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    Forum
    Soldering
    Thanks for the comments. Bought some brass and a propane torch, going to try that.
    1 month ago by retirement-hobby
    Blog
    funnel mounts and deck hatches
    Fitted the "legs" to the wheel house so now at correct height when on the deck. Funnel mounts done (just need to finish the funnels, workout what holes to drill and then mount the funnels to the mounts) so we added 2 hatches to each mount, painted white with brass hinges. the one placed between the Cowl vents is open, the one at the back is closed. as we only had "closed" hatches put a triangle shaped bit of plastic under the "open" hatch to prop open. When dry mounting the Cowl Vents found an issue with the rear vents as they are suppose to be higher than the wheelhouse and the ones i got where not, so found 2 wooden cotton reels the right height and turned then down to the correct width using the pillar drill as a lathe, painted them up and then placed the Cowl vents on those. also painted the "flat" vents chrome and stuck those to the mounts as well. to finish off these all we have to do is fit the breather pipes and ladder to funnels and fix the funnels to the mounts (allowing for the front funnel to have the hole for the smoke generator. Started work on the 2 deck hatches using 1mm plastic sheet. Made the 2 housings up and the planked and varnished them ready for the hatches. found out i had only enough hatches to do 1 housing, so drilled a 7mm hole in the hatch for a 10mm brass porthole, painted white with brass hinges. once dry stuck them on the housing ready to go. (ordered some more hatches to i can complete the other housing lol) one last thing was to start on the wheel box. Found in "The Works" in town a heart shaped box which was almost perfect for a mold for the thin wood that was steamed to shape and then held on the heart to fix the curve in place. next to do is to make up the front and back of the wheel boxes and stick the "curved" wood to that
    1 month ago by barryskeates
    Media
    perkassa
    renovated 49" very easy to plane with current set up 2075 kva brushless 120 a speedo 45 mm
    brass prop
    2 months ago by vortex
    Forum
    Shroud for Model Air Boat
    Copper will solder well (though it will take some heat!). But unless you use a very light and flimsy gauge it will be very heavy. Brass will solder well - don't know the size of prop you want - may be a bit expensive. You can bend thin sheet round a former to make any diameter shroud. Aluminium tube should do, if you can get an off-cut the size you want. Don't play around with aluminium soldering, which is a specialist job - but small pop rivets will work perfectly... We don't know the size you are interested in, so it's hard to advise on materials. But if your boats are static models, card or thin plastic sheet will be fine. A slice from a plastic squash bottle may fit the bill?
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    New to Forum
    well back in the day (when Noah was building the ark) and I was serving me time :-) we used to have a golden rule about ferrous and non-ferrous metals and solder - Ferrous metals and alloys contain iron and they tend to rust; non-ferrous materials do not. . such as brass, copper and so forth and these are the easy ones to solder with soft solder. Ferrous metails which contain iron as we have said - we need to use a harder solder such as brazing silver solder and then we are into the field of Welding. Basically the art of soldering is to find out the type of materials we intend to join together and then we can come up with the appropriate method. Stainless steel is a different world altogether and so is aluminium. Hell of a subject to get into πŸ€“
    2 months ago by JOHN
    Blog
    Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug
    Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2"
    brass prop
    . More to come..... Joe
    4 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    PROPELLERS
    Thinking of trying to make my own
    brass prop
    ellers. Has anybody any suggestions on the best construction techniques?
    10 months ago by RHBaker
    Media
    Thames cruise barge
    total scratch built on fibreglass hull 127cm x24 cm,11 months to build 6volt system brushed motor,3blade 35mm
    brass prop
    .
    3 months ago by markiee
    Blog
    Tin Work
    The tin can that I used is from a small tomato paste sauce from the market. Use whatever tin that you would like or can find. Look at my sketch to see how it needs to function and adjust your design to what enclosure is available to you. Lots of ways to do it, just make sure you have these points covered: 1. Method of attaching a fan to push air into the unit. 2. Place for output stack / tube. 3. Method of mounting a wick with heating element attached that can sit above the fluid level. See sketch in previous post. First photo, I cut three holes, each sized to fit the brass tubes and fan opening. This tin is thin and easy to poke holes in. I start by marking the opening locations with a marker, them I use a small sharp awl or pin to stare a hole. With hand tools ( power drill will easy shred the can, be careful) I enlarge the holes with small hand drills or reamer, found files, etc, I rotate the tools slowly in the opening and gradually enlarge it to size needed. Then I cut brass tubing to length with a small hand held hobby razor saw. Our in place, apply flux and solder. Once heated properly the solder flows easily.for the larger fan opening, I then used a dremel tool with sanding drum to make a nice round opening. The fan has corner openings for screw mount. Secure with some tiny sheet metal screws. Next I will build an enclosure around the fabpn edge to fit the round can. Might just use silicone caulk. Note, I did not open the can with a can opener, left the ends in place and poured the content out thru the holes made, Yes, it's a bit messy and wasted the sauce, but it's a cheap way to get an tin enclosure. More to come. Please give me feedback, am I being clear enough? Thanks, Cheers, Joe
    3 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Rubber stopper wick & element
    In the previous post in the video, note that a black rubber stopper is inserted into a brass tube soldered to the tin container. Starting with the element again, select proper length of heater wire by applying voltage to lengths as show previous. Crimped wire to one end. Next photo shows a rubber stopper, I use my drill press to drill to straight holes to allow the voltage supply wire to pass through it. Then I put together a wick with a brass rod (1/16") to provide support and to secure it to the stopper. Brass rod with wick is pushed thru the stopper, drill a pilot hole for the brass rod centered in the stopper. See photos, the supply wires will come thru the stopper at each side of the wick. Put one wire through the stopper, then I wrapped the heating element around the wick. This is tricky and took several attempts to get it done cleanly. The supply wire for the end is then fed back through the stopper. This is a weak part of the design as it must run back to the stopper without touching the heater element. it does work, but I will try to improve on this. This entire assembly fits into the tin can and is the correct length to just submerge the bottom portion of the wick and not the wires. I forgot to do a sketch showing a section through this, but will try tomorrow. Joe
    3 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build
    I have the hull. I have the fittings from battlecraft and excellent they are too. I also have 4
    brass prop
    s plus the A frames. All i need is the time a space to start this build. First i need a larger shed. Too much work and no play! makes Jack a dull boy😊
    3 months ago by andyhynes
    Blog
    Build
    The heating elements in the hairdryer had two different wire gauges as elements. I removed the lighter gauge thinking they would probably draw less current. I am attempting to use 6 volts as that is what my boat is. 1. First Photo: Took a length of element and stretched it out as shown, started with a longer piece about 8". if you are at 12v probably longer. Use some alligator clip jumpers and attached to one end, ran it to negative terminal of my 6v SLA. Took another jumper and attached to a point on the wire, say about 7". JUST TOUCH the other end to the battery positive to see if it glowed, it did not. So just moved about 3/8" at a time till it glowed - See Photo. CAUTION, make certain you have a nonflammable surface to work on, I used a tile scrap. IT GETS HOT FAST AND WILL BURN, DON'T ASK ME HOW I KNOW. That's why I just touch the terminal till it glows then stop, let it cool for a while. 2. Cut element to length, than take your 16 gauge wire and the crimp tube shown in earlier post. insert both into the tube and crimp it. I used a side cutter and carefully just squeezed enough. Make sure that the element will not pull out. Do the other end. Because I am using only 6 volts, I had flattened out the wire to give me more wraps on the wick. See photo and note. 3. in the lid of the box, I located the fan at one end, the exhaust stack at the other. Drilled a hole matching the fan opening and secured with two screws, drill small pilot holes so as not to crack the plastic. Drill hole to match brass tube OD, tube is about 1" long or so. Super glued brass tube in place. Excuse the sloppy copper sheet work on the inside of the lid, it was an experiment at the time. I added this a a bit of a heat sheild as the wick and element would sit below this. 4. Next photos show the interior of the box, not the best photos of the process as this was already built.... The mint tin set inside the plastic box was an idea to do two things; first isolate the heating element from the plastic,and two, provide a smaller vessel for the fluid. You may want to just use a metal container instead of the plastic box, again I was just using what I had on hand. The wick is laying in the tin with the element propped up at on end to keep it out of the fluid. Photo shown does not show much fluid in place. This needs some work, but worked for this test. Experiment, just be sure that the lower portion of the wick is in the fluid and the element wire wrap is above the fluid level. For the test, I used some mineral oil and a bit of glycerin, smoked very well. it's late so I will run it and photograph tomorrow. Cheers, Joe (Excuse the Imperial rather than metric)
    3 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Motor, mount & prop-shaft.
    The prop-shaft, coupling and motor mount that I ordered from ModelBoatBits has arrived so it seems a good a good time to make up a supporting wedge for the mount to fix to. I do have a rigid brass motor alignment aid that I used when building the Crash Tender but do you think I can find it in the workshop?....nope! 😑 I expect it will turn up when I need it least! 🀞 Not wanting to waste time I used a length of heat shrink tubing over the motor coupling to make it as rigid as possible, a trick I had seen done elsewhere, and this enabled me to position the motor on its mount in the desired position and measure the angle that the mounting wedge needs to be made to. I used an offcut of beech that I had in the workshop which I cut to size and then shaped it on the rotary sander that I bought in Lidl, fantastic piece of kit !!. The wedge was then drilled to take the nylon motor mount and also the fixing screws that pass through the beech block, through the balsa base of the box and into the ply reinforcing plate that I put in during early construction of the hull. After cleaning up the hole through the keel the prop-shaft was keyed with some abrasive, smeared with some epoxy and then pushed through to mate with the motor coupling. I used the excess epoxy resin around the shaft inside the hull and used some packing tape to stop it running out when I inverted the hull to seal the lower end. A quick spin on the motor confirmed that the alignment was spot-on and the hull set aside while the epoxy set. The next step will be to plank the deck.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Railings
    I have made just a couple of bits for different models. As well as used it to make something for my granddaughters dolls house. But I keep a supply just in case I need it for the model boats and cars. This is the mast I first made from it on my 28" RAF Crash Tender. I shrunk the plan parts on a scanner and made it from 90% balsa. The water trial was a bit of a failure as the
    brass prop
    was too large and 4 bladed. I have since invested in 3 smaller ones 30, 25, and 20mm 3 bladed brass but not got around to another sea trial yet. Also as you can see she still needs to be finished with painting. I will get round to it one day.
    4 months ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    Propshaft Lubrication
    I have always used wheel bearing grease. I have a brass tube fitted to the prop shaft which is the same diameter as a grease nipple so slides into the grease gun Yours Brian
    4 months ago by scout13
    Media
    Electric Barbarella
    Ahoy Maties! it's been a long time since my last posting. Happy 2019! I just completed my new scratch-built boat "Electric Barbarella". I tried to recreate (with some liberties) one of my favorite boats of all time, the 30-footer Chris Craft Sportsman built during the 1970s. it measures 24 X 8.5 inches. it is powered with a 9.6 NiMH 4200 mAh battery "nunchuck" pack (like the one used for paintball guns), brushless motor attached to a 30A Mtroniks Hydra controller and a 30mm M4 3-bladed
    brass prop
    eller. The hull (my own on-the-go design) was made out of Balsa wood which later I fiberglassed. For the superstructure I utilized 2mm ABS plastic sheet material. To my surprise the boat turned to be a very stable and forgiving platform. I really feel a very close connection to this vessel as it is my first own hull design.😁
    4 months ago by Krampus
    Blog
    Day Two Springer
    Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2"
    brass prop
    . More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    4 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.
    6 months ago by teejay
    Blog
    New bits
    Right, just been given some nice bits. Brushless outrunner FUSION 3535/05 1500kv ESC Top Edge 60A water cooled SC060B Plus a coupling. So now to go shopping. Which make of Lipo3 and from where? What type and size of
    brass prop
    ? Where to buy silicon wires and the fancy gold terminals? Steve
    4 months ago by steve-d
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Finally the new
    brass prop
    ellers arrived, delayed about a month in one of Canada's regular postal disruptions. After minor modifications to the boss profile (the brass are more streamlined and thus longer than nylon) to give clearance with the rudder leading edges, they were easily installed. Could now refit the electrical equipment previously removed to get access to the shaft couplings. Inevitably took the opportunity to make β€œimprovements”, so then could not get anything to work! After much frustration determined the problem was not from my improvements, but from the cheap and nasty slide switches provided with ESCs. These must have got damp during the test runs and corroded internally. Suggest when using these switches they be consigned to the garbage and replaced with proper toggle ones. Had decided to use the centre brushed motor/propeller for manoeuvring and low speed operation and then the outer brushless for high speed. Brushless ESCs do not modulate smoothly and motor operation is erratic. This was particularly evident when going from forward to reverse and vice versa. Using a lever control Tx, it was also easy to inadvertently operate the brushless control along with the brushed making the model response unpredictable. After some thinking, decided to insert a small relay into each of the white signal wires for the brushless motor ESCs. These relays would be controlled by a RC switch operated by another channel on the Rx. Hoping this way the brushless motors could be switched on and off whenever desired. The two relays would retain the ESCs as separate circuits and avoid any interference between them. The idea worked, can now operate the brushed motor confidently knowing the brushless will not be inadvertently triggered. This means low speed manoeuvers can be gently undertaken using the modulation and control ability of the brushless motors and, by selecting the auxiliary control, can add the high speed capability of the brushless. Am also hoping that when the Li-Pos trigger the low voltage cut-outs in the ESCs, this will retain a β€œget-home” facility on the brushed motor as that ESC operates independently. Much to look forward to when next on the water.
    5 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Tarpon hardware help
    Looking for more help please. I have settled for the Graupner Speed 600 8.4 Volt (4.8-9.6V) with the Mtroniks TIO Marine 30 Amp ESC driving a 3 blade brass 35mm prop. I need advise on what size of NiMh pack to use and will it be under propped with the 35mm 3 blade?
    5 months ago by Gordon-B
    Blog
    coastguard
    I bought the hull from a member on here i stripped the insides and redone it to take the rudder servo i then made the motor mounts from ply i used epoxy to set them in it runs nicely on the two 45mm
    brass prop
    s i will make the superstructure from lite ply
    5 months ago by Northumbrian
    Blog
    Vintage Model Works 46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Here's the history bit so pay attention... Many years ago as a boy in the fifth year of my north London secondary school, circa 1971, our woodwork class was given the option to make something of our own choice. Having mastered the majority of joints, wood turning, finishing techniques and the making of table lamps, stools and bookshelves etc. this seemed a good idea, so myself and a fellow classmate and model making chum asked if we could construct a model boat. The teacher, on hearing that it was to be from a kit and not from scratch was a little surprised but agreed. So my friend and I jointly invested about 20 quid in an Aerokits 34.5 inch RAF Crash Tender from Blunts' model shop in Mill Hill (long since gone like many others) and we set about construction during lesson time and sometimes at break times. I recall we used "Cascamite" to glue it all together on the advice of the woodwork teacher because neither 'Scotch' glue nor PVA was suited to marine construction. Good progress was made over the course of our last year at school but it was never fully completed, only requiring painting, running gear and detailing. My friend decided that he needed to withdraw from the project as he was enrolling in a college away from home to study for a career in the merchant navy and I agreed to buy out his share and continue with the project. And so it was that I carried on with the painting and installing the running gear which consisted of a 1.5 cc marine diesel engine, water pickup, prop shaft and rudder and a MacGregor radio system with a stick for steering and a single button for speed control. The engine and radio came from Michael's Models in Finchley (also long gone) for Β£20 as my elder brother, who had started a Saturday job there, was able to get a staff discount for me. The diesel engine was noisy and smelly and a pig to start with a leather thong around the flywheel and I decided to abandon this means of propulsion (I foolishly ran it for slightly too long 'dry' and melted the soldering around the brass water jacket!). By now I had graduated from my part time job in Woolies to an engineering apprentice with Post Office Telephones and my new income of 20 quid per week could support my modelling and electronics hobbies after my contribution to the household for my keep. So off to the model shop to buy a Taycol Supermarine electric motor, two 12v volt lead acid batteries and a suitable charger. The diesel came out and was sold on Exchange & Mart and the mount and coupling re-made to accommodate the new Taycol motor. What an improvement that was! I can't remember now what speed controller or servo I used but whatever it was did the job, and it went like the clappers on Friary Park boating lake (also long since gone) even though the radio control system was a bit crude with the non-proportional steering and 'blip' throttle control. The boating took a back seat when I acquired my driving licence and my first car (a rusty old Cortina Mk 1) and I also got involved in sound recording for radio. I decided to sell the boat and bits for Β£60 through Exchange & Mart and bought an Akai 4000DS tape recorder and a 'Chilton' audio mixer, built a home studio and along with a good mate of mine started making radio commercials for the new commercial radio stations including London's Capital Radio. We even won a 'Campaign' advertising award for one of our efforts! And so after several years as a 'phone engineer I moved into professional recording for A/V and broadcast and then into TV production. Fast forward to today. Semi-retired with grand kids and with more free time on my hands I still had an interest in model making so in Jan 2016 went to the Model Engineer exhibition at nearby 'Ally Pally'. It was there that I saw an RAF crash tender just like the one I built all those years ago and got into conversation with the chap on the stand. This re-ignited my model making interests and I researched the hobby and that model in particular.
    3 years ago by robbob
    Response
    BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY
    The only thing you might have to watch out for is back feed from the pump out the aux tube (when moving) if you don't set up the y joints (must be y not T ) to create a venturi effect from the pump side. Doesn't matter standing still but at speed a T junction might reduce the flow as the flows will be fighting each other slightly. The beauty of the twin system is that if you are running a lot at high speed you could turn the pump off to save power. The best place to position water intakes is I have found is directly behind the prop (I usually just squash the brass tube slightly, fair it, cut it off at 45 deg and set it to just sit in the prop wash). At lower speeds especially, the prop will help to push water into the tubes rather than just relying on speed alone. Never had a problem with pickups interfering with rudder effectiveness as long as you fair the pickups nicely
    6 months ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    1-35 scale S100 schennllboot
    Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and starboard will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.
    12 months ago by teejay
    Blog
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi all this is my first blog, last year I post my intention to do a project about an RAF D boat that my Father served on and as a precursor to that build That I was going to do this S/E boat as the hull design is shared by both, and as plastic kit modeller the kit great the first stage was to put together the decks and superstructure as normal, with the exception of all the bits that would be easily broken as most kit aircraft modellers aerials and guns tend to brake ,so long ago I got into the habit of making these out brass rod or bar using a mini drill and a set of needle files, holding the drill in my left hand and the files in my right, when started this I saw the number of stanches I needed so I came across this little beauty a mini bead lathe it is a great bit of kit and not expensive less than Β£50 and plenty of types and accessories available so all the stanches aerials hand rails, gun rails, horn, and some of the components for the rudder and tiller were made on this lathe. so good time being had in my first radio control boat. the next post will show all the parts for the rudder/tiller setup ( I have reposted blog because I think I did not do it properly first time round)
    6 months ago by teejay
    Forum
    Taycol Supemarine Resurrection
    Well Doug, have been to Ludlow today and saw a Sea Queen on the River, it was powered by a Supermarine, driving a 50mm x 50mm
    brass prop
    . Power supply was 12v 7ah sla using a 30 amp. esc. it looked fantastic on the water, even against the current it was moving ahead with full power. if my sea commander goes that well I'll be as happy as a dog with 2 tails. Cheers Colin.
    7 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Taycol supermarine, to which prop.
    As I intend to fit my supermarine, after Doug has finished his magic, into a vintage Aerokits Sea Commander, what prop would be best, if I am using a 12v 7ah sla battery. I have available 2.5 inch 4 blade
    brass prop
    , 2 inch 3 blade brass, and various plastic 2 or 3 bade, in 30-35-40&45mm. Which would be the correct one to use. Any thoughts would be much appreciated, cheers Colin.
    7 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Launch ELAINE,
    Keep you outta mischief won' it Colin! πŸ˜‰ I like the fine adjustment of those burners. Found 'em great for soldering oiler pipes to
    brass prop
    tubes- WITHOUT setting fire to the boat 😲 Phew!! Reckon it'll cope with your motor no sweat - YOU might though😁😁 Have heard Santa's coming early this year πŸ˜‰ He must have a new E-Sled 😁 Now back to the fish cutter gear box!! Cheers, Doug 😎
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    'The Stripper'
    It seems that the proper procedure for fixing the leak and then moving on to β€œthe good stuff” is to strip all the paint off and see what we have. So the heat gun has been obtained ( I already had the fire extinguisher..) as amongst other reasons there would be less dust. Time for a few tentative steps. Now at this point I am not only well out of my comfort zone, but up to my knees in my β€œslough of despond”………………………. After all, I bought a boat to sail this month and so far I have drilled holes in it and am now about to set it alight! First image shows efforts with lower heat and using the tools supplied and the next two show temperature taken up to 450 degrees c and a ΒΎ inch chisel used to remove paint. A much better outcome. Now who suggested that would be the answer I wonder??? 45 minutes spent to get this far and although I did remove the plastic props ( being replaced by brass anyway) I wondered if I should remove prop shafts? I have used a bit of a deflector to reduce the heat anyway. On the final images, I wonder whether I am down far enough to start sanding or to go further. Now that I have started I hope to complete at least the general stripping tomorrow. TTFN. NPJ
    8 months ago by NPJ
    Forum
    Chinese props
    All of this over props! I'm glad I use scaled
    brass prop
    s. For my Tugs! I don't need sharp edges for them! If you know there's a possible danger in sharping the prop. You do so at your own risk! Stay away from beryllium props.... Cheers, Ed
    8 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Chinese props
    Quote from rcgroups forum- "Yep, beryllium-copper in many racing props, like Octura's. No problem for "scale" brass/bronze props. " Seems only to be a problem for the extreme racing performance guys! Conclusion: Buy European!πŸ‘
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Chinese props
    dont know if this is a sales pitch to make them sound sexy as the element is used on things like the space shuttle and missile technology its also used in industrial spotwelder electrodes where it is alloyed with copper ,it is a carcinogenic and used to be called sweet metal due to the sweet taste if injected through taste ,personally I would just avoid it and purchase normal
    brass prop
    s .cheers Marky
    8 months ago by marky
    Forum
    Chinese props
    https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?2454547-Metal-vs-Plastic-Props "Downside to metal props is the fact they need to be balanced and sharpened, which is a lot of work and not without health issues due to the beryllium used in some brass alloys. Berillium is highly toxic, read up on the stuff and take the appropriate measures." and https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?1267378-Dangers-of-prop-work. I know you cannot trust all you read on the internet, but better safe than sorry!
    8 months ago by CB90
    Forum
    Chinese props
    Hi CB, Where on earth did you get that from? Can you give me a URL link? Brass is basically a copper - zinc alloy anyway. Agreed beryllium is toxic but over 45 years in electronics I've only ever run across it in various RF hi-power transistors types. Never in a brass alloy. Academic for me as I buy my
    brass prop
    s from Raboesch in Holland. They are already balanced and polished anyway!😊 'Chinese' manufacturers not subject to the much maligned EU regulations huh!? Cheers, Doug 😎 BTW People: IF by remote chance your props do contain beryllium DO NOT WORK ON THEM AT ALL. Dispose of them pronto at your local hazardous substances recycling depot. Above all do not sand or grind them. it's the beryllium oxide dust that's dangerous, that's why safe disposal of busted florescent lamps and the old first generation 'Energy saving bulbs' is also mandatory. YHBW!
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings...
    I was just searching for a model car pattern I made months ago for some mods and I found all the lovely etchings I'd done years ago, pre computer, for Riva and Chris-Craft models. These two pics show two brass patterns for the Riva vents and two of the white metal cast vents, one polished about 20 years ago, one done just now, to show that a well burnished casting will stay looking chrome even without lacquer. Then the two Chris Craft tread plates I had the great, good forethought to draw when I found I had a bit of space on the Riva fret. They are perfect, as are the Chris-Craft side flashes and all the Riva badges, even though they were done from hand drawn artwork, proving that Vector images are NOT essential as the pootah people will tell you. I shall mount these two on the typically wedge shaped base and have them cast. I also found a FUEL engraved cap cover which will go on my Chris-Craft filler. it happens to be bang on size wise! I'm cock ahoop! I knew I had these, but had no idea where to start looking. Thanks Mel for getting me started on the search for your Tecno F2 car, but sorry, couldn't find that devil. I have made some more Vincent bits, been to son's to play on his new steering wheel and pedals racing game ( I managed a whole lap of the proper Silverstone in a Lotus 25!) and dined out with the lady wife. What a great day. Martin
    8 months ago by Westquay
    Response
    Range Safety Launch?
    Evenin' Neville, Yes go for 3 blade cast (not soldered)
    brass prop
    s, one LH, one RH. Jury is still out on which should be port and which starboardπŸ˜‰ Size I'm not sure of, my 28" twin shaft PTB has 35mm props, which I may reduce depending on the sea trial results, so I'd guess your 44" boat may need something larger, perhaps 40-42mm? Hope the drivers of larger Fireboats and such pick this up and can advise! All the best, Doug 😎
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Deans Robert E. Perry Libertyship
    Started building Deans Marine Libertyship Robert E. Perry finished Lenth 54 1/2” beam 7 1/2” weight 35 lbs. Power is Deans motor Falcon 3671 6 volt 1500rpm 3.19mm shaft and prop 147-18
    brass prop
    eller 50-L-4bl-M4. Kit is very nicely done all fittings and hardware are included with the kit. The hull is detailed and I have lined the inside of the hull with 2 x 2 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin to give it more rigidity. I have installed the motor and prop shaft along with the rudder which I replaced since the kit supplied rudder was cast resin and only had a 3/32 dia shaft, I’m sure it would work fine but felt better with something a little more substantial. Added 5 lbs of ballast I used shot and installed sub floor in hull. Equipment installation and deck fitting, added 1/8” plywood as deck and styrene on top.
    9 months ago by Mikep
    Forum
    Martin's Taycol Conversion Boards
    Fantastic stuff, Doug. That gizmo on the right with 0.05 and 6.0. is that Amps and volts? is that really just 0.05 amps with the motor running?! Does that really mean just 0.3 watts? Would the model even move? Ah, but then that's off load, innit? Stick a 35mm 3 blader on it and what would it draw in the wet stuff, I wonder? OK, I'll get a bloomin watt meter. Least I can do I suppose Impressive on the videos, too. Ain't it quiet? My Taycols growl at me, but then so does the Mrs.! I'm gittin' excited now. You have to need some brass bashing, so I can thank you properly for all the work. Cheers, Martin
    9 months ago by Westquay
    Response
    Emerald - ''Round the Word'' ocean racing yacht.
    Main Sheet Modification: Yachts of this nature, would be fitted with a Traveller, which would be used to help shape the Main Sail. Also, the route of the main sheet, has a lot of twists and turns to get out of the cabin and up to the Boom. Plus, it has to pass through the tube and bend at its edge. The starting point of the control would be from the cockpit, especially if it is a Single Handed yacht. The ideal place for the traveller, would be on the roof of the cabin. To keep physical disruption to a minimum, I decided to use the original boom running gear pulleys. The termination of the MainSheet would now be at the traveller on the cabin. 1. The cleat was removed from the cockpit, and the eye bolt was replaced by an S hook, screwed to the cockpit deck( see picture 1). 2. A hole was drilled in the cockpit, adjacent to the cabin hatch, and in a direct line with the main Sheet control system. This will allow the main Sheet to pass directly from the cleat. Through the pulley assembly (withought going round the pulley), and straight aft to the cockpit. 3. A brass tube was glued into the hole, flush with the cockpit surface and extending inside, towards the mainsheet control system (see pictures 1 and 2). 4. The Traveller was formed from a length of brass rod, (approx 300mm long), formed to the same curve as the cabin roof. Slide the pulley onto the rod so that it runs freely. Make a 90 degree bend at each end, the length of the traveller apart. These 2 legs will pass down into the cabin roof, leaving about 10 mm for the pulley to run from end to end. Plus about 10mm at each end of the rod, which will be bent up against the inside of the roof and glued. (see picture 3 & 4). 5. Mark the cabin roof where the traveller is to be mounted. I chose to mount the traveller directly under the boom pulley. I have made a revised sketch which is taken from the original plans for guidance. See picture 5. Note: make sure the pulley is mounted on the rod between the two bends. 6. Drill the holes in the cabin, pass the ends of the rod through the holes. I put a 10mm piece of wood under the traveller rod, next to the hole. This allows you to hold it securely, while you bend the rod out, on the inside of the cabin. Apply plent of glue or resin to secure it. Do the same at the other end of the rod, and leave to set. With the cockpit removed, and the mainsheet control system in place, take the free end of the main sheet and pass it through the new hole in the cockpit. The cockpit can be secured by the 4 locking pulleys. Now pass the mainsheet through the S hook and up to the boom. Adjust the S hook to suitable angle. When the yacht is rigged, the mainsheet is passed up to the end of the boom pulley, along the boom, over the pulley and down to the traveller pulley. With the tx/ex active, pull the mainsheet right in, and the trim set right out (this allows for final tightening).Secure the mainsheet to the eye of the pulley, ( I use a figure of 8 knot ). Now adjust the trim on the joystick to pull the main Sail tight. Finally, run the servo right out, and back in a few times, to make sure it works properly. Move the boat round so the wind cones from a different angle, and watch the traveller as the sail is pulled in and out. Now you are ready to sail. May your wake be long and straight. Ray 😎
    9 months ago by East-RN
    Blog
    Hellen Fishing Boat
    Hi All This year I bought an unstarted kit, but, sold it to a club member. A month later one of the club member wish to swap for a faster boat and as my Sea Commander required a repaint and fittings. I thought a swap for a very good working Hellen was a good deal. So are making a dingy and replacing the broken prop with a brass one I had my second Hellen for the year. Three weeks ago another Hellen pops up on Gumtree(aka EBAY), so it was to cheap not to buy it. While waiting for it to come, I made a new stand, a dingy with oars and a set of fenders. When it arrive the mast where laying on the deck broken, but , the posted pics show that. The motor is a 11 to 1 geared MFA Como 919 D which runs OK. A spare new plastic prop. Started on the repairs, like the keel and deck around the mast bases. The aft mast was broken in half, so I brass sleeved it. The aft sail was missing and the forward sail was all glued up, so I bin it. So this is the boat pics so far. Canabus
    9 months ago by canabus
    Blog
    Cabin roofs
    Theoretically this should be a very straight forward process and a change from rubbing down the hull so let’s look at the instructions – what instructions! First of all fit some thin card to the sides of the cabin walls to allow for a clearance fit (cornflakes packet) then some minor trimming of the spars to give an exact ,(not tight) fit across the side supports, I decided to pin each of the parts together as well as epoxy in the joints. I always find the best approach is to use a jig to drill pilot holes for the pins ensuring that the pins do not split the wood and the construction is accurate. The frame is then glued up and placed back in the boat and left to dry next job is to fit the corner strengthening pieces, the easiest way I found was to put a card support for the corners to rest on whilst they set still in the cabin structure. Looking forward I had decided to retain the cabin lids with Neodymium magnets so I machined a slot in the corner pieces underside to house the magnets, to be fitted at a later date. Next job is to fit the roof skins which again will be pinned using the 0.7mm brass pins. The roof skins are now epoxied in place so I need to mark out the position of the secondary panels. Looking at the pieces and the instructions the spacer frames seem to be the same size but I was sure I’d read somewhere that these overhung by 2-3mm, reading Robs blog conformed this to be the case. So some trimming required before fitting and marking out the appropriate position then being glued into position. The mid cabin was assembled in exactly the same way
    9 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Windows, stoopid question.
    Hi Guys, many thanks for the responsesπŸ‘ So, in chronological order:- Mike: I did chamfer but probably not enough πŸ€” Yes I know about the lead in side of the die πŸ˜‰ and I know the one step forward half step back technique πŸ‘ I bought this tap n die set recently, made by Toolcraft so not cheap rubbish, maybe expensive rubbish?πŸ€” 3mm is the smallest in this set and the holder (with ratchet actionπŸ€”) is big an' clunky and weighs 340gm so not the easiest tool to keep level. Maybe good for a 1/2" Whitworth but not so super for a 3mm which is the smallest in this set. My 'Fine thread' set only goes to 2.5mm πŸ€” As you can see from the pics the die is solid and there is only one locating screw so I can't open the die slightly as you say, and I remember from my car restoration days. Cutting oil I also have, mostly used on my two lathes, both Proxxon, one for the BIG stuff and one for the twiddly bits, pics 4 & 5. Have just used the littl'n to drill a 4mm brass bolt screwed into a 35mm prop so I can reduce the thread to 3mm for the shaft, pic 6. IF only I can get a decent thread onto the shaft 😲 I'll put the shaft back into the littl'n and turn a taper on the end as you advise. My Milling machine is only a teeny weeny one with no possibility of mounting the die on it, pic 7. it's very useful for pre-drilling precision holes in in spray rails an' such to take the 0.5mm pins for fixing. Just used it to pre-drill the new keel for the cutter. I have tail stocks for both lathes but no possibility to mount a die holder. Will investigate that pronto cos I'm gonna be faced with this snag again soon; 2 new shafts for my Graf Spee and 4 for my HMS Belfast. Might also look for a different die set😲 In the meantime I'll try improving the chamferπŸ‘ Martin; as you can see from above I do have lathes, and a good selection of silver steel rod, so many thanks for your kind offer but now you've pointed the way I'll have a go at making my own punch. That piercing saw set looks good so I'll spring a few € for that πŸ‘ You never know I might be able to use some shortened blades in my ancient Minicraft jig saw, for which you can no longer get spares πŸ€” Your MB III looks great, and I can see why you were taken for that German musician - Doppelgange! Thanks for all the advice Gents πŸ‘πŸ‘ G'night. Doug 😎 PS Just put me name down at Frau Schmutterputz's, but I'd more likely be found in the roses or perhaps petunias singing- "I'm a lonely little petunia in the onion patch ...." πŸ€“πŸ˜²
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Media
    Titanic
    I built this 1/125th scale Amati kit of the Titanic over two years from 2016. it has enhanced etched brass details from Minibrass. Conversion for radio control involved making the hull waterproof with multiple layers of fibreglass cloth bonded with epoxy resin as well as the installation of a drive train and RC gear. With only a tiny rudder, steering is dependent on a mixer unit controlling the differential speed of the propellors.
    10 months ago by JeremyBB
    Response
    Wheels
    Great job, and nice clear pic πŸ‘ Thanks Hammer 😊 Now we can see the refinements of your construction. Good stuff. I also use a mini gas torch sometimes, in pistol grip form with adjustable flame. Pizo ignition, dead easy. Get 'em in good cooking accessory shops. Good for soldering oil tubes on
    brass prop
    tubes an such. Cooks call them Gourmet Torches and use 'em for their Crème Brulet 😊 Also various electric irons, 50 W with a 1/4" chisel bit for big stuff, standard 25W general purpose, temp controlled 25W,and a mini 1mm bit temp controlled for SMD work. Good for small LEDs etc. Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Also one electric iron 1200W ........ . . . . for ironing shirts! Ugh!! 😑
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Main Cabin almost Completed!
    looking good, my Brooklin that I built 25 years ago has pulled a 250 pound barge using a 4 blade
    brass prop
    . Keep up the build
    10 months ago by captaindoug1
    Forum
    PROPELLERS
    Hi Rowen, I agree with John πŸ‘ Unless you have your own brass foundry the best we can do is turn the hub on a lathe, prefabricate the blades (making sure that they are identical form and weights!), cutting / milling slots into the hub and then solder - which is weakpoint Number 1! Then wonder why it runs rough and cavitates cos it's outa balance and uneven pitch😑 I suggest you leave it to the pros like Rabeosch who for about 15 bucks or so will give you a robust cast, balanced and highly polished scale or sports finished article. Weigh up the hours you will spend fiddlin' about against the price of a decent pro job. Especially if you need two or three the same for one boat. Only time I fiddle about is when I need small scale props for my plastic magic projects 1/72 down to 1/350! e.g. 4 for a carrier like Ark Royal or Enterprise at 1/350. There ain't nowt that small on the market. Cheers Doug 😎
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    David Metcalfs Waveney - ''The Scout''
    For sale is my 1/12th scale model of the Waveney Lifeboat - "The Scout" Kit produced by David Metcalf. Built to a good standard with an array of working features: Working radar controlled through a voltage reducer Navigation lights, mast lights, front and rear searchlights, flashing blue light and well lights all controlled by an Action Electronics P62 quad switcher. The flashing effect of the blue light is controlled by an Action ElectronicsP73 multi flasher. Powered by two Turnigy 3542/5 1250kv brushless outrunners controlled by two Fusion Hawk 60amp electronic speeed controllers. Fitted with Raboesch propshafts and 3 bladed brass left and right handed propellors. Batteries and radios are not included in the sale. The model is available for pick up only with cash on collection from Stafford ST16 which is approximately 1/2 mile from Junction 14 of the M6 motorway. Price Β£700 ovno
    10 months ago by Flack
    Forum
    Fittings & Detail Parts
    Thanks, Doug. I’m glad I posted my erroneous method for calculating scale speeds, otherwise I wouldn’t have learned the correct way to do it. Looks like I’ll be eating crow for dinner tonight with humble pie for dessert. it just shows how much I have to learn. I never would have guessed that the prop tubes in our HE tugs are plastic. At first it struck me as a poor material for the job, but from another perspective I guess it’s not so bad. At least the shafts themselves are metal & there’s a nice set of brass counter-rotating props on the business end. By the way...what’s a moorhen?
    10 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Forum
    Fire Boat (crash tender) colours...
    Evenin' Martin, just a quick thought before I hit the hay! For the non slip deck paint why don't you cover the deck with a suitable wet and dry paper? πŸ˜‰ With a bit of luck you might even find some wet n dry the right shade of grey!! Don't know the size / scale you are building but maybe around 120 / 240 would do! Cut to fit, glue it down with a spray glue, I found some in the 'Creative Corner' of a garden centre near me. Also a good source of fine gauge steel, brass, copper, gold and silver wire and nylon thread, and anchor chainsπŸ˜‰πŸ˜Š Then seal with a spray-on flat sealer or varnish, then spray a satin colour you want. Humbrol H129 might be a good substitute for 'Cerrux Deck Grey'. See Model Boat Mayhem for references to Cerrux Grey πŸ˜‰ I agree the cabin sides are a much lighter shade of grey, almost white. Just ripped all the innards and deck fittings off my PTB. Just got the bare hull and shaft tubes left. Just havin' a wee dram then up the 'apples and pears to Bedfordshire' before I get tempted to sand and paint through the night. it happens sometimes 😲 G'night all, cheers Doug 😎 ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
    10 months ago by RNinMunich


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