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    Response
    Re: On the water!
    Very true! Fishermen do love a sub!! Showed one of my fishermen friends earlier, he asked how I made the trawls. Told him it was the bags you put your socks in when they go in the washing ma
    chine
    and a satsuma bag for the cod ends.. He said a couple of two hour tows across the lake should give a good haul of satsumas!!
    2 days ago by GrahamP74
    Blog
    40'' Seaplane Tender, new build P
    Trial fitting all the plumbing for the heat exchanger to make sure coamings will still fit. Small pump behind port motor is the circulation pump and the other is the raw water pump. Also fitted the ESCs and made the battery holders. would have liked the batteries and pumps nearer the stern, but not enough room under the floors. May have to put a few sinkers in the stern to get the WL correct. That can come at the end once everything else is done, (paint etc) Rudder system is also temporarily hooked up and works fine. Will remove and test water system shortly. Using 6mm silicone hose for the raw water pump for better flow. As can be seen, everything tucks away quite nicely out of sight, (was sort of like death by a thousand cuts,- fitted by a thousand slots!) some pretty close fits here and there. could have done without the heat exchanger but I don't do things the easy way. Got to try fitting a smoke ma
    chine
    in somewhere so I can have smoke coming out the exhausts with the water (more tubes, more bits!) and a sound unit! Might be pushing it, but I managed to fit twin units on the HSL and that's a lot narrower. Might be a rack system yet, plenty of room upwards in the cabin. Don't really want to put anything in the wheel house, just wheel, instruments etc.
    2 days ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Boat retrieval
    There are a number of commercial 'missing signal' units available. Fly boys use them to set controls to default safety, or sound a beeper for finding a lost aircraft. I believe that there are some specific ones for subs. Washing ma
    chine
    s and boilers both have pressure detection units inside. This is what a typical one looks like. They are mechanical microswitches operated by a diaphragm. The blue screw sets the pressure at which it operates. They could form the basis for an independent safety system - emergency blow with a Sparklets cylinder, for instance, or releasing a 'sub down' tethered buoy.....
    2 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Revell Gato Class Submarine Conversion.
    I am about to start the most ambitious project to date. This one will be running alongside the three others currently on the go, The Police Boat which is nearly completed, The Dusseldorf Fire Boat which is well underway and the PTB upgrade. My intention is to change this Revell model into a static dive radio controlled Submarine. I am lucky that Martin555 has agreed to help whenever I get stuck which will be invaluable since he has already almost completed the same. I started by purchasing the model from Amazon for less than £50. I have also purchased the water tight tube for the electronics. I will make the end caps and sealed internal plugs from some 80mm diameter nylon I had at work. It will now come in handy that I am a toolmaker and have a considerable array of ma
    chine
    s at my disposal. I will turn the plugs next week and find suitable o rings. I have started to prepare the hull. There is an enormous amount of work required to adjust the standard kit. A lot of cutting and drilling. I have prepared the split lines and glued in the alignment pegs. I have ordered suitable shafts and propellers from the USA. They should be here in a couple of weeks. Next job is to stick the two halves together and start the cutting.
    1 month ago by MouldBuilder
    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the ‘Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a ‘Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately £2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of £48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more ‘hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the
    chine
    s, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as ‘strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone ‘off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Anyone into CNC, or perhaps looking to get into it? I am wondering about putting my plans out as G Code, and it would be useful to have a discussion about the practicalities. For instance, what bed size do people use? Model boat plans are a bit specialist for most CNC boards. They worry about cutting hard materials - we mainly use balsa and ply. Their ma
    chine
    s are usually square - ours would need to be long and thin. They use big commercial routers and spindles - we could get away with smaller motors and dental burrs. I picked up one of these over Christmas, and am currently going through the learning curve. But it doesn't seem to be all that difficult.... https://amberspyglass.co.uk/store/index.php?seo_path=eshapeoko-cnc-milling-ma
    chine
    -mechanical-kit
    6 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    "...To prevent parts falling out, There is a low tack film sheet that airbrush painters users that you could stick to the under side of the wood...." There may well be. But it turns out to be easy to just specify a cutting depth which has exactly the same effect. I was surprised at how precise these ma
    chine
    s can be. And I'm running off such archaic software that I would have to do tabs all manually - a lot of work....
    14 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    A strong magnet would work - but in fact I have found that: - cutting 1/16" and 1/8" balsa sheet - using a 0.5mm cutting tool and a 12v boat motor the sideways cutting forces are sufficiently small for a simple raised lip around the cutting table to hold the sheet in place. One difficulty with passing round files of 'cutting instructions' to people so that they can create their own kits is that the cutting ma
    chine
    s are all different. They will all accept 'G-Code' of some kind, but that code effectively says things like 'Go to position 25"x2" and cut a circle radius 2 inches'. Now, if you have a ma
    chine
    that only has a 10" cutting bed, you can't do that. You have to reposition the part so that it fits onto your cutter. So I've passed a DXF file to Nick - this is a CNC file with the shapes drawn on it. He will have to take each shape and position it on his ma
    chine
    where he want to cut. I have designed my ma
    chine
    to be able to take a standard sheet of 4"x36" balsa, because I expect to do most of my cutting that way. If other people have cutting beds which can do this, i can pass them cutting files directly. Another difficulty with cutting everything out of a single sheet is that one part may fall out of the sheet while cutting is going on in another part of the sheet. The best way I have found to avoid this is to not cut completely through the balsa sheet - leave a small gap of about 5 thou. Then you can easily push the shapes out later...
    14 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    "....I am sure that you will end up with a lot of customers when see these...." While it is, of course, quite reasonable to charge for materials and time, I am looking forward to a future where the base patterns for a model boat kit will be available for free off the Web. You can download a lot of free patterns already, but I haven't seen anything I would call a 'real boat kit'. CNC cutters and 3-D printers are already available at most schools, and local councils now operate 'MakerSpace' workshops where this kit is made available to the public. Hobbyist designers could turn out the cutting files - all a modeller would need to do would be to buy the sheets of wood and feed them into the ma
    chine
    to have a kit coming out the other side. Not too sure how to do fibreglass hulls, though...
    14 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    3D Printing.
    Go for it! If you get one in kit form it will keep the costs down, with the added advantage of learning how the ma
    chine
    works as you build it. Prusa probably do the best kits on the market, pricey but decent European quality. Tronxy or Creality are good
    chine
    se ma
    chine
    s starting at around 150 for something decent enough to get you going.
    chine
    se quality has come on in leaps and bounds over the last few years and they have listened to the community and made improvements accordingly. And then comes the endless hours of fun 'upgrading'. There are plenty of on line forums and social media groups for advice and assistance, so for the price of a boat kit you can add a whole new dimension to your modelling skills. Not just modelling either, there is a thousand and one things you can do. For example, I replaced a £15 button on the washing ma
    chine
    in half an hour with 20 pence worth of plastic.
    14 days ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Bit of an update on my CNC router. All up and running now and I am well chuffed with the results. I abandoned the Arduino based controller and opted instead for a Duet 2 WiFi board, a 32 bit controller with on board drivers. The ma
    chine
    can be loaded with a job directly from my computer/laptop/mobile phone and progress monitored from same. I have also added a 7 inch Paneldue touch screen display for when my daughter is hogging all the internet bandwidth. It has been going for a couple of weeks now and I haven't stopped making stuff, all for other folks! I need to find some DXF files for model boats now. I have a set of plans for a Lysander aircraft that my mate wants me to cut out for him, so far my efforts to convert PDF into useable vectors have come to nought.
    15 days ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    Pond Weed
    Don't know if you can get a dinghy into the pond with a Seagull silver Century on the back (lots of pulling power) and devise a type of floating rake with fingers the depth you want, and drag it up and down the pond, (they have similar boats here set up with a big rake system on the front). You might be able to get a number of guys to drag it if motors aren't allowed. Check this ma
    chine
    out http://www.envirolands.co.nz/ like a giant barbers clipper. Don't know how clogged your lake is but if it's anything like this lake you may need some serious gear. Carp are by far the best but if you can't use them there it's a problem. http://www.aquaticweedmanagement.nz/ also https://thisnzlife.co.nz/4-ways-weed-waterways/ just a few things to read on weed control methods here, (probably similar there as well) John. B
    16 days ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Back for Summer
    Hi Martin - thanks for that tip - had a very enjoyable half hour on you tube - never thought of it before. Hi Colin - we had a good laugh at this fellow on this ancient ma
    chine
    that arrived for the run to Lake Mcillwaine one fine Sunday morning . Most of us riding Bonnevilles , Super Rockets etc with my older sibling on his state of the art 750 Norton being the fastest. The flying bedstead passed us all and we did not see him again until arriving at the hotel 20 miles odd away.You must have guessed by now - it was a Vincent - not sure if it was a Shadow or Prince. You must have been heart broken at the loss........... Have you seen that marvelous film "The Worlds Fastest Indian" with Anthony Hopkins? There is a scene on the beach where he passes a bunch of other motorcycles at a frightening speed - reminded me of that day with the Vincent.
    17 days ago by redpmg
    Response
    Re: Steampunk Pike.
    Hi Martin. whats the basic material - styrene or ABS ? Do you cut it all by hand ? Only found out when trying to cut ABS on the laser that it emits Hydrogen Cyanide gas when burnt !!!!!!!!. Quite glad we have a good extractor on the ma
    chine
    . Will have to use the scroll saw - not so good on straight lines...........
    21 days ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Hintsand tips - Decals made easy
    "....It's a lot easier and cheaper then buying a vinyl cutter and learning how to use it. It might not cost much more than a pack of decal paper...." I can't report on the 'learning how to use it' part, since I haven't started, but having a CNC ma
    chine
    means that you can add all sorts of tools onto the cutting end. At the moment I just use a small router to cut balsa - I would use a bigger one or a laser to cut ply - and I have just bought a 'swiveling knife' set to cut vinyl. Cost of a mount and 15 blades - £4.37. Should let me cut any size or shape character out of vinyl (or anything else) sheet...
    21 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    New drive Train and Oiler
    Most of this actually took place last August / July! Regular readers may have seen that when Dad built this boat in the 60s he put a Taycol Target field motor in it. About 25 years ago I put a Decaperm and 'modern' transistor ESC in her to provide forward and reverse. Performance was sedate to say the least. I have since modified the Taycol (see below) so it can be run forward and reverse and decided to put it in an ancient Billings Boats Danish fish cutter (Gina) that I inherited from an Aunt. The cutter is badly in need of renovation (see pic 1) and the Taycol will be more suited to her performance requirement! On advice from Canabus in Hobart I obtained a Propdrive 2830 1000kV brushless motor, appropriate ESC and a 35mm 3 blade prop from Raboesch. Pic 2 shows the old and new motors. Next step was to trial fit new motor mount, coupling and prop. Pics 3 &4. While doing this it became obvious that a new shaft was in order, as mentioned in last update. Soooo, - appropriate stainless steel rod, thrust washers and set ring were acquired and back to the workshop. After cutting to length to accommodate the new coupling type a 3mm thread was cut a the prop end. At the inboard end I milled recesses for the grub screws in the set ring and the coupling, pics 5 - 7. I don't like to just file(or even mill) flats for the screws cos they have a tendency to slip and work loose😡 Trial fitted the new shaft and found I'd boobed a bit with the measurements and need extra thrust washers to make up the difference. 😲 Pic 8. No sweat, they came in a pack of 50 anyway😊 You can also see in this pic that I decided to fit an oiler pipe while everything was in bits anyway.😉 To solder it on in a cramped space without setting the boat on fire 😡 I packed a wet rag underneath and used a gas Kitchen Torch! Known as a 'Gas Gourmet Burner'. Yep, those handy little gas torches like your Missus uses to melt the brown sugar on her Crème Brûlée!! So do I, delicious 😜😉 The torches are not expensive, small, very handy, refillable with lighter gas and can be adjusted to a very small hot flame. ideal for this job. See pics 9 & 10. Pic 11 shows the new motor & mount, shaft and coupling all trial fitted after using a brass alignment tool I quickly made up on the lathe. Pic also shows the trial electrical installation after cleaning up the 'ma
    chine
    ry compartment' a little and painting with silver Hammerite. A Quickrun BL ESC is sitting in the bottom in one of the trays my Dad originally fitted for the 2 wet cell (very wet!) 6V lead acid batteries. The home made board on the left carries the battery and ESC connectors, main ON/OFF switch with LED, blade fuse holder with a 20A fuse and a green LED which tells me if the fuse is blown! Stuck on the walls (OK Bulkheads!) with so called Servo Tape are a 6 ch Turnigy iA6 2.4Gig RX and the arming switch for the ESC. Battery compartment is sized to fit 2S and 3S hard case LiPos. For trials I can fit my Wattmeter forward of the switchboard and splice it into the battery supply using Tamiya connectors. Might change these to XT60s later if current drain is more than 12 to 15A. All for now, all this was pulled out again preparatory to cosmetics on the hull, decks, cabin roof and walls inside and out. But that's another chapter so, 'Tune in next week, same time same channel when once again it's time for 'WHAT DO YOU MEAN BUCK RODGERS IS APPROACHING!? 😁 Or 'The Saga of the Cabin Roof' 😉 Cheers Doug 😎 BTW: After drilling the shaft tube for the oiler pipe I flushed it out with light ma
    chine
    oil (pumped in from a big syringe) and shoved a few pipe cleaners through (rotating them on the way) to remove any remaining drill swarf!!
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Servo jitters
    Another thought Eric, It could be that your mini servos are more susceptible to interference - especially as you are operating the TX very close to the RX! First move the TX away at least 10 feet or more and try again. If it still jitters try fitting a ferrite ring to the servo lead, wrap the lead at least 3 times through the ring. Cheers, Doug 😎 PS found your 'Bob the Duck' article in one of my Model Boats back numbers 👍 Gonna have a go at that, might also be possible to modify to work as a rowing ma
    chine
    !😉
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Plan Sources
    Er... yes. I have also done a bit of research when drawing up the EeZeBilt PT boat. The US came late to the concept of light torpedo boats. The original doctrine, gathered from the old WW1 exploits of the MAS boats, was that these light boats would overcome capital ships by force of numbers and agility - typically in harbour defence scenarios where their lack of blue-water range was not an issue. Similarly, they could defend against prowling submarines. Since the US did not have any close maritime enemies, they did not consider light torpedo boats to be worth investing in. Strategy had moved on by WW2, and when the US finally considered them, with the 'Plywood Derby', their original raison d'etre had all but vanished. capital ships were surrounded by Torpedo Boat Destroyers, and radar meant that it would be suicide to consider approaching a 'big gun' enemy on the high seas. Nevertheless, the initial US PTB purchase specified armament for just this function - standard US Mk VIII tube-launched torpedos, smoke for concealment and 0.5 calibre ma
    chine
    guns for local/AA defence. This turned out to be almost completely useless in practice. The tactical doctrine makes engrossing reading: "...3401. Unsupported attack on enemy task force.-The plans for attacking an enemy convoy apply equally to attacking an enemy task force, the only material difference being that stiffer resistance may be expected and a great number of boats should normally be employed. 3402. Supported attacks in fleet action.-This type of attack has such a wide range of possibilities which depend on so many factors that it is not possible to recommend any general plan. Some of the possibilities, however, are listed below. (a) Night action with destroyer support where MTB's first attack the enemy screen, permitting destroyers to penetrate the screen and attack the - main body. (b) Night action with destroyer or light cruiser support where the DD's and CL's engage the screen, permitting MTB's to pierce the screen and attack the main body. (c) Day action where destroyers, aircraft and MTB's attack enemy main body simultaneously. MTB's launched from a carrier or operating from a fleet base. 3403. Attacks coordinated with aircraft.-Attacks by large numbers of motor torpedo boats and aircraft made simultaneously on enemy forces should be highly successful, as such attacks will present a great multiplicity of targets for enemy anti-aircraft and secondary batteries and will bring heavy striking power to bear on the enemy. The time of the attack will depend upon the motor torpedo boats, as aircraft can control their timing more readily. The aircraft attack may be a dive-bombing, strafing, or torpedo attack or any combination thereof. An aircraft torpedo attack, coordinated, should be made on opposite side from the MTB attack. A high altitude horizontal bombing attack will not divide the enemy's fire to the maximum extent, as he will not divert the use of his ma
    chine
    guns toward the bombers. In this type of attack all available motor torpedo boats should attack simultaneously...." !!! There are a number of propaganda stories during the early part of WW2 suggesting that PT boats were engaging and sinking Japanese cruisers. These all seem to be untrue, and circulated as 'morale boosters'. I can find few examples of a successful attack on a big ship - the strike on the light cruiser Abukuma by PT137 during the Battle of Surigao Strait (which was almost certainly a mistake!) is one notable example. The PT boats came into their own as shore harassing gunboats and inter-island supply interdiction once the initial Japanese advance halted, and that was when they began needing to add more guns. The Toku Daihatsu barges used for Japanese supply were almost immune to torpedoes, drawing only a foot or so, and were heavily armoured, so the 'Ma Deuces' were of limited use. Some early PT boats had a 20mm Oerlikon mounted on the stern. I have never seen one with twin Oerlikons mounted this way, though there might have been occasional one-offs. Invariably the armour plate on the gun was discarded for weight reasons. Single 20mm Oerlikons were also mounted on the front quarters, together with the distinctive 'horse-collar' M4 37mm cannon, initially from u/s Bell P-39 Airacobras, but later as a standard fitting. By 1945 they were adding 5" rockets... On the stern the boats were rapidly updated to carry a Bofors 40mm, which they could do when the heavy MkVIII torpedo tubes were replaced with light Mk XIII aircraft 'roll-off' torpedoes. A bit of a misnomer, this, as the torpedoes did not actually roll.... But I have never seen a PT Boat with a 35mm cannon on it. The radar fitting was one of three types: 1 - no radar 2 - SO dome 3 - SO-3 with rotating parabola. I wish there was a simple, cheap way to get a 1:48 Bofors gun. The EeZeBilt PT boats need a Bofors on the back, but I haven't managed to source one yet. And I suppose I should add torpedo tubes to provide accuracy across the whole PT range... Below is a picture of two EeZeBilt PT boats. The far one is an 1940 model with no radar mast and a single Oerlikon on the stern. It should really have tubes as well, of course. Note the position of the life-raft on the bow. The near one is a 1944 fit, with an M4 at the front and SO radar. The life-raft has moved back to the top of the chart cabin. It should really have a Bofors on the stern, and a small boat on the day cabin, but I haven't made these yet. And, of course, no PT Boat had varnished wooden planking. But I just thought that it looked nice... 🤗
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Plan Sources
    Hi DG, I'd be MOST interested to see what you consider to be the 'relevant plan'! So here is your 'Round to It' 😉 I heartily agree with you regarding the portholes / glazed units! But as far as armament goes - Anything goes, especially for those operated in the Pacific theatre - which was the vast majority. Crews scrounged and used whatever they could get their hands on. The classic example is the 37mm Army Anti Tank gun JFK scrounged and fitted to PT109. To no avail; they were rammed and sunk the day after by the Japanese destroyer IJN Amagiri. If it worked it was introduced in the next production class. As far as your 'relevant plan' goes; I guess that depends on which boat of which class in which of 30 squadrons (RONS) of 80' ELCOS built at which stage of the war was taken as the basis of the plan. The early classes, up to about the 103 class (to which JFK's infamous boat belonged) had no radar at all. You are correct that there was a large radar pod on some PTB's. As built probably from the 200 class at the earliest. Earliest pics and references I can find indicate that the radar pods may have been first fitted to the 500 series. Highly likely that such such details were still secret and not available to Les & Co in the late 40s early 50s. I have seen some photos of PTBs with that odd 'button' on the mast top but haven't yet fathomed what it could be. Don't fit no radar antenna that I know of and it's way too small for the radar of the time anyway. Some earlier boats may have been retrofitted but not many. Most squadrons only had one or two boats fitted with radar at all (destroyers and upwards took precedence in the early days of radar, until centimetric and corresponding smaller antennas were introduced and could be mass produced) and most PTB skippers switched them off at night and lowered the mast anyway to reduce the risk of detection. The early classes also had no armament on the foredeck. As the official model of PT109 shows. Only the Carley Floats or some other form of liferaft. I also attach drawings from the USN Bureau Of Ships deck plan and profile drawings as designed and originally built. (Thanks for the pointer Maurice👍). They and all subsequent classes were, consequent to operational experience esp. in the Pacific, rapidly fitted with a colourful assortment of single and twin barrel cannons fore and aft as well as single and /or twin 20mm Oerlikons midships and/or on the torpedo mounts - similar to British MTBs, e.g. Vosper. Later versions had all sorts of guns on the foredeck and a single 0.5" ma
    chine
    to port just forward of the cabin. so as far as a PTB model goes; Yer pays yer money and yer takes yer choice. You can fit a model with virtually anything less than a 3" QF/HA and probably be right for at least one boat somewhere at some time! In my archive I have dozens of photos of PTBs of various types and classes; as built, in operation, and as restored, if anyone needs 'em.😉 Wrt the straight or front cabin; difficult to see what was intended in the Aerokits plan😮 I agree with you that the ELCOs had a cabin front slanted backward. The Huckins PTBs did have a straight cabin front. Not many were built and never saw war service being stationed mostly in Florida, Pearl Harbour and Midway and used for training. Maybe someone got their plans mixed up. Cheers and G'night, Doug 😎 PS Have a look at Battleship Cove for lots of photos of the restored PT617. There you can see the later radar pod.😉 "Armament The primary anti-ship armament was two to four Mark 8 torpedoes, which weighed 2,600 pounds (1,179 kg) and contained a 466-pound (211 kg) TNT warhead. These torpedoes were launched by Mark 18 21-inch (530 mm) steel torpedo tubes. Mark 8 torpedoes had a range of 16,000 yards (14,630 m) at 36 knots (67 km/h; 41 mph). These torpedoes and tubes were replaced in mid-1943 by four lightweight 22.5-inch-diameter (570 mm) Mark 13 torpedoes, which weighed 2,216 pounds (1,005 kg) and contained a 600-pound (270 kg) Torpex-filled warhead. These torpedoes were carried on lightweight Mark 1 roll-off style torpedo launching racks. The Mk13 torpedo had a range of 6,300 yards (5,800 m) and a speed of 33.5 knots (62.0 km/h; 38.6 mph). PT boats were also well armed with numerous automatic weapons. Common to all US PT boats were the two twin M2 .50 cal (12.7 mm) ma
    chine
    guns. Early PT boats (Elco PT20 through PT44) mounted Dewandre plexiglas-enclosed hydraulically operated rotating turrets.[12] Almost immediately after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Dewandre turrets were replaced on the entire PT boat fleet with open ring twin mounts. The ring mount was designed by both Elco and Bell, and designated Mark 17 Twin 50 caliber aircraft mount.[13] Part of the Mark 17 Mod 1 and Mod 2 ring mount consisted of the Bell Mark 9 twin cradle.[14][15] Another automatic weapon commonly mounted on PT boats was the 20 mm Oerlikon cannon. On early series of boats, this cannon was mounted on the stern. Later in the war, several more of these 20 mm cannons were added amidships and on the forward deck. Forward of the chart house of some early Elco 77-foot (23 m) boats (PT20 through PT44) were twin .30 cal (7.62 mm) Lewis ma
    chine
    guns on pedestal mounts. Beginning in mid-1943, some boats were fitted with one or two .30 cal Browning ma
    chine
    guns on the forward torpedo racks on pedestal mounts. Occasionally, some front line PT boats received ad hoc up-fits at forward bases, where they mounted such weapons as 37mm aircraft cannons, rocket launchers, or mortars. When these weapons were found to be successful, they were incorporated onto the PT boats as original armament. One such field modification was made to Kennedy's PT-109, which was equipped with a single-shot Army M3 37mm anti-tank gun that her crew had commandeered; they removed the wheels and lashed it to 2x8 timbers placed on the bow only one night before she was lost. The larger punch of the 37mm round was desirable, but the crews looked for something that could fire faster than the single-shot army anti-tank weapon. Their answer was found in the 37mm Oldsmobile M4 aircraft automatic cannon cannibalized from crashed P-39 Airacobra fighter planes on Henderson Field, Guadalcanal. After having demonstrated its value on board PT boats, the M4 (and later M9) cannon was installed at the factory. The M4/M9 37mm auto cannon had a relatively high rate of fire (125 rounds per minute) and large magazine (30 rounds). These features made it highly desirable due to the PT boat's ever-increasing requirement for increased firepower to deal effectively with the Japanese Daihatsu-class barges, which were largely immune to torpedoes due to their shallow draft. By the war's end, most PTs had these weapons. The installation of larger-bore cannons culminated in the fitting of the 40mm Bofors gun[16] on the aft deck. Starting in mid-1943, the installation of this gun had an immediate positive effect on the firepower available from a PT boat. The Bofors cannon had a firing rate of 120 rounds/min (using 4-round clips) and had a range of 5,420 yards (4,960 m). This gun was served by a crew of 4 men, and was used against aircraft targets, as well as shore bombardment or enemy surface craft. Gunboats In the Solomon Islands in 1943, three 77-foot (23 m) PT boats, PT-59, PT-60, and PT-61, were converted into "PT gunboats" by stripping them of all original armament except the two twin .50 cal (12.7 mm) gun mounts, then adding two 40mm and four twin .50 cal (12.7 mm) mounts. Lieutenant Kennedy was the first commanding officer of PT-59 after its conversion. On 2 November 1943, PT-59 participated in the rescue of 40 to 50 Marines from Choiseul Island and a foundering landing craft (LCP(R)) which was under fire from Japanese soldiers on the beach.[17] Towards the end of the war, beginning in 1945, PTs received two eight-cell Mark 50 rocket launchers,[18] launching 5 in (130 mm) spin-stabilized flat trajectory Mark 7 and/or Mark 10 rockets[19] with a range of 11,000 yards (10,000 m). These 16 rockets plus 16 reloads gave them as much firepower as a destroyer's 5-inch (127 mm) guns. By war's end, the PT boat had more "firepower-per-ton" than any other vessel in the U.S. Navy. PT boats also commonly carried between two and eight U.S. Navy Mark 6 depth charges in roll-off racks. Sometimes they were used as a last-ditch weapon to deter pursuing destroyers. The depth charge could be set to go off at 100 feet (30 m), and by the time it exploded, the pursuing destroyer might be above it. Additionally, a few PT boats were equipped to carry naval mines launched from mine racks, but these were not commonly used. "
    3 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Look for a simple balsa build
    "........I have found that most old hand drawn plans are inaccurate......." I bow to your experience, of course! My rather more limited exposure to vintage model plans is that they are indeed inaccurate. Your points are all true, and on top of that wood and paper can shrink and warp over the years. I handled that on the initial EeZeBilts by providing a copy of the die-cut sheets as well as the 'improved' cutting lines, which were 'what I thought the designer meant'. It was still hard to be sure that I had got things right, because manual cutting from plans introduces more errors - but now that I have a cutting ma
    chine
    that source of errors should be minimised. I originally thought that PDF format was a good one to use for distribution, since it was meant to be a 'facsimile image' - but I didn't realise that people can set their printers up to do all sorts of default formatting, which can alter sizes...
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Pulley blocks and Deck Rigging Screw Eyes
    Been away on holiday for a few weeks so not been doing much but back at it again - Pulley blocks The mast has a small pulley block on each end of the cross bar, but I wanted to have a go at making them so using some 0.5mm I marked out the profile and then bent the flat pieces into a channel this was followed by drilling an 8BA clearance hole through both sides. Next I ma
    chine
    d the centre pulley out of brass with a 2mm rad to suit the rope I will be using; I also did an extra round dummy pulley in steel to use as the template to file the radius on the frame and use as a guide for the width of the block. Using a smooth file I carefully filed the radius on each piece using the dummy pulley as a guide and trimmed the width, this was followed using wet and dry paper to finish. To fasten the blocks to the cross bar they need a screw fastening on the top, this was done by soldering an 8BA nut on the top. Finally the brass pulley wheel was secured in place with an 8BA nut and bolt, with a threaded stud in the top. Deck rigging screw eyes - can be bought, but again, I had to have a go, so first I ground a tool to form the end ball which would also part the piece off after it had been turned and threaded. The bar was turned down to the thread o/d and then using an 8BA die the diameter was threaded. I then used the form tool to produce the ball end, this worked OK but could be improved on as the final turned finish wasn’t as good as I’d hoped for, but I don’t have time to spend on this as I only wanted six eyes so the diameters will be finished with a small file and wet and dry. Turned pieces finished, next I set up a gang of slitting saws to mill the flats, holding each part in a split threaded clamp in the ma
    chine
    vice the flats were milled in parallel. Finally using the same clamp jig the ball was drilled with a 2mm hole again to suit the 2mm rope. There’s some final dressing to do before the parts are clear lacquered.
    3 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    ".......I am on a bitof a learning curve at the moment........" A few lessons I learned: 1 - Get a good, solid base-board which isn't warped. The local timber yard may have off-cuts of 3/4" ply. You will want to assemble the mechanics on a proper base, and it helps to have it available first. You will want to paint it anyway, so it will need time to dry. 2 - Get a dial indicator. An easy way to check for precision in assembly is to attach a dial indicator to the end of the Z axis and run it over the base board. It's good for other fault-finding and calibration as well. There are cheap ones on Ebay. 3 - Plan out all the wiring. I put my limit switches in as an afterthought, and found that I had wires which couldn't go in the places I wanted them to go. 4 - Wiring loom control. Consider Drag Chains, Heat-shrink tubing and Braiding. All items are very cheap from Ebay. If you don't put the wiring in at assembly you won't be able to put it in later once everything is connected up... 5 - If you use a drag chain for the USB connection, you will either have to make sure that it's wide enough to take a USB plug passing through it, or cut the plug off, pass it through and re-solder it afterwards. If you do the latter, note that the shielding in a USB cable is aluminium, and won't solder. So you will need to use a connector plug which has a physical connection to the shielding, because interference can ba a problem on these ma
    chine
    s....
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Oak or Mahogany for stable signs, I do plan on fitting limit switches at first anyway. I am on a bitof a learning curve at the moment. Once I have the ma
    chine
    up and running I will no doubt get the hang of it. Good cheap screw supplier.. https://www.gwr-fasteners.co.uk/m3-socket-cup-point-grub-screws---high-tensile-17166-p.asp
    3 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    My plan is to trace PDF files into DSM and output as DXF, or work up my own drawings. I have DXF to G code so I guess I could deal with your files. When finished, my OX will be used for all sorts, cutting aluminium is a must, Daughter has demanded name plaques for her horses stable, she reckons her horsey pals will pay for nice carved name plaques so who am I to argue! ply and balsa cutting will be essential and possibly light brass sheet, hence my first choice of the 900 Watt DeWalt router. I may well end up with an arsenal of spindles/routers and eventually a laser head. I am using the CNC shield for now but the intention is to use a Rumba board, a versatile Arduino mega 2560 based board with loads of output options more commonly used on 3D printers, I have upgraded 2 of my printers with them already. Like 3D printers, the options for modifying/tweaking are endless. I will be fitting endstops, but I may use TMC 2130 drivers, which do not need endstops, as soon as they detect a substancial increase in current they switch off. My Mk3 Prusa has them, certainly reduces the ammount of wiring! I have a notion to draw up some plans for a series of warship boats at rc able size, ie, 47ft Whaler, Skimming Dish FML Cheverton Launch etc, interesting boats but rarely seen actually on the water as working models. I have a milling ma
    chine
    so a plentiful supply of milling cutters is available for a range of jobs.
    3 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Hi. This ma
    chine
    is called the Ox, a full set of plates, anodised in black, is on sale at Oozenest at half price, I am building it bit by bit as I do not have funds for a kit. All parts are sourced in the UK, either from Oozenest, plates, extrusion some bolts and other Ox specific parts, Arduino Uno and CNC shield, the rest, Nema 23s, Toshiba motor drivers, bolts, some extrusions, 30 wheels, spacers etc from WE Do 3D Printing in Sheffield. Control will be via Arduino Uno and CNC shield, with Toshiba 5 amp drivers on a 24 volt PSU. This ma
    chine
    can be made as big as you want just by increasing the length of the extrusions, which consist of 20 x 80, 20 x 60, and 20 x 40 V slot. Mine will have a footprint of 750mm x 550mm, which will give me a build area of around 380mm x 650mm. Big enough for me, I have very little space and I am going to have to sell a couple of 3D printers to make room. I will be using GRBL firmware, Designspark Mechanical for design, DXF2Gcode for converting and Universal G code sender to cut. I don't anticipate needing a bigger ma
    chine
    as I cannot lift big models any more so 600 mm long will do me. I have not thought about work holding and my designs, If I manage to get ant sorted that work, will be there for anyone to use.I have not fully mastered the art of CAD yet, I learned Tech Drawing on a drawing board with T square and compass. This weekend will be a laugh as I am going to get the electrics sorted, I have mastered Marlin, used in 3D printing, and I have been laboring on the misapprehension that CNC would be the same, so it's teach meself GRBL time! https://ooznest.co.uk/product/ox-cnc-aluminium-plates/ https://shop.wedo3dprinting.com/ Please note, I have nothing to do with the suppliers I have linked to other than as a satisfied customer...
    3 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Hi, I am in the process of building an Openbuilds Ox ma
    chine
    . So far I have built the gantry and Z axis. The drivers for the Nema 23 motors should arrive on Saturday so I can spend the bank holiday weekend fiddling about with the electrics. I will use a Dewalt 900Watt router for the spindle so there will be enough power to cut aluminium sheet. I have been using 3D printers tobuild a minesweeper with great success so a CNC router will add to mt arsenal...
    3 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Having successfully used the ma
    chine
    to make the workholding support for the wood sheets, I started on the final leg - getting the ma
    chine
    to actually produce parts for a model boat. It's just going to be used for EeZeBilt balsa parts initially, until I understand a bit more about cutting tools and feed rates. I'm not using a 'professional' spindle motor (which can cost well north of £100), but just an old model boat motor with a cheap
    chine
    se chuck and milling head. You can see a couple of examples in the pictures below. The first material I tried to cut was cardboard. I wanted something really weak, because the cutting tools are very narrow, and I did not know how much sideways force they would take. Turned out fine, though. Further pictures show the first attempt at cutting balsa sheet, a whole sheet of 1/8 balsa being cut, and a couple of parts which have just been cut. Points to make: 1 - you need a high RPM from the cutting motor if you want a fast feed speed. Boat motors work, but a high speed brushless would be better. As it is the edges of the balsa are a bit ragged... 2 - Probably the best way to keep all the parts in the balsa sheet is not to use tabs, but just to cut 90% of the way through. I left about 5 thou on the balsa part, which meant it stayed in place but could easily be pushed out... 3 - you need a soft surface under the balsa sheet in case you do cut deeper by mistake. I thought of felt but that gets caught up in the blade too easily. You could use another balsa sheet, but I used a bit of Correx. Depron would be fine... So there we are. I have now cut a complete kit out of balsa and will start to make it up. I can recommend this ma
    chine
    if you want to just sit and have a beer while all the hard work of cutting parts is done for you...!
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Detailing the cabin – Part 2. The Roof Rails.
    Some hardwood dowel is supplied in the Vintage Model Works kit for the handrails that would look perfectly acceptable for most builders but as I’m going a bit overboard with the detailing of my boat I chose to fabricate mine differently to look a little more authentic. This involved selecting some obeche stripwood of suitable dimensions and carefully measuring and marking out the positions of the supporting legs and the spacing between them. Again I used some ‘photos of the NMM model as a guide for this. Fortunately I had previously treated myself to a vertical stand accessory for my Dremmel drill and I used this as a milling ma
    chine
    with the addition of a suitably sized sanding drum and an improvised ‘fence’ attached to the base of the stand. After making a test piece I also chose to attach a vacuum cleaner hose to the stand to extract the dust as the process generates quite a lot! Milling out the recesses in the obeche strip was a remarkably quick process but the subsequent hand finishing using abrasive paper glued around a dowel and some abrasive pads took a great deal longer to achieve the final profiles. I was very pleased with the final result and so I applied several coats of Teak stain before hand drilling a 2mm hole in each of the supporting legs to take a plasticard rod which was superglued in place. These form fixing spigots that will enable me to easily fix the rails through the roof without using epoxy or superglue on the roof surface but on the underside of the roof instead. The legs at each end of the handrails were drilled to take 1mm rods as the legs are a bit smaller. The rails were then laid out on the cabin roof and with the aid of some masking tape the position of each plasticard rod was marked and then the drilling centres marked with an indent through the tape onto the roof. The fixing holes were all hand drilled through the roof and the handrails pushed into place before being secured with a drop of superglue on the underside. When set the excess plastic rod was cut flush with the roof panel. The finished result is very pleasing 😀 as seen in the last pic along with a sneak preview of the searchlight.
    4 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    While it helps to be accurate, the final trimming of the work holder is done by the ma
    chine
    itself. Here I am cutting the edges of the holder so that a sheet of 4" balsa will be neatly held. That's about 1.6mm wider than a 100mm sheet, so I will need a packing strip if I use the metric sizes. It's surprising how precise these ma
    chine
    s are - I'm moving the cutter in by 0.1mm each pass, but it can move in much smaller steps - one microstep is 6.25 microns, which is about 2.5 ten thousandths of an inch. The balsa will be held between some raised sides made of hard balsa, so that they can be cut easily by the ma
    chine
    if I get a command wrong and move the cutter out of the work area. I expect to put a 2mm felt layer below so that the cutter will have something soft if it goes completely through the workpiece.
    4 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Once the ma
    chine
    is set up, we run into the two classic workshop requirements - tooling and work-holding. We hardly need a powerful spindle or Dremel for cutting balsa, which is what I am going to start with. I am going to use an old brushed boat motor with a small chuck added. But I need an easy way to hold the workpiece. Here I am making up an experimental vacuum holder. It's sized to take a 4" x 36" sheet of balsa. I hope to slip a blank sheet in, run the ma
    chine
    and take out the equivalent of a die-cut kit sheet an hour later. Note the requirement for everything to be massive and rigid, so that items can be held exactly in a repeatable position without movement while the cutting forces are applied....
    4 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Mast assembly
    The supplied mast is of white metal and although OK it has a number of minus points for me. 1- The mast does not lend its self to being hinged. 2- It really needs navigation light on top and the supplied casting is not suitable for this. 3- wiring needs to be hidden, not easy with the casting 4- it’s quite heavy Having said all that it’s ok if you don’t want my wish list. So on with the manufacture of a replica, I chose brass as the preferred material because it’s easy to silver and soft solder. The main legs are made from 6mm round tube, which I squeezed in my ma
    chine
    vice to an oval shape to look like the castings, each of the ends were then squeezed again at 90 degrees to allow then to join to the cross mid-section. I made some brass inserts for the hinged end from 2mm brass sheet, which are bent by 25 degrees to allow the hinge mechanism to sit at 90 degrees to the cabin roof, these are drilled and tapped 8BA. These pieces actually block the end of the oval tube and need to have a 2mm slot milled in them to allow the wires to exit the tube; these are soft soldered in place later. Two feet were made from two pieces of 2mm brass plate the base plate being slotted to accept the upright and finally silver soldered together. (A point here for silver soldering is to use as little solder as possible and allow it to flow with the heat around the joint this means that no filing is needed. I find it’s also good practice to quench the part when nearly cool to break the glass like residue of the flux then just steel wool is required to clean the parts). The feet upstands were then drilled 8BA clearance and the base fixing holes drilled the same size. The cross mid-section is made from 1mm brass sheet and is bent through 360 degrees whilst placing a 6mm round bar in the centre to create a hole for the top mast. A small wooden former was used as the piece was pressed together in the ma
    chine
    vice, this was then silver soldered to give stability and then filed to shape. This piece has to accommodate the wires passing through, so again a 2mm slot is milled from each leg location to the centre to create passage up to the top mast. The top mast is just stock tubing which then has a turned top with four 5mm holes ma
    chine
    d at 90 degrees to accommodate the LED. This is a 5mm Flat top wide angle LED this will direct the light out of the four holes. Finally the cross piece, again stock tube with small ball finials at each end soft soldered in place and tapped 10 BA for the pulley blocks. All pieces now made, it’s time to assemble the parts using a combination of soft soldering and epoxy resin. The wire that I used was silicon sheaved, and when I soldered the legs to the mid-section and lower hinge piece I made sure there was enough wire to pull through to check if the process had damaged the wire, but it hadn’t. So having soldered the LED, the top was epoxied to the upper tube and the tube epoxied to the mid-section. Finally the mid-section was filled using Milliput but first putting some Vaseline on the wires to avoid them being stuck should I ever have to rewire the unit. Next the cross beam was added and epoxied in place. The bottom of the legs looked plain compared with the cast version so I have made some thin gauge brass covers with mock bolts as per the original. The whole assembly was cleaned up ready for a first coat of etch primer, and white primer, followed later with a final coat of appliance white
    4 months ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    Hull finishing touches
    The Huntsman Hull has now had the finishing touches applied...Sanding Sealer, Eze-Kote, glassfibre sheet and hull
    chine
    bars added. The inside of the hull has been given a good dollop of Eze-Kote to seal it and waterproof it so next job is to fit the prop tube and motor before the whole hull gets a coat of primer... I've only just realised, but the kit from SLEC does not contain any decking, so I need to sort out whether to just go for plain mahogany veneer or try to find teak decking which is laser cut to fit with plank marks....any help or advice here welcome for a novice! (I can't find anything suitable on the internet). 😡
    4 months ago by StuartE
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Continuing the saga - assembling the mechanics is one thing - getting it to be accurate requires a lot of set-up work! Here is the ma
    chine
    bolted to a thick chunk of ply, having all the axes checked out for runout. They are all adjustable, so occasionally some shimming needs to be done. Note that though a start has been made on some of the wiring, this is just the mechanics. No motors or control systems have been added yet...
    4 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Response
    Hull progressing nicely!
    I hate the idea of having to shape the balsa front ends. I have in the past re cut the bottom skins on 1/16th marine ply and steamed and pinned with small brass nails. But if that model is all balsa you couldn't do that but if the bulkheads are ply and
    chine
    stringers then it is possible.
    4 months ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    Bending balsa
    its a VERY well known technique its how we used to make rolled balsa bodies for rubber powered competition airplanes. Back in the day we used spent developing solutions from blue print ma
    chine
    s ( ammonia solution). Rolling the balsa sheet around a snooker queue. That is how tight a curve you can get if you give it long enough to soak. Full strength takes a couple of weeks to recover.
    5 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Well, I've got my eShapeoko. I bought all the electronics and motors as well as the mechanical kit from the same source, which meant that I didn't have to do all the work to check compatibility. Total cost, including VAT and postage, was £563 - which is remarkably cheap for a ma
    chine
    with this size cutting bed. if I had wanted to save money and use the free LinuxCNC with a
    chine
    se breakout board I could have dropped the price to around £400 - probably below £350 if I had gone for
    chine
    se Ebay steppers as well. There are more things to get, of course. Tooling and workholding are the standard extras for any big workshop ma
    chine
    . The eShapeoko is designed to hold a Dremel clone, but I will probably be using a more delicate tool to cut out thin balsa shapes for EeZeBilts. The eShapeoko is quite capable of milling metals, but I don't expect to do that very often. So I can't see the total price rising by a lot - perhaps another £20 or so before I can be cutting my first parts. The first thing I did when I got the parts was assemble them roughly to check that it all went together properly. Here is a shot - minus the wiring and controls, of course - to give an idea of the size of the thing. With it I can cut keel lengths up to about 36". The maximum cutting width is about 14". I can easily expand it in length by adding longer rails, but this represents a balance between what would be useful and what would fit easily in the shed! Assembling it is just like making a Meccano kit. Which should present no difficulty to someone of a certain age...! For anyone interested this is the site I got it from: https://amberspyglass.co.uk
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Response
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    I have all the ma
    chine
    s and more but I cannot do that. You have a real skill. I love your fixture ideas. One day I will try to ma
    chine
    some similar parts when I start my 46" RAF Crash Tender. I intend to use this build blog as my guide. Thanks for all of the in depth explanations of how you achieve such detail using every trick in the book and many that are yet to be written. I love reading this build. Really clever. 😊👍👍👍
    5 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Slightly confused newbie
    hi ya J that looks like an Mtroniks speed controller in the pic - does this one have the button on that you press to set it up? because I know what you would need to do is set your trim in the neutral position for the throttle and then go through the procedure of switching on the transmitter and then the receiver and then pressing the button on the speed controller so it recognises where neutral is. I believe some of these Mtroniks are something like 100% rpm forward and something like 75% rpm in reverse. if this idea doesn't work you could always swap the wires over on the motor. (NOT ON THE BATTERY) 🤓
    chine
    e smokey come out of speed controller if you do dat 😲 John
    5 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    vice suitable for Dremel Workstation
    Good morning folks, I have a Dremel Workstation, or drill stand as I call it, and would like to get a small ma
    chine
    vice (is that the correct name?) to go with it. I have seen a few smallish ones but they are usually too big to bolt to the base. Can anyone out there offer any workable suggestions please? Also, is the material the vice is made from of make any relevance at this small size, i.e. is cast aluminium any good? ( I had a screw-on table top vice made of cast aluminium which snapped in half the first time I used it.) I feel the need for this vice as I am about to drill a 1mm hole in a model yacht's mast to locate the boom vang and with my shaky hands it could end up being big enough to pass the boom through without some sort of support!! Chris
    5 months ago by octman
    Forum
    vice suitable for Dremel Workstation
    I'll have a look in the workshop tomorrow and let you know what I have that would be suitable, probably one of the small record ma
    chine
    vices. Cheers Colin.
    5 months ago by Colin H
    Blog
    Roof magnets
    I had from the beginning I had intended to hold all the hatches down with Neodymium magnets however as you work on, these things seem to get forgotten, so now it’s time to do some of the not so exiting tasks. I had bought some 10 x 5x 1.5 magnets so I need to ma
    chine
    the slots into the roof cabin quadrants. These needed to be mirrored by a quadrant that can be epoxied into the corners of each cabin area. Using the trusty Lidl disc sander I produced 12 quadrants and then after making a simple jig to hold them in place I ma
    chine
    d the corresponding slot in each one taking note of left and right hand variants. The next job is to glue all the magnets into the roof spaces and then when they are set glue the magnets into the quadrants making sure the orientation is correct. To make sure the magnets are set into the cabin sides at the correct depth I made a temporary balsa wood frame around each cabin to rest the quadrants on while they set. Another small job complete
    5 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Sea Queen - strakes
    The principle is simple. Fluid flowing over a surface tends to stick to it (Google Coanda Effect). it's worse at the low Reynolds numbers that models work at. The result is that water displaced by the boat at speed tends to flow up the sides of the hull, sticking to them, and can even pour onto the deck. This slows the boat down and can swamp it. If you have a sharp
    chine
    , you can force the water to move away from the hull at the discontinuity, because it can't easily flow around a sharp angle. ideally, you can deflect it downwards and get some lift, helping the boat onto the plane. So a lot of models have small rails along the
    chine
    , shaped to deflect the water downwards a bit. This is what many of the Aerokits models have. Deep Vee design relies on these a lot - the bottom of the hull has a series of parallel spray rails so that as the boat rises in the water the spray is deflected downwards by each rail in turn and an ever-smaller part of the hull bottom is wetted - reducing drag a lot. But the Sea Queen is not a Deep Vee, and doesn't need more that the one set of rails along the
    chine
    . Deep Vee spray rails can also help to cushion the shock when a boat drops back into the water after leaving it - but that's more useful in full-size practice rather than models....
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Good buy from Lidl
    Hi Marky, Have you managed to source the adhesive sandpaper discs the ma
    chine
    uses? I have not enquired at Lidl yet, but will next time I am there. cheers Peter🤔
    5 months ago by Rookysailor
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    I'm thinking about interchanging boat plans as CNC files - so I'm thinking about the sort of ma
    chine
    s people are going to have at home. There are a lot of 'cheap
    chine
    se' ma
    chine
    s on EBay for £200 up to about £500 - but these will be used for engraving, and will have cutting tables of about 8" square. Boat modellers really need a long axis. The Shapeoko is an 'open source' hardware design - much like the Rep-Rap, and the great thing about it is that you can specify the axis sizes - so you can have a ma
    chine
    which is a foot by six feet if you wish. I have just bought a UK kit for one called the eShapeoko - 1m x 500mm - cost about £500. But there is so much to consider - calibrating the ma
    chine
    , choosing a spindle drive, picking a software set....
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    We used a package called aplicam, it suited all the ma
    chine
    s once, you told it the ma
    chine
    zero settings it worked it all out for you. And all we had to do was put dimensions on to the pdf files, or trace using a graphics tablet. It was the best system I used in all my engineering life from school to retirement. I wish I had a copy of it now, it was originally DOS operated in the 70's, and when I retired it was up to Windows 10. Cheers Colin.
    5 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Ah - I've never used any commercial packages - just Open Source. I presume that your company matched their software to the ma
    chine
    s they had. i'm finding that different home ma
    chine
    s seem to have slightly different command sets - for homing, for instance....
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Using downloaded pdfs, I use a reverse engineering package to get my cnc program (in G code). it worked with all the ma
    chine
    ry in our factory, laser, oxy,/acetylene profiler, pulsa and proteus punching ma
    chine
    s and also cnc machining centres. Most commercial cnc programs come with reverse engineering. Hope this helps you. Cheers Colin.
    5 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Not much point uploading a .pdf, unless it has some unusual conversion software. CNC ma
    chine
    s work off G Code. The work area is critical for model boat work. Typical parts are long and thin. The eShapeoko I am building is a nominal 1m x 500mm, which lets me do a 36" keel piece. I would like to put out G Code for cutting the EeZebilt boats, but am not sure how to standardise it so that many CNC ma
    chine
    s will be able to use it. Different CNC controllers seem to use subtly different G Code commands...
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    Hello to Rick and Peejay, Rick this bit is for you, Good to hear you have a steam engine fitted, and are contemplating a bench run to see how long it will run on a boiler full of water. it will bench run longer than on the water as the engine has no loading, I would recommend you fit a gas cut off valve to be on the safe side. I once years ago ran out of water and had to watch the boiler turn its wooden lagging to charcoal. No major damage was done but it did smell a bit for some time. Peejay may I suggest that you Google the likes of Microcosm and other
    chine
    se manufacturers of model steam engines, there is an awful lot out there you will be surprised, try for a twin double acting side valve as they are very efficient, and will run on only 20 - 30 PSI, plus a 1/2" bore twin cylinder will easily power a one metre length hull. Regards to you both, Gary.
    6 months ago by GaryLC
    Blog
    Fitting the rubbing strakes.
    Before I can apply the final coats of epoxy on the hull I need to fit the two rubbing strakes. I started with the bottom rubbing strake which runs along the
    chine
    where the side skins and bottom skins meet. The strakes meet the external keel at the bow and also extend across the stern. I used a length of square section of obeche which needed a gentle curve towards the bow, rather than steam the wood I soaked it in water for a few minutes to soften it and then used a heat gun while bending the strip gently to the required curve. When the wood had cooled and dried the bend was set I did a test fit and drilled very fine holes through the strip so that the modelling pins I use to hold the piece in place would not split the wood. A 30 minute epoxy was used to fit the strakes on both sides of the hull and stern. Above this bottom strake is a second rubbing strake and this also meets the keel at the bow and runs across the stern, I used a broader and thinner obeche strip for this and it was prepared and fixed in the same way. The final pieces to fit will be the gunwales which run around the hull where the sides meet the deck but I will not fit them until I have planked the deck.
    6 months ago by robbob


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