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    Blog
    Just another, Smit Nederland Build!
    Well, The Tug Atlantic was a no go! So, I ordered the Tug Smit Nederland! This is going to be a nice build. I have many idea's in mind! I'm going to incorporate independent throttling! also independent smokers will be used as well! Her lighting will be tricky. But with help from others on the website. I'm sure I'll be able to put running light! Her main power will be two 12 volt
    batteries
    ! But they will work independently of each other. Via a switch! Kind of what's known as a guest switch! Well that's it for now! ETA of arrival is Oct'3 for the kit! Kit coming from across the pond! Stay tuned to further updates!๐Ÿ‘
    2 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    LATEST SMOKER, E-CIG ELEMENT
    That was one of my thoughts Graham, ease of access to the tank etc for filling or servicing the coil. I'm still looking for small alloy or metal boxes or cans to try ideas out with (like the old alloy film cans, -have one somewhere just don't know where). Might have to start trolling on EBay etc or maybe the car accessory shops. For the latest effort I just need a can slightly larger than the tank (room to fit tinfoil round tank for heat dissipation) or I could wrap the tank in silicone tube and run water through it. Gets too hot to touch after a few mins on 2v, needs to be kept away from leads and
    batteries
    etc. Could easily warp the hull if sitting against it! Introducing air from the bottom of the can might help cool it as well as pushing the smoke out. JB
    3 days ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: Egret Cabin Cruiser
    Looks like a fun build! Canโ€™t wait to see her completed. What
    batteries
    and esc do you plan on using?
    5 days ago by Cashrc
    Response
    Re: MORE SMOKER STUFF 2
    RE its a great deal of experimentation you are doing JB Looks complex Red but it's probably that it's all spread out and messy. Not that expensive really as the smoke unit in the vid (modified Heng Long with fan) cost around $10, the voltage reg about $4, water pump around $4 a length of silicone pipe and a bunch of JST leads,- around $4 and the 2 air pumps around $6. The metal box for the Vape coil version was $10 and the guy in the vape shop gave me the coil FOC, so all in all, not a huge amount. I don't smoke or drink so I'm happy to spend a few $$ to try an idea which might be of use to others. Graham has sorted the electronic version which is excellent, and I'm trying to sort a cheap more 'mechanical' system for those who are high tech electronically challenged like myself๐Ÿ˜ฎ Re force air methods,- I did think about the small CO2 cartridges (soda syphon) through a valve but they might be a bit dangerous. Also thought of aircraft retract pump up cylinders but they cost lots. Really just have to find a good small high pressure pump with a good output (either that or make something) Also thought about compressed air in a can (for electronics cleaning etc) but that's $20 a can! and you still have to figure out how to connect it (plus the room factor. If you have plenty of room in a boat to fit a bit of gear it's no problem, but with say, twin engined models in the 3ft range with a few extras, space gets a bit scarce (see pics of my attempt at trial fitting this version in the HSL,)- major rewiring and re routing plumbing etc (looks like a bit of room by the smoker but the
    batteries
    go either side) JB
    6 days ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: Vietnam River Gun Boat (Pibber)
    Interested in your build of the Pibber River Gunboat. I have the Pro Boat version which performs well. Would like a bit bigger hull as there is not much room for normal size
    batteries
    . Which hull did you use? Also interested in the Patrol Craft Fast ( Swift boat)of the Vietnam era
    12 days ago by TP87
    Response
    Re: YET ANOTHER SMOKER VERSION
    All too true Martin, I sometimes think about selling all my models and spending more time with my real boats, as it is far less stressful, and I can get all the necessary bits locally (or on line locally), (sort of like BIG modelling without the stress. You also can fish, sail, or float without having to think, "did I bring the TX,
    batteries
    " etc, - went down to the pond this evening -30km round trip,- got there and found I'd brought one wrong battery and the pond was starting to fill with weed now they have removed the carp, ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ญ๐Ÿ˜ญ##!!***. You don't have to worry with the real boat, - boat lashed to trailer,? check, trailer properly on the tow ball,? check, gas, life jackets oars and anchor? check, bag with phone, necessary bits, check, and off you go (most of this stuff is always in one place ready to go, and lucky I only have to go 300m to the ramp, and can zip home if I did forget something). You don't have dozens of mini problems like models, much more basic. We need less stress not more, and sometimes hobbies can be more stressful than the real thing (ie guys who crash $30,000 jets!). The only thing I have to wait for is the weather. Beautiful calm day today, should have used a real boat! but I did video the eels which greet you at the pond๐Ÿ˜Š. Should make you f-eel r-eely calm๐Ÿ˜‚ JB
    14 days ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: Gun, Decks and Capping Strips
    Yep that makes sense Steve, but I still wouldn't do it that way with that wire! It'll most likely kink while you're trying to fix the stanchions and the remainder are flopping about the shop!โ˜น๏ธ Had similar experience using tinned copper wire on my 1/72nd scale H class destroyer๐Ÿ˜ญ Eventually I sequentially fixed and pushed/pulled the wire through stanchion by stanchion rather than waiting until they were all fixed. Periodically I had to stretch the wire between two pairs of pliers to de-kink it, which was a pain in the nether-lands!๐Ÿค” Took a while on a 1.35 metre deck ๐Ÿค” But I cheated by making the main deck in two sections; midships so I could service
    batteries
    , distribution board, ESC, smoker and stern section to get access to motors, rudder and auxiliary sound and switching modules. B and X gun platforms were a bit tricky too! Apart from 'kinky' railing - so far so good Steve๐Ÿ‘ Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž PS and BTW, having gone to all that trouble threading metres of wire round the railings - I used them as the + and - supply rails for bow and mast lights! ๐Ÿ˜‰ 3V 'rice grain' bulbs in those days. Will be replaced with LEDs during current refit.
    16 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    LATEST SMOKER, E-CIG ELEMENT
    Hi Martin, that looks pretty flash! I have ordered a tank (Vaporesso brand) to try ($25) but it looks like I will have to modify it to fill it up. My idea is to have a small self contained unit that can be filled without having to remove it, no chance of leaks, and easy to replace elements. Only problem I can see with the sealed tanks is re-filling them (having to remove hoses etc) whereas this will just have a plug/dipstick in the lid to fill it, 5 sec job. Most of the better e-tanks seem to be pyrex so you can't drill holes for a fill hose or tank adaptor. The 'throw away' $2 e-cigs might be ok as you could just rotate and fill a bunch of spares (still have to unplug things though) and you have to break into them to get to the element and wire up an external power source, (the small on board
    batteries
    would not last long enough). Also the elements in some are very cheap, just a few wraps of wire round a chunk of cotton string, as against the nice stainless screw in Vaporesso one I have ( which are only $5 each) and appear very solid. Thought about the rebuildable ones, but again, too much mucking about, -although the ready made coil rebuildables don't look too bad and coils are cheap. This all costs money (and a lot of time) so I'm not going to get too carried away, as I want to make it quick and affordable for others who might want to give it a go. Still a lot of refining to do yet but between Graham and myself I think we are making good progress and having a bit of fun as well. Always nice to have an idea actually work๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜ JB
    18 days ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: Southampton Tug Boat
    Hi Nerys, yes you are right, Southampton is a RTR model, about ยฃ150, rc gear is ok, but not the best quality, I have 3, one has been converted with 7.2NmHd and Futaba rc. The other 2 i am waiting for the radio's to fail, but they have been converted with 7.2
    batteries
    , also 1 of them has been converted to Wyforce, this was the basis of the model, but, i suspect they could not get a licence to copy the name. Hope this helps Mark
    20 days ago by jarvo
    Forum
    JUNO
    Info from Buxton Model Boat Club member and builder Dean. Juno is quite a basic flat bottomed boat, mainly due to my very basic modelling skills, and is intended to be a bunkers barge. She is roughly 1.24 scale, approximately 43 inches by 8 inches and is made from recycled and up cycled materials wherever possible. She has a single rudder and propeller, powered by a single motor from a drill, and two 6v lead acid
    batteries
    . She is a totally freelance design, but I took inspiration from Humber barges such as the Humber Princess, which I used as a rough plan for the deck layout. As a foot note to Juno, when I built her, I also built a second hull at the same time almost identical, but with a different deck layout. This became Elsa, my steam dredge barge.
    22 days ago by philcaretaker
    Forum
    BUXTON MODEL BOAT CLUB
    Deans Ferry and Fuel Bunker More info on Juno as requested from builder Dean - Juno is quite a basic flat bottomed boat, mainly due to my very basic modelling skills, and is intended to be a bunkers barge. She is roughly 1.24 scale, approximately 43 inches by 8 inches and is made from recycled and up cycled materials wherever possible. She has a single rudder and propeller, powered by a single motor from a drill, and two 6v lead acid
    batteries
    . She is a totally freelance design, but I took inspiration from Humber barges such as the Humber Princess, which I used as a rough plan for the deck layout. As a foot note to Juno, when I built her, I also built a second hull at the same time almost identical, but with a different deck layout. This became Elsa, my steam dredge barge.
    1 month ago by philcaretaker
    Response
    Re: Buxton Model Boat Club
    Hi Martin ,ref Juno - here is a response from our club member Dean who built "Juno" Juno is quite a basic flat bottomed boat, mainly due to my very basic modelling skills, and is intended to be a bunkers barge. She is roughly 1.24 scale, approximately 43 inches by 8 inches and is made from recycled and up cycled materials wherever possible. She has a single rudder and propeller, powered by a single motor from a drill, and two 6v lead acid
    batteries
    . She is a totally freelance design, but I took inspiration from Humber barges such as the Humber Princess, which I used as a rough plan for the deck layout.
    22 days ago by philcaretaker
    Forum
    Blackpool Boat Show 2019
    I go for the traders mainly, saves paying p&p, and you can cherry pick the items you want, also some deals going on, Component shop had a few show prices. I bought 2 x 12v-10amp pb
    batteries
    for only ยฃ13.15 each, a good saving, I think Iain has done a great job with the show, and free parking, all you had to do was write down your car reg number, simples.๐Ÿ˜ Cheers, Peter
    29 days ago by Rookysailor
    Blog
    Fitting sub decks and Sea Trials
    The fore sub-deck is glued onto the bulkhead assembly, prior to fixing it into the hull. This is a straightforward operation, but some sanding of the sub deck is needed, particularly around the bow. With short strips of square balsa glued onto the hull sides between the deck beams, to support the edges of the foredeck, the whole unit was again dry fitted. Happy with the dry fit and armed with various clamps and clothes pegs, I glued the assembly into place. (Once again, apologies for the lack of photos as I did this before deciding on doing the blog). Before fitting the aft sub-deck, I cut out an opening to get to the tiller if necessary. The opening will be disguised later in the build. Sea Trials. I decided on lead acid
    batteries
    , as the weight would go a long way towards ballasting - she sits very low in the water. Jotika advised 60mm 4 bladed props, which were duly fitted. As I have already said, I use a Taranis radio and this has the advantage of being able to set up a differential drive between the motors and rudder in the transmitter. As you can see on the video, she turns in her own length. You will also see from the video the 'deck cargo', or cardboard box full of the white metal fittings. This gave me a better idea of how much more ballast I would require for the finished model. I did have a scary moment when the 'deck cargo' shifted and she took on an alarming list to port! I thought I would be a contender for the 'Titanic Award', presented annually by our club for the best sinking. However, with nerves of steel, I navigated her safely back to the slipway. I was most pleased with the way she handled and moved through the water. The motors and props supply more than enough power and she will require very little more ballasting.
    1 month ago by cormorant
    Blog
    Bulkheads and motor fit.
    And it was all going so well! If all else fails, read the instructions and look carefully at the drawings. Having removed deck camber beams, mid deck bulkheads and longitudinal stringers from the CNC sheets, I glued the assembly together and taped it to a flat surface to dry, as per the instructions. However, as you can see from the two magnified sections in picture 1, the deck camber beams and stringers are not flush. I only became aware of this after glueing the assembly into the hull and trying to dry fit the aft deck. Once again, the trusty Dremel with cutting disc attached came into its own and I managed to rectify the problem - not without difficulty. Before glueing the bulkhead assembly into place I fitted the motors. As I have already mentioned, with the propshafts parallel to the hull, there is very little clearance for the motors. However, with the offset shafts on the 2.5:1 540 geared motors, this was not a problem. I used vac formed plastic 'cradle' motor mounts and standard universal couplings. I am now a great believer in using proprietary silicone sealant to fix the motors onto the mounts. This not only cushions vibration but allows tweaking of the final line up, which I do by eye. Before the sealant sets, I run the motors and further tweak to get as little vibration as possible. See pic 4. With motors in place it was time to fix the bulkhead assembly into the hull. Instructions suggest using slow cure epoxy, but I used Gorilla glue, which does the job just as well, without the trouble of mixing. Included in the bulkhead assembly is the servo tray for the rudder and with that connected and the power plant -two 12v 7ah lead acid
    batteries
    - in place, sea trials were fast approaching.
    1 month ago by cormorant
    Response
    Re: Milford Star
    Did check out and can fit
    batteries
    ok will show when battery boxes go in
    1 month ago by Elsrickle
    Response
    Re: Milford Star
    Hi Elsrickle, Nice choice of boat, have built the Caldercraft Sir Kay, which I believe is the same hull as the Milford Star. Be careful of moving the motor forward, I believe the short prop tube is so the motor can make more room for
    batteries
    , Caldercraft are pretty good on their instructions.๐Ÿ˜ Cheers, Peter (Rooky)
    1 month ago by Rookysailor
    Directory
    Yorkshire Man Tug
    Yorkshire Man tug kit by Model Slipway, one of two tugs sent to the Falklands, sister ship Irishman. Powered by two belt driven motors, two 12v -7 amp
    batteries
    , spectrum radio DX6i, motors on individual sticks. Peter (Rooky)
    1 month ago by Rookysailor
    Media
    40'' Seaplane Tender, first test run
    Finally, had a decent day (if you can call calm but fully overcast decent) and managed a try-out of the ST. Unfortunately had the pleasure of some yappy kid asking a thousand stupid questions, then his grandfather started, while I was trying to set it up. Got so distracted I ended up breaking the mast while trying to grab the boat and answer rapid fire questions. Trying to do a video and the kid's yelling behind me, and the grandfather just let him carry on.??๐Ÿ˜  Don't mind kids being interested at all, but some are just a pain in the 'transom' Anyhow, enough grumpy old man stuff, -boat went pretty much perfectly and is plenty fast enough, and also very economical on the
    batteries
    , (Vid was twice as long before editing) and when I stopped they were still at 3.9v/ cell (they are only 2200MAh 2s ) and were only 4.1 at the start. All in all, distractions and a bit of mast damage aside, I'm quite happy with it, (did hit the jetty at a 20deg angle at 2/3 throttle while taking photos, - going for that last shot -๐Ÿ˜€ bounced off without a mark, - lucky the jetty piles are slimy and I build tanks !)
    1 month ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: ELECTRIC EXHAUST SMOKE AND WATER VERSION 2
    Re Get the Patent first JB,๐Ÿ‘ But how will I stop certain 'reverse engineering experts' ๐Ÿ˜‰ copying it Doug. Perhaps call it a vape machine to put them off the scent๐Ÿ˜€? 'Thinks' blast! I've already told them how I did it. Never mind, now we'll soon be able to buy one off Ali Express. Once had an idea for a pen with a triangular letter opener on the top end. Years later I went to a pop-up Chinese nic nac sale in a rented warehouse, and guess what was there??!!!โ˜น๏ธ They are obviously employing psychics to walk around jotting down peoples' ideas๐Ÿ˜ฎ I also still have 5th form (1968) sketches I did for a hybrid go-kart using a Briggs and Stratton motor driving 2 alternators charging twin 12v
    batteries
    driving electric motors on the back wheels with chain reduction drives, WHO KNEW??? JB (the too late inventor)
    1 month ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: 40'' Seaplane Tender, on the water at last
    Good piece of water you have there JB - what is it dam or river ? Was at Beale park in UK when a fellow was demonstrating his gas turbine powered Bluebird K7. Only just got on to the plane and had to shut down - short water - looks like he could have run it successfully there. Tender looking great on the water - glad you have her running before you added much more detail. From the pictures of the bow wave it looks pretty much like scale speed - seems to be the same as in pics of 206's final run. What sort of endurance on the
    batteries
    exactly ? Now onto the next model then?????? PS what about a ducted fan Bluebird or Crusader..........
    1 month ago by redpmg
    Blog
    40'' Seaplane Tender, on the water at last
    Finally got a reasonable day and got the model on the water for the first trial, - goes pretty well (see vid) A few small trim tweaks and she'll be set. Very economical on the
    batteries
    as well.
    1 month ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Irshman Tug
    Going astern Doug, Oh, no,no,no, that would be unwise, putting the
    batteries
    forward would take her off the ballast line, she sails in perfect trim, will take her sailing, and get some photo's to show how she sits.๐Ÿ˜ cheers Peter
    2 months ago by Rookysailor
    Forum
    Irshman Tug
    I would think that going astern could be quite heart stopping as well๐Ÿ˜ฎ Maybe you can shift the
    batteries
    forward a tad? Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Irshman Tug
    Thanks Doug for your kind comments, she runs just like the original Irishman, she has 2 x 12volt/7amp
    batteries
    , and with that weight, the freeboard at the stern is about 1 inch, looks wrong being that low, but am assured it is correct, very frightening turning hard port or starboard, she want to ship water on rear deck, and as you can tell by the dust on her, I don't sail her much.๐Ÿ˜ cheers Peter
    2 months ago by Rookysailor
    Response
    Re: 40'' Seaplane Tender, new build. mods and improvements.
    Ahah a Vampire no less - have about 6 or 7 hours flight time in a DH Vampire T11 courtesy RRAF . First jolly as a raw recruit - was told by pilot - I'm the Captain and will leave the ship last - but if I say "Eject" and you say "What" you will be talking to yourself........... Love them Went up to 49,000ft - wallowing well - then vertical dive . Reading the dymo tape on the dash "Thou shalt not exceed 550 knots" as the ASI crept up to 600 with the canopy shaking like a leaf ....... Pulling out at 20,000 but only leveling out at about 10,000 but was too busy staring at the floor unable to move - don't know how many G - but sure it was in excess of limits....... Could not wait to go up again........... Have a plan for a ducted fan Vampire - but gave up flying years ago when distracted for a second by a stupid question - the newly built Bipe tried to demolish the wall of the ablution block (the only building on the field). Eyesight also deteriorated afterwards and now after a double cataract op see better than in my youth - but responses are no longer up to scratch........ As to Lipos - have a couple of hard celled ones like giant AA
    batteries
    , one soft cell 7.4v and two small Lifes 6.6V? Not used any one of them yet - electrics & myself do not get on - years ago trying to put courtesy lights in my Cortina Mk1 GT was called for lunch - and then promptly asked if the car should be smoking like that ...... The Cressida was very popular here , the one you have is a great version. Invited especially to the local launch of the Cressida as the company I worked for had a fleet of 600 odd vehicles........ and I was responsible for the transport division........
    2 months ago by redpmg
    Blog
    TX - RX
    batteries
    Arrived
    The F-14 Controller works as it should! My
    batteries
    for the F-14 arrived today. I checked them and they were fully charged! The F-14 is a spectacular controller. It going to be a very useful tool in my RC arsenal!
    2 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Night Watch
    Excellent Sub.๐Ÿ‘ I'll discuss your suggestion with FOTS and request him to liaise with you with a view to incorporating your programme into his Training and Manoeuvres Plan. Just watched three hours or so of the Parliament TV, House of Commons debate. https://parliamentlive.tv/Commons Johnson's statement and Q&A session!๐Ÿค” My God! What a rabble, with a few notable exceptionsโ˜น๏ธ I'd rather face the shore
    batteries
    in the Dardanelles Strait than go through that again!! John Bercow was brilliant though, I'll miss him. Then came Statement of Business for tomorrow and subsequent weeks. No sign of new appropriations for the RWN I'm afraid๐Ÿค” FLEET//๐Ÿ˜Ž
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    HMS Prince of Wales
    Not so much as forgot the camera,forgot the
    batteries
    ๐Ÿ˜ญ,After being asked by she who must be obeyed "do you have everything". Alas not me dancing it takes me allmy time to lift my legs๐Ÿ˜‚I take it they had to wear modesty pants in case anyone is easily offended (q)"what's worn under a Scotsmans kilt? (a) nothing its all in perfect working order .๐Ÿ˜Š
    2 months ago by marky
    Forum
    York model boat club regatta
    Here we are, a year later and we went again to the York model boat regatta at Laytham Camping and Caravan Park. It was time to give my first boat its maiden voyage. You may have seen the boat in my harbour, the Freeman 22 Norfolk broadsโ€™ cruiser which now belongs to my grandson. I managed to finish it for his 6th birthday hence the name (Tyler JWT 6). It sailed very well and achieved a realistic speed, turned well and reversed-turned very quickly. I am going to make some adjustments to its weight distribution because although built to specification I felt it sailed too low in the water and slightly bow heavy. So the solution is to remove one of the 6 cell NiMh
    batteries
    which is only there to balance the weight, the powering single battery will now be located in a central position slightly towards the stern. Iโ€™m now looking to join this club which has been really welcoming in a fantastic location. PS hopefully video to follow
    2 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    ".....it seemed to generalise without mentioning the the decisive parameters involved, including cost difference!..." Um. Tricky to cover everything, in a 4 sentence comment! There seems to be a grave shortage of balanced advice in all aspects of modern life - though no shortage of advice per se at all! In a field where technological change is proceeding it is even harder to gather a useful view. Comparisons which were true one year are incorrect the next, and I suggest that it would be very useful to update any advice on the board which covers
    batteries
    .... Luckily there is one reasonably independent place we can go for a balanced view - the market. Although it is not perfectly unbiased, we can deduce that if some battery technologies are surviving in that marketplace there must be a demand for them, and hence that these technologies are likely to be the best available ones for some specific task. We only need to determine what that is. As a quick example, if you look at a major UK battery supplier to the model hobby - Component Shop - you will find available: NiMH - both standard and low self-discharge LiPo LiFe Lead Acid (sealed) Alkaline (probably Manganese) Silver Oxide All of these will be the 'best choice' for some application. Our interest is probably mainly with the first four. There are many battery features to take into account. The energy capacity that the battery contains is one common figure, usually measured in amp-hours, but most people do not realise that that is only correct for a particular delivery rate. To make a motor go fast you need a battery with a high current delivery rate - able to put out a lot of amps over a short time. Dry
    batteries
    , for instance, do not usually have a high delivery rate - hence the poor performance available to us in the 1960s! My top-of-my-head generalisations are below, though I am sure exceptions can be found in all cases! 'Robust' refers to a mix of physical strength and resistance to misuse, such as over-charging or excessive drain. I will try to use the words 'capacity' for the amount of energy stored in a battery, and 'delivery' for the maximum rate at which that energy can be released... SLA Very robust. Cheapest for high amp-hour capacity at 6 and 12V. Can do high delivery as well, Very heavy. Use for displacement boats, where the ballast weight is a positive benefit. Can do heavy discharge as well, but many small SLAs are designed for emergency equipment use, and expect to support a light discharge over 10-20 hours. NiMH Fairly robust. Quite cheap for medium amp-hour delivery, and reasonable capacity. Low self-discharge costs are dropping and that technology seems to be expanding in the market, though they tend to be low amp delivery types. Some types can compete with Lipos for high amp delivery in the 30-40A range. Fairly heavy. Make sure that you buy a high-delivery type if that's what you need for motors. Low self-discharge types are good for emergency flashlights and RC transmitter/receivers... LiPo - Less robust. Best current choice for high amp delivery with low weight. Only readily-available type offering current delivery in the 100+ Amps range. Light, and available in very small sizes. More expensive than NiMH, high capacity very much more, and you need a special charger, though these can be quite cheap nowadays. You should really be using a charger optimised to your battery type anyway. Remember that each LiPo cell is 3-4V, not 1.2V... LiFE - Similar to LiPo, but more robust. Slightly lower voltage, but very flat volt delivery. Typical current delivery in the 30A range rather than 100+. More expensive than LiPo at the moment, but may displace them eventually. LiPos are essential if you are using a very high consumption motor - perhaps a racing boat? But when using such currents you usually require cooling systems and quite a specialist drive train. Brushless motors can take high currents, so LiPos are often associated with them, but you can use any battery with any motor if you want - just so long at it delivers the amps! There is no reason why you should not use brushless with SLAs, or LiPos on a low-drain application - though a LiPo may be more expensive than you need for that... NiMH are perfectly capable of making a boat plane - IF you ensure that the max amp delivery is adequate. You can, for instance, buy NiMh
    batteries
    designed for wireless phones with max output 500mA or less - these will disappoint you if you try to use them for motor power! A handy rule of thumb for estimating optimum battery discharge is to look at the capacity in Amp-hours. A low-drain battery is probably designed to put that out over 20 hours, so divide the Ah by 20 to get an estimate of optimum current draw. A high-drain battery is usually designed to output over 1 hour - so divide the Ah by 1 to get optimum amps. That's only a generality, of course, and the battery spec sheet is the definitive place to look... "...more likely that HE had shares in a LiPo company to be able to afford them back then..." When it comes to electrical equipment I do have connections. ๐Ÿ˜Š If you think LiPos were expensive in the 2000s, you should try buying NiCad pen cells in the 1960s. Probably the most unusual battery I have used was a pack of saline/manganese oxide cells from ex-RAF life jackets, where the battery was open to the water underneath the boat and you could speed it up by scattering salt in front of it....
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    "...I charge them up occasionally and as luck would have it we recently had a power cut so I was able to power up a couple of car headlights so That we could see...." A very clever idea! You can get car accessories like immersion coils for boiling water, which may also be useful in the future. I have a number of old Uninterruptible Power Supplies sitting around with dead
    batteries
    - these will run off 12v car
    batteries
    very nicely and give me 240v if I need it - though at the cost of some efficiency. The last power cut we had here was 2 days ago, and if we keep running our energy strategy in the way we are currently doing, I expect they will become a regular feature of life. Luckily it wasn't long, so the web servers stayed up on their UPSs.....
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    Thank you DG, That explanation has made it clearer to me. I still have a few sealed lead acid
    batteries
    that are mainly used just to weight things down with. I charge them up occasionally and as luck would have it we recently had a power cut so I was able to power up a couple of car headlights so That we could see. We used one and the other we took around to an elderly lady who lives on her own, plus a flask of hot water for her to make a cup of tea. So now I make sure that they are charged more often now. They certainly came in handy then. Martin555.
    2 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    Hi Peter, "One thing this conversation has resulted in is a much better understanding of alternatives to LiPo. " Thanks! Then I have achieved my objective๐Ÿ˜‰ What irritated me about Dodgy's initial post on the subject, and apologies to Dodgy if my response was a little over the top, (must remember not to answer such posts so late at night๐Ÿค”) was that it seemed to generalise without mentioning the the decisive parameters involved, including cost difference! Sure there are better low discharge NiMhs thse days, but at higher cost, as I believe I mentioned. E.G. for the fast electrics market. LiPos have also improved their safety record tremendously (thanks partially to the Boeing Dreamliner mini disaster) in the 15 years that Dodgy has apparently been using them. Seems more likely that HE had shares in a LiPo company to be able to afford them back then๐Ÿ˜‰ In fact most of the earlier problems with Lithium
    batteries
    were with Lithium-Ion. Was a big nuisance when we wanted to export some of our mobile/portable tactical radio kit. Had to send the
    batteries
    separately under special (expensive) conditions ๐Ÿ˜  Seems about time I updated the Battery charging sections in the 'How Tos' on this site to match current products! Been meaning to do that for yonks. So much to do, so little time ๐Ÿค” Cheers, Doug
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    batteries
    and Charger!
    And other supplies were ordered today! I also had to order some metric drills. I only had a few american standard drills! I also ordered some wood glue! I know I should of asked before ordering. I ordered some Admiralty Glues Water Resistant PVA Wood Glue 200ml! I hope this was a correct purchase! The
    batteries
    should be here in a few days time!
    2 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    Any battery when abused causes problems - even good old Ni-cads - there were a few pictures of exploded boats in MB magazine - one a Sun tug split in half when the owner tried to fast charge non fast charge Ni-cads. I had a melt down with two dissimilar Ni-cad packs using a Graupner servo type switch speed controller - the smaller pack burst into flame - fortunately on a test rig. Possibly what is different about Lipos is they take far less abuse than the other types - so if you are careless with your
    batteries
    it would probably be safer to avoid them... Has anyone any knowledge of the Lipo's which look like double sized AA
    batteries
    ? I have 4 and a charger - not sure how to use them ........
    2 months ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    Basically for the benefit of the new guys to this hobby. It is important that you know what type of
    batteries
    you have and how to look after them properly. If in any doubt then please seek advice. We have some very knowledgeable members on this site so don't be afraid to ask. Martin555.
    2 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    "...The point I was trying to say is that if you hear all the bad things about
    batteries
    exploding/smoking then nine times out of ten it is not suitable for the job or someone trying a short cut to charging..." Lipos are not continually exploding - if they were you would not find them on sale for long. But they do require close attention to the rules and the rules are somewhat different to those that people were used to with NiCads, for instance. They can easily be damaged if you do not treat them correctly. All
    batteries
    have an optimum application based on their characteristics - Lead Acid
    batteries
    , for instance, are great at providing working ballast for tugs and will tolerate a lot of abuse...
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    Hi Jb, Yes I agree that you require a certain amount of knowledge about the equipment that you use and the health and safety side of things. The point I was trying to say is that if you hear all the bad things about
    batteries
    exploding/smoking then nine times out of ten it is not suitable for the job or someone trying a short cut to charging. I have heard many stories of this happening but someone new to this hobby will think that it is to dangerous and look for a different hobby. I think that the important thing to get across is using the equipment properly rather than going in to the in' and out's of the very technical descriptions of various bits and pieces. I am probably not making it any clearer what I am trying to say. Martin555.
    2 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    Not quite the same thing but definitely
    batteries
    . My partner, Alice was given an electric bicycle at the weekend and was told the battery had 'had it'. She worked on it for a few hours, luckily, knowing what she was doing and was able to go for a ride on it yesterday afternoon. Nerys
    2 months ago by Nerys
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    Re - It is good to have all this information on the different
    batteries
    , Hi Martin, I think what we are trying to say is that all battery types are good as long as you maintain them properly and they are suitable for the job they are doing.
    batteries
    are getting better and safer every day and the choices increasing as well so it can be confusing for beginners in the R/C hobbies. Unfortunately you do need to be aware of the technical stuff re -use and charging, as all battery packs can be dangerous (ie, try shorting a big NiCad or NiMh pack and see if the smoke doesn't leak out and melt your fingers!) They can cause fires too but people seem stuck on the LiPo 'dangers' and forget about those 'safe'
    batteries
    . The good thing is that people can google anything these days and can usually check for instructions or possible problems before buying any product, model or otherwise. JB
    2 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    Hi Guys, It is good to have all this information on the different
    batteries
    , but I like many of us use what ever is recommended to us and probably don't look after them as well as we should do. I have had
    batteries
    that have lasted many many years and some that have lasted only months. It is really good to have members on this site that know the technical stuff and that you can ask questions about it and will get the proper answers. I feel that we tend to go a bit overboard with the technical stuff and I am sure that if new guys start reading all of this then they might steer away from this hobby. It is so easy to get bogged down with the technological advantages of this type or that type, but at the end of the day we just want to enjoy the making of a nice boat and the pleasure of seeing all your hard work finally going through it's paces. That to me is what this hobby is all about. Martin555.
    2 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    "....Usually you post useable info, but in this case I have to vehemently disagree! And I would like to put the record straight before you lead our novice members to potential disaster, or at least an expensive disappointment!..." Well, this certainly stirred something up! And I can't see why? Perhaps RN has shares in a Lipo factory? ๐Ÿ˜‰ All that I have said is standard knowledge on the subject. NiMH ARE more robust than LiPos - I can't see how anyone can disagree with that. They are more forgiving of overcharge and over-depletion. I have not said that Lipos should not be used - I use them myself - but I have stated a preference for NiMH where the benefits of Lipos are not a requirement. I have been using NiMH for around 15 years, and Lipos for about the same time. During that period I must have bought around 2 dozen packs of each type. I currently have one working LiPo pack, while all my NiMH packs work, albeit sometimes with less charge than originally. The Lipos have gone unbalanced, swollen, delaminated or punctured at some point. Lipos, when working, are phenomenal items, and make miniature flying models possible. I use them for this, and would, as I have said, use them when light weight and high power are essential. But they do require that you look after them and follow the rules - in particular, not over-discharging them. If you do not treat them properly they will certainly swell and fail - I cannot see why stating this is considered scaremongering? It is this lack of robustness that makes me prefer NiMH, since I do not take particular care of my
    batteries
    . NiMH will put up with this - Lipo won't. That is the gist of what I said, it is attested by other comments on this thread which stress that you must 'follow the rules' and I can't see how stating it will lead novice members to potential disaster or expensive disappointment? I would have thought the opposite... Incidentally, your comments about the differences between Lipos and Nimh seem to cover all the good points of Lipos and the bad points of NiMH. It would be more useful to novices to see a better balanced description. For instance, recent advances in NiMH
    batteries
    have produced low self-discharge
    batteries
    - (quoting the wiki) "In October 2011 the
    batteries
    were again improved to retain up to 90% of their capacity after one year, 80% after three years and 70% after five years." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eneloop These are readily available, I have used these in emergency flashlights and can confirm that they do do 'what it says on the tin' (though I haven't had time to try out the five year claim yet!). They can be of use if your modelling practices include going to the lake at short notice. I hope this isn't going to develop into a flame war. As I said, I can't see why noting a preference for the robustness of NiMH should engender such a response...
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    RE "I would use brushless, but avoid Lipos in less there was a good reason for them. Quite true Doug, I still have the first Zippy Flightmax 5s 20c LiPo I bought (02.06.2010) and it still balances after all this time, (just pulled it out of the archive and it's reading 3.92-3.91- 3.92-3.90.3.92 in storage mode) Doesn't have much guts any more but is perfectly usable in a boat. I have a few newer 4s 40c discharge
    batteries
    which have puffed/gassed, but are still usable with care ( don't suck more than 40A for too long, cool them straight away - always have an Esky with bagged ice handy if running
    batteries
    at high drain and getting them hot) At home and you're testing, if they get quite hot, just put them in the fridge to cool down. I have even forgotten and frozen them solid in the freezer, (takes a while to get power back while they warm up,- bit like frozen frogs!) If you have any that puff badly or get very hot constantly for no reason, ditch them. Safest way to do this is to make up a bucket of very salty water outside and drop the battery in to discharge it (you will see the leads bubbling,) next day, (if all activity has stopped), take it out in the middle of the garden (making sure the wind is blowing towards open space- Not your neighbors just in case as if it does smoke,- it's nasty stuff!) and ram a large garden fork or 4"nail right through it to make sure all the charge has gone and it's safe to dispose of (I still leave them outside in a tin for a few months just to be extra sure) Do Not Do This Without Discharging In The Bucket First !!! as once they start you can't put them out, as it's a chemical reaction, and you will have so much nasty smoke you won't believe it !!!), not to mention a few thousand degrees of heat and flames!. Now go out and buy a new battery and look after it properly ie, using correct charging, discharging and storage charging, and it should last for years, - especially in boats, as unless used in racing boats, the discharge for the average brushed/ brushless scale boat is nothing compared to planes. JB
    2 months ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: Futaba F14 Dual Thottle Installed!
    Hi Doug, I didn't know there was a different version! Or that it came with the
    batteries
    . Next time I'll ask questions????? The reciever I have is the Futaba R3008SB. T-FHSS AIR S.BUS 2 8 Channel with High Voltage System! With Dual Antenna's Only thing is I'll have to wait. Till I have the
    batteries
    to test the unit! PS. The instructions you have provided. Are the same ones I had downloaded. From futaba wedsite! Thanks, Though appriciate it! Cheers, Ed
    2 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    "I would use brushless, but avoid Lipos in less there was a good reason for them. NiMh are fairly forgiving of neglect - they can be left for months, charged and run. Lipos need looking after, otherwise they swell and might go bang. And boats are happy enough with the extra weight.. . " ๐Ÿ‘Ž Sorry Dodgy, Usually you post useable info, but in this case I have to vehemently disagree! And I would like to put the record straight before you lead our novice members to potential disaster, or at least an expensive disappointment! 1. "NiMh are fairly forgiving of neglect - they can be left for months, charged and run." WRONG! NiMh cells lose about 1% of their charge per day! Cheaper ones with a higher internal resistance even moreโ˜น๏ธ Which means that after about three to three and a half months they will go into deep discharge from which they can not recover. I.e. buy new
    batteries
    ! The rate of such self discharge of course depends on the quality (hence price ๐Ÿค”) of the battery in the first place. The higher the internal resistance (cheap batteryโ˜น๏ธ) the faster the self discharge rate. Probably the best ones to go for are those advertised as Racing Packs. With luck they will have a lower internal resistance, otherwise they'd be useless for high speed high current racing motors!! "they can be left for months, charged and run" Hmmm! Maybe, if you're lucky, but they won't then ever run for so long as when they were new, or properly looked after, i.e. recycled/recharged every 2 or 3 months. At best you might be able to regenerate them somewhat by going through about 10 cycles of discharge and charge to recondition them. But if they have been too long in deep discharge even this won't work, the chemical deterioration is no longer reversible. Remember also the Memory Effect of NiMh chemistry
    batteries
    . If you fully recharge an NiMh battery before it is fully discharged it has an irritating habit of "remembering" the state of charge when you started charging and will not accept any more! Which means that the the total capacity of the battery is prematurely reduced each time this happensโ˜น๏ธ 2. "Lipos need looking after, otherwise they swell and might go bang." This I can only regard as pure scaremongering! I'm not usually so scathing in my remarks but in this instance I fear it is justified! Sure LiPos can be dangerous, but so can any battery of any chemistry! Seriously overcharge a "so called" Sealed Lead Acid (SLA) battery it can vent hydrogen gas. One spark in an unventilated room and you can re-enact the the Zeppelin disaster at Lakehurst. Unlikely these days I'll grant you, cos you'd have to stick a lot of amps in for a long time! The advantages of LiPos over NiMh, apart from the lower weight per energy/power available is that their self discharge rate is almost negligible, and their inherent internal resistance is much lower, given that you don't buy the cheapest No Name on offer! If you intend to store (not use) a LiPo for an extended period cycle it and give it a "Storage charge" of 30% and you can leave it so for several months. During which time your NiMh battery will probably self discharge itself into destruction. Modern LiPos will only swell and explode if you seriously maltreat them; - subject them to excessive heat, - leave them on a manual charger (not programmable for LiPos) for too long, - charge them at too high a current, Ignore all those labels with 10C or 20C charge rates! That's just marketing blurb to get you to overstress your
    batteries
    so you have to buy new ones sooner. NEVER charge at more than 1Amp if you want to get several years of life from your expensive battery. - charge without using a cell balancer, - draw excessive current from them under load. Stick to the rules and LiPos are no problem at at all. That is my experience from three years of using them. Oh! And not all boats are tolerant of the extra weight (of an NiMh presumably), for many smaller boats (Plastic Magic conversions for example) LiPos are the only viable solution. They now make the previously impossible possible ๐Ÿ˜Š Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Transmitter and Reciever
    batteries
    !
    Looking around the mighty web. I have found where to source. The
    batteries
    for the F-14 controller! It's setting me back $75.00! For the Transmitter Battery. and the Reciever Battery. I also have to order the Charger! Now, I liked it in the old days. When you purchased a Controller system. It came with everything you needed!
    2 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Fast attack craft
    I have a good number of LiPo
    batteries
    and have found them not only powerful but extremely good at holding their charge. I have no choice, I have to leave my
    batteries
    for six months at a time and their storage charge does not diminish at all. I check them on every visit and they are always exactly as they were left. I do take precautions though as they can be problematic if not cared for. I always keep them with a storage charge in a fireproof bag inside an ammunition box. You can never be too careful but my experience is that they are quite safe if cared for.๐Ÿ˜Š
    2 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Blog
    Futaba F14 Controller Arrived!
    My F14 controller arrive on schedule. I was a bit confused with the unit! I thought they sent me the wrong controller. But, It turns out it the right controller! I had ordered the 2.4ghz unit. But, the unit comes marked 40mhz! But, after looking around and reading. The pamphlets it turns out it's 2.4ghz! I thought I was going to have to send it back! Now all I have to do is order. The
    batteries
    that it uses. Also order the chargers! You would think for such a expensive radio. They would give the battery packs. But, I guess that's how they make their money! I had also ordered the dual throttle controller. Which I plan on installing shortly! According to how this radio is configured. I can add another 6 channels to it! That should be enough. For what I'm going to do to her. Controls whise!
    2 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Upgrade to 2.4
    This is a plastic boat which used to be sold in large numbers for the RNLI. It is now rather rare and is collectable. Here is one on Ebay for ยฃ127! Note - that does not mean that they will get a sale at that price - but they will still sell for quite a lot! https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/IMPACT-RNLI-SEVERN-RADIO-CONTROL-LIFEBOAT-RNLB-VOLUNTEER-SPIRIT-GREAT-CONDITION/264428640626?hash=item3d912cd972:g:8OYAAOSwrdRdUWr8 These were often converted to 'proper' 2.4GHz by modellers. I've never examined one, but I think they are 27Mhz, driving two motors which provide steering and power. If that is so, a conversion would mean buying a 2.4Ghz radio set, a single motor and propshaft and a servo and rudder, taking out the entire inside of the boat and re-installing the new equipment. You would need some modelling skill to do this. It is unlikely that the other 2.4Ghz sets interfered with your signal. The 27Mhz set installed in your boat will have limited range compared with the 2.4Ghz systems, but it should work adequately close to you. Perhaps your
    batteries
    are weak, the aerial is badly positioned, or there was some 27Mhz interference close to you? If someone else was using a 27Mhz radio close to you then it may interfere if they and you were on the same 'spot frequency'. The 27Mhz band is divided up into sections, and only one boat can use one of those sections at a time. These sections are given colours, and you fly a coloured flag on your aerial to tell everyone that you are using that section - called a 'spot'. Do you know what spot your boat is on, and was there anyone flying a coloured flag on their aerial near you? I think you have a difficult decision. Either keep it as it is and make it work as well as it can, or get some help and spend some money converting it. I would try to get it working as well as I could first. Have you tried a range check? Get someone to hold the boat while you walk away with the controller and see how far it will work... and the next time you take it to the pond, ask one of the experienced modellers if they can help a bit...
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer


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