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    Forum
    Workshop
    Here's my downstairs man cave, bit untidy as was having a big clean out Bike went to the op shop). Have hand tools, power tools, vice, large Taiwanese Lux drill/ mill, welders etc in one end, a large industrial drill and vice down the end of the garage on another bench, (drill painted by my son when he was about 12,)-drill looked a bit sad when we bought it but came up well with a scrub and a bit of paint. Was 3 phase but I converted it to single phase as I don't have 3 phase on the house. I bought most of the heavy tools years ago as I was making boat trailers, modifying cars etc. The most useful tool I have is an Austrian Emcostar multi purpose machine, (if you ever see one cheap grab it!) it has a bench saw, band saw, disc sander, belt sander, and jigsaw all in one (plus other attachments are available, (ie wood lathe attachment.) You can tilt it horizontal for the sanders and saw, or flip it up and use the
    bandsaw
    (and disc sander). All the functions are engaged with dog clutches and everything tilts or adjusts in one way or another. Whoever designed it should have got a medal for being a bloody clever bastard! A guy at work gave it to me as he wasn't using it and it was down the back in his garden shed! My main modelling cave is upstairs in whatever room I want, (missus lives elsewhere😊😊😊) I just do the really dusty stuff downstairs, (painting, sawing sanding etc) Problem is I have to go outside to get there, (pain if it's raining) Aircraft hanger -(ceilings in 2 rooms plus wall rack in another) I used to have one plane left 11 yrs ago, and was very happy until a guy at work started giving me his write-off planes and got me started again, now have 18 + 6 boats and need serious help! -certainly don't need what Martin's on , I'd be 10x worse!
    8 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Bustler
    While waiting for the new
    bandsaw
    blades to arrive to start the hull I started on the bridge and superstructure ,made from 18mm mdf .will start a build blog soon .πŸ‘
    1 year ago by marky
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona - the hull
    So... here is a compressed build blog of my paddle tug Iona... and I'm playing catch-up as the vessel is 95% complete and has been sailed already, but there may be some interest in what I've done. Iona was scratch-built off plan and has turned out to be the cheapest build so far out of 3 I've made, mainly because I was able to source materials from the leftovers box! it's a 'mixed-media' boat 😜using traditional methods of plank on frame hull, with paddles made on my 3D printer, and other parts turned on the lathe. So starting with the hull, frames were drawn out, transferred to some scrap 9mm ply and cut out on my
    bandsaw
    , along with the keel. These were assembled on a build board with some right angle brackets / measuring tools and test fitted before being stuck in place with epoxy. This was quite difficult as the shape of the hull is critical and comes right at the start of the build. I did remake 1 frame to correct alignment. The deck stringers need to bend in 2 directions, so some steaming with a carpet steam cleaner attached to some tubes worked and the wood clamped in place to dry. Outboard sponsons (?) were fitted to make a frame for the paddle boxes to fit on. Then a large sheet of ply forms the bottom of the hull, and the only job left to complete was the (tedious) planking. This was my 1st plank on frame ship... and it took ages. I think it came out reasonably OK but I'm not a perfectionist and I know if I'd spent more time it could be better... but I didn't! Next blog will feature building the paddle boxes and superstructure.πŸ€“
    1 year ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    Keel
    Printed out the frames /ribs drawings and outlined each in orange so I could easily see the correct lines. Cut those out and pasted to some plywood. The plywood is Baltic Birch 1/4" -5 ply, very nice quality that I get from a local woodworking supply store. it's a bit nicer than from the local warehouse hardware lumber yard, but that would work also. Used some spray rubber cement, sprayed only the paper back and stuck on the plywood. Spraying just one surface allows quick removal of the paper once cut. I don't have a
    bandsaw
    of scroll saw, so I use a sabresaw/hand jigsaw mounted upside down on a surface that secures to my drill press. Works pretty good. My shop is so tiny that I just don't have a space for larger tools. Maybe someday. Keel board was glued up, will show more tomorrow on that. Joe
    1 year ago by Joe727
    Forum
    Carry case.
    Hi all, just made a carry case for the Crash Tender which should prevent damage to all the sticky out bits when I glue em on. White faced hardboard, framed with 1x1 free packing timber from the wood yard and screws bought for 50p a box from a boot fair. Handles will be rope from the same wood yard, so that the whole box is carried, not just the top board. Ally scrap cut on the
    bandsaw
    and bent to shape in the workmate so that the front panel is the slide-in "lid". Stands will be made for the boat and foam glued in to protect edges. Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Cabin/Superstructure
    Upperworks, this launch has a long cabin and a well deck ( Gin Parlour ).. Sides were traced out and cut from 1.5mm ply, internal formers are 3mm ply, spacers and struts Obechie, the cabin front is formed with Balsa which will be covered in 1.5mm ply, all the external faces have been veneered in Mahogany, except the roof which will be probable a piece of ply. The old favourite 1 inch ring saw came into play again for the cutting out of the windows. Applied the veneer after cutting out the windows, have found this easier and it tends not to split and crack the veneer, so one has to recut the window openings but its a very quick and easy job if you use a 1/2 inch drum sander in something like a Dremel hobby type drill. I,m afraid we have the oposite of Rain stopped play , its Sun stopped play at the moment.. You may notice the "Old Batteries" and cans, used as weights to hold down / compress the veneer, also the Jig saw, bolted to a piece of ply and then clamped into the B&D Workmate, I aint got room for a
    bandsaw
    which i would love, so this lash up has done me proud for a few years. Regards Muddy....
    2 years ago by muddy
    Forum
    GRP hulls by the million...
    Hi Doug, 36" even at 1/350 scale. Ye Gods, they really were big devils, eh? I always thought Hood was a very attractive ship. My loft was going to be my slot track home, then I went to stand up...DoH! not even crouch room, never mind head room, so storage it is. My Sea Urchin, Veron Veronica yacht, vintage Marblehead and Dorada are all up there. There is so much insulation up there that you can't see where the joists are when poking about. But I'm lucky to have a 6x6 foot brick shed with a Fort Knox type door, so models can also go up in the rafters of that too. Vanity on the side bench, currently. That's also where the
    bandsaw
    lives, the table saw and where silver soldering happens. Just out of interest, I've noticed there's a lot of photo-etch detail for 1/350 scale. Do you use that? I'd be interested to see your Hood when it's done. Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Response
    Lady T
    The next stage was to fit the prop tubes and motors, MMModels prop tubes and T4 motors were used. Now I will admit that getting the tubes lined up and getting them to come out of the hull nearly horizontal gave me a lot of headaches. The hull had different thicknesses and shapes of fibreglass were the motors had to be fitted, the A frame markings on the hull, especially the inboard ones were way out, all of this plus the fact that the motors had to be fitted more or less on the bottom of the hull. Aligning pieces were made on the lathe to go between the prop shafts and the motors. Motor mounts were made from hardwood and shaped on a belt sander to fit the hull bottom. I think I had about five attempts at this stage using all sorts of pieces of ply with holes in them, wooden wedges and of course masking tape. Motor mounts, I only have one photo of these, holes drilled in hardwood with a hole cutter, then cut in two on the
    bandsaw
    to give two halves that can clamp the motor, draught excluder stuck on the inside and the two halves fastened together with two wood screws.
    2 years ago by AlanP
    Response
    Tools
    This looks very similar to a
    bandsaw
    I have, probably the English version of your Canadian model. I needed blades and sourced some on the internet. I will have to check but I do believe they came from your side of the pond, but could have been the USA. I will post details when I find them
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    What wood to use for a Boat Stand
    HI Ed, your problems continue!!!! you need a contour plate, its got thin spines that slide to get a shape, once you have decided where to support the hull, to protect the prop and rudder, approx 1/3 2/3 bow to stern, take the plate and press the splines gently against the hull, this will give you the contour to draw onto stiff card, cut out and make a mirror copy, this will give you the template to mark onto your chosen wood, cut out with a
    bandsaw
    or a jigsaw. I use 10mm plywood, with mahogany veneer, several coats of varnish, sanded between coats, with support rails between uprights, screwed and glued together. Protect the hull with foam lagging. When cutting allow for the foams thickness. Mark
    4 years ago by jarvo
    Forum
    bandsaw
    Thanks for your input Dave, it's given me food for thought, the smaller one would help with the smiley face and perhaps the bigger one might be a bit much for Santa to get in his sack. πŸ˜€ Alan
    4 years ago by AlanP
    Forum
    bandsaw
    My
    bandsaw
    is wrecked, think I might have pushed it too far. I have been looking at a Record BS250 and the bigger one, Record BS 300. Has anyone got one of these, or could give guidance. Alan
    4 years ago by AlanP
    Forum
    bandsaw
    HI Alan I have an Electra Beckum 250 (badged Metabo) and it is a good hobby
    bandsaw
    . If you are into serious modelling and are needing to cut lots of wood then the bigger version will be more suitable. Bear in mind that a bigger machine will need bigger (dearer) blades and use more power. The smaller version will fit on a bench whereas the bigger will be on a floor stand. OK if you have the room, but do you really need all that capability for your modelling needs. I find I can cut whatever I require and can have the machine in my workshop as against having a larger one in the Garage. The smaller one may help with the smiley face. Dave
    4 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    bandsaw
    HI Shaun Thanks for the reply. Didn't put a smiley as the wife doesn't know yet 😯 Alan
    4 years ago by AlanP
    Forum
    bandsaw
    HI Alan, Must be serious no smiley's 😁 I have a Record Power BS12 which is not listed anymore but is similar in size to the BS300. its a great band saw and has always done everything I have asked of it and more, in hindsight I think it maybe a little too big for a hobby workshop, the wheel kit fitted is useless, 😫 I ended up making a trolley on castors to move mine around. I have had a bit of a problem with the on/off emergency stop switch but Record Power have been absolutely brilliant with their warranty. 😊 😊 Cheers Shaun
    4 years ago by Flack
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Hi What you say makes sense and must admit I am now giving it serious consideration, will have to work out what tools I would need (only have the minimum) to build from kits and also were I could source the wood I would require as no model shops in my area, can it be obtained on the internet. As far as tools I wouldn't mind spending quite a reasonable amount as the cost to build from scratch I would think would be considerably less than buying a kit. Will try and compose a list of tools perhaps a small type
    bandsaw
    Etc. Telling the wife might be the next hurdle to overcome but what's life without some confrontation . Thanks again Haverlock Peter
    5 years ago by Peter501
    Forum
    fireboat update
    Mmmm thanks for that Shaun, something to look forward too. Thought about cutting it nearly to size on the
    bandsaw
    with the wife stood at the side squirting coolant (water) on the blade. Maybe not a good idea 😁
    6 years ago by AlanP
    Media
    ''AMERICAN''
    HI All, Heres some pics of my "American" tug boat based on one of McAllister's tugs. it is scratch built from Images on the net, plank on frames in pine, cut on my
    bandsaw
    . it has working lights and radar scanner. it's powered by an electronize 540-12 motor and a 6v 4amp SLA battery.
    6 years ago by lubberland
    Blog
    Inshore fishing boat
    My
    bandsaw
    for Shaun
    6 years ago by AlanP
    Response
    Inshore fishing boat
    Is it a
    bandsaw
    or a scroll saw that you use to cut your timber Alan? ❓ The
    bandsaw
    s I've seen all seem a bit fierce for delicate work πŸ’­
    6 years ago by Flack
    Blog
    Inshore fishing boat
    Time to start the planking, the wood I am using is Lime cut from Ikea wooden blinds, cut to 6mm on the
    bandsaw
    and sanded, it has a fine grain and bends very easy. The frames were faired (if thats the right word) sloped to take the planks using a file and strip emery
    6 years ago by AlanP
    Response
    Rebuild continues
    HI Greg Have you the RNLI plans for the ARUN? Mine show 23 stanchions 12 one side and 11 the other. Do you know how many triangle plates are on the Speedline etching? I used aluminium bar 10mm x2mm from B&Q. You need to bend to follow the deck contours but it will bend eventually. I am in the process of making the mounting brackets again from aluminium angle from B&Q. I made a drilling rig and use a small electric pillar drill to make 2 holes on each leg, I then
    bandsaw
    so that I have a bracket about 3mm wide. The rail should be 1mm above the deck. Water line is near spot on to the RNLI plan. I may increase it by 5mm as the props are cavitating. The white line will add another 2mm but the spray rails are above the waterline not level. You should be able to confirm this from any on water pics of the real boats.I have not really checked the cabin re the steps but will have a good look before I proceed further.I tried to look at your build but even after registering I am denied access. Dave
    10 years ago by Dave M


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