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    Blog
    40'' Seaplane Tender, new build U
    Cabin partly painted, (tops to paint), mast painted with LED riding light fitted. Second sound unit turned up and both now fitted and working, (with as near as I can find to Detroit 4-53s as fitted to this boat, in the programmed choices). Inner hull in
    cockpit
    and some interior painted and steering servo fitted. Props painted bronze (art acrylic metallic). Still waiting for shaft collars for the motor end of the shafts and some nice little shaft oiler cans (far easier than trying to make them). They have arrived in the country so shouldn't be too long. Off to get some paint tomorrow for the cabin tops and deck, also I have to fit the
    cockpit
    side battens which I've already stained and cut. Once the cabin's painted I can fit the windows and grab rails as the stanchions have arrived from CMB. Going to make a quick vid later, showing the sound units operating etc. Still have bow roller and a number of smaller details to go, such as tidying the waterline with a black boot topping and making the name decals (if my printer stops mucking about, - almost time for a new one)! Also have to do the nav, cabin and stern lights, ( have ordered a small adjustable voltage reg to adjust lights. Remote switch for lights is already fitted.
    4 months ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Enclosing the controls.
    From Boaty I am following your post with interest as I had been thinking about building a Police Launch in the near future. Models with aft
    cockpit
    s can present issues when installing RC gear and I have experienced this when building an Aerokits Sea Scout and five years ago when restoring the Crash Tender. Simplest method is to install the servo horizontally and raise the
    cockpit
    floor but this can create problems in itself unless the floor is sealed around the edges to prevent water entering the compartment. The seat idea is a realistic method as it could be eliminate the problems that I mentioned above as well as providing easier access to the RC gear. Keep up the good work Boaty😁
    9 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    Help identifying
    Boaty I agree with Canabus. The shape of the hull does appear to be from the Sea Hornet and when looking to the aft the
    cockpit
    is also very similar. Looks like you have a good buy there. Boaty😎
    9 months ago by boaty
    Response
    Electric Barbarella
    She's a beauty!!! (And I am not talking about only the lady in the
    cockpit
    !) I grew up a block away from the river, and there were a lot of pleasure craft in the area. Most of them were pre-70's as I left before then.
    11 months ago by Peejay
    Blog
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    After the Christmas break its back to the cabin to finish some of the instrument detail. You may recall I detailed the
    cockpit
    with some ply constructions to represent the general layout; I also intend to detail the compass, throttle controls, steering wheel, panel lighting, and instrument panel. The instrument panel was copied and scaled from various drawing and pictures and I came up with a three-panel unit where panels 1 & 3 are identical as they are for the two-engine managements system the centre panel deals with electrical things. I intend to make the panel out of 1.5 mm aluminium cut to size on the guillotine I then attached this to a hardwood block with some strong double sided tape this will be more than strong enough to hold the piece for the drilling/light milling operation. I worked out the hole positions using an absolute datum (same as CNC work, if only I was still working) This does take some time using my rather old milling machine making sure any backlash is taken out during the 28 linear movements. I used various sizes of centre drills to produce the holes as they give not only accurate size but also perfectly round holes on thin material and the only ones that needed to be a particular size (6mm dial holes) the others are for switches and LEDs which can all be a 3 mm location hole. Each hole was drilled and then chamfered to simulate a bezel on the dials. Finally, I milled a shallow groove (2mm x 0.3 deep) to simulate the separate panels. I have copied a number of different marine dials from the internet and using PowerPoint I aligned in a complete group and then printed and laminated them, this will be placed behind the aluminium plate using double-sided tape. Having fixed the dials in place I drilled through the holes where LEDSs will fit. The LEDs will be shortened and polished so they are flat to the face; these are then stuck in place. Next, I made all the switches from brass bar with a fine brass pin glued across its face to simulate the lever. These were painted gloss black and the centre pin picked out in red, they were then glued into the 3 mm location hole. The black knobs/pull switches were turned out of black Perspex and polished; they were then glued into the location holes. The whole instrument panel is then pinned on to the wooden framework which has been left in natural wood finish (ply) as it looks like the original boat was just a varnished ply finish.
    11 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Sea Queen Frames
    Sorry a bit off the original topic but here's a picture of my Swordsman build underway, ready for skinning. I made quite a few modifications to the drawings because I wanted the aft
    cockpit
    version at a scale of 1:12 and added a spine and "fingers" to help with construction.
    12 months ago by ChrisF
    Media
    Searcher (Nimbus2)
    "Searcher" was a Graham Goodchild design offered as a free plan in "Model Boats" in December 1981. Here is my version , many years in the building and finally nearing completion. Access to the hull on the original design was via a hatch above the
    cockpit
    - I had no faith in my ability to make it water tight so went for removable grp. hatches. The model is activated by a reed switch just in front of the rear hatch, which saves me the hassle of doing/undoing all the nuts (this had not been fitted when I took the first picture). The rear hatch gives me easier access to the drive coupling. The name "Nimbus2" is in honour of one of Dan Dare's spaceships in the Eagle comic. The third picture shows the ship in its final state with added 'enhancements' and working lights.
    1 year ago by rpbidgood
    Forum
    My other hobby
    Go for it if you get a chance Ed πŸ‘ I spent 40 years or so flying round the world on business. After a while Jumbos and co just become 'busses with wings' πŸ€” Although I did have a few pleasant experiences as well like - being invited to the
    cockpit
    of a brand new Lufthansa 747-400 during a flight from Sao Paulo to Santiago de Chile. Sitting right behind the Captain I had a great view of the crossing of the Andes, as well as of the then novel digital flight displays. I those days we could still swap smokes while drinking coffee and watching the plane fly itself 😲 After take off no one touched the column until the wheels were almost on the ground at Santiago! The First Officer had a clip board on his right knee and now and again said something like 'About here we turn left', and sure enough the plane banked gently left to line up with the Santiago approach. No 1 made a tick on his clip board 😊 - The now defunct Lan Chile airline used to upgrade me to 1st class on flights from Madrid to Santiago de Chile. Not so pleasant was having to run across the pan to bag a seat on an overbooked plane at Entebbe Airport in Uganda! I made it, was younger and fitter back then 😁 Or arriving at the airport in Rio de Janeiro 4 days before Christmas to be told 'I'm sorry but you're not in the system'!😑 Oh well - Christmas on the Copacabana πŸ˜πŸ˜‰ Nowadays I can't stand all the crap at the airports caused by the terrorists, so I'm not particularly sad that my globetrotting days are over. πŸ˜‰
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Brixham trawler IBEX
    Edward, Yes - thinking out problems is half the fun😊 My first build was a Vic Smeed Starlet - just completed. Pretty straight forward but I over engineered it to try out some ideas - thinking the ideas through was great fun. So although I will not start the Cariad until January I'm trying to explore problems now. The angle of the rudder shaft is one that I think I have a solution to. Take it right through the deck then put a handle onto it, hinged at the shaft so that it does not rise and fall as it is turned. Then a Bowden cable from each side of the
    cockpit
    to power the steering. I will enjoy building a mock up and trying it out! As to the rudder, I am thinking of a detachable extension - downwards. I'm also thinking about placing the prop to one side - perhaps more authentic but also well clear of the rudder. One thing that I'm still thinking through is the access hatch. I see some builders move the dingy to the centre and create a hatch here but I like the clean decking on the original, with the dingy to the side. A hatch to the side would work for everything but the top screw for the detachable keel. Some more time dreaming up a solution. Thanks Sam
    1 year ago by sam
    Blog
    Assembly
    Hi All Would suggest you dry assemble with the cabin sides as my forward bulkhead was out by 2 Degrees. When I cut the pieces out I used a new Dremel Moto Saw as my old srollsaw from Dremel was condemned due to inavailability of blades. Like I say not enough clamps Have ordered the decking from Jotika this is extra and allows you to plank the deck and
    cockpit
    more realistically.
    1 year ago by Ianh
    Forum
    34'' RAF Crash Tender Windows
    Thanks Martin, I consider that praise indeed from an 'old pro'! πŸ‘ Now just got to figure out what to do with the
    cockpit
    , and how. It rumbles around the back of my mind while I'm tinkering about with other stuff. Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Nomenclature...
    Ha Ha i got no credit for some things I came up with either Trouble is I can only remember the word FANTABULOUS which I invented by accident Fantastic and fabulous ame to mind together as I was talking and the hybrid word came out.πŸ€“πŸ€“ Re the BECS I know that but I couldn't explain it like you and was also asking what I thought Martin wanted to know. Floating arrays? Didn't TESLA do something similar during the RC boat . trials? Or was that actually the vessel itself? in one of my bigger boats I used FOUR ex GPO L/A cells which was enough with it's Ex forces motors to put a bone in the boat's teeth as the say. The boat ? RMV Mauritania 5 feet long but very light for it's size hence the need for the accumulator cells Balsa frames and sides with ceiling tile superstructure with balsa bracing. Free running so it was always heeling and with the bone creaming at the forefoot was very impressive. Destroyed by a guy collapsing on it. He'd only fainted but me pore owl gerl was just chips and snowflakes from one end to the other. Nothing to repair as there was nowt left to repair🀐 I kept one cell for starting glow motors and sold the rest at a good profit. incidentally the motors were that good that when everyone found out where to get them They were sold out in 2 days with no more available anywhere Don't know what they were out of but from the overspray on them (
    cockpit
    green but the Yank version -- we thought) we believed they were from planes. Very solid with 9 segment rotor . Totally enclosed. Airtight? presumably to prevent arcing igniting fumes. The rotorsegments? We found out when one didn't run so we stripped it and found them shining at us. Lovely tight windings. Thick with shellac/varnish. The problem? A stuck brush caused by a tight pivot Drop of 3 in one oil and a very light smear of grease cured it. The carbons were replaceable if you could make or find some. I found a firm in Formby that made and sold brushes for anything. I fixed son's Fiat automatic thenks to them. it had a magnetic clutch and the brushes were so worn we didn't know what the shape should be. Turned out to be about 2 inches long rectangles plain and simple. LOL. Wish I could find some of those lovely engineered motors now.πŸ˜€πŸ‘
    1 year ago by onetenor
    Forum
    How to Create water tight seal?
    Any suggestions for creating a water tight seal? I am using clear hockey tape around the cabin roof which seems to keep water out, but over the open
    cockpit
    is where I am placing a cover which is suppose to keep water out of this area. I also poured polyurethane on the floorboards of the
    cockpit
    to provide a good seal and caulked the seams too.
    1 year ago by Ron
    Media
    Wianno Senior in the water
    On the pond today. Sailing well, though took on water easily over the combing into the
    cockpit
    . So back home I added a clear covering which should take care of that problem.
    1 year ago by Ron
    Response
    Mid Deck
    An excellent Tutor Mike, many thanksπŸ‘ Will try to use these techniques on the
    cockpit
    of my Sea Scout. Possibly also on the fish cutter renovation as well. Old (Sea) Dog - new tricks!?πŸ˜‰ Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings...
    I also enjoy restorations, Colin...just as much. Every challenge is different. This Chris Craft is a restoration of an Aerokits Sea Urchin that cost me all of 99p. on ebay! But then i thought it would be better made up as a single
    cockpit
    smaller runabout, hence the Chris Craft with the steeply tumblehomed stern. My son has an Aerokits PTB and my other son has a Sea Rover. I also have a Sea Urchin and a Veron Veronica yacht, so yes, I do like the restoration of old items. I have a pre War Marblehead in the loft too! I've never been interested in the big ships and service vessels. Only inshore sailing fishing boats and classic speedboats. If I can help you out with any info or techniques, let me know. I have a lot of books on woodies and years as a professional modelmaker to call upon. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Fairey Hunsman renovation part 3
    Thanks to ChrisF I am able to rebuild the boat with a different superstructure, but using the Huntsman 31 hull, he informed me of a Sport version of the 31 that had similar cabin as the 28. With some investigation. The New boat will now be '2017 Huntsman 31
    cockpit
    ', this is a modern remake of the original design by a new setup. https://www.faireymarine.com/new-boat-showrooms/huntsman/2017-huntsman-31-
    cockpit
    -6084414/ Fairey 2017 Huntsman 31
    cockpit
    , 2 berth classic sports cruiser Length: 31’3” Beam: 9’6” Draft: 2’10” Displacement: 4.5 Tons
    1 year ago by CB90
    Blog
    Complete!
    So, having had a few days off during the week when "The Boss" has been at work has given me enough hours to finish The Waveney off! Its been a hard week of making the small bits n bobs from scratch using a combination of balsa, carbon rod, brass rod, plastic tube, plastic sheet etc to make the radar array, antenna mast, extra
    cockpit
    details ect. The deck winch was made from large Servo output discs! The RNLI flag printed off Google! This has been followed by alot of detail painting and laquering. Anyway, I think I have just about exhausted as much detail as can be had at this scale and and happy to call completion! Only job to do now is get it in the Hot Tub and add the 2 Kg of ballast to get her on the waterline. On water photos and video to follow in the last update on this thread! as for next projects? I have the Aeronaut Pilot boat sat in the pile and the Fairy huntress 23 plan and wood pack on route from Sarik Hobbies!
    1 year ago by Skydive130
    Response
    Fairly Hunsman renovation part 1
    Fairey Huntsman 31 aft
    cockpit
    2 berth classic sports cruiser it will be then, sorry about the spelling will correct if possible. Length: 31’3” Beam: 9’6” Draft: 2’10” Displacement: 4.5 Tons
    1 year ago by CB90
    Forum
    What is the optimum prop shaft angle?
    The Nor Star Kingfisher is a heavy boat for its size and the positioning of the motor and prop shaft angle certainly matter. I built one in 1972 powered by a DC Sabre marine diesel (1.5cc) and the engine was in the
    cockpit
    which made it heavy at the bow. I was disappointed by its poor performance in relation to other boats of similar dimensions, in some cases these being powered by 1 cc diesels. It never crossed my mind that I could have used "ballast" and the boat was sold on 7 months later at a greatly reduced price. "Fools rush in where experts fear to tread." Boaty😎
    1 year ago by boaty
    Blog
    Chris-Craft Special Runabout
    OK, you know and I know that this is an Aerokits Sea Hornet, BUT, with a little reworking, it becomes a very passable Chris Craft Special (sometimes Custom) Runabout. One
    cockpit
    , long engine deck. I think it suits the Sea Hornet shape and proportions very well. Generally, I think too much is expected to be going on with a basic Hornet and the deck furniture is too simplistic. Also, don't be tempted to call this one a barrel back They had one continuous curve right over the transom from chine to chine, whereas this hull and the Special Runabout had a break, albeit a small one at the deck level. Anyway, I redecked the Hornet with 1/16th" ply, leaving the engine hatch long. I also had to make a small hatch at the stern to service the tiller and its connection. Then I realised I would never be able to get to the two starboard screws that hold the steering servo in, so a wee hatch went in over them too. That will be held in with a small magnet and just popped up from inside the engine 'ole hatch. Because the hull needed filling and various repairs, I decided to paint it, but veneer plank the deck. many Chris-Crafts were painted and I think this one in a nice off-white with a varnished Mahogany and pear deck will look just the job with nickel plated deck furniture, made in brass and nickel silver and plated in nickel to look like chrome in scale. Chrome is a) difficult to get these days and b) too bright and garish on a model. The hull has been epoxied and rubbed down then brush panted heavily with cellulose primer surfacer. This rubs down a treat ready for a sprayed enamel top coat or three. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Blog
    nearing completion!
    So, I have managed to crack on quite a bit this week. Ive done a heap at work on nights this week, followed by near enough a whole weekend of no interuptions as the "long haired Segeant Major" has been at her parents for the weekend!😁 it took a couple of days to build the coxswains console out of balsa and alot of fettling with plastitube and sheet, very please with the outcome. its not 100% scale acurate as is the rest of the model, but close enough to give a good representation of the wheelhouse contents. Just the Coxswain and seat to build and paint for a completed wheelhouse. The rest of the weekend has seen the
    cockpit
    just about finished, painted and laquered. So, to complete the model the following items need to be built, painted and fitted. Radar mount and radar, instrument dials,
    cockpit
    glazing, antenna mast and rigging, towing bitt, rear
    cockpit
    railing and winch, hull grab ropes, anchor, and finally about 2 kilos of lead ballast to get her sitting right on the water. I reckon another week to 10 days for a completed model!
    1 year ago by Skydive130
    Forum
    Mahogany in Scale
    Maybe I should write one, eh, Colin? For the scratchbuilders among us. A treatise on brass bashing and woodwork. Nobody would be interested. I've just epoxied my Sea Hornet, which I'm modifying as a Chris Craft Custom Runabout. One
    cockpit
    , big hatch. Cost me 99p off ebay a few years ago. I just had to scrape all the old red paint off it as it wanted to fall off anyway! Then a huge rub down, a wipe with cellulose thinner and a coat of epoxy applied with a square of styrene sheet because I couldn't find an old credit card on the quick, just as good though. Next, rub down and 2 coats of cellulose primer surfacer, then the top coats. This one is to be one of the painted CCs. There were quite a few. But the deck will be veneered in the correct style and varnished. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Aft
    cockpit
    deck
    I first cut the base material to size allowing a card thickness all round for final clearances. The lower deck has a number of features in it that need to be measured. I took dimensions from the plans and marked out the base. Again following the upper deck which has a mahogany boarder I cut and planed a further amount of 6mm x 1.5 strips of material. I started by outlining the mahogany boarders, Some years ago I made a mitring device for picture framing which has come in very handy for doing the corners. Having all the pieces cut they are then glued and temporally pinned in position until set. The next job is to prepare all the edges with black card and then measuring each plank across the width starting from the centre line. I must take into account how the planks sit against main access hatch and the battery hatch opening however, all seems to look good but until each plank is positioned and glued with its caulk divider it’s difficult to tell. When preparing each plank I first cut each piece oversize with wire cutters then using the disc sander I trim square one end, then place in position and mark for final length and finish again on the disc sander giving each plank a nice push fit Because lime planking varies in colour across a batch I numbered each plank across the deck varying the pattern of colours as I cut each to length. Next I cut a number of card pieces to length and start to glue (using Aliphatic glue), plank, followed by card filler across the half width, then repeat the other side. Finally the battery hatch and main access hatch are treated in the same manner. Next comes the finishing , I use a very fine grade on my belt sander (I attach a block on the underside of the main access deck to control the sanding process) to remove the majority of excess irregularities followed by an orbital sander for a fine finish. if there is any staining by the black card residue I simply remove it with a pencil rubber. Next I put the nail holes in again using the jig I made to ensure uniform spacing and then gave a coat of sanding sealer. Final finishing will be done as a complete assembly. Preparation of the side panels is the next process before final assembly
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    46Firefloat Mk2 paint
    Interesting, valuable photos and drawings. More like that would be welcomed by many of us. As it would have been illegal not to have a stern light on vessels like these, for both normal passage and also when towing, perhaps that photo without one was during build before it was fitted? No draft marks either. The photo of 93 secured at Vospers (therefore probably before acceptance) shows the stern light while the early type fire monitors also show the date of the photo was early on. I also note one drawing shows the breach hose connectors aft of the
    cockpit
    that indicate it to be of later than original build. Similarly the
    cockpit
    roof cleats have been re-positioned athwartships rather than the original two being fore-and-aft. Considering their short operational life, it's surprising how many detail changes were made when all the available documentary evidence is studied! You'd think that after 60+ years all the answers would be known for sure by now!
    1 year ago by astromorg
    Response
    The Crew(s)!!
    Oh Sh....ugar, DHL just told me the crews are reporting for duty tomorrow already an' I ain't made the
    cockpit
    furniture yet 😲
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Final Finishing before Sea trials ;-)
    For people to occupy the
    cockpit
    I usually peruse the toy section of the Dollar store.Then modify them with Milliput.I don't know if you have any comparable store over there.It's a lot less expensive than the hobby shops.The other bits and pieces I just have to remember what cabinet and drawer they are in.
    1 year ago by Donnieboy
    Blog
    Final Finishing before Sea trials ;-)
    A quick Flashback to May 😲 Got sidetracked with 'lectrickery' an' stuffπŸ€” Hull was given a final spray top coat and gloss clear lacquer coat. All flatted back in between coats with 3000 grit Tamiya W&D sponges. Used wet with a drop of liquid soap. Then a few hours of polishing with car paint cutting compound and finally with 'anti hologram' polish until it feels like glass.😊 Same polishing procedure for the decks and cabin sides. Fitted a few deck fittings; tank filler caps, which also hold the aft deck down, and 'Jam' cleats fore and aft. Both from the 'Riva' range from Krick. Apart from the
    cockpit
    she's done! Need suitable scale crew and
    cockpit
    furniture now. Ship's wheel I have but that's it so far. Last pic is a reminder of how the 'old girl' started out last year, after 25 years of neglect in the cellar! Sea Trial soon. Cheers, All, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Emerald - ''Round the Word'' ocean racing yacht.
    Main Sheet Modification: Yachts of this nature, would be fitted with a Traveller, which would be used to help shape the Main Sail. Also, the route of the main sheet, has a lot of twists and turns to get out of the cabin and up to the Boom. Plus, it has to pass through the tube and bend at its edge. The starting point of the control would be from the
    cockpit
    , especially if it is a Single Handed yacht. The ideal place for the traveller, would be on the roof of the cabin. To keep physical disruption to a minimum, I decided to use the original boom running gear pulleys. The termination of the MainSheet would now be at the traveller on the cabin. 1. The cleat was removed from the
    cockpit
    , and the eye bolt was replaced by an S hook, screwed to the
    cockpit
    deck( see picture 1). 2. A hole was drilled in the
    cockpit
    , adjacent to the cabin hatch, and in a direct line with the main Sheet control system. This will allow the main Sheet to pass directly from the cleat. Through the pulley assembly (withought going round the pulley), and straight aft to the
    cockpit
    . 3. A brass tube was glued into the hole, flush with the
    cockpit
    surface and extending inside, towards the mainsheet control system (see pictures 1 and 2). 4. The Traveller was formed from a length of brass rod, (approx 300mm long), formed to the same curve as the cabin roof. Slide the pulley onto the rod so that it runs freely. Make a 90 degree bend at each end, the length of the traveller apart. These 2 legs will pass down into the cabin roof, leaving about 10 mm for the pulley to run from end to end. Plus about 10mm at each end of the rod, which will be bent up against the inside of the roof and glued. (see picture 3 & 4). 5. Mark the cabin roof where the traveller is to be mounted. I chose to mount the traveller directly under the boom pulley. I have made a revised sketch which is taken from the original plans for guidance. See picture 5. Note: make sure the pulley is mounted on the rod between the two bends. 6. Drill the holes in the cabin, pass the ends of the rod through the holes. I put a 10mm piece of wood under the traveller rod, next to the hole. This allows you to hold it securely, while you bend the rod out, on the inside of the cabin. Apply plent of glue or resin to secure it. Do the same at the other end of the rod, and leave to set. With the
    cockpit
    removed, and the mainsheet control system in place, take the free end of the main sheet and pass it through the new hole in the
    cockpit
    . The
    cockpit
    can be secured by the 4 locking pulleys. Now pass the mainsheet through the S hook and up to the boom. Adjust the S hook to suitable angle. When the yacht is rigged, the mainsheet is passed up to the end of the boom pulley, along the boom, over the pulley and down to the traveller pulley. With the tx/ex active, pull the mainsheet right in, and the trim set right out (this allows for final tightening).Secure the mainsheet to the eye of the pulley, ( I use a figure of 8 knot ). Now adjust the trim on the joystick to pull the main Sail tight. Finally, run the servo right out, and back in a few times, to make sure it works properly. Move the boat round so the wind cones from a different angle, and watch the traveller as the sail is pulled in and out. Now you are ready to sail. May your wake be long and straight. Ray 😎
    1 year ago by East-RN
    Forum
    Aerokits MTB, what is it?...
    Hi Martin and here extracts from the USN Bureau Of Ships Plans. Plus some painting inspirationπŸ˜‰ and
    cockpit
    and stern detail. Have fun, cheers Doug😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Emerald - ''Round the Word'' ocean racing yacht.
    Auto Bailout Modification. 1. I drilled small holes in the lower corners of the
    cockpit
    wells, opposite each other. These were then connected together with some small brass tube. This was to allow the water to flow from the front
    cockpit
    to the rear
    cockpit
    . (See pictures 1 and 2). 2. Two more holes were drilled in the rear
    cockpit
    , in the outer corners further aft. these were fitted with brass tube stubs. These were to take the plastic tube, which runs to the nozzles fitted into the hull (see picture 3 and 4). 3. To ensure the water would not flow into the boat, while stationary, the tubes were run through small eyelets on the under side of the deck(see picture 5). 4. Small holes were drilled in the hull and brass tubes were cut and bent, so that they would pass down through the hole in the hull, and lay flush against the hull, with the opening facing aft(see picture 6 and 9). 5. On the outer hull, the tube is built up, and covered in a cone shape, so the tube opening is the widest part of the cone and flush( see picture 7 & 8). 6. When the tubes are fitted to the stubs on the aft
    cockpit
    , and the
    cockpit
    secured in the yacht, the bale out is complete. Principle: While the boat is still and on an even keel, the
    cockpit
    floor is above the waterline, the tubes raise up to the deck level which prevents the water from flowing up and into the yacht. When the yacht starts to move under sail, the water flowing over the outlet nozzle is forced out by the cone, and creates a small vacuum at the nozzle opening, which draws any water in the
    cockpit
    through the tube and out through the nozzle. During a gust or strong winds, the yacht will heel over more. This will bring all the
    cockpit
    water to the lower side bailout tube, and be drawn out by the vacuum. When the yacht slows, and becomes even keeled, the
    cockpit
    will have been emptied. During heavy gusts, I found that the yacht will heel excessively, and if the waves are high enough, the
    cockpit
    will take some water over the deck. This is why I fitted the bailout device. So after a long sail in heavy weather, a long cruise back to shore on a broad reach and more even keel, will ensure the
    cockpit
    is dry. Happy Cruising
    1 year ago by East-RN
    Forum
    46Firefloat Mk2 paint
    Unless described as flat, paint was more often a brighter satin than matt and rarely actual gloss. White will always have been an off white as the components of paints were such that it was not possible to get a really bright white. I know that for a fact as my grandad always made his own and until PEP in the mid 60s (Plastic Emulsion Paint) there was no such thing as brilliant or appliance white. Unfortunately getting an decent off white is not easy these days since Plastikote went acrylic and their previously excellent paints started eating themselves on recoating. I now use enamels exclusively. They are densely pigmented, flexible and modern enamels dry pretty quickly. I am using a black enamel primer on my Crash Tender, which I will then spray with black "gloss" from the same range, which, once thinned with white spirit, will dry a little less than glossy. I still don't have a matt brick red for the undersides, but it can be made matt-ish with a careful rub down with 1000 grit wet and dry used wet and soapy, but be careful not to sand through, so very lightly does it, even 1000 grit can cut well when new. Decks were said to be Cerrux Light Deck Grey, anti-slip, which means a textured surface. That would be darker looking due to the surface texture's way with the light. The cabin sides were described as "smooth", i.e. same as the decks but not anti-slip. The roofs? Well, on Vosper's drawing "white" is crossed through and "Grey" written in. But, some pics do look white, the best pics look darker by a whisker than the sides and the roofs are clearly textured as they show evidence, as do the decks, of filth which will sit in the texture. You choose. NOBODY has yet given us chapter and verse. The fact is, an already very handsome boat looks so very pretty with white roofs. But they too should be off white if you can get it! Good luck. Fittings, btw can be had from SLEC in Watton in white metal. Basically the old Yeoman fittings, masters now owned by IP Engineering who bought them to cast when they owned Vintage Model Boat Company. Now they've sold that to SLEC, but I don't think SLEC have white metal casting facilities, so probably cast by Ivor still. I have just had a set for my birthday and they're excellent. They do need careful cleaning up as in mould lines need to be filed/scraped/sanded to a decent finish and then given good primered surface. No hook though, but it does include nav and riding lights. This site also has masts for sale in plastic, but I made my own in brass as I will the hook and davit. I have also just had a set of crew figures cast from my patterns and they will be available soon...a driver(Helm), a boss with binoculars and a lazy slob laying around in the after
    cockpit
    . Needs a roll-up to finish his look. No idea of price yet as don't know how much rubber to mould or resin to cast for a set. Yes, 1/16th scale. All this to finish a model I had 55 years ago! But I reckon it deserves it. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Spektrum, new, useless...
    Hi John, yes I'm sure I saw that story on the 'Mayday - Alarm in
    cockpit
    ' series. A sobering tale, like the cheap 'forged' false pylon bolts that caused a 777 to loose an engine 😲 Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    54 year old Crash Tender
    I would like first to say that this is NOT a restoration. It has always been mine and followed me around all those years, been used extensively on Oyster beds on the Essex coast and Valentine's Park in Ilford, Essex...even the great Victoria Park, of which my Granddad was a founder member. It has eaten its way through lantern batteries out of number which my Dad, who was in the business could magic from thin air. There was always a nook in the boot of the Triumph Town and Country saloon and then the Austin Westminster for another new lantern battery, which the Taycol would destroy in about 20 intermittent minutes of left, centre, right, centre from the REP single channel gear. How I wish I still had that, but it was stolen. The REP, that is, the Taycol remains, restored and cleaned and like new again waiting to go back in the boat. I finally decided I should finish it. My wife bought me a set of white metal fittings by Yeoman out of IP Engineering, so I have no excuse. Not that I need one. It has suffered a bit over that half a century, losing odd panels, but they are easily remade and replaced. First, I had to clean out the insides of the detritus and loft life of decades. Vacuuming, scraping with a pointy thing and brushing with a stiff brush, followed by more vacuuming using a clever attachment that my dear wife thought might be useful and it was, being at least a dozen stiff, but small diameter tubes poking out of the end of a nozzle. It both pokes and nudges the old dirt and dust and sucks it away. After that the old thin mahogany deck planks, my friend thought to add in the late 60s were removed and saved where salvageable as I quite like them for trim on other boats. The deck was rather brutalised with a coarse rasp and any loose nails punched back in flush or slightly below. Then some way too old, but still good, epoxy (WEST) was used to slar all over the decks and most of the insides, even some of the cabin sides. That will be finished before dark today. I can hardly believe the epoxy still works, but it does, perfectly and so is pressed into use. In this warm weather it set very quickly. I did my usual trick of squeegeeing it on into the grain with an old credit card or Gummi, which is a sample block of silicon. Styrene will also do. I use some spare 2mm stuff I was given (that guy at IP Engineering again). The roofs had already been corrected the other evening and heavily cellulose sanding sealed. The forward cabin removeable roof was unwarped by having a tight fitting diagonal piece of pear pressed in under the top skin and glued. The new hatch on that roof was made and the shape of the roof and hatch runners changed slightly, as per drawings from this site. Here are pics. of the work today. The above resinning, the remade cabin panels a new wheelhouse bulkhead and the tow hook base panel, finally a new aft
    cockpit
    rear coaming which it never had but should have. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Spektrum, new, useless...
    Doug, if you have an Orange Rx. like mine, the bit where the plugs go is on the end face, so when you tip the battery wire on its side to plug in, the red wire is indeed uppermost, the black wire, bottommost. The Spektrum Rx. has the plug bit in the top face, so the uppermost, red lead goes through a right angle and goes downwards, but yes, in the middle. I made sure of the polarity first, but that bit you mentioned meant nothing to me, just symbols. I didn't want to trust them if I didn't understand them. The bind plug did indeed go in the slot marked bind. On the Orange Rx. it says BIND/BATT. I didn't plug any servos in as it isn't necessary and I didn't have them to hand without fishing them out of the restricted space in my Vanity model. I have now watched so many you-tubes and read so many instructions that I can assure you I got the order right. Bind plug has never been out of the Orange Rx, except to assure myself of good contact. Battery pack plugged into AUX> socket, flashing yellow light, Tx. tother side of workshop, pull on trainer switch and turn on power. Beedlyboop noise, light on right hand side of array, but NO flashing on Tx. Hold trainer switch till will to live starts to ebb, give up. The Spektrum you show, Doug is the same, albeit with different aerials, but the guy assures me it bound to his DX5e before he sent it to me for the trial. Your Orange however is very different from mine. Mine, as I said, has the pins poking out the end and the writing where your pins are. Yes, it has an S in the case, which I read meant signal, not that I knew what that was. it is a much smaller box than yours. Now you can see why I spoke of uppermost as my battery cable has to go on its side to plug into my Orange and in that position the red wire is indeed, uppermost. if you see the normal position for the Rx. to be flat on it's back with the pretty stuff on top. So, what else can it be? I will try what you suggested about the metal free garden, tomorrow and after that we will have to wait till the Fly Sky arrives, estimated E.T.A., early next month. Your PTB looks very bare. Had you always intended to strip the tubes and rudders too? Now, you have to paint the insides a nice neutral colour, like Spitfire
    cockpit
    green, which is also Jaguar
    cockpit
    green, but Maseratis were silvery grey. Don't ask how I know...long story Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?...
    Evenin' Martin, Just back from 'nosh' with Gisela, my camera girl in the vid! She's mean like that too, keeps me hoppin' about like the proverbial cat on the proverbial hot stuff 😑 Can't wait to see the rotating teddyπŸ‘ Put a couple of mini Cam lenses in his eyeballs and you'll get a terrific 360Β° First Person View from the driving seat😁 Re Sea Scout, I took your advice and did the hull in Royal Blue (no navy knickers!πŸ˜†) or what passes for that here. Anyway I'm pleased how she turned out. OK, I admit I accidentally turned her into a Sport Fishing Boat😁 She's 24" what scale do you think that makes her? I'm looking for crew figures and stuff to fit out the
    cockpit
    but I'm not sure what size to look for. I thought maybe 1/20 i.e. a 40 footer? Waddya think? Re Kako; while recently trying (fruitlesslyπŸ€”) to make space in the workshop (got two renovations on the go in parallel - saves getting the same tools, rattle cans an' stuff out twice!😁) I ran across the original Kakos and Mabuchis I used in my scratch 53" H class destroyer Hotspur in 1966. She ran off a 4.5V EverReady flat (form not volts😁) battery until Granny took pity and bought me some 6V Lantern batteries! I ran 'em up on a power supply and they turned but now sound like mini football rattles! Think they need new big end shells 😁 Jeez, how many guys under pension age have ever been down to the bitza bazaar looking for 50 thou oversize bearing shells and compression and oil control rings?? Pics show her Sea trials in Radnor Park pond, Folkestone, Kent, summer 1966. Sorry about the quality, only had a Box Brownie 127 in those days and could only afford Gratispool free B/W filmsπŸ€” Pentax? Canon? Sony? Not to mention Digital? HD? Wassat? 50 years on I got all threeπŸ˜‰ I like Lupins too, preferably the blue and purple ones. BTW, for your steering guy's arms you don't need a separate RC function or channel! You just need a coupling from the rudder control to turn a pulley and cord which turns a suitably scaled pulley attached to the wheel axis. The arms are fixed to the wheel and go with it! Dead simple (to write anyway😁) and no lecktrickery! 😊 OR you could just put one of his hands on the wheel and the other on the throttle. Then use a 'Y' cable to split the ESC cable into two. Connect the second output to a servo which moves the throttle lever via a push-me-pull-you-rod, pulleys and cord or gears or whatever. Sure you can figure out the mechanics better than I. Whatever, have fun and don't electrocute yourself, keep your socks dryπŸ˜‰ Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Fire Float info.
    Found this on the RAF fire fighting museum site. Very useful. it shows that the CC F.F. type pump was similar to the road towed version, but simply mounted and encased and it also shows the Meadows petrol engine. Clearly a 6 cylinder with twin carbs. Probably similar to those used in the invicta car. One each side. That takes care of most of the open
    cockpit
    and the Cove. Climax pump mainly fills the "cabin" which is open backed. interesting. Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Media
    Such is life
    I fist bought the plans when I was about 12. 50years later I decided to build the boat. it took me about 6months to build. The plans are the original Sufury but with a few changes. The
    cockpit
    is similar to that of a cigarette boat, extended the length and added a duck board. The power plant is 2100kv brushless moter, a 120amp speed control, 4mm flex sharftwith 2 11.4volt lipo batteries. in a straight line the boat is fast, but she really leans over when turning. Such is life is fun to drive.
    2 years ago by Kevin-56
    Response
    Sea Scout 'Jessica' Sea Trial - at last!
    Interesting Canabus! Not quite what you recommended last year 😲 if you now think the Propdrive 1000kV has "no guts" why did you recommend it to me?? Thanks for spoiling my mood πŸ€” As far as I'm concerned you just devalued your currency! I'm happy with her as she is, balance and stability is OK and performance, endurance vs current drain is much more lively than she ever was in 55 years.😊 After all, she's supposed to be a Broads Cruiser and not an Offshore Power Boat.πŸ˜‰ I'm not into racing either. From time to time I'll fiddle with fittings detail and
    cockpit
    on Jessica. Time to get on with other projects now. Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Sea Scout 'Jessica' Sea Trial - at last!
    Muchas gracias Ed πŸ‘, was worth all the effort. During one run a nice American lady showed up with her grandchildren who were quite absorbed with the boat's antics. We had quite a nice long chat. Was a good afternoon. Now considering what's next (apart from final fittings and
    cockpit
    outfit for the Sea Scout): the old fish cutter restoration with my modified Taycol motor or the upgrade / conversion to PT-109 of the 1:35 ELCO PTB I bought last year !? Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    More running in at Bournville.
    Hi Novagsi0, From the video and pics I see two problems! 1. Ship the fenders before sailing. They seem to be throwing water up onto and into cabin and
    cockpit
    . πŸ˜† Bad practice to sail with fenders out anyway. 'Just not done old chap' πŸ˜‰ 2. You have a brushed motor and no spark suppression so it can create interference with the receiver and may also directly affect the ESC. Look here for info on motor suppression. https://model-boats.com/rc/motors/suppression Cheers Doug 😎 PS: think maybe you should raise the coaming around the deck access as well! Making it as tight a fit as possible.
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    More running in at Bournville.
    Dennis The Menace, the captain at the helm strikes again, after a radio outage the
    cockpit
    ended up full of water up to his waist. Some fresh paint need on the bow. Need to find out why the speed controller without warning goes mad. Tio Marine 50A ESC and fly sky receiver paring.
    2 years ago by Novagsi0
    Blog
    Bits n pieces arrived / Aft Deck Mk 2 built ;-)
    6mm lime wood planks from Krick and 4mm tap from Conrad arrived on Wednesday so Full Speed Ahead. This time formers were made from the 6mm lime so no bending or slitting required, new piece of mahogany cut so that this time no inserts left an right were needed. 😊 Formers attached using Rocket cyano and a bag of clamps and left overnight. The 'Riva' tank filler caps were tapped 4mm and appropriate holes bored in the deck piece. Neodymium magnets attached to forward edge. Deck fitted and trimmed in situ for flush fit all round. Transom got scratched during this process so will need a resprayπŸ€” Underside sealed with two coats of EzeKote and sealing / varnishing / lacquering process started on the topside. Last two pics show current status; So Far So Good.πŸ˜‰ Next step; fit windows made of 3mm green tinted acrylic 'glass', which also arrived Wednesday. Will now have to start thinking about what to do in the
    cockpit
    😲 All I have so far is a 25mm ship's wheel. Furniture building is not exactly my Forte! First time for everything I suppose! Suggestions gratefully received!! Ciao for now, Doug 😎 Almost forgot! While waiting for varnish to dry I tackled an old problem with the rudder. Namely; asymmetric rudder throw caused by the rather bulky connecting rod binding on the rudder arm! Suddenly remembered I still had some E-Z Connectors from old aircraft days. Been hanging around for 35 years or so waiting for something to do! So replaced the old plastic linkage with 1mm spring steel rod and two E-Z connectors. Works a treat 😊
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Amati chrome plated ships wheel - Help!
    Let me bring you all up to date. I called a meeting with me and the now famous wheel and noticed there was a lot of flash that had not been cleaned off the castings, so I started filing it off. it was not easy. The metal was hard to file and the revealed surface looked as shiny as the chrome outer. I clamped the rim in a small vice and did the flux and solder thing and it worked! So I mounted the whole assembly in the
    cockpit
    of my Huntsman, braced it and superglued it. After a suitable time had elapsed I removed the support and the wheel promptly fell off! it is so heavy! Undaunted I got out the Gorilla Glue and that seems to have fixed it. Yay!
    2 years ago by Black Dog Jack
    Blog
    After Deck / Hatch - If at first you don't succeed ...
    give up and go home! Oh! I am home 😁 Since I need access to the rudder the after deck has to be made as a removable hatch. Would you believe at the last refit (25 years ago) I actually managed to shoehorn the RX and RX NiMH battery in there as well!? Pic 1 shows what it looked like when I started this refit, after 20 odd years in the cellar 😲 Anyway, I wanted the deck to be mahogany to match the cabin roof and as a hatch it was obvious that it would need a subframe. Pic 2 to 5, had to open a new bag of chomp chomp clamps πŸ˜‰ Trial fit Pic 6. SFSG! Under side was sealed with two coats of EzeKote and fixings added; neodymium magnets at the forward edge, domed captive nyloc nuts glued into the under frame at the aft edge. Pics 7 & 8. These will then accept 4mm studs screwed into Riva style fuel filler caps to hold it down and (hopefully) keep it watertight. Mahog was then finished in the same laborious and patience testing process described above (or is it below😲) for the cabin roof and decks. Pic 9 shows it screwed down with normal 4mm 'Camembert' head screws - Why? see below πŸ˜† Finish was OK.. BUT After leaving screwed down overnight a hairline crack had developed 😑 Pic 10. Also, I didn't like the 3mm fillets between the hatch deck and the main deck, and was wondering what to do about the lip on the bulkhead at the rear of the
    cockpit
    . There was a chunk cut out in the middle. This was where in the old days we had a tiller bar to set the rudder for Free Running on a great circle (Radnor Park Lake in Folkestone - side note for Graham P74, probably before he was bornπŸ˜‰) Sooo .... machined the lip away, removed the 3mm fillets, made a cardboard template for the new deck-piece and tomorrow is another day. Wonder what I can muck up then !!?? 😊 G'night all, ciao Doug 😎 Oh yes the Filler caps - drilled them on the lathe for 4mm thread clearance, dug out the tap set, selected 4mm 0.7mm pitch ..... Oh S..t, only a tapered tap which starts cutting at 5mm. Hole in the cap is only 5mm deep.😑 Immediately ordered 4mm parallel machine tap, should be here on Wednesday. No sweat, should have deck hatch Mk. 2 finished by then 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    cockpit
    detailing
    Not a great deal of action today, had to do some the as detailed by the β€œmrs”! Added the forward
    cockpit
    coming roofy thing, shaped, sanded, filled, sealed and sanded again. Last thing today was to build a pair of simulated engine intakes. My be a few days till more work now as back on shift
    2 years ago by Skydive130
    Blog
    Bridge/
    cockpit
    /Flight Deck construction
    so, having been at work all weekend, today saw a day off and a few hours to start building the foreward
    cockpit
    bridge thingy. There will be quite a bit of shape changing mods to this part as we build, simply because the Dumas kit is of the 44ft Coastguard cutter and the Waveney class Lifeboat has quite a few differences. Changes to make include the windows, the rear walls to be extended to take acount of extra windows at back of cab, forward sloping front piece, engine intakes on both sides, and changes to the roof. Still waiting on a reference book on "Waveneys" from ebay, should have been here by now! that will give me the change to start super detailing the exterior decs, cabins ect.
    2 years ago by Skydive130
    Response
    Main deck and cabin walls
    Many Thanks MT, πŸ‘ You're right! I've already marked out the 'hatch' on some 1.5mm mahogany to match the roof. Have to think about the surround, i.e. have a rummage through the bits box! But I reckon you're right again, it would look better with some sort of frame. Still haven't figured out what to do with the
    cockpit
    , or even what scale crew I should be looking for ... Help!😲 Re Cabin roof detail .. That's it for now, until I start fiddling with mast and lights an' such πŸ˜‰ What did you want to know? I've got a ship's wheel ca 1", some chrome deck fittings and Skydive has given me some inspiration regarding the 'Pulpit' rail, apart from that ...... Ciao, Doug 😎 Just remembered; I've started cutting out some 1.5mm mahog strip to make the wooden handrails on the roof. More later 😊
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    more progress.
    First job today was to reduce the rudders by 1cmx1cm which I think not only looks better but should reduce the affects that have been mentioned in comments below. Ive fitted the
    cockpit
    which I assembled yesterday. its not the best fit into the deck, however, I shall blend it all in with some balsa strip, sand, filler, sanding sealer hopefully for a seamless finish. I have pictured the 2 x Hobbyking waterproof boat 30 amp esc. These are supposed to be water cooled, however I am not going to fit the tubing and start drilling water pickup and exit holes in the hull x 4 until I think that water cooling is going to be necessary. Once I have watt meter readings for 2S and 3S lipo, it will give me an idea what the ESC are going to be like. Of course if you guys think I need to go water cooling, please let me know! I have an Mtroniks W-tail mixer that will allow the motors to be synched to the rudders allowing the inboard motor to slow or stop when turning. Never used one before, so may need to some programming once hooked up, we shall see. Last job today was to shoot a could of coats of red oxide primer on the lower hull to see what the resin finish was like. on the whole not a bad finish at all, just a could of tiny areas that need a little sanding for a faily blemish free finish.
    2 years ago by Skydive130
    Blog
    Cabin detail Pt 1
    I wanted to try and recreate the detail as per the available photos and drawings that I had so the first thing was to try and make the cabin have walls and a door, so previously I had cut away bulkhead B2 and extended CF2 to the bottom skin and put the door opening in. Now for the actual piece of cabin floor, the entry is slightly strange as there appears to be an inset step from the from the sick bay up into the
    cockpit
    but then it is relatively straight forward, it was made from 2mm ply. Planking was something I have never done so a lot of research was done prior to starting. I decided to use a lime wood plank with a black 0.3 black card divider (caulk) all glued with aliphatic adhesive. I found the process quite enjoyable and the results on the test piece for a first attempt were quite pleasing. I then wanted to reproduce the nailing of the planks so I devised a small tool to ensure a consistent pattern its simply a piece of obeche with four holes, 4 brass pins and a black divider line, this is simply placed on the join line and then tapped with a light hammer and filled with the tip of a black pen. The first attempt looks slightly misaligned but proved the system worked, I have made a more accurate one for the real floor. After the planks were set it was sanded flat which unfortunately leaves the wood grain blackened by the black card dust, however using a plastic eraser it’s easily removed ready for sealing. I thought that the door opening needed some sort of finishing/dressing so I decided to manufacture a mahogany door frame and handrail around the cabin.
    2 years ago by mturpin013


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