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    Forum
    Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build
    Hi John, You seem to have missed the point entirely, as you also did with your first post on this thread, in which instead of trying to help Andy and answer his question you attempt to dissuade him from his goal. Unfortunately I missed Andy's question back in March as I was embroiled with family matters. BUT, if he hasn't in the meantime been 'scared off' by the lack of constructive response I will do my best to help, having several times been down the road of multiple screws, as have many other better constructors than me on this site. Nearly all my ships have two, three or even four screws. Only the Sea Scout and ancient Billing Boats fish cutter (a restoration and conversion from static to RC project) have single screws - as per originals. About a year ago I acquired a model of a US Elco PTB fitted with two shafts. I am restoring it, rebuilding as Kennedy's PT109, and will fit the third shaft to complete it to scale as per original. Why? Because that's what scale modelling is about and because it's a challenge - pushing limits. Far be it from me to decry or put down anyone (as you now seem to be trying with me). We all have the enthusiasm (or we wouldn't be here) and do the best we can with the skills nature gave us and what the budget and state of health allows. I have often been astounded and appropriately applauded, and supported where I can, what fellow members have achieved with very limited resources and under very different circumstances from those we in the so called 'Western World' enjoy. That guy in Bangladesh blows my mind with what he manages in the back of beyond! Look for his post about his March '71 boats. WHEN I pitch in here I try to do so with constructive assistance, drawn from my own modelling experience and a lifetime spent working with navies and shipyards, to help a guy achieve his aims and dreams. NOT to immediately deflate him by saying 'Why do that? I did mine this way, it's not what you want but it works for me'. So far the Likes, PMs and mail feedback, request for assisitance I have tell me I'm doing something right. if I do boob (we're all human) I'm prepared to admit it and make amends / corrections. I have no idea what this 'Hooben' is that you yatter on about BUT - if "every little detail (is) reproduced with superb accuracy" why then ruin the overall effect by not continuing this attention to detail on the underwater ship and fitting shafts and screws appropriately? Whatever you do have fun with it, but don't dissuade others from pursuing their dreams. True there are "many roads to travel before one reaches there (!sic) destination" BUT as Confucius said "Every journey begins with the first step." if at the first step someone says 'Your destination is the wrong one' instead of offering a roadmap ..... ! Regards, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž BTW: still waiting for the pics / videos of your 'Hooben' (?) and the Perkasa.
    6 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    I'm doing the eShapeoko - I wanted a more rigid machine for general purposes, and I liked the fact that you could specify the X and Y axis lengths. For cutting model boat parts you rarely want something as wide as 1 foot - but you often want items of length greater than 1 yard. The eShapeoko has standard sizes as extreme as 15 inches by 60 inches, and can easily be extended. I've gone for 18 x 36 inches - should be fine for EeZebilts... One of the things that's a bit annoying with GRBL is that it doesn't currently do tool radius compensation. I'm using an arduino with grbl as well, and if I cut my plans as drawn they will all be a tool radius out. I am currently looking to use a 0.5mm tool so the effect will be small - but if you know of a better driver interpreter...?
    6 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Media
    Commission 44347
    This is a Dumas kit for a USCG Life boat 44' built in Curtis Bay Maryland Coast Guard yard. I've been working off and on this model for a couple of years.
    12 months ago by RedRider
    Forum
    Spektrum, new, useless...
    You know, my son bought a bottle of Bardolino with him to the boatyard when we lived afloat. And it was gorgeous if I recall, especially with some Gentleman's Relish and Rochefort on French bread. We preferred it to Barosso. Enjoy, you clever man, enjoy. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Fittings & Detail Parts
    Aw, it's Monty et famille! When Chris and I were in our 10 foot caravan in the boatyard we backed onto a pond with Monty the Moorhen and his Mrs. and they raised 4 generations of tiddlers. in the end Chris used to sit with her hand out of the window and feed the little devils. Monty or Mum would take the new ones across the boatyard to the canal for a swim and to get them used to feeding themselves. At such times all traffic would be brought to a halt by Chris and me on pain of death. Those who made no fuss got a cuppa. Those who moaned were wise not to leave their vehicles in the yard overnight while they went boating. When we left, the moron who leased the yard filled in the pond as well as trashed our "little home". Bastard croaked a while back. Karma. Moorhens rule. Coots are 'orrible show-offs. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Council madness...
    When I used to sail on the Liverpool park lakes ,2 of which have dedicated model boating ponds. The birds which were about ,even the babies often hitch hiked on the slower vessels. The faster ones were ignored unless too close for comfort.They just lifted off a yard and settled again. The birds not the boats๐Ÿ˜‹ The main lakes were "Boating Lakes" with rowing boats but noone moaned about them disturbing the birds. Actually noone moaned about models either. I wonder if it would have been different if the pools weren't dedicated.๐Ÿ‘
    1 year ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Fittings & Detail Parts
    Hi Pete, Afraid you've found the chink in my armour๐Ÿ˜ฒ I enjoy solving problems and building and renovating things immensely, but I'm afraid I'm probably somewhat neglectful on the maintenance side, until it's almost too late and I'm faced with a complete rebuild๐Ÿ˜ฒ Anyway, unless anything happens which makes me dismantle the shafts I leave 'em alone until the end of the season and they go into storage. Then I remove and clean and inspect them check bearing wear etc. Then apply some PTFE/TEFLON grease to the bearings, refit the shafts in the tube and put a few drops of light machine oil into the oiler pipes that I'm in the process of adding to my ships and boats as they go through my 'yard' in various refit projects. Pics show the oiler pipe I added to my 1960s Sea Scout during her recent refit. The silicon tube simplifies the 'topping up' ๐Ÿ˜‰ Last pic shows the completed 'Machinery Flat' ๐Ÿ˜‰ I dimly remember Lithium grease. Doesn't it have a tendency to coagulate and clump over time, especially at low temperatures? Dim memory cos I was an electronics engineer not mechanical๐Ÿ˜‰ Anyway not sure that Lithium is too environmentally acceptable to the 'jobsworths' in local authorities governing the use of municipal ponds these days. PTFE/TEFLON should not be a problem in this respect and it still works at lo and hi temps. if it's good enough for NASA ..... ? Stuff I use is called 'Gear-Flon', Check out http://www.gear-flon.de/Produkte/ I also use this grease in the rudder stocks, and anywhere else there is a moving joint. Keeps things moving and prevents rusting๐Ÿ˜Š There are other guys on this site who swear by various curious mixtures, but since I (and I suspect also you!) am not interested in maximum revs ultra fast racing electrics I don't think that's worth the bother. Many don't like grease of any type, claiming that it hardens or adds drag on the shaft. The jury is still out on that! A smear of PTFE/TEFLON on the tube bearings, a few drops of light machine oil after every run, including the motor bearings (if your running brushed motors KEEP IT OFF THE CARBON BRUSHES!!!), and I'm happy. So are my boats so far, Cheers Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Wherry hull in GRP
    I am truly sorry if I have thrown a spanner in the works. I saw the picture and was surprised on the height the bow went. I do spend a lot of time up on the Norfolk Broads. The Avatar I have is my boat that I have moored in Hebert Woods
    boat yard
    in Potter Heigham. I have seen the Wherries on the river many times and just had to point the error out. Once again I'm sorry to have ruined your dream of getting the correct model.
    1 year ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    1928 โ€œthe Sea Queenโ€
    Very nice, Ron. it must be so satisfying to live in a land where you only have to hit the coast somewhere to see some proper boats. Sea Queen is lovely as is that little cruiser near the end which has all the looks of an Aerokits Sea Nymph. Over here you have to go to one of very few special events or yards to see old wooden cruisers. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    It's a sad day!.
    Martin you do have a way with words, I like it!, yes, and steam locomotives run on at least ten times the pressure of a steam driven boat. Happy memory's of the old New Brighton lake, my nan and mum would take me over from Liverpool on the ferry, which in those days went to New Brighton, with my pride and joy under my arm, my "victory models fire boat" remember the one? all plastic with twin brass screws driven by a mighty midget motor. The old lake was demolished approx' 10 to 15 years ago and the new one constructed 30 yards further up. I was there as demolition was going on and the old lake was a large heap of concrete and rubble fenced off to the public. Do you know to this day I so so regret not squeezing through the fence and taking a hand size piece of the concrete side wall, the concrete wall I would have lent over 1000 times as a young boy of seven to launch my boats.
    1 year ago by stormin
    Forum
    It's a sad day!.
    Hi Westquay i spend quite a bit of time up in Norfolk and I have a boat up there. it's the one in my avatar. I do take my Probaot Miss Geico. I haven't even thought about taking one of the IC boats up there. I did run one down the river following it in my boat. Run it for about 3 miles. My boat is in a
    boat yard
    that has quite a large area. Once I get another IC boat sorted I might just do that. I think my PT 109 might be the first candidate once I have treated her to a new flexi shaft. That's the one I damaged just before the Park Ranger turned up.
    1 year ago by BOATSHED
    Response
    Emma C Berry Fishing Smack
    I was told by a
    boat yard
    , that the rudder placement was be far a stern with this type of rig. Where is it on this boat, your photos do not show the model out of the water.
    1 year ago by Ron
    Blog
    Getting ready
    The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum moved their Model Boat Expo back to May and I'm getting Constellation ready to sail. It's a tradition now that I have some progress to show each time she sails, so this time I want to set the courses. Since her last sail the aft bulwark was added and new winch drums made, and a wedge added to the cart to keep her from sliding back. Putting her on and off her ballast was a pain by myself, so I ground off the threads on the rods for about a centimeter so they act like pins and hold the boat in place while I thread in the other rod. That little hack was much simpler than figuring out some sort of cradle to fit on the cart. I looked at all sorts of ways to control the courses, and the simplest method was sort of a yard at the bottom, but one that wasn't obvious. I used a length of vinyl coated clothes hanger and sew pocket onto the clews on the backside of the sails. in the center of the foot, I sewed a sleeve. The rod goes through the sleeve and onto the pockets. if I need to reduce sail, I can easily pull out the rods and bunt up the sail. I also figured I'll set the two gaff-headed Spencer sails. So far I sewed hoops on the forward one. Their a line on it to brail it up if I need to lose it. The t'gallants and royals will get hooks on the halyards, and some sort of easy release on their sheets, so I can take them off, yard and all, if it's too windy. if need be, I should be able to brail up the spencers, bunt up the courses, and remove the t'gallants and royals all in just a few minutes, and have her down to just tops'ls, spanker, and jibs. if THAT's too much sail, well, then it's just too windy to sail. Hopefully I'll get to sail her with all 17 sails set! The other bit of "progress" for this sail will be to use both winches. Previously I used one winch to control the main corse yard, and the fore and mizzen were slaved to it. Last time I controlled the fore tops'l yard and slaved the main and mizzen to the fore. This time the main and mizzen tops'l yard will be controlled together on their own winch, and the fore tops'l yard will be controlled separately on it's own winch. This way, when I come-about or tack, I can back the fore against the wind to push the bow across. So, I was looking at images of the real ship to refresh my memory of how the main and mizzen brace were led when I noticed the main tops'l brace was anchored in the rig in one place when sail was set, and another place without sails. Looking around I found there was some sort of ring or band that slide up and down the mizzen topmast pushed by the tops'l yard parrel when it was raised and lowered to set or take in sail. I'd never noticed that sort of thing before, but looking at images of ship contemporary to Constellation, I found it was actually pretty common place, and I even saw it done on a few British ships of the 1850's and later. Always learning something new.
    1 year ago by Jerry Todd
    Forum
    Calling Devon boaters. Help!
    Hi Charlie, Further to my last message I have been banging my head against the brick wall called Torbay Council. it seems that the pool in Youngs Park Goodrington is not "approved" for any kind of model boat. This seems strange as the Torbay Model Club sailed there for many years. All is not lost as the Kings Pool is approved by our Burghers for both sail and electric powered boats. This is simple to get to and parking is on the seafront or at the rugby club. if you put "Kings Drive" into your satnav you park at the seaward end. The lake will give you a striaght run of at least 80 yards and if there is any problem it is simple to recover a stuck boat. Contact me on info@harmonygambia.org.uk by e-mail or 01803 267943 and we can get together on this. Regards, Peter PS The park is open 24 hrs and not even fenced.
    1 year ago by Keystone
    Response
    Sanding down.
    Hi MouldBuilder, I have been using a car window washer pump for about 15 years in my fire boat with out problems. Sourced mine from local scrap yard, cost me 50p for two, second went into another boat 2 years ago. Both boats running on 9.6 volt nicads. Cheers Colin.
    1 year ago by Colin H
    Response
    Devil in the detail!
    I'm with you there Skydive ๐Ÿ‘What Boatshed means is the part of the rudder in front of the stock. Thinks: are you building an Offshore Power Boat or a scale Lifeboat? If the former then follow Boatshed's recommendation. If the latter and the rudder is 'scale' then leave it alone. Any braking effect, which usually is only significant in a fast racing boat model or other fast planing types, can be diminished by reducing the rudder servo throw at the TX. One should also consider how the original behaved, maybe they did 'dig in' maybe not. There has to be a reason why such rudders were developed, and surely not just to annoy modellers ๐Ÿ˜ One more minor point that struck me - Ouch ๐Ÿ˜ญ Your prop struts! "not that it provides a huge amount of support but adds to the scale appearance." Even in a model they can be important. To help reduce potential whipping of the propshaft, especially if the model is overpowered. Actually in the originals they were vital, especially in larger vessels. The purpose of these struts, in larger vessels 'A' frames, is to provide support to the end of the shaft which carries the prop weighing several tons and, more important, to carry the bearing for the outer end of the shaft! Actually in the originals the shaft tube, or 'Stuffing Box' would not extend significantly beyond the hull. Thus the strut or A frame was vital for the shaft end bearing, fitted immediately in front of the prop for maximum stability. Attached pics of my HMS Belfast (sorry don't 'ave nutt'n smaller with this feature๐Ÿค”) show the arrangement. Have witnessed such construction in various shipyards around the world. Last one in UK was the first T45, quite an experience! ๐Ÿ˜ฒ In the end she's your boat, if it feels good do it! ๐Ÿ˜‰ I would leave the rudder alone if it is 'as fitted'. ๐Ÿ‘ I make my struts and A frames from brass sheet and tube. Cheers Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž PS Stick with the brass Donnie! ๐Ÿ‘
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Media
    The Latest from the Bilzin Boatyard
    Krick WSP 47 as seen on MBW vids Working radar and blues (no twos..... yet)
    1 year ago by bilzin
    Response
    Agenora
    Another great build from the Gascoigne boatyard
    1 year ago by Baggie
    Forum
    Is this scratch built
    Thanks for sharing, when I look at my
    boat yard
    in the basement I will cheer for the boy along with a good deal of shame that although I have done a lot of models, I think maybe some of us are tool and fitting collectors....๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜œ๐Ÿ˜ Funny thing is; my favorite one is the tug Seguin, made with basic rudimentary tools, some home made!! take care pal. Mark
    1 year ago by pugwash1
    Forum
    Riva boat launch
    Riva was finally launched in the Torrevieja boat clubs water last Sunday after eleven months work. Fifteen coats of yacht varnish and final Polish of Turtle wax she went like a dream.Plans came from America and the plywood from local woodyard.Graupner 37 motor pushed 31 inches smoothly. Dumas supplied the chrome fittings
    1 year ago by Alan999
    Directory
    (US WESTERN RIVER TOWBOAT) ILLINI LOYAL
    ANOTHER ON THE WAYS: SALVAGED DUMAS ABS HYDRODYNE HULL, 35 X 10 X 2" ORIGINALLY IN THE AMERICAN BEAUTY KIT. MY INTENT IS TO SCRATCH BUILD FROM THIS HULL, A SINGLE-DECK TWIN SCREW LINEHAUL TOWBOAT WITH A FUNCTIONING TELESCOPING PILOTHOUSE. THEY ARE COMMON ON THE UPPER ILLINOIS RIVER WHERE THERE ARE FIXED OVERPASSES OR LOW OBSTRUCTIONS SPANNING THE WATERWAY. THE DES PLAINES AND CALUMET RIVERS IN THE CHICAGO AREA ALSO HARBOR THESE PUSHBOATS. THE PLAN IS TO KEEP HER LIGHT WITH A LOW CG, BUT POWERFUL ENOUGH TO PUSH SOME SCALE WEIGHT; I RECKON 775 MOTORS WITH 50MM 5-BLADE WHEELS WILL SUFFICE. THIS BOAT WILL BE STEERED WITH STANDARD RUDDERS, NO FLANKING RUDDERS, BECAUSE I WANT TO KEEP IT SIMPLE. (K.I.S.S.) I AM STILL BRAINSTORMING THE SYSTEM FOR RAISING/LOWERING THE PILOTHOUSE; POSSIBLY A SERVO WINCH & CABLE OR LINEAR SERVO. A PNEUMATIC RIG IS ALSO A POSSIBILITY I RECKON. SHE WILL BE WEARING THE ORANGE TRIM AND MIDNIGHT BLUE PAINT SCHEME OF MY SHOP-ILLINIWEK MARINE SCALE SHIPYARD. I USE LIGHTHOUSE LED's & MINI SWITCHES FROM THE SEATTLE AREA EXCLUSIVELY, 9V, 3MM. HARBOR MODELS 1.5V WORKING RADAR & MAYBE A 6V WORKING DECK CAPSTAN WILL BE ADDED. SHE IS MY 5TH ADDITION TO THE ILLINIWEK MARINE FLEET, AND WILL OF COURSE PUSH AHEAD THE MATCHING BARGES. GO FIGHTING ILLINI! (Motor: 775 JOHNSON TYPE) (ESC: DIMART 320A FAN-COOLED) (8/10)
    2 years ago by circle43nautical
    Directory
    (Life Boat) USCG CG-44345
    VINTAGE BILLING BOATS (MY FIRST RC ENDEAVOR 1989) 1:20 US COAST GUARD 44' MOTOR LIFEBOAT. ABS HULL & DECK WITH PLYWOOD CABINS. ALL STOCK RUNNING HARDWARE AND FITTINGS. I'M CURRENTLY OVERHAULING HER, HULL IS DECORATED AND MARKED WITH NEW DECALS. THE ORIG KIT WAS CG-44329, WHICH SAILED OUT OF US COAST GUARD LIFEBOAT STATION MANASQUAN INLET, NJ. I CHANGED THE HULL NUMBER AND RELOCATED HER TO USCG LIFEBOAT STATION LUDINGTON, MI., WHICH WAS MY DREAM STATION WHEN I WAS A PROUD US COAST GUARDSMAN, '80-86. THERE WERE 110 OF THESE MLB'S BUILT BY THE COAST GUARD YARD IN CURTIS BAY, MD, AND THE DESIGN WAS SO SUCCESSFUL, IT WAS DUPLICATED BY THE RNLI AND STILL IN SERVICE TODAY. THERE ARE EVEN A COUPLE FOR SALE THE LAST TIME I CHECKED. OTHER THAN THE 40' UTB, THE 44 IS MY FAVORITE COASTAL RESCUE CRAFT. YES-MR. ARNOLD PALMER WAS A US COAST GUARDSMAN (YM3) 1950-53 (Motor: MAB 540) (ESC: HOBBYWING) (8/10)
    2 years ago by circle43nautical
    Forum
    Unbekannte Flitze. A very flighty girl
    Managed, at last, to get to the water on Monday at the Knap in Barry, South Wales with the Vale of Glamorgan Model Boat Club. Unbekannte Flitze was very fast off the mark, agile with incredible turns and generally good control. After about 5 or 6 minutes she became sluggish and I started to bring her in. About a yard out she just pointed her nose in the air and bubbled ignominiouly as she went to the bottom. Only one answer. off with everything but my pants and in we go. Rumour from Ken Thompson was that i was practising for the local Iron Man event. One poor lady actually believed it. The problem was a loose water cooling pipe....my fault for p... poor preparation. Note to self... buy chest waders.
    2 years ago by AllenA
    Forum
    Chesapeak Bay Maritime Museum
    This is way more than just a maritime museum. The location in the heart the Chesapeak Bay Area, the home of the only sail โ€ fishing fleet in the U.S.A. No power drives at all with the exception of small โ€pusherโ€ units, kind of tiny, with room for a motor only! These are used to aid in getting to the fishery. The traditional boat is a Skipjack and the museum is a living
    boat yard
    . So even when there is no events there is always something to see. Model boat days are held around a large square tempary pool. One day is for scale and live steam, and another is free sail and model skipjack racing. We do not have control of the weather but I can not remember anything but sun on the days I have been there๐Ÿ‘. The team at the museum are a great group of ladies and gentlemen who are passionate in their love of the sea and on model days you will find loads of helpful tips etc from all the โ€œcaptainsโ€. if you are visitors on holiday, Anapolis is no more than three quarters of an hour away, this is the home of the Rodgers collection of dockyard models and the worlds largest collection of French prisoner of war bone models (napolionic) in the world, it is a super nautical town! the Chesapeake museum is in St.Michaels, with lots of super shopping for the non model boating spouses. Further up the road on Tilghman island is a fantastic nautical book store who specializes in model ships and boats. However you need to visit the book store a day before the show day as everyone will be looking for that rare and special book!!!!! Hope this is a help.
    2 years ago by pugwash1
    Forum
    Tilgear
    Just to agree with Doug the Bluebell is gorgeous๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘ , the shipyard I served my time in Henry Robb built quite a few of the Flower class I remember there being a painting of HMS Dianthus (sunk by a U boat if memory serves ) and photographs of Pink and a few more in one of the management offices ,always wondered where all the models went when the yard closed .
    2 years ago by marky
    Directory
    (Naval Ship) HMS Ceres
    Scratch built using Admiralty drawings from Greenwich and miscellaneous photos. Hull carved from basswood as are boats. Rigging and aerials steel guitar strings. Flage halyards thread. Sails very well and remarkably stable for such a narrow ship due to bilge keels. Hours logged on contruction 885, which includes research on line. (8/10)
    2 years ago by Gdaynorm
    Forum
    new brighton model boat lake
    Most of my models are the old Aerokits models, or modern versions of, so none fall into those categories. I sail what I like to think of as "normal boat models". Most are capable of more than 4mph, but do get a move on when asked to ๐Ÿ˜‰ And finally, yes, as a member of Worcester Model Boat Club, i do have PLI, and would wear my club lanyard so to prove. Thanks for your replies Dave M. Best wishes, Dave W ๐Ÿ˜Š
    2 years ago by rolfman2000
    Forum
    What Gun?
    Hi Cormorant, 'Italian job' 76mm would mean Oto Melara. And this is like no OM gun I ever saw on board in 30 years working with navies and shipyards around the world. Looks more east block to me. Probably Russian or Chinese. What is the origin of the photo? Looks like it could be on a DDR (East German) Patrol Boat probably of Russian design, maybe built by Peenewerft yard in Wolgast. Cheers Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Secure the hatches and raise the flags !
    Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace ๐Ÿ˜ฑ! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a โ€˜hook toolโ€™ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on itโ€™s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass โ€˜hook toolโ€™ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now thereโ€™s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find itโ€™s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. Thatโ€™s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for itโ€™s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process ๐Ÿ˜ And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice ๐Ÿ‘ ๐Ÿ˜
    2 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Dont throw your tins out.
    I have been into model boating since I was 9 (1959) ans still enjoy it. I moved up to Heywood in 1991 and lived there for 2 years and as I had nowhere to do things there and take model boats to use them, I left them down in my Greenwich flat. used to see people fishing in Queens Park so I thought I cannot use a model boat on there. So I went there fishing instead and also went out to Pilsbury and fished there. I was living in a house in Wild Street Heywood with my Ex wife. (yes EX). We were just getting back together. I only wish I had known there was a model boat club that I could have gone to. I had seen there was a pond/lake in the grounds of Mutual Mill as this was just at the end of Wild Street. I once asked a man at the gates of Mutual is I was allowed to fish in there and he said no it's private. I have since seen in the angling papers where they have had fishing days there. And also since joining this site I have seen it is also used for model boating. OH what a bummer, that was 2 years of using my model boats wasted ๐Ÿ˜ญ. We eventually moved down to Greenwich and she now rents the Heywood house out. And I go using my model boats down here now and also use them in the boatyard in Potter Heigham when we go up to Norfolk to my river boat up there.๐Ÿ˜Š
    2 years ago by BOATSHED
    Blog
    As of Summer 2017...
    After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. it requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. if I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. if only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.
    2 years ago by Jerry Todd
    Forum
    fire boat
    my granddaughter has decided if her brother can build a boat and get glue in his hair and paint everywhere else then so can she (a little bit of big eyes and petted lip)so E-mailed my tame CAD lazer wizard to get another one cut he's going to cut one in ply and the other 2 in 3mm mdf for the kids ,the back bedroom's going to look like a shipyard with 3 on the slips
    2 years ago by marky
    Media
    JOLIE BRISE gaff-rigged cutter
    This fantastic model was scratch built by John of the Solent Radio Controlled Model Boat Club. Here it is seen sailing in light winds on Setley Pond in the New Forest, UK. She took about a year to construct and is now into the third year of sailing. The boat is based on the period 1929/34 when "Bobby" Somerset owned her, he won the Fastnet race twice and finished second once, infact she is the only boat to win the Fastnet three times. She is based on the river Hamble and is owned by Dauntseys school in Wiltshire and is regularly raced by the pupils there. The model is approximately 1:15 scale. In 2013 the full size Jolie Brise celebrated the centenary anniversary of her construction by the Paumelle yard in Le Havre in 1913. The world famous, gaff-rigged pilot cutter was the last boat to carry the royal mail under sail and has won the Fastnet Race three times, including the inaugural race in 1925. in 2015 and 2016 she was the overall winner of the Tall Ships Races. Jolie Brise is owned, maintained and sailed by the pupils of Dauntsey's School. For more information about Jolie Brise go to, www.joliebrise.com (apologies...just seen this vid was already posted by Dave M๐Ÿ˜)
    2 years ago by Dom of Essential RC
    Forum
    RAF rttl D2763
    A brief history After the second world war and as part of the occupational forces the Second tactical air force the RAF took over Sylt airport in 1945 and later in 1946 the RAF decided to use the airport and the airspace west of Sylt and Amrum as a firing range, and was known as RAF Sylt Armament Practice Station. From February 1948 to February 1949 the airfield was closed and prepared for the operation of jet aircraft. For target practice a target towing Squadron was stationed continuously on the station. The aircraft used were Miles M. 25 Martinet, hawker Tempest TT, DE Havilland mosquito TT. 35, Gloster Meteor F. 8, Meteor T 7. For instruction and training flights the flight also had some DE Havilland vampire T. 9s, hawker Hunter F. 4s, Hunter T. 7s. The aircraft of the target towing squadron were housed in the hangar of 402 near the South West of the Station. Therefore, the unofficial designation of weapon training squadron 402 was used at the time. For patrolling and securing the range area, as well as for rescue and training operations Marine Craft Section boats were stationed at List and Hรถrnum, Bristol Sycamore HR 14 rescue helicopters were Also station at RAF Sylt. Air traffic control boats and HSLs were stationed in the port of List at the beginning of the fifties (see pictures) D Boats In 1954, the decision was taken to replace the air traffic control boats and the HSLs with RttLs mk2s Rescue Target Towing Launch. As part of the rebuilding program to help the German economy the boats were designed and built by Krogerwerft Yard at Rendsburg. (Later taken over by Lursson ship builders) and were numbered D2762- D2766 these boats came in service mid 1955 which explains why my Father severed on both HSL and D-boats (preferring the D-boat) D2762 and D2765 Based Hรถrnum, D2763 and D2764 from List, with D2766 as a reserve boat in the event of maintenance or breakdown, Their design was very different to any other boats in the Marine Craft Section/unit more like the German Schenllboot or S Boot (allied code name 'E' Boat which my father always used), with flared bows and rounded bilges and powered by high speed diesels. The D boats were fitted with winches for Target Towing, these were removed as the boats duties were change to Range Safety and ASR These boats only served with the RAF, until 1961. Two were sold to the south African Air force D2762 and D2764 in1961, and the other three handed over to the Federal German Navy in 1961. All were subsequently used as ASR craft. D- Boats in German service The German Navy, the โ€œBundesmarine commissioned them on 1.9.1961 as FL 9 to FL11 and were used by Marinefliegergeschwader 5"naval aviation Squadron 5โ€ Until end of September 1975. the three were termed as air traffic control The fate of these three boats is a bit uncertain, one of these boats was in the process of being sold as NVG S1 as a North Sea supply boat, this deal fell through and the boat was sold to private owner in italy (no further record for this boat found) the other two boats are said to been scraped or de-commissioned , however these boats are quit properly the two that ended up in the service of the Spanish customs service as cutters, after they were confiscated when smuggling, I have tried to contact the Spanish about these boats but have not heard from them and presume they were scraped or sold in to private hands ( there is the suggestion that they were driven on rocks and sunk, no evidence found) D-boats of the South African air force/navy The two boats that were obtained by the south African air force in 1961 were originally known as R30 and R31 and they served under SAAF until 1969 when the unit was taken over by the south African navy and R30 became P1552 and R31 became P1551 these were changed again when holiday makers referred to the boats as PISS1 and PISS1 too R30 to P30 and R31 to P31. Both these boats were diffidently sunk R30 Lost off Saldanah Bay on 7 October 1988 after striking a reef off Danger Point. R31, near Cape Point, after she grounded through contaminated fuel issues There are somethings about these boats that strike me as odd, The originations that took over these boats, they donโ€™t like to mention the fact that these were ex-RAF or British boats, There is no record of the Spanish boats, it is said that they were sunk but no details are available except what is said on one form. I think I have done as much looking for information as I can, most of the bare facts are stated so thanks to all those web sites and forms that I have used and the pictures I have used I would like to thank to Dave M for the drawing And thanks to the marine craft branch museum for their help and for putting me in touch with Mr Rick Mortby who built the museums model of the D boat And a big thank you to Rick Mortby for the scale drawing and for his trust. And to Dr Christian Ostersehlte historian for Lurssen shipbuilders for the pictures of my Fathers boat D2763 and now I can start the building of the model D boat
    2 years ago by teejay
    Media
    Miss Geico 29''
    This is the 29" Brushless Miss Geico. Running on two 14.8 volt 5000mAh LiPo batteries. in Herbert Woods Boatyard in Potter Heigham Norfolk. She is pretty quick but do not know her top speed. Turns flat out on full rudder lock. Runs for about 15 to 20 minutes. Would recommend as a great fun boat.
    2 years ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    Finishing
    I didn't realise that! Of course, if you live near Kings Langley you could pop in to see Mark Johnson and he'll actually MAKE the paint for you like he did for our historic wooden canal boat, Heather Bell. But I don't know if he's still trading from there. His company was Tramar Coatings. He advertised in Waterways World. I still have a tin of what he labelled Heather Bell Burgundy. it's on that wee Sea Urchin above. Lots of extra alkyd resins and finer pigments. He's a diamond. He used to call us on a Friday evening when his wife did arty things he had no time for and say, "Put kettle on". Half an hour later he'd turn up at the boatyard with fish and chips for three. We didn't have transport. Happy days. Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    info on old yachts
    Yes, I got that one short mention in "in the boat shed" on my search. I provided those pictures to him and most of the history, as I did to Alex Laird when he was trying to sell her through his boat brokerage in Classic Boat magazine in the 90s. She was towed by a fishing boat from Burnham round to Canvey where an ex Police mechanic and his girlfriend were living on her, then the next I know she's out at Dauntless's yard on Canvey, then gets transported by road to Bristol. By now she was in the ownership of a John Ord, an antique print and book seller. She has remained there ever since. I visited her when she was in a creek at Canvey and spookily, as I looked into the water, a piece of her interior floated past me! The Police mechanic guy said they'd stripped her interior for safe keeps and it was in his mother's garage in Leigh-on-Sea. Well this piece wasn't, was it? I tried to get it with a stick but couldn't. I'd have kept it if I could have got it! That was the last I saw of her. I imagine by now she'll have been destroyed. Mark Rolt, who was in charge of her where she lay in Bristol, is a nephew of the great Tom Rolt, who started the inland Waterways Association, the Talyllyn Railway Preservation Society and the Vintage Sports Car Club. All major interests of mine over the years. He will be revolving in his grave like one of his beloved Alvis engines. Doug, she was one of a class called C-Class and fitted the then rules for only a few years. She was built in Dan Hatcher's yard in 1885/6. The chap I bought her from, Steve Bowen, gave me the picture of her afloat and rigged. I stayed friends with Steve for years. He then got picked up by a rich lady and went touring around the chateaux of Europe, most of which seemed to be owned by her friends. Nobody could have deserved such a fate more than Steve, one of nature's true gentlemen. it is thanks to raggy arsed enthusiasts like Steve and me that these old boats were preserved as long as they have been for rich gits to take advantage as they now do. Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    glass cloth or tissue?
    Yep, it can generate a lot of heat if you overdo it ;-/ Copper foil below the waterline will look great ๐Ÿ‘ Your boat had more luck than a GF mine-hunter I once worked on. That put a copper plate on the keel to act as a counter balance for the comms antennas, which we fitted. Before it came to sea trials we noticed the comms performance on the HF antennas had deteriorated. The yard sent divers down and found that the copper plate looked like Chantilly Lace after only a few months ๐Ÿค” Maybe I'll start a Blog about my destroyer - "HMS Hotspur - A Never Ending Story" - it started 50 years ago and the ship has undergone many Life Extension Programmes since. Here a couple of pics (Box Brownie 127!) of the maiden voyage , ca 1965-66, in Radnor Park, Folkestone, Kent. Free-running on 2 cheap Mabuchis and a 4.5V cycle lamp battery! Those were the days, oder vielleicht nicht ๐Ÿ˜‰
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glass cloth or tissue?
    Thanks, Doug. No, the woodwork really isn't good enough for varnishing and as it's a scale model it has to be painted. Good old British yacht black, with a coppered bottom. I still have a piece of her copper somewhere. it was perfect after 120 odd years! I'll go with the tissue then, thanks for the info. Apparently you can thin epoxy with meths, but I've never found it that thick and I used 25 litres on my full sized canal boat restoration! Supplied free by West as a kind of sponsorship. Hot weather helps, but, as you say it can go off a bit quick if you're not careful with the mix. A guy at the boatyard once mixed way too much to repair his GRP boat and it started to go off in the pot, which then caught fire. A large set of tongs was handy in dunking it in a barrel of water! Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Richards 48'' Swordsman
    Go to the fairey owners club site, some great info and pictures. Also look up historic racing boats. You'll be pleasantly surprised by what's out there. Some
    boat yard
    s have some nice examples for sale and the pictures are good for reference.
    3 years ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Richards 48'' Swordsman
    I have both huntsman and swordsman, and visually there is no difference. I have been to many
    boat yard
    s over the last 50 years and seen both of the real boats, and both can have open tear cockpit or rear cabin. The differences lay within. Nice model and I concur with replacing the delaminated section. I use fine glass cloth coated with water based resin to cover my hulls.(eezicoat) No smells so handy when working in the house and dry in about 25 mins.
    3 years ago by Colin H
    Response
    Voyager
    No, it came as is. The details are on this site if you look in my
    boat yard
    ๐Ÿ˜€
    3 years ago by robtroi
    Forum
    Is westbournemodel@ co serious?
    Westbourne has been criticized for poor service and Cornwall Model Boats praised for good. Would suggest readers also add Model Dockyard to their lists of reputable suppliers. I am a relatively new customer, being recommended to them by a friend. All my earlier transactions were fine; but with my latest, the goods were unreasonably delayed in the great intestine of the postal service. After about 5 weeks of waiting Model Dockyard replaced and reshipped the order at their expense, totally without quibble. Over two mail deliveries I have received my original order and now it's replacement. That is the type of service that deserves recognition, would recommend this company to anybody.
    3 years ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Is westbournemodel@ co serious?
    Lest anyone run away with the idea that Cornwall Model Boats is the only good supplier (and I agree they are good), there is a list here of many suppliers: http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/links/traders.htm It is not complete, it does not include Model Dockyard for example, but the few I have dealt with have all been good.
    3 years ago by Trillium
    Forum
    2.4gig Radio and brushed motors???
    Hello Jarvo & Haverlock. I had been googling before I read latest due to a problem I had yesterday. You're correct about ariel length, I wasn't thinking... (Car Ariel's had to be 39"), but that's off topic. One of my boats shot off on its own, hit the concrete and flipped. The reciver is directly above the motor and alongside the speed controller. Never had this issue with an Electronize . But now have a solid state type. Last week had similar issue with same boat, but only went a few yards. Should have been a warning. Time for a refit.
    4 years ago by Derek
    Forum
    Car heater fan motors
    Used to be very popular with the Tug boat fraternity as they were quite torky and were capable of turning a large propeller. I have one in my Lady Jan Tug. Most were multI poled so they ran very smoothly and worked well on 12v. If you have the room and the facility to make a suitable coupling, many were 1/4" shaft, then it should work well. Not as easy to find as EU regulations have stopped the easy access we used to have to scrap yards. Mobile Marine used to stock them but they are heavy so will attract high postage charges unless you can attend a show that might have some. Dave
    4 years ago by Dave M
    Directory
    (Racing Boat) Xblaze custom
    When I first brought the boat I knew nothing about them I put it in the water in my backyard I live on a river and thats when the problems started water coming in the hull and a few cracks in fibreglass from fliping and crashing the boat and within a week I lost the whole strut,flex shaft,prop, I didnt use lock tight or lock nuts I got replacement parts did some research and made the boat flawless with no problems I reinforced the hull in certain spots where it was needing more fibreglass I then sealed the inside with paint and clear coat then painted the outside upgraded the prop to a metal 37mm 3 blade and upgraded the watercooling I made a new fibreglass hatch as I lost that when I flipped the boat again lol its a good boat if ur willing to put in the time to do what is required I gps speed tested it and got a top speed of 61km/h on 4s lipos the worst thing about the boat is the hull its not reinforced or thick enough so recommend fibreglassing the inside for strength it does have a tendancy to flip at top speeds aswell (Motor: Joysway) (ESC: Joysway) (5/10)
    4 years ago by Rickynoose
    Response
    ytgn 12
    THIS IS A VERY FINE BOAT, AND JUST LOOK AT THAT DECK I HAVE SEEN FEW AS GOOD AS THAT I HAVE JUST GIVEN A MONSTER BRISTOL PILOT BOAT SOME 48 INS LONG AND WEIGHING IN AT OVER 14 POUNDS TO MY MATE DAVID CHATTERS AT DAVIDS DOCKYARD WHO HAS AROUND FOURTEEN BOATS IN HiS YARD WELL WORTH A LOOK
    5 years ago by professor123
    Forum
    milford star
    Isn't the whole matter of a distressed and rusted boat/ship a personal choice? I've seen some well built models spoilt by folk who can't apply the rust to look realistic and they end up with something looking like it's on the way to the scrap yard but I've seen some models with just the right amount of rust which l think look superb. I don't have an air brush so all my models end up looking just made, yachts are high gloss, tugs have some gloss parts, and cutters matt. I'm the only crew so I have to keep things shipshape.
    5 years ago by chippy
    Blog
    125ft 1st Class Torpedo Boat, 1885
    Off we go again on another build, this time a Victorian 125ft First Class Steam Torpedo Boat. HMTB 75 was built by Yarrows on the Thames in 1885. these vessels carried 4 single tubes designed to handle the new Whitehead Locomotive Torpedo, designed by Robert Whitehead in 1866. They were 125ft in length and 13 ft in the beam and only 8 ft draught, these little vessels could maintain a speed of 19 knots for up to two hours, steam being provided by a locomotive type boiler with refinements by Yarrows. total heating area was 1200 sqft with a grate area of 30 sqft, producing steam at 123psi. Engine was of the compound type, and produced top speed at 376 revolutions. they originally carried 5 torpedo guns, one in the bow and two either side, but the bow tube was eventually removed, They also carried a Hotchkiss 6pdr quick firing deck gun and 2 Nordenfeldt double barrelled machine guns, also removed. The lack of the distinctive 'turtle' fo'castle made these boats both wet and uncomfortable, their crews of 16 (mostly stokers) certainly earned their 'hard lying' money. The model is based on a glassfibre hull, plan and some fittings from Chylds Hall Model Shipyard, 870mm long and 85mm beam, electric powered on six volts. So, lets make a start. First job is to sort out the shaft, this requires a 150mm tube and a 220mm shaft, so an 8 inch x 4 mm shaft was altered to suit. Cut the tube to length, minus the thickness of the bush, knock out the bush from the off cut and refit into the tube. Cut the shaft to 220mm and replace in tube. Also needed is an A frame, this was made from a 1/2 inch length of brass rod, drilled and reamed 4mm for the shaft and reduced slightly in diameter make the bearing part. two 'legs' were then silver soldered into slots cut in the bearing. The hull is now drilled to take the stern tube, which is lined up and tacked in place with superglue. The A frame legs need cutting to size and fitting into slots in the hull. That is the progress so far for day 1, more to follow. Today I fitted deck supports and cut deck from 1.5mm plastic.
    5 years ago by Nickthesteam


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