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    Blog
    Auxiliary motor, rudder servo,
    bowsprit
    bitts
    Back to posting again....I decided to added an auxiliary motor since I had several laying around and it will come in handy when I am tweaking the sailing setup in case I get stuck in the middle of the pond. Made a stuffing tube just like I did on my rescue tug build. Made a shaft from some 3/16" steel rod, threaded it and polished it up, works great. Photo of the aft section shows continued hull framing and upside down mount of the rudder servo. I will enclose the servo with the small pilot house as is typical on the barge. This will make maintenance and adjustment access easy. Yes, the build is wandering away from the true "Pearl" which I used the hull plans from. it will maintain the same sail plan, but I will modify some items for ease of RC use.
    bowsprit
    will be retractable, bitts are shown in progress. The
    bowsprit
    will be made from a carbon fiber "arrow shaft". Mast will be wood and I am shaping out of maple that I have. Staring to plank the hull as well. More to come shortly, Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Determine Scale / Ribs / HELP with building board ideas?
    To clarify this build, it will be a RC Sailing Boat with full functioning rudder and sails. I say this as I am using the PEARL for its design overall, but as to detailed historical details it will have some, but be simplified. Boat's Dimnsions were shown in Imperial, 21' width x 85'-6" length. The
    bowsprit
    adds about another 25% in length. To determine what scale I wanted to build in I thought most about storage, weight to lift and how to transport to the pond. I like to keep things simple, I prefer to rig it and transport while assembled, with the topsail mast dropping and the
    bowsprit
    retracted. Have done this before and it has worked well for me. Looking at potential scales and finished sizes. * 3/4" or 1/18 scale would be 16" x 64" * 1/2" or 1/24 scale equals 10.5" x 42.75" * 3/8" equals 8" x 32" I prefer a larger bout in length as it is easier to get to sail correctly, at least in my experience. Anything under 32" get tricky. I like the 64" size, but with
    bowsprit
    will be about 88" LOA. This will be a little too large for my vehicle. I decided to go with 1/2" scale as it will still be a good length hull. Ribs - I took the hull line drawings from the book, which were very small, just about an inch wide. I scanned the image and using the app "paint" on my laptop. I cropped it close around the hull rib drawing, I then enlarged it to 1/2" scale. Then I printed on standard letter sized paper, then mirrored the image cut them in two, pasted up as seen in the photos to show the completed rib sections. Next I will put together a building board / hull jig. I want to build bottom up for planking. DO any of you have any good ideas for the best one to build? I have never done this except for tiny boats. Ideas, Help would be appreciated. Joe
    10 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc....
    I just got a lovely old Star SY 3 yacht and needed to clean some filthy sails. My wife suggested Vanish and blow me down with a genoa, it's working. A generally mid to dark grey (I believe oil based) grubbiness has all but disappeared and I should be able to re-rig them with some new off white 1.3mm string from Caldercraft fittings at Cornwall Model Boats. I can make new styrene bowsies and any metal hooks and loops. I've scraped the mast and
    bowsprit
    fittings of rust until they look shiny again, repaired a broken mast and repainted the green edging which had been a bit knocked about. I love doing these restorations more than making new stuff! Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Directory
    (Other) Christian Radich
    My model of the Christian Radich a Norwegian full-rigged ship. I don’t recall the manufacturer’s details of this model kit but I believe it was of Spanish origin. Construction of the model is a double plank hull and deck with most of the small fittings being supplied in the kit of parts, the build time was 680 hours. The vessel was built in Sandefjord, Norway and was delivered on 17 June 1937. The owner was The Christian Radich Sail Training Foundation established by a grant from an officer of that name. The vessel is a full-rigged three masted steel hull, 62.5 m long, with an overall length of 73 m including the
    bowsprit
    and a maximum width of 9.7 m. She has a draught of about 4.7 meters and a displacement at full load of 1050 tons. Under engine power she reaches a top speed of 10 knots, while she can make up to 14 knots under sail. in 1939, the ship sailed across the Atlantic to visit the World Trade Fair in New York. The ship and the voyage created huge press coverage and made Christian Radich famous. When the ship came back home in September 1939, she was taken over by the Norwegian Navy. After the German invasion, the Nazi’s used the ship as an accommodation ship. At the end of the war, Christian Radich was towed to Flensburg in Germany where it was later bombed and sunk. At the end of the war, Christian Radich was hoisted up and towed to Kiel with a minesweeper as a protection ship. She was later towed to Norway and fully restored in 1947. There is a rich source of information about this beautiful ship on the internet if anyone is interested to learn more about her. (5/10)
    1 year ago by pjarrett
    Response
    Vanity, Victorian Cutter
    Thanks, I used to make top end model furniture for the Home Miniaturists. it's my way of finding a connection with my cabinet maker Granddad, who was a big model boat fan too, in fact he was a founder member of the Victoria Model Steamboat Club. She is 48x9x11 plus
    bowsprit
    . Height of rig is about 4 feet also. And yes the fitting on the keel is a piece of ally box section cut in half so it becomes U section, drilled through at equal spacing for the fin keel. Then the U section is screwed with brass screws and Marineflex sealer/adhesive to the keel, which is all solid hardwood. I did my sums and gave up, so once she was waterproof I put her in my son's fish pond and kept piling stuff in until she floated on her marks. Rigging won't be that heavy, but I made an allowance for it. Once it was floating right it turned out to need 14 1/2lbs. of ballast. BUT, that's inside. On the end of a 15" inch(ish) fin it will be less. I have 2 half bulbs cast by my other son in his back garden from my patterns. They will be bolted to the fin and faired in. Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Any clues?
    I am inclined to thinking it might be a barge. it is broad in girth (like me) and fairly short bow to stern but has a hole for a
    bowsprit
    . The guy it came from has gone the way of all good sailors (off to Thailand to find a wife 😁) but his other boats are a Joffre Tug and a Smit Nederland tug (plus Pourquoi Pas from Billings) - all to appear, apparently, on Fleabay. The hull I have is a fibreglass moulding so presumably comes from a commercial source but I doubt it is a "kit" like the others. Workmanship on the capping rail and deck is a bit ropey so it will need a lot of tlc. if I can find a suitable plan to give me some thoughts it will become the next on the stocks once my Battle Class destroyer is finished.
    2 years ago by aanside
    Response
    Thames sailing barge Capricorn
    I made new little blocks for brails and I added the missing brails for main and mizzen masts.In this photos, the
    bowsprit
    is not properly fastened, only put down due to photographing. Last photo - model ready for transport...
    2 years ago by tomarack
    Blog
    The Big Heavy Model Boat Launching Blues
    Fully set up, I'm guessing Constellation weights between 100 and 110 pounds (I haven't had the opportunity the get an accurate measurement yet). Taking her to events with pools requires lifting her into the pool. I haven't figured out a way to do that easily, or safely, or more importantly, alone. I built her to sail in open water, so the 2 or three times I have to ask for help at a pool isn't a big deal. I'm sure that most of the time I'll be launching her at a ramp or shoreline, and that I'll need to move her from the parking area to the shoreline, however far that may be. There's times I may be faced with a bulkhead, but like the pool, there's no easy fix for that with a model this size. My first plan was a hand-truck set-up like the picture of my friend Ray from RCGroups, and his SC&H model of Surprise, a very similarly sized model to mine. The hand-truck is plastic and the cradle is wood, and you can see it's pretty bulky to hold a 100 pound model. Ray said his issue with it was it floated. When launching he had to push it down to get the model clear, and when retrieving he had to hold on to it or it would fall over, while trying get hold of a big model with spars sticking out everywhere. if the water was choppy or boaters were making wakes, it was that much more difficult. He also didn't like that he had to go into knee-deep water, at least. Dan, also from RCGroups, and the fellow that developed the sliding-brace-winch, has an SC&H brig he's modeled as the US brig Syren. it also came with the same hand-truck Ray's Surprise did. Dan wasn't all that enamored with it either. He pointed out how when you lean it back to move the model, it put you in among the rigging risking damage or even injury. Dan altered his hand-truck into a cart and has not looked back. In my mind, it's a boat. I have a 16 foot sailboat, and to move it, and launch it, I use a boat-trailer, so it would make sense to make a boat-trailer for the model. I scribbled an idea on paper, but then turned to some old 3D modeling software so I could see it better. My model has a 4 foot long ballast tube bolted to the keel. So I figured a U shaped channel to cradle that tube and support the model would be the basis of the cart. While Dan's cart has worked great for him, I didn't care for his 3-wheeled arrangement. Like an actual boat trailer, I opted for a single axle right under the model. I figured this would be more easily maneuvered and handle terrain a little better. I figured on making the cart from angle steel I dould bolt together. I over-designed the thing a bit, drawing a framework that would cradle the model that the more I looked at, the less I thought I needed. Going back to my real boat trailer, it just had center support and a pair of carpet cover skids (bunkers) to hold the boat up-right. Simple is always the best approach - and I had just the right material to build this cart from - a steel bed-frame. This L-angled steel had the strength to easily carry the model while using a minimum of material, and it certainly wasn't going to float! Two girders would form a U shaped channel to cradle the ballast tube. I figured a rod axle would need support or it could bend with a 100 pound model bouncing on it, a third angle would be set across for the axle. A couple of upright posts with padding would hold the model upright. Nearly all the weight of the model rests in the channel, so there's not a lot of strain on the uprights. I didn't have a cutting wheel so tried cutting the bed frame with a reciprocating saw. Bed frame steel is hard, it ate both blades, and two more I bought before finally getting the three main pieces cut, though I had no trouble drilling it. I used the u-bolt portion of a set of wire-clamps to hold the axle. A bit of flat steel to brace the axle so it wouldn't try to twist. it's all held together with nuts and bolts. I wanted short pieces of steel for and aft to hold the loose ends of the channel, but I wasn't gonna try to cut that stuff again, so I just used some scrap 2x4. To hold the handle I tried mounting a wood block with a hole forward, but then I remembered I had a flag-pole mount from when I replaced a rotten post on the porch. it took some searching, but I found it and screwed it on. The wheels are shopping cart wheels bought new from Ace Hardware online for about $5 each. I looked into inflatable wheels to give a softer ride, but they were too expensive for me. I watch the local thrift shops though, and if something shows up with nice wheels, I'll grab it. A fender washer goes on the axle first, so the wheel doesn't rub against the axle support; then the wheel, another washer, and a hitch-pin holds it all on. I can pull the hitch pins and remove the wheels making it easier to stow the cart. The uprights are simple 3/4" pine with some pipe insulation for padding (as opposed to tennis balls in the 3D model). They're bolted to the axle support, but I want to alter that a little so they can be folded in to make the cart flatter for transport. The handle is an old wood closet pole I've had for a long time. A bit too old it would turn out, but that's a later story. I painted it white for visibility as it also serves as a guard to protect the model's
    bowsprit
    from cell-phone wielding idiots that seem to be the most common form of life on this planet now. I painted the cart blue, because it wasn't black, white, or red; the other colors I had. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready in time to the museum event, and didn't go, but I wanted to sail the model before it got cold, and see if this thing worked.
    2 years ago by Jerry Todd
    Blog
    Sailing for the First Time
    In April 2011 I set a deadline to sail the model for the first time on July 10th. I had places to go and other things to get done, so I figured that was far enough ahead to have her ready in time. There were a lot of things that needed to get done if the model was going to sail; * Shape the still rough cut yards; fore course, fore tops'l, crossjack, and mizzen tops'l yards. * Complete the yard trusses with mast bands and banding to attach them to the yards * A gammon "iron" for the
    bowsprit
    . * Rudder control & steering. * New winch drum for braces (the originals with wood drums warped badly). * Sails for planned sailing suit; 3 tops'ls, spanker, and jib. She was basically jury-rigged, with all three course yards linked together to a single winch. July 9th's forcaste was for perfect weather, light northerly wind, blowing up the creek so if there was a problem, the model would drift back to me. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready by the 9th and the 10th was light, variable, fluky, 90Β°, and humid. The top mast fids were pulled and the topmasts lowered. The model with some tools, her ballast, and what I thought I might need were all placed in the truck the night before. The radio and main batter were put on charge. Next day we drove the couple of block down the street to the Sloop Cove public dock on Stoney Creek. The rig was raised, ballast attached, electronics connected and tested, and she went into the water. With her ballast and extra lead I had she still sat 2" high in the water. I set her out, but the iffy light wind sent he back, then she threatened to get tangled with a powerboat on a lift until I managed to squeek her out into open water. She sailed a bit, but just when she'd get moving the wind would shift or reflect off something and catch her aback. Then suddenly she stopped responding at all. Something of a gust caught her and she headed for a dock. I headed over, which meant swimming, and not being a great swimmer realized I should have brought my flotation vest from my sailboat along. it being so hot, the swim wasn't exactly unwelcome, but it was a lot of work. The model sailed right into the end of a dock about 100 feet away, bounced on her forestay, and basically parked there. I got her back to shore looking like a drowned cat myself, but there was no damage at all to the model. As it turned out, the main battery failed.
    2 years ago by Jerry Todd
    Forum
    ''Vanity'' leaves the building board
    This one is (for you furriners) 80mm long by 50 wide. This is the tiddler between the roundhouse/tiller area and the companion aft. Then there's a bigger one forward of the companion and then a forward companion forward of the mast. Mast bitts, Samson posts for the
    bowsprit
    and prism bricks in the deck. Fortunately Vanity's deck was laid a la workboat, all planks parallel unlike most yachts. I shall pay for that simplicity when I deck Bloodhound. That has swept decks with mitred toeboards round every item of deck furniture, joggled into a King plank fore and aft and the main companion is shell topped, requiring steamed, tapered planks all the way across, but I tend to like the fiddly bits. The finish on that is cellulose sanding sealer. When the other light is done I'll varnish it all very thinly. Cheers, Martin
    3 years ago by Westquay
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Bertha
    Scratch built from Marine Modeller plans. One sail drum servo for the main and self tacking jib. A sail arm servo for the staysail and foresail. An extra servo to allow tension on the upper trisail. The
    bowsprit
    is an additional 10" on the overall length of the model. For RC sailing I have a 2.5kg detachable keel and rudder extesion ( shown in the photograph). All the deck winches are built from old clock parts. The lee boards are also functional and work in conjunction with the forward head sails and the sailarm servo. For transportation the top mast can be lowered and the
    bowsprit
    raised. (8/10)
    3 years ago by solo1274
    Media
    KATE. pilot boat
    pilot boat, made from kauri strip planks and then glassed.
    bowsprit
    slides in for transport and mast comes out. Small motor to get you home if no wind.
    3 years ago by chrys
    Forum
    Thames Sailing Barge
    Good Morning Gents, .......and now for something completely different........ I enclose a picture of my model Thames Sailing Barge. Model Barges are very popular at clubs in the Essex and Kent area, because of the many historic barges in Maldon and the surrounding rivers. The members of Maldon Blackwater Model Boat Club have built several barges, but there are many other barge owning clubs in the Essex and Kent area who meet to run interclub Barge Matches. Most Model barges are built 40"-45" in length either 'stem head' or '
    bowsprit
    ' and usually they are fitted with a fin keel and a deep rudder, to give improved sailing abilities. Many are highly detailed models of specific barges; however the yellow barge is a 'generic' model with a 'Sirdar' hull built from balsa reinforced with grp. The model in build is based on a 'Veronica' grp hull and will be a
    bowsprit
    barge. These are the names of 'racing' barges, sadly broken up many years ago. I hope you find our particular passion interesting. Best Regards Frank Burgess
    3 years ago by frankburgess
    Blog
    A bit more work.
    I've been waiting for the rudder servo tray from Speedline for a couple of weeks ( perhaps they're on holiday ), which was missing from the kit so am doing odd bits whilst waiting. This time the
    bowsprit
    and it's mounting and I've made a start to planking the deck. Chris
    4 years ago by chrislang
    Media
    HILDA
    Another damaged fiberglass hull rescued. every thing else made by me. At 3/4"=1' a very big model. Completed 2012 but only sailed twice, a very good sailor just needs a big lake. The mast lifts & folds forward after removing the hatch. The top mast lowered, the
    bowsprit
    retracted and the sails raped around the shrouds, held in place with masking tape. ( this stops the lines from tangling.) Takes about 5 minutes to reassemble.
    6 years ago by hammer
    Response
    Cariad Sailing after refit
    Paignton, in Yongs Park only in the winter as there is a concession for motor boats in the summer. The Exeter club's new pond is almost surrounded by trees over hanging the water, no good at all for boats with no motor. This summer I am going to try the river Teign (salt water tidal). I will have to loan a friends 16ft boat incase things go wrong and the model goes out to sea. Thinking about things, your motor although low down will give your boat a higher C of G to mine. My ballast is chips of sheet lead mixed with cement, spread along the bottom. I must confess I sold Spray on Ebay Β£250. Was the only fiberglass hull I had. Needed the room. I still have a Sailing trawler,4ft pilot cutter cutter 4ft, Topsail schooner 3ft, all plus
    bowsprit
    , & 2 paddle steamers 5ft & 6ft both steam. Only the schooner has a drop keel. πŸ”¨
    6 years ago by hammer
    Media
    Stardust
    HI fellow model leers.this is my latest model.Built in 1926' for the Ffyfe(bananas) family. Originally it was run on steam,but in 1939 converted to diesel,this was kept until 1957 when all the staterooms were replaced by cargo holds . She was then made into a feeder bringing eleven thousand boxes from Rotterdam to Southampton. She was scrapped in the seventies.my model of her was from 1926 the scale is approx 1/30th her length is 48 inches including
    bowsprit
    , and has a beam of 10 inch amidships. She is totally scratch built, plank on frame, all the decks are individually planked with black card in between , wheel house and all other parts are mahogany. She runs on a decaperm geared motor @ 6 volts, and the lighting system consists of 10 accommodation lights, port and starboard , wheelhouse, and both mast headlights,the large saloon skylight is also lit up with a set of disco lights on a separate circuit. The funnel houses a heavy duty smoke unit switched on by switching unit.
    6 years ago by Chiefpurser
    Directory
    (Yacht) Moonbeam
    This is a gaff rigged yacht kit by David Metcalf. 52" long including the
    bowsprit
    , overall height in stand 63" and carries 14 Lbs lead shot. This was a great build from an excellent kit. it sail very well even in the lightest winds. I've made a few changes to the original rigging which has made Improvements. Easily transported in the car. Will have to get a better photo. (9/10)
    7 years ago by chippy
    Response
    Motor and prop shaft
    HI David Sounds very similar to our lake. I can easily lower the Topsail and with the lead now amidships and sealed to the base of the hull I am confidant that I can sail safely. My
    bowsprit
    is also wedged so acts like yours. Also helps to load into car and storage. Actually need nearer 6Kg of lead in the end so my total weight is over 7Kg. Thanks for the additional feedback Dave
    7 years ago by Dave M
    Response
    Motor and prop shaft
    HI Dave I think I did not explain very clearly about wind at our lake it comes in of the sea but the lake sits down below an embankment and on one side there are apartment blocks so the wind does swirl around to the point you can be beating in one direction when the wind will do a 180degree change in direction. if the wind is gusting about I leave the topsail off this makes it a little more stable.My
    bowsprit
    e is held in position by a wooden tapered wedge so if I do run into anything the
    bowsprit
    e just slides back onto the deck then all I have to do is pull the
    bowsprit
    e forward and refit the wedge and away we go.Cant remember the weight of the ballast could weigh boat minus masts and rigging etc it will give us a ballpark figure when I get a chance will mail you. Good sailing David
    7 years ago by Lifeboatmember
    Response
    Motor and prop shaft
    HI David Yes I had 4.7kg of lead either side of the keel and I was very lucky to make it back to shore. I have plenty of scuppers so the deck drained ok. Problem was my poor sealing at the rear. That's now sorted and I have built a lead keel extension. Tried in the test pond and appears very stable. I have covered the lead with glass cloth and fibreglass and once hardened (bit too cold at present) I will make it nice and symmetrical and smooth. I wish our lake had such nice wind. Problem is we a we surrounded by trees which cause horrible gusts and turbulence. I agree about the damage you can cause. The worst problem is getting the
    bowsprit
    entangled. What is the weight of your ballast? πŸ˜€
    7 years ago by Dave M


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