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    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the β€˜Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a β€˜Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately Β£2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of Β£48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more β€˜hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the
    chine
    s, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as β€˜strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone β€˜off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.
    5 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Once the ma
    chine
    is set up, we run into the two classic workshop requirements - tooling and work-holding. We hardly need a powerful spindle or Dremel for cutting balsa, which is what I am going to start with. I am going to use an old brushed boat motor with a small chuck added. But I need an easy way to hold the workpiece. Here I am making up an experimental vacuum holder. It's sized to take a 4" x 36" sheet of balsa. I hope to slip a blank sheet in, run the ma
    chine
    and take out the equivalent of a die-cut kit sheet an hour later. Note the requirement for everything to be massive and rigid, so that items can be held exactly in a repeatable position without movement while the cutting forces are applied....
    5 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Anyone into CNC, or perhaps looking to get into it? I am wondering about putting my plans out as G Code, and it would be useful to have a discussion about the practicalities. For instance, what bed size do people use? Model boat plans are a bit specialist for most CNC boards. They worry about cutting hard materials - we mainly use balsa and ply. Their ma
    chine
    s are usually square - ours would need to be long and thin. They use big commercial routers and spindles - we could get away with smaller motors and dental burrs. I picked up one of these over Christmas, and am currently going through the learning curve. But it doesn't seem to be all that difficult.... https://amberspyglass.co.uk/store/index.php?seo_path=eshapeoko-cnc-milling-ma
    chine
    -mechanical-kit
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Mast assembly
    The supplied mast is of white metal and although OK it has a number of minus points for me. 1- The mast does not lend its self to being hinged. 2- It really needs navigation light on top and the supplied casting is not suitable for this. 3- wiring needs to be hidden, not easy with the casting 4- it’s quite heavy Having said all that it’s ok if you don’t want my wish list. So on with the manufacture of a replica, I chose brass as the preferred material because it’s easy to silver and soft solder. The main legs are made from 6mm round tube, which I squeezed in my ma
    chine
    vice to an oval shape to look like the castings, each of the ends were then squeezed again at 90 degrees to allow then to join to the cross mid-section. I made some brass inserts for the hinged end from 2mm brass sheet, which are bent by 25 degrees to allow the hinge mechanism to sit at 90 degrees to the cabin roof, these are drilled and tapped 8BA. These pieces actually block the end of the oval tube and need to have a 2mm slot milled in them to allow the wires to exit the tube; these are soft soldered in place later. Two feet were made from two pieces of 2mm brass plate the base plate being slotted to accept the upright and finally silver soldered together. (A point here for silver soldering is to use as little solder as possible and allow it to flow with the heat around the joint this means that no filing is needed. I find it’s also good practice to quench the part when nearly cool to break the glass like residue of the flux then just steel wool is required to clean the parts). The feet upstands were then drilled 8BA clearance and the base fixing holes drilled the same size. The cross mid-section is made from 1mm brass sheet and is bent through 360 degrees whilst placing a 6mm round bar in the centre to create a hole for the top mast. A small wooden former was used as the piece was pressed together in the ma
    chine
    vice, this was then silver soldered to give stability and then filed to shape. This piece has to accommodate the wires passing through, so again a 2mm slot is milled from each leg location to the centre to create passage up to the top mast. The top mast is just stock tubing which then has a turned top with four 5mm holes ma
    chine
    d at 90 degrees to accommodate the LED. This is a 5mm Flat top wide angle LED this will direct the light out of the four holes. Finally the cross piece, again stock tube with small ball finials at each end soft soldered in place and tapped 10 BA for the pulley blocks. All pieces now made, it’s time to assemble the parts using a combination of soft soldering and epoxy resin. The wire that I used was silicon sheaved, and when I soldered the legs to the mid-section and lower hinge piece I made sure there was enough wire to pull through to check if the process had damaged the wire, but it hadn’t. So having soldered the LED, the top was epoxied to the upper tube and the tube epoxied to the mid-section. Finally the mid-section was filled using Milliput but first putting some Vaseline on the wires to avoid them being stuck should I ever have to rewire the unit. Next the cross beam was added and epoxied in place. The bottom of the legs looked plain compared with the cast version so I have made some thin gauge brass covers with mock bolts as per the original. The whole assembly was cleaned up ready for a first coat of etch primer, and white primer, followed later with a final coat of appliance white
    11 days ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    Hull finishing touches
    The Huntsman Hull has now had the finishing touches applied...Sanding Sealer, Eze-Kote, glassfibre sheet and hull
    chine
    bars added. The inside of the hull has been given a good dollop of Eze-Kote to seal it and waterproof it so next job is to fit the prop tube and motor before the whole hull gets a coat of primer... I've only just realised, but the kit from SLEC does not contain any decking, so I need to sort out whether to just go for plain mahogany veneer or try to find teak decking which is laser cut to fit with plank marks....any help or advice here welcome for a novice! (I can't find anything suitable on the internet). 😑
    11 days ago by StuartE
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Continuing the saga - assembling the mechanics is one thing - getting it to be accurate requires a lot of set-up work! Here is the ma
    chine
    bolted to a thick chunk of ply, having all the axes checked out for runout. They are all adjustable, so occasionally some shimming needs to be done. Note that though a start has been made on some of the wiring, this is just the mechanics. No motors or control systems have been added yet...
    13 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Response
    Hull progressing nicely!
    I hate the idea of having to shape the balsa front ends. I have in the past re cut the bottom skins on 1/16th marine ply and steamed and pinned with small brass nails. But if that model is all balsa you couldn't do that but if the bulkheads are ply and
    chine
    stringers then it is possible.
    17 days ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    Bending balsa
    its a VERY well known technique its how we used to make rolled balsa bodies for rubber powered competition airplanes. Back in the day we used spent developing solutions from blue print ma
    chine
    s ( ammonia solution). Rolling the balsa sheet around a snooker queue. That is how tight a curve you can get if you give it long enough to soak. Full strength takes a couple of weeks to recover.
    23 days ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Well, I've got my eShapeoko. I bought all the electronics and motors as well as the mechanical kit from the same source, which meant that I didn't have to do all the work to check compatibility. Total cost, including VAT and postage, was Β£563 - which is remarkably cheap for a ma
    chine
    with this size cutting bed. if I had wanted to save money and use the free LinuxCNC with a
    chine
    se breakout board I could have dropped the price to around Β£400 - probably below Β£350 if I had gone for
    chine
    se Ebay steppers as well. There are more things to get, of course. Tooling and workholding are the standard extras for any big workshop ma
    chine
    . The eShapeoko is designed to hold a Dremel clone, but I will probably be using a more delicate tool to cut out thin balsa shapes for EeZeBilts. The eShapeoko is quite capable of milling metals, but I don't expect to do that very often. So I can't see the total price rising by a lot - perhaps another Β£20 or so before I can be cutting my first parts. The first thing I did when I got the parts was assemble them roughly to check that it all went together properly. Here is a shot - minus the wiring and controls, of course - to give an idea of the size of the thing. With it I can cut keel lengths up to about 36". The maximum cutting width is about 14". I can easily expand it in length by adding longer rails, but this represents a balance between what would be useful and what would fit easily in the shed! Assembling it is just like making a Meccano kit. Which should present no difficulty to someone of a certain age...! For anyone interested this is the site I got it from: https://amberspyglass.co.uk
    26 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Response
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    I have all the ma
    chine
    s and more but I cannot do that. You have a real skill. I love your fixture ideas. One day I will try to ma
    chine
    some similar parts when I start my 46" RAF Crash Tender. I intend to use this build blog as my guide. Thanks for all of the in depth explanations of how you achieve such detail using every trick in the book and many that are yet to be written. I love reading this build. Really clever. πŸ˜ŠπŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘
    1 month ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Slightly confused newbie
    hi ya J that looks like an Mtroniks speed controller in the pic - does this one have the button on that you press to set it up? because I know what you would need to do is set your trim in the neutral position for the throttle and then go through the procedure of switching on the transmitter and then the receiver and then pressing the button on the speed controller so it recognises where neutral is. I believe some of these Mtroniks are something like 100% rpm forward and something like 75% rpm in reverse. if this idea doesn't work you could always swap the wires over on the motor. (NOT ON THE BATTERY) πŸ€“
    chine
    e smokey come out of speed controller if you do dat 😲 John
    1 month ago by JOHN
    Forum
    vice suitable for Dremel Workstation
    Good morning folks, I have a Dremel Workstation, or drill stand as I call it, and would like to get a small ma
    chine
    vice (is that the correct name?) to go with it. I have seen a few smallish ones but they are usually too big to bolt to the base. Can anyone out there offer any workable suggestions please? Also, is the material the vice is made from of make any relevance at this small size, i.e. is cast aluminium any good? ( I had a screw-on table top vice made of cast aluminium which snapped in half the first time I used it.) I feel the need for this vice as I am about to drill a 1mm hole in a model yacht's mast to locate the boom vang and with my shaky hands it could end up being big enough to pass the boom through without some sort of support!! Chris
    2 months ago by octman
    Forum
    vice suitable for Dremel Workstation
    I'll have a look in the workshop tomorrow and let you know what I have that would be suitable, probably one of the small record ma
    chine
    vices. Cheers Colin.
    2 months ago by Colin H
    Blog
    Roof magnets
    I had from the beginning I had intended to hold all the hatches down with Neodymium magnets however as you work on, these things seem to get forgotten, so now it’s time to do some of the not so exiting tasks. I had bought some 10 x 5x 1.5 magnets so I need to ma
    chine
    the slots into the roof cabin quadrants. These needed to be mirrored by a quadrant that can be epoxied into the corners of each cabin area. Using the trusty Lidl disc sander I produced 12 quadrants and then after making a simple jig to hold them in place I ma
    chine
    d the corresponding slot in each one taking note of left and right hand variants. The next job is to glue all the magnets into the roof spaces and then when they are set glue the magnets into the quadrants making sure the orientation is correct. To make sure the magnets are set into the cabin sides at the correct depth I made a temporary balsa wood frame around each cabin to rest the quadrants on while they set. Another small job complete
    2 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Sea Queen - strakes
    The principle is simple. Fluid flowing over a surface tends to stick to it (Google Coanda Effect). it's worse at the low Reynolds numbers that models work at. The result is that water displaced by the boat at speed tends to flow up the sides of the hull, sticking to them, and can even pour onto the deck. This slows the boat down and can swamp it. If you have a sharp
    chine
    , you can force the water to move away from the hull at the discontinuity, because it can't easily flow around a sharp angle. ideally, you can deflect it downwards and get some lift, helping the boat onto the plane. So a lot of models have small rails along the
    chine
    , shaped to deflect the water downwards a bit. This is what many of the Aerokits models have. Deep Vee design relies on these a lot - the bottom of the hull has a series of parallel spray rails so that as the boat rises in the water the spray is deflected downwards by each rail in turn and an ever-smaller part of the hull bottom is wetted - reducing drag a lot. But the Sea Queen is not a Deep Vee, and doesn't need more that the one set of rails along the
    chine
    . Deep Vee spray rails can also help to cushion the shock when a boat drops back into the water after leaving it - but that's more useful in full-size practice rather than models....
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Good buy from Lidl
    Hi Marky, Have you managed to source the adhesive sandpaper discs the ma
    chine
    uses? I have not enquired at Lidl yet, but will next time I am there. cheers PeterπŸ€”
    2 months ago by Rookysailor
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    I'm thinking about interchanging boat plans as CNC files - so I'm thinking about the sort of ma
    chine
    s people are going to have at home. There are a lot of 'cheap
    chine
    se' ma
    chine
    s on EBay for Β£200 up to about Β£500 - but these will be used for engraving, and will have cutting tables of about 8" square. Boat modellers really need a long axis. The Shapeoko is an 'open source' hardware design - much like the Rep-Rap, and the great thing about it is that you can specify the axis sizes - so you can have a ma
    chine
    which is a foot by six feet if you wish. I have just bought a UK kit for one called the eShapeoko - 1m x 500mm - cost about Β£500. But there is so much to consider - calibrating the ma
    chine
    , choosing a spindle drive, picking a software set....
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    We used a package called aplicam, it suited all the ma
    chine
    s once, you told it the ma
    chine
    zero settings it worked it all out for you. And all we had to do was put dimensions on to the pdf files, or trace using a graphics tablet. It was the best system I used in all my engineering life from school to retirement. I wish I had a copy of it now, it was originally DOS operated in the 70's, and when I retired it was up to Windows 10. Cheers Colin.
    2 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Ah - I've never used any commercial packages - just Open Source. I presume that your company matched their software to the ma
    chine
    s they had. i'm finding that different home ma
    chine
    s seem to have slightly different command sets - for homing, for instance....
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Using downloaded pdfs, I use a reverse engineering package to get my cnc program (in G code). it worked with all the ma
    chine
    ry in our factory, laser, oxy,/acetylene profiler, pulsa and proteus punching ma
    chine
    s and also cnc machining centres. Most commercial cnc programs come with reverse engineering. Hope this helps you. Cheers Colin.
    2 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Not much point uploading a .pdf, unless it has some unusual conversion software. CNC ma
    chine
    s work off G Code. The work area is critical for model boat work. Typical parts are long and thin. The eShapeoko I am building is a nominal 1m x 500mm, which lets me do a 36" keel piece. I would like to put out G Code for cutting the EeZebilt boats, but am not sure how to standardise it so that many CNC ma
    chine
    s will be able to use it. Different CNC controllers seem to use subtly different G Code commands...
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    Hello to Rick and Peejay, Rick this bit is for you, Good to hear you have a steam engine fitted, and are contemplating a bench run to see how long it will run on a boiler full of water. it will bench run longer than on the water as the engine has no loading, I would recommend you fit a gas cut off valve to be on the safe side. I once years ago ran out of water and had to watch the boiler turn its wooden lagging to charcoal. No major damage was done but it did smell a bit for some time. Peejay may I suggest that you Google the likes of Microcosm and other
    chine
    se manufacturers of model steam engines, there is an awful lot out there you will be surprised, try for a twin double acting side valve as they are very efficient, and will run on only 20 - 30 PSI, plus a 1/2" bore twin cylinder will easily power a one metre length hull. Regards to you both, Gary.
    2 months ago by GaryLC
    Blog
    Fitting the rubbing strakes.
    Before I can apply the final coats of epoxy on the hull I need to fit the two rubbing strakes. I started with the bottom rubbing strake which runs along the
    chine
    where the side skins and bottom skins meet. The strakes meet the external keel at the bow and also extend across the stern. I used a length of square section of obeche which needed a gentle curve towards the bow, rather than steam the wood I soaked it in water for a few minutes to soften it and then used a heat gun while bending the strip gently to the required curve. When the wood had cooled and dried the bend was set I did a test fit and drilled very fine holes through the strip so that the modelling pins I use to hold the piece in place would not split the wood. A 30 minute epoxy was used to fit the strakes on both sides of the hull and stern. Above this bottom strake is a second rubbing strake and this also meets the keel at the bow and runs across the stern, I used a broader and thinner obeche strip for this and it was prepared and fixed in the same way. The final pieces to fit will be the gunwales which run around the hull where the sides meet the deck but I will not fit them until I have planked the deck.
    2 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    I'm doing the eShapeoko - I wanted a more rigid ma
    chine
    for general purposes, and I liked the fact that you could specify the X and Y axis lengths. For cutting model boat parts you rarely want something as wide as 1 foot - but you often want items of length greater than 1 yard. The eShapeoko has standard sizes as extreme as 15 inches by 60 inches, and can easily be extended. I've gone for 18 x 36 inches - should be fine for EeZebilts... One of the things that's a bit annoying with GRBL is that it doesn't currently do tool radius compensation. I'm using an arduino with grbl as well, and if I cut my plans as drawn they will all be a tool radius out. I am currently looking to use a 0.5mm tool so the effect will be small - but if you know of a better driver interpreter...?
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Hi All The boat had the rudder completely vertical to start with and that is the problem. With the rudder vertical the boat pulls the bow down in the turns which makes it sit up on the
    chine
    . A planning hull attack angle is about four degrees to the water, but these boats like an angle of about six degrees. The leading edge of the rudder and the angle of it governs bow lift or dip in the turns. Also the balance point of the boat is as important as the rudder setup. Canabus
    3 months ago by canabus
    Forum
    Smoke generator
    Have just made a prototype of a fan forced smoker which seems to be working well (despite breaking the heater coil by moving it while hot, - had it apart, broke wire, screw and washer repair, not quite as hot) I bought a couple of Heng Long smokers (for R/C tanks or cars) to play with, for $10 NZ each(or 5.3 Euros to you Northerners give or take a yen) from Bangood and just bought another from Ebay. There seem to be 2 different models, as one has a long coil with a lamp wick draped over it, which is sitting in the oil reservoir, the other has a small coil inside a piece of heat resistant woven tubing (as you might find insulating toaster/heater wiring etc) which acts as a wick and that also sits in cotton wool in the reservoir, (this seems to be the better of the two) Tip - don't fill the tank right up, only enough to soak the cotton, element should be just out of the oil. The wick loads the element. The better model seems to have a black top to the tank (also maybe either brown or black tank) and the other has a brown top and dirty brown tank. As with most of this stuff you won't know till you get it what it's going to be. What I did was remove the tank and cut off the pump tube just in front of the screw lugs (see black line in photo) then fitted the tank, and a 40x40x10 5v ESC fan (voltage controlled by a UBEC set to 5v on the jumpers) into a plastic electronics utility box from Jaycar (our local electronics and hobby store). I made up a double JST lead for the 2s 1800Mah Lipo and fired it up (using baby oil). it's pretty much silent and smokes well once it gets warmed up, ( starts smoking in about 5 seconds) You could control it (on/off volume) by either a remote on/off switch or perhaps a small cheap 10A brushed ESC. I would leave the fan running and control the element to avoid burning the element. The original pump tank inlet hole seems ok as is (approx 1.5mm) but you could enlarge it very slightly to get a better flow if you could find a better oil. At the electronics store they have proper smoke ma
    chine
    oil for $20 NZ per litre so I may have a look at that. The reason I went for the fan idea was that I found in std pump form, if I immersed a tube from the tank in water, it sucked water back into the tank. I was hoping it would pump smoke out of my HSL exhausts at water level alongside the cooling water but it would need a very light non return valve to do this. The fan seems to pump the smoke through 2mm ID silicone tube ok, so tubing of similar ID to the OD of the tank outlets should work well. These pumps in original form work pretty well for the price, and are cheap enough to keep a few for spare elements, the only thing is they are a bit noisy but in an 'engine sounding' way, (might add to the effect on a tug or work-boat though) What you have left after this mod is a very handy little geared motor with an eccentric output wheel which could be used for winches, radar and whirly bits of any description (see pic of motor leftover and original) To avoid burnout, these should be run on no more than a 2s (around 7.5v-(suggest 8v max with fan running) The other tank is going to work a lot better than this one but I'm not making a tug, just want a bit of exhaust smoke on start-up etc to go with the 2 sound units. Very cheap to make (around $25 NZ with pump, box, fan and UBEC all through Ebay, Aliexpress and Bangood (and local electronics store) if you wanted to run an ESC to control the smoke and you have no channels left to control it proportionally, you can always try using a second receiver bound to your TX, (if your TX will allow it,) power it and a brushed ESC (wired to the element) as normal and use the throttle channel to plug in your smoke control. This should work if you want more smoke as you accelerate or if you are using only 1 stick on a 2 stick TX you could use your 'elevator' stick pushed up (or a toggle switch if available) to start/stop the smoke (through the brushed ESC setup) . This setup weighs 100g (10g more than std) The quest for lots of smoke continues Will try to upload vid later and update progress.
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    Perhaps if I had all the ma
    chine
    tooling that you have !!
    3 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Hello all, since I keep the weekend for me I thought I'd try hooking up all the lecktrickery for my brushless motor. It's one of they outrunning tiddlers. I have a 3S LiPo which is firing on all cylinders at 3.79 volts per. I plug it in to the ESC, some
    chine
    se one I got recently. I soldered wires to a T type plug that fits the Overlander battery pack. I'd already soldered the 2mm connectors to the other end of the ESC wires and protected them with heat shrink. Plugged tested (6.2 volts) Nimhs into Rx and it starts flashing, then plugged ESC into a channel and the motor, yes , the MOTOR starts beeping! How the hell can that happen? I plug the battery in and the motor beeps even quicker! What on earth is happening? Needless to say, no rotation, buzzing, whistling, just beeps from a motor, clear as you like! Please help. I am already teetering on the edge of getting rid of all my working stuff as it takes up space and is such a damned faff! But what I have, I would like to work. Just long enough to prove it all. Martin
    4 months ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    After the Christmas break its back to the cabin to finish some of the instrument detail. You may recall I detailed the cockpit with some ply constructions to represent the general layout; I also intend to detail the compass, throttle controls, steering wheel, panel lighting, and instrument panel. The instrument panel was copied and scaled from various drawing and pictures and I came up with a three-panel unit where panels 1 & 3 are identical as they are for the two-engine managements system the centre panel deals with electrical things. I intend to make the panel out of 1.5 mm aluminium cut to size on the guillotine I then attached this to a hardwood block with some strong double sided tape this will be more than strong enough to hold the piece for the drilling/light milling operation. I worked out the hole positions using an absolute datum (same as CNC work, if only I was still working) This does take some time using my rather old milling ma
    chine
    making sure any backlash is taken out during the 28 linear movements. I used various sizes of centre drills to produce the holes as they give not only accurate size but also perfectly round holes on thin material and the only ones that needed to be a particular size (6mm dial holes) the others are for switches and LEDs which can all be a 3 mm location hole. Each hole was drilled and then chamfered to simulate a bezel on the dials. Finally, I milled a shallow groove (2mm x 0.3 deep) to simulate the separate panels. I have copied a number of different marine dials from the internet and using PowerPoint I aligned in a complete group and then printed and laminated them, this will be placed behind the aluminium plate using double-sided tape. Having fixed the dials in place I drilled through the holes where LEDSs will fit. The LEDs will be shortened and polished so they are flat to the face; these are then stuck in place. Next, I made all the switches from brass bar with a fine brass pin glued across its face to simulate the lever. These were painted gloss black and the centre pin picked out in red, they were then glued into the 3 mm location hole. The black knobs/pull switches were turned out of black Perspex and polished; they were then glued into the location holes. The whole instrument panel is then pinned on to the wooden framework which has been left in natural wood finish (ply) as it looks like the original boat was just a varnished ply finish.
    3 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Welcome to the magic world of cheap
    chine
    se clone R/C equipment!
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    internet sales
    I have been reading about how the high street shops are suffering in regards to sales.I wish to plead guilty as i purchase most of my model boat kits and parts online ! The shop keepers have high rates and running costs etc when compared to some online retailers .I purchased online a 4 channel transmitter,receiver and 30amp esc from china for around Β£40 as this would cost double from a uk retailer its no wonder there are very few model shops left but as an Oap i look after the pennies.All the
    chine
    se parts are excellent and work well. I would prefer to buy local and enjoy a walk around a well stocked shop but difference in local retail prices and imported items is now too much.Model shops of my youth are sorely missed.
    3 months ago by keithtindley
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    This 'Cheap
    chine
    se' design, according to the documentation, seems to come in several different (nominal) amp ratings, and, interestingly, in a 'standard car' or in a 'crawler' version. The one for crawlers - slow rock-climbing cars - is also recommended for tanks, and has a jumper giving the sort of instant reverse we would use for boats. This looks like an example... https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Waterproof-Brushed-1060-60A-ESC-For-RC-1-10-Crawler-Car-Tank-Model-Accessory/362488539332?epid=13025976857&hash=item54660028c4:g:ybcAAOSwwdNb7rDO:rk:127:pf:0 Which might help if anyone's browsing cheap brandless ESCs...
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Hi Steve, I have the same problem with the ESCs in my HSL. They are cheap
    chine
    se car models and can be a bit tricky to get into reverse quickly. I have found that either waiting a few seconds in neutral before trying reverse, or going to neutral and flicking the throttle forward a few clicks and back to neutral quickly (in .5 sec) usually sorts it. I think it may be that the motor stops somewhere that the cheaper ESCs can't detect (bit like an old car starter that hits the bald spot on the ring gear and you have to jog it a bit) so you have to move it slightly for it to 'see' it (maybe the capacitors also). Brushed ESCs don't have that problem as the brushes are in constant contact, rather than relying on correct positioning in Brushless motors. You will also find that some
    chine
    se motors are not timed/wound correctly, and you can feel weak or 'floaty' spots between certain magnets which may also cause a problem. Perhaps trying a higher or lower ESC timing by 1 step either way might help if you have that capability. if it works by just flicking the throttle method, you can just slow down as you come in and take you time finding reverse in a scale like manner (remember the PT109 movie where they went through the shed on the wharf) You can also try swapping the other pairs of wires on the motor (same direction but different pairs). if you are still not happy then it might be time as Doug said, for a better ESC with instructions. Get one which has all the programing features, (fwd, rev , timing, auto batt detection (lipos or NmH etc) starting mode- ie soft,hard, brake etc) this will give you plenty of options for adjustment. Doesn't have to be a marine one, a good known brand car/buggy one will do and if you have any heat problems you can always put a mini fan on it. Water cooled marine ESCs are really only for high amp high speed setups. My 36"HSL has 2x 30A car ESCs running 2x 28/45 2000kv water cooled motors and ESCs never get even warm. Pictured are the ESCs I am using from HK which have an output plug for a fan if needs be. The 3rd pic is the brushless ESC types (EBay, AliExpress) I am using, which have no problems with reverse transition (see vid section re Thornycroft MTB maneuvering) also the HSL vids to give you an idea of how these brushless ESCs perform even with the minor reversing problem. Hope you get it sorted.
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    BRAVE BORDERER
    Hi I once saw a boat called a Telectra perform . Hard
    chine
    hull nothing unusual. This planed as flat as a pan cake even in fast turns . it was unusual in having a central single screw close to the transom but with twin rudders mounted as far away from the prop as possible . So no propwash over the rudder Cheers Ian
    3 months ago by TOWN3810
    Response
    Excelsior
    Hi Joe, In answer to your queries, Hull was built in the bread and butter system using deal sealed inside and out with coats of yacht varnish and painted using acrylic. Subsequent models of Wherries and
    chine
    se Junks were plank on frame using 1/8” balsa strips sealed with resin,varnish inside and out, with again acrylic paint. Balsa easier to work with to gain experience - reasonable effectiveness both in carvel and clinker planking. All the best and good sailing. Gascoigne
    3 months ago by Gascoigne
    Blog
    Stern & keel formers
    Various small pieces, S8 & S9, are added to bulkhead former F7 that create the curvature of the stern which in turn support the outer skin, in addition there are some pieces that are fixed either side of the keel as laminations to add strength and to support the bottom skins where they meet the keel. The prop shaft has yet to be delivered so I used a length of 8mm plastic rod temporarily in its place so that I could fit the keel laminations K5 around the shaft. I chose to fit additional pieces on either side of the keel between the bulkhead formers to support the bottom skins and some extra pieces of balsa were fitted at the stern to support the outer skin, and in a similar fashion some extra pieces fitted either side of the keel formers at the prow. Once all these pieces were firmly set they need to sanded to the profile of the hull, and this is best done with abrasive paper around a sanding block. I made a sanding β€˜plate’ from some 6mm MDF with a sheet of 120 grit aluminium oxide abrasive paper glued to it to form a perfectly flat sanding surface and this was used to chamfer and flatten the bulkhead, keel and
    chine
    formers so that the outer skins would lay as flat as possible across them. I also fitted some pieces of ply under the centre section of the box around the keel to reinforce the area under where the motor mount will be as I don’t think the balsa base of the β€˜box’ will take screws firmly. The next step will be to fit the side skins and then the hull will really take shape.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Response
    aeronaut classic
    I am also upgrading the prop shaft, I have purchased a 4mm shaft to use that has a decent outer casing. All other boats I have built the side
    chine
    rails have all bee 1/4 x1/4 inch rails. I am just so disappointed with some of the substandard use of certain parts. I just feel for the price they are cutting costs to up their profits on the boat. I have built a few of the older AeroKits like the RAF crash tender, Sea commander, Sea Queen and Sea Hornet as well as the Precedent Fairey Huntsman, and these all have a substantial set of side rail to fit and even the bulk head pieces are a much better thickness of ply. I would just not recommend the Aeronuat kits to anyone myself now. I was just going to fit a standard Gruapner speed 400 motor in but still unsure. I was thinking maybe a brushless may just be a bit overpowering her. but as I say still unsure, I may put in a brushless yet who knows. Keep us informed on here as to you progress I am keen to see your finished model. I suspect yours will be finished well before mine as I have shelved the build for now. Happy modelling.
    3 months ago by BOATSHED
    Response
    Upper & Lower
    chine
    s
    Hi Robbob, thanks for the heads up on London Model Engineering Exhibition at 'Ally Pally' in January 2019. I am hoping to be there, Just to see your masterpiece !
    3 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Upper & Lower
    chine
    s
    Hi Doug. All credit due to Phil Smith and his original design for that actually... Hi rolfman2000 I hope SWMBO is good to her word as I happen to know that the kit is now available to buy from Vintage Model Works πŸ˜ŠπŸ‘ I'm told the price is Β£185.00 + P&P and there's also an optional stand/carrying box which is CNC cut to the hull profile for an additional Β£10.00 That sounds a bit of a bargain too. Contact Mike Cummings at VMW for more information: http://www.vintagemodelworks.co.uk/ I'm hoping to have the boat in an advanced state of completion in time for the London Model Engineering Exhibition at 'Ally Pally' in January 2019. It will be on the St.Albans & District Model Engineering Society club stand alongside my RAF Crash Tender. Rob.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Upper & Lower
    chine
    s
    Oh how this brings memories flooding back from 50 years ago, seeing the same construction as my original Veron Police launch (that's sat in the garage), going together. I bet the fit is a darned sight better than it was all those years ago, what with cad laser cut pieces and cad designs as well. I'm following this with even more interest, as I have permission of SWMBO to get the new bigger kit when it becomes available. Fingers crossed, not long now. Keep the installments coming Robbob. Best wishes, Dave W 😊
    4 months ago by rolfman2000
    Response
    Upper & Lower
    chine
    s
    Simple Rob, Instead of attempting some almost impossible bends of thin (0.5mmx5mm )planks, I'll cut it out of 3 interlocking pieces (each side) of 1.5mm mahog sheet. Will probably end up looking more like it would have been done on an original 😊 Cheers, Doug 😎
    4 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Upper & Lower
    chine
    s
    Hi Doug. Not sure how I've helped you out with your caprail but thanks for the compliment πŸ‘. Mike. The boat gets a lot heavier once the ply skins and planking goes on, I hope it doesn't need blasting as there's not too many places to hide it away πŸ€”.
    4 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Upper & Lower
    chine
    s
    Thats coming on nicely and as you say it looks quite a rigid construction. How much of a bonus is a lightweight construction V an all ply construction as I assume you may have to put some ballast in the finished model. not thtat I have any experience on the subject
    4 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Upper & Lower
    chine
    s
    Excellent RobπŸ‘ Thanks for showing me how to make the mahogany caprail for my cutter 😊 "More power to your
    chine
    s"😁 Cheers Doug 😎
    4 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Upper & Lower
    chine
    s
    The next stage is to assemble and fit the upper and lower
    chine
    s to the bulkhead formers. Each
    chine
    is made from three parts that are step jointed together, the instructions recommend using the plan to ensure correct alignment with a protective transparent paper between, however the cutting accuracy of the parts is such that having checked the alignment over the plan I was confident that assembling and glueing them together on the cutting mat would be OK. The upper
    chine
    s were assembled first and when set were glued and pinned to the tops of the bulkhead formers with the fronts butting against the K1 keel former at the prow. The lower
    chine
    s were assembled in the same fashion and when dry are glued and set into the slots in the bulkhead formers. Finally the stern former F7 is added and the whole assembly set aside to dry. The hull is quickly taking shape now and even at this stage is very rigid and yet remarkably light.
    4 months ago by robbob
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    You are correct in your thinking. The component is called a spray rail and is mounted at the
    chine
    line from bow to stern. The spray rail provides additional lift so planning can be achieved at a slightly lower speed, and at the same time deflects the spray down and out from the side of the boat at speed.
    4 months ago by bubbletop409
    Forum
    steam water pump
    I would suggest you go on to eBay, and then type in Microcosm Steam engines in the search window,this will take you to a
    chine
    se Company who make numerous steam engines, at very reasonable prices plus lubricators and mechanical water pumps for various engines. Let me know how you get on. I willpost youa photo of an engine with a pump fitted, one of Microcosm's engines, they do boilers as well.
    4 months ago by GaryLC
    Blog
    Elizabeth
    After a long lay-off, not requested or wanted. The call of the sawdust was here again.. Looking back at the Gentlemans Cruiser, i decided to start afresh with its sister ship, Elizabeth. She is a hard
    chine
    construction so was hoping to get her to water in record time. But the gremlins set in when the hull had to be skinned.. The bottom skins did not want to play ball, or maybe it was me on a not so good day, but persevered and then planked the bottom in Obechie 6mm x 3mm, and then fitted the side skins vertical grained, and i must admit they fell on, no grunting and moaning with the hull frame in a half nelson trying to bash home a few pins, it was like hanging wallpaper.. The basic hiull is not as drawing with built up bulkheads but the keel and bulkheads are 5mm ply.
    chine
    s are 3/8" x 1/8" spruce and Obechie, obechie to the outer edges, easier to work.
    9 months ago by muddy
    Media
    March'71
    165footer job from Bangladesh navy. Armed with 1 37mm
    chine
    se naval cannon (which I replaced with type 76F variant), 2 orlicons. Actually used to patrol costal area here , also used in coast guard. The class name is padma class patrol vessel, designed and made by BN. Tried to make its rc version in 1:110th scale(I'm not great like you guys so please help me do better and suggest me where I can do better). Length 45cm, beam 7cm. Powered with dual 180. The only thing I'm suffering is motor shaft connectoΕ•. Those two universal joints I bought are not good enough for smooth rotation. They vibrates. So I used silicone tubes. Now I'm using latex rubber tubes . Any suggestions or plan what I can use in peace!πŸ˜†
    4 months ago by Sakibian
    Blog
    new sails
    the other half has been a busy bee with her sewing ma
    chine
    so today i set about fully rigging her
    4 months ago by jacko


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