few thou', we used to use a Rizla paper, Make sure all joint are tight and that the shaft turns freely and smoothly. The motor need to be securely mounted to a good solid base and 100% aligned with the coupling and prop shaft. Personal experience tells me you don't get a second chance with brushless, you have been fortunate if it is only the prop tube has suffered. Is your hull wood, plastic, fibreglass? Whilst Araldite is a fine
    adhesive
    you may need to use Stabliz Express or UHU Acrylit Plus which provide an exceptionally strong joint. E-bay have sellers of UHU in the UK. Good luck and please keep us posted
    1 year ago by Dave M
    Forum
    What is this material?
    What
    adhesive
    can be used on it?
    1 year ago by Ron
    Blog
    MV TEAKWOOD
    Have moved on to the deck furniture and equipment, including the funnel. Most of it can be made from the usual assortment of scrap materials and odd and ends. Decided to start on the funnel. Planned to make up a wooden replica and wrap a thin styrene sheet around it, finally inserting styrene formers into the shell, gluing them into place. Made the replica up from scrap wood blocks and shaped it into the correct shape. The outcome looked so good was tempted to use as final as making funnels seems quite a challenge. Anyway proceeded to plan and shape thin styrene sheet around the replica, using a heat gun to overcome the memory. Once this was done, fitted shaped styrene internal formers to hold the styrene to the correct shape and glued with
    adhesive
    . After the styrene glue had dried and the excess material trimmed, now had two usable funnels - wood and styrene. The wood version is nominally smaller and fits slightly better, so decided to use it. The Teakwood was originally operated by the J I Jacobs Company, which had a buff funnel with a black cap as markings. Stumbled across a picture of the vessel when she was chartered to the British india Steam Navigation Co. Evidently BI usually painted chartered vessels in their livery. Although the picture does not show the traditional and attractive BISNCo white hull cheat line, it does show the funnel markings. These are black with two narrowly separated white bands. Rather preferred this scheme so adopted it. The picture was taken in the mid 1960s and it also shows a pristine looking ship, my worries about the model looking unsoiled seem groundless. One of the pictures shows a strip that extends back from the wheelhouse almost to the funnel - this is a support for the awnings that fit over the bridge wings.
    1 year ago by RHBaker
    Blog
    MV TEAKWOOD
    Having corrected the bow problem, returned to the superstructure. The original plan was to try to reproduce the whole of the superstructure, right back to the rear of # 5 hold in one continuous piece of styrene. it would be cut and then filed out to fit the front panel right through to the rear on both sides. This would avoid any joints and discontinuities and it was hoped would capture the flowing lines more accurately. Measured and found the piece would be over 42'' long! Decided this would be difficult to cut accurately and would probably never fit. Gave up on the idea and made the piece up in three sections; the front and both sides. The sides would be from an assembly of styrene strips and various precut shapes, the front from one styrene piece. After making several measurements and then templates, made a complete front panel from a cereal packet and from it cut the proposed panel out. Left the solid areas oversize so could file and sand to the correct size and shape. Once was reasonably confident the panel would fit, heated and bent the corners around a steel rod to get the correct radius. Throughout this kept offering the panel up into place making sure the radius and dimensional adjustments were satisfactory. Finally glued it into place. Once glued in place, cut the lower edges to follow the hull bulwark contour. Used a similar technique for the sides and finally glued them into place and together. Sanded to remove traces of
    adhesive
    . Fitted LED navigation and wheelhouse lights, but left the wheelhouse structure off as the funnel size and shape will determine the navigation deck cut-out. This will be added after the funnel has been researched and made.
    1 year ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Prop Shaft Grease
    Hi Dave, I guess I have not run my models long enough yet since I have had no wear in either shafts, bearings or seals. I did have one seal in a Raboesch assembly, in a twin shaft model, which didn't leak but seemed to be deteriorating. Raboesch supplied a replacement free of charge. I had used Goop
    adhesive
    to attach the seal/bearing cap so it was a 5 minute job to soften the
    adhesive
    with a heat gun and fit the replacement. Roy
    1 year ago by Trillium
    Forum
    Safely Packed ???
    That's Amazon for you I had a similar one not long back but with a tin of Evo contact
    adhesive
    (other makes are available) when the box arrived I couldn't think of what I ordered that needed that big a box but they never but any protection under the goods they are always at the bottom of the box under miles of brown paper? It's OK its all recyclable!
    1 year ago by kmbcsecretary
    Forum
    treatment
    Hi All,up to now,Ive built exclusively in wood,now I find myself contemplating plastic.What surface prep do I need before glueing,painting etc.I presume that some mouldings/castings will have a release agent on the surface.Epoxy seems to be the
    adhesive
    of choice,do you agree?Many thanks all,in advance
    2 years ago by johnmont
    Blog
    Electronics Down Below (5)
    This time I will try to remember to put in the ‘source’ information on the bits and pieces I use........... In the most recent piece I should have included exciters/transducers are Dayton Audio DAEX 25VT -4, 4 Ohms – 20 Watt pair, obtained from Sound Imports Netherlands and very quickly as well. The sound unit is a Mtroniks Digisound 5M diesel sound, available all over the place. Now to look at where I am at. Exciters are in place as high up the Hull as possible, but remembering the Deck level. Used the
    adhesive
    pads as supplied after wiping that part of the Hull with Meths and Silicone
    adhesive
    to keep in place as well as using the wiring tidies from Modelsport Ltd., for the cabling. (Pic 1+2) Before I start the motor and controller wiring I changed the platform ‘up front’ (pic3) with a piece of thin ply which I have given a couple of coats of varnish to waterproof. Then I thought to myself “why am I waterproofing this when, if it gets that wet, it will have gone to the bottom and be useless anyway”! (Pics 4) However, the platform gives a little more choice in terms of layout of other components and my plan for them is not really settled yet. I am concerned about the stern and possible swamping, but it currently seems the best place for the upgraded battery. (Pic5 ) Whilst talking batteries, I have gone for a separate battery supply for the receiver and hope to use the Bec supply for running other less critical items. Also the fitting of the battery in the stern bay drew my attention to the rudder servo for a couple of reasons. First is I am still considering increasing the size of the rudders and I am assuming that will increase the strain on the servo. The servo supplied is a standard issue and not water resistant so I have gone for an upgrade as shown(Pic6) That gives torque increase of 17Kg/cm over the Hobby Engine S1040C and has metal gears, metal control arm and waterproof for 20grams extra weight. Second is the closeness to the new battery position. So I was going to alter the servo arm setup anyway and the new metal arm suits this well. Maybe my ‘tutors’ will consider all this to be a little ‘over the top’ but I do so enjoy messing......................... New Servo DS 3218 by AYANI from Amazon. (Pics 6/7 ) Following that distraction, back to the front end and the Motor/Mixer placing and wiring. Now a little time ago I drew a plan to see what could go where and it came out that most of the ‘bits’ would go in the front bay with motors to be wired once power was brought forward, followed by the Esc/Mixer. (Pic 8) At that time I bought a P94 dual esc/mixer from Action Electronics and got the 20 amp version to be on the safe side................. My ‘guardians’ did point out this was ‘over-kill’ but I had already got it. Now, when placing the unit on the mounting board I found that the heatsinks made it too high to fit in the Hull! So being a spoilt brat only child I ordered the 10 amp version and as usual it came very quickly from up here in Bangor. ( Will keep the other one for the next project............Happy Hunter??) Unboxed it and it looked just the same, heatsinks and all. (Pic 9/10 ) So at that moment there was a bit of a set-back so I rang Component Shop at Bangor, they said “take the heat sinks off and you have a P94 lite”! Such a simple answer and such a nice chap. (Pic 11 ) Now a quick 'measure up' before I have a glass of wine (Pic 12) and does it all fit...? Well it appears to at the moment! (Pic 13) Next time really going to screw down the components under the forward hatch and wire it up. NPJ
    2 years ago by NPJ
    Blog
    MV TEAKWOOD
    Thinking back over this part of the project, felt it might be of interest to others considering modifying a hull to summarize my experiences: 1) Cutting and modifying a hull to a different profile seems intimidating, but using planning then care, using a simple selection of workshop tools and
    adhesive
    s, it is quite within the skill of the average modeler. 2) This is the second proprietary glass-fibre hull I have used. Both required a “spindle” of bulkheads and longitudinal stringers to hold the hull rigid and to which can also be fastened the electrical / mechanical equipment needed for the model. 3) Have tried two approaches for the spindle. The first was to totally assemble it off the hull, get it as rigid as possible, fit it into the hull and epoxy into place. The second was to fit the keel reinforcement to the hull then epoxy the bulkheads and remainder of the spindle to it. That spindle remained relatively flexible until finally installed. 4) On reflection, think it is best to fully assemble the spindle, taking care to get it true and then fit it to the hull. The relatively flexible hull can then be adjusted to fit the more rigid spindle and kept true. 5) Used the relatively flexible spindle arrangement on the Teakwood and have spent many hours getting the bulwarks and deck frames leveled and lined up satisfactorily. The more rigid spindle would have helped mitigate this by ensuring the frame was accurate before trying to adapt it to the hull. Have now finished all the modifications needed to the hull and the result shows that this type of transformation can be successfully completed..
    2 years ago by RHBaker
    Blog
    An experiment with foam board
    I am going to try an experiment with foam board similar to a build that I ran across on the internet. it consists of making the keel and bulkheads with 1/4" foam board or a double thickness if it is thinner. The board that I have will require two thicknesses. if all else fails, it will proof my plans that they are reasonably acurate. The inner gunwales and the sheer clamps will be clear pine. Trace the outline of the part, cut out and stick with
    adhesive
    spray onto foamboard and cut out. Kere is the partial keel which I labelled "K1". Will post pictures as I progress.
    2 years ago by hecrowell
    Response
    Superstructure finished!
    Skydive, she looks superb, semi scale or not few people have ever seen a Solent in real life, do what you feel is right. Your question about the rubbing strake. I found some "D" shaped self
    adhesive
    rubber on ebay, comes in different sizes but nicely moulded, like a foam stuff, best of all it was cheap, when we inevitably smack the wall coming alongside, if it is damaged it is easily replaced !!! Mark
    2 years ago by jarvo
    Forum
    Hobby Engine Richardson Upgrade
    Neville, toilet rolls, problem, especially if you have a cat!!!. 3 screws at the stern, 1 central 2 at the corners under bollards, leaver up with thin screwdriver. 1 each side of the rear deck hatch. 1 each side opposite the cabin rear hold down bollards screw fitted in inboard side of each one. 1 each side rear of the forward hatch. 1 each side forward hatch, again hidden by bollard screw from side. 3 in the bow area. PS all screws in the deck are under small plastic plugs, be gentle with them as you want to put them back to seal the deck again. You should have 14 screws now, the deck is sealed with a gasket, 'O' ring, and what seems like Vaseline, and splits at the rubbing strip just behind the tyre fenders, might need a bit of a pull, going round the hull as you go. Once the deck is off, it is all in front of you. Looking down into the hull, there is a black battery plate, held down with 4 screws, the receiver and the on/off switch. I have kept the plate, but cutaway the dividing 'walls' was needed, for the new receiver etc to fit. It is not big enough for the buggy type battery, so i glued a thin platform on top for the battery to sit on. Battery is held with self
    adhesive
    velcro pads to keep it in place. 'Central hull' is the motors and gearbox, follow the long Red and Black wires back to the receiver and cut them as close to the receiver as you can, ready to wire into the ESC, i used a 'chocolate' block, 10ah. Stearn is the servo and steering linkage, nothing needed here just a smear of grease to lubricate. A couple of drops of oil on the ends of the propshaft won't go amiss. 'Battery position', i have mine on the radio plate, but with care and a little trimming you can fit it across the hull, above the propshafts, or with care between the propshafts, fore and aft. Make sure there is a side plate fitted to stop the battery fouling the rudder servo. Hope this is clear, don't force the deck be gentle Mark
    2 years ago by jarvo
    Forum
    Sea Queen refurbishment
    Great news regarding the insurance, so sorry you are in so much pain. Dont forget the hours of building time as well as kit, paints,
    adhesive
    s etc, make them pay for their failure to maintain the tree Mark
    2 years ago by jarvo
    Forum
    adhesive
    Thanks guys for info I will try Poundland Uhu epoxy being new to boat building I am happy that someone replied I thought it may have been covered in older posts. Thanks o41biger 👍
    2 years ago by O41biger
    Forum
    adhesive
    Agree with Colin, I use UHU clear epoxy, comes in Slow, Fast and Super Fast! With spatula and mixing dish. Don't all get all stuck up😉 Cheers Doug 😎 BTW Colin, how's the salvage operation going? 🤔
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    adhesive
    Yep I've used it to fix water pick ups and outlets also rudder tubes and not had any problems with it sealing brass to wood and plastic to wood. Seems to take modeling enamel paint okay as well once fully cured. But my personal favourite glue is epoxy from pound land, you get a clamp and spatula free with it as well. Happy sticking Colin.
    2 years ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Logos etc
    My preferred logo paper is the white waterproof
    adhesive
    -backed vinyl made by Papilio for inkjet printers. http://www.papilio.com/inkjet%20waterproof%20
    adhesive
    %20film%20media.html. You may find a supplier in the UK - which is where I presume you are. A UV-resistant spray is all that is recommended. its
    adhesive
    is far superior to that on waterslide transfer paper. Roy
    2 years ago by Trillium
    Forum
    Glue
    I want to cover the plywood deck with 0.5mm plasticard. What type of
    adhesive
    should I use please? Steve
    2 years ago by cormorant
    Forum
    Glue
    Hi Graham Thank you. it's amazing how the apparently cheap and cheerful stuff works. Since my original post I have been trying Wilko's Heavy Duty All Purpose
    adhesive
    . it's a spray on contact
    adhesive
    and costs £5 for a 500ml can. Tests show that it sticks like the proverbial and doesn't affect the plasticard. Steve
    2 years ago by cormorant
    Forum
    Working radar
    Hi Julian, I think that's the easiest in the long run given the space available.👍 Also simplest (and quietest) way to get the drive round 90° corners 😉 If you don't have / can't find a suitable size rubber band get a length of round silicon rubber gasket material ca 1 to 2mm diameter. This you can cut to length (allowing for some tension) and join the ends with cyano
    adhesive
    . I used this method for the sealing gasket on my Type IIA sub. No leaks 😊 Have fun,😎 Doug BTW: old stripped out video recorders / players are a good source of cogs, pulleys and drive belts 😉
    2 years ago by RNinMunich


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