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    Response
    Re: Enclosing the controls.
    Hi Alan. You are correct, I had tucked that leg of the aerial alongside the ESC and probably would have used that position but I'll take your advice and move it away as far as practical. I'll put it in a thin plastic tube at the front of the enclosure so it will be correctly distanced as you rightly suggest. I had not considered that any nasty RFI from the ESC (or any other acronyms 😉) would be an issue with 2.4G kit. The other leg of the aerial is passed through a hole in the side wall of the well deck into the hull cavity and extends forward, it's also above the waterline too so that should be OK. The aerial wires will be at 90 degrees to each other which I know is desirable too. BTW. I have developed the fan
    cooling
    of the motor a bit more so I'll post an update on that soon 😁. Thanks 👍👍. Rob.
    2 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    Soldering
    if your not used to using a torch please make sure whatever your resting the work on will not burn!! Oh and please remember things stay hot for longer than you might think
    cooling
    a soft soldered joint with water is not a good idea allow it to cool slowly. Get a couple of cheap pairs of pliers and some rubber bands to use for clamps if the parts are small and light enough a 3rd hand is useful https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2047675.m570.l1313.TR3.TRC0.A0.H0.Xthird+hand.TRS0&_nkw=third+hand&_sacat=0 some examples there.
    2 months ago by Haverlock
    Blog
    cooling
    the motor – update.
    I’m grateful to mturpin013 for commenting that he considered using the propeller adaptor supplied with the Turnigy motor as it prompted me to retrieve mine from the box and adapt it to secure the fan on the end of the motor. I cut off the threaded shaft from the prop adaptor and the end was ground flat and then I placed it on the end of the motor stub and used a scriber through the bolt holes to mark the positions on the flange of the fan. The fan was then removed and the holes drilled through and opened up to 3mm and then it was a simple matter to put the fan back on the motor and attach the new piece to the motor using the three 2.5mm cap head screws which are supplied with the prop adaptor. I think this is a far better ‘engineering’ solution to securing the fan to the rotor than a spot of CA. Because the addition of the fan was so straightforward and effective I have decided to implement it on the model anyway so I cut an opening through the end panel of the motor cover and put some stainless steel mesh over that to finish it. The motor is now connected to the ESC and I have done some tests with the motor running and I’m delighted to report that there’s a very healthy airflow through the motor cover 😁👍. It turns out that my modification is not unique at all and credit is due to reilly4 who did something similar to the twin motors on one of his boats long before I came up with the idea. He posted a ‘photo of his boat when replying to mturpin013 on the subject of servo mounts. Take a look at the motors in his picture!
    2 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Enclosing the controls.
    The original boat had a wide and deep seat at the back of the well deck and this is an ideal place to conceal the fuse, ESC and receiver. I started by setting out the components and marking an area sufficiently big enough to accommodate them all with room for the associated wiring and plumbing (water
    cooling
    for the ESC). A framework of obeche strip was formed on the floor and sides in such a way that the top and front panels of the cover would be flush with the frame, the side frames were also built out so that the cover would be narrow enough to clear the coamings on the sides of the well deck. The rear panels and floor of the enclosure are 1.5mm obeche panels, the rear one with cut-outs for the wiring to come through, both were given a coat of Teak stain before being glued in place. The cover ‘seat’ was made from a framework of obeche strip and panels with bracing pieces at each end to add rigidity and it fits neatly into the frame, some finishing detail was also added to this. This was also given a first coat of Teak stain. The cover will be held in place with small neodymium magnets.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Servo Mount
    Robbob, This was my first venture into using brushless motors so I was a bit uncertain on
    cooling
    . I made the fans from aluminium and bolted them on at the existing 2mm bolt locations. Someone told me they wouldn't rev fast enough but I think every bit helps. I also have water
    cooling
    at the front plate of the motors. The end result is that the motors never get warm, even after an hour of sailing around the lake at good speed.
    3 months ago by reilly4
    Response
    cooling
    the motor - an experiment.
    Mike. The motor in my crash tender barely gets warm so I think you should be fine. Rob.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Response
    cooling
    the motor - an experiment.
    I considered doing this on the crash tender using the supplied aircraft prop adapter that the motor came with so Ill be interested to see how it performs.
    3 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    cooling
    the motor - an experiment.
    That's a very interesting idea Rob and one I've not seen before. I've saved a photo in my PC folder of motor related items. I think that if you are going to keep it as a permanent feature a drop of cyano would be a good idea despite the tightness of the push fit. Alan
    3 months ago by ukengineman
    Response
    cooling
    the motor - an experiment.
    That looks great, pretty cool 😎 and nicely done. I cannot wait to see the finished boat. Also some video of her on her maiden run. Keep up the great work.👍👍
    3 months ago by BOATSHED
    Blog
    cooling
    the motor - an experiment.
    Whilst I don’t think I’m going to need to cool the motor it got me thinking that it may be a useful experiment to see if the ‘Stick A Fan Blade On The End Of The Rotor’ idea would actually work 🤔 So while waiting for some glue to set on another part of the build I decided to rummage through the junk PC bits box and find an old fan of a suitable size, and I did indeed have on that would fit the bill 😀. I broke away the outer fan casing to release the motor and blades and then set about separating the fan blade, which proved fairly simple. The fan blade has an overall diameter of 45mm which is ideal and there’s a moulded-in centre mark so I used a step cutter to open up a hole to 10mm and then a tapered hand reamer to carefully open up the hole to about 11mm which is the diameter of the end bearing stub on the rotor. The fan was then pushed onto this motor stub until it seated flush on the wide and end of the rotor can and is a very tight friction fit so it doesn’t need any more than that to hold it. I don’t have a dial gauge but I can tell by eye that the fan is perfectly centred and true and so it shouldn’t cause an imbalance 🤞. The motor turns clockwise when viewed at the fan end which means that the fan would be pulling air through the side vents , through the stator and around the rotor and would need to exhaust through a new panel cut into the end of the motor enclosure. The existing motor enclosure still fits perfectly over the motor and its fan and wouldn’t need any other modification than the extra opening and mesh. So in theory this arrangement will give forced ventilation and
    cooling
    of the motor in the event that there is a heat problem. In practice I’ve yet to wire up the motor to the ESC so I have not been able to run a proper test to check it actually works but I’m pretty confident of it. This motor
    cooling
    arrangement could prove useful to others when faced with a similar situation which I why I decided to conduct the experiment...... and validate my theory. Just keep your fingers away from the fan blades…..😨
    3 months ago by robbob
    Response
    The motor cover.
    Hi Mike. A 5v supply would be easier to derive for that fan, but recent informed opinion says it should not need forced
    cooling
    though, and I tend to agree. Cheers. Rob.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Response
    The motor cover.
    Rob I have just bought a miniature fan which runs on 5volt 30mm x 30mm x8mm £4:78 free post Miniature 5V
    cooling
    Fan for Raspberry Pi https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=Miniature+5V+
    cooling
    +Fan+for+Raspberry+Pi+%28and+Other+Computers&_sacat=0
    3 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    The motor cover.
    I know exactly what you mean, it's do-able but there's not enough room inside the box for a miniature fan, I could mount it externally on the forward vertical face of the box over another opening and I'd need to derive a 12v dc voltage to drive it as well. All of which would spoil the apperarance and add to the complexity. it would seem logical for the motor to turn it's own
    cooling
    fan 😜
    3 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Fairly Hunsman renovation part 1
    Pictures Rubbing down hull, Close ups of hull repairs Drill holes in transom for the exhaust pipes (water
    cooling
    outlets). Added spray rail to side of hull. Have found that I am having bad reactions to the fumes from Gorilla Glue.
    9 months ago by CB90
    Place
    E s c
    Hi I am using a Blue Rain esc rated at 60 amp 480 amp stall current .Has all the features of the viper plus a finned heat sink and
    cooling
    fan . Powers 2 black and decker 600 drill motors with Graupner series 162 props motors approx £3.50 and esc £6.43 All on E BAY Or motors can be had from Potts in Derby .The motors draw 30 amps at full speed and I use a 5000 3 cell lipo The expensive bit Hobbyking supplied .The boat is a Jules Verne Cheers Ian T
    4 months ago by TOWN3810
    Forum
    Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build
    Don't quite understand why you would want to run four props & motors. One of my fleet is a old Precident Perkasa, in all wood including the hull. Powered by a 12v 7ah lead acid battery a single 550 motor and a three blade prop. As you can probably imagine she is heavy but still gets on the plane to mimic the real thing, will admit the motor did get a bit hot untill I fitted a heat sink with fan
    cooling
    . I also have a Hooben Perkasa in injection moulded plastic, yet to be built but intend to use the same set up. Cheers for now John👍
    4 months ago by bikerjohn57
    Forum
    Smoke generator
    The first time I ever made a smoke generator was in the 1960s at school - for flow visualisation in a wind tunnel I was building. There there was no shortage of power, so i used a 1/4" glass tube wrapped with asbestos and nichrome heating wire, and boiled paraffin in it - no wick. Loads of lovely white smoke once it was forced through a
    cooling
    fan - but it was oily and smelly, and not ideal for lab work.... Later when I built a Revell Bluebell corvette, I made a shallow perspex dish with the glass-fibre wick, and used the smoke fluid from a disco smoke-maker. That's essentially a glycol/water mix - much less smelly. Unless they add perfume.... I suspect that paraffin would be less smelly outdoors, though fire and an oily residue would be hazards. You should be able to get a bottle of glycol smoke/fog fluid for less than a fiver....
    4 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Smoke generator
    Have just made a prototype of a fan forced smoker which seems to be working well (despite breaking the heater coil by moving it while hot, - had it apart, broke wire, screw and washer repair, not quite as hot) I bought a couple of Heng Long smokers (for R/C tanks or cars) to play with, for $10 NZ each(or 5.3 Euros to you Northerners give or take a yen) from Bangood and just bought another from Ebay. There seem to be 2 different models, as one has a long coil with a lamp wick draped over it, which is sitting in the oil reservoir, the other has a small coil inside a piece of heat resistant woven tubing (as you might find insulating toaster/heater wiring etc) which acts as a wick and that also sits in cotton wool in the reservoir, (this seems to be the better of the two) Tip - don't fill the tank right up, only enough to soak the cotton, element should be just out of the oil. The wick loads the element. The better model seems to have a black top to the tank (also maybe either brown or black tank) and the other has a brown top and dirty brown tank. As with most of this stuff you won't know till you get it what it's going to be. What I did was remove the tank and cut off the pump tube just in front of the screw lugs (see black line in photo) then fitted the tank, and a 40x40x10 5v ESC fan (voltage controlled by a UBEC set to 5v on the jumpers) into a plastic electronics utility box from Jaycar (our local electronics and hobby store). I made up a double JST lead for the 2s 1800Mah Lipo and fired it up (using baby oil). it's pretty much silent and smokes well once it gets warmed up, ( starts smoking in about 5 seconds) You could control it (on/off volume) by either a remote on/off switch or perhaps a small cheap 10A brushed ESC. I would leave the fan running and control the element to avoid burning the element. The original pump tank inlet hole seems ok as is (approx 1.5mm) but you could enlarge it very slightly to get a better flow if you could find a better oil. At the electronics store they have proper smoke machine oil for $20 NZ per litre so I may have a look at that. The reason I went for the fan idea was that I found in std pump form, if I immersed a tube from the tank in water, it sucked water back into the tank. I was hoping it would pump smoke out of my HSL exhausts at water level alongside the
    cooling
    water but it would need a very light non return valve to do this. The fan seems to pump the smoke through 2mm ID silicone tube ok, so tubing of similar ID to the OD of the tank outlets should work well. These pumps in original form work pretty well for the price, and are cheap enough to keep a few for spare elements, the only thing is they are a bit noisy but in an 'engine sounding' way, (might add to the effect on a tug or work-boat though) What you have left after this mod is a very handy little geared motor with an eccentric output wheel which could be used for winches, radar and whirly bits of any description (see pic of motor leftover and original) To avoid burnout, these should be run on no more than a 2s (around 7.5v-(suggest 8v max with fan running) The other tank is going to work a lot better than this one but I'm not making a tug, just want a bit of exhaust smoke on start-up etc to go with the 2 sound units. Very cheap to make (around $25 NZ with pump, box, fan and UBEC all through Ebay, Aliexpress and Bangood (and local electronics store) if you wanted to run an ESC to control the smoke and you have no channels left to control it proportionally, you can always try using a second receiver bound to your TX, (if your TX will allow it,) power it and a brushed ESC (wired to the element) as normal and use the throttle channel to plug in your smoke control. This should work if you want more smoke as you accelerate or if you are using only 1 stick on a 2 stick TX you could use your 'elevator' stick pushed up (or a toggle switch if available) to start/stop the smoke (through the brushed ESC setup) . This setup weighs 100g (10g more than std) The quest for lots of smoke continues Will try to upload vid later and update progress.
    4 months ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    Decks & hatches.
    Because I need access to the wiring at both ends of the boat I formed the framework of an opening at the bow to make the dummy hatch into a real hatch. In a similar way a hatch was formed in the rear deck which will give me access to the wiring, rudder servo and the ESC
    cooling
    . It’s going to be quite tight to get all that into the cavity under the rear deck but I’ve done a test fit and it will all go in but will involve some ‘keyhole surgery’ through the rear hatch opening when I get to the stage of installing all of the running gear…🤓. Both of these decks were glued and pinned in place and some packing tape used to pull the decks firmly onto the frames. The side decks were also trimmed for best fit and secured in the same way and when all was dry and set a small hand plane was used to trim them flush to the hull sides. The next stage will be to fit the balsawood blocks at the bow and shape them to the hull…..it’s the tricky bit I’ve not been looking forward to…😟
    5 months ago by robbob
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    An outrunner is better for this type of boat as it is more torquey. if
    cooling
    is needed (and it may not) just use a proper water cooled motor mount. Chris
    5 months ago by ChrisF
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    I cannot see how you can mount the water
    cooling
    coil safely onto a out runner motor. Near impossible I would have thought. if there is too much vibration then I would think that it would rub on the motor and wear a hole in it and flood the boat or just jam up the motor. I would go for an in runner. Much more practical in a boat in my thoughts.
    5 months ago by BOATSHED
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    I'm new to this and was told by the guy who gave me the motor that this was the thing to do. He says the coil still provides
    cooling
    and says the warm water coming from the stern is all the evidence needed. We will see if he is right. Steve
    5 months ago by steve-d
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Why would anyone even try fitting a water
    cooling
    coil on an out runner ?????? I didn't realise that an out runner was what was going to be used. is an out runner worth fitting in a model boat, surely an in runner is a far better option.
    5 months ago by BOATSHED
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Hi Dave, the whole point here is that it's an outrunner motor so if the coil touches the rotating case things'll get very interesting and exciting 😲 Cheers, Doug 😎
    5 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    As long as the coil toutches the motor you will be ok if it is NOT touching then simply start agaain as it will b a waste of time.............................................With regards to your painting question simplest way is to go to halfords and buy grey primer with is acrylic....if it is a wooden hull then you WILL NEED to use a coat of Halfords or Equivellent car laquer to seal the primer underneath ...rub down with 800 DRY then put your grey on top of it....reason for this is simple the primer is porous so you will need to stop water getting at the wood,if it is GRP then no need for this Dave
    5 months ago by Dave J
    Blog
    Plumbing the water-
    cooling
    for the ESC
    The HobbyKing ESC I’m using has the facility for water
    cooling
    and as it will be in an enclosed location without any free ventilation it seems sensible to utilise this feature. To keep the water circuit as short as possible I will put the pickup just behind the propeller and the exhaust on the stern but as the boat has a bulkhead just in front of the stern skin I need to make an access hole through it to allow me to secure the nut on the stern skin. I made a hole through the bulkhead large enough to get a socket on the nut and reinforced the hole with a ply plate, similarly I reinforced the inside of the stern skin where the outlet passes through it. When I was happy that the arrangement worked and I could attach the hoses and securing clips easily I glued and pinned the stern skin to the hull. The water pickup is a standard one that is readily available but it’s supplied with overly large and ugly fixing nuts, the inside one is of no consequence but I thought that the outer one needed smartening up so I put it on a threaded rod and locked it in place with another nut and put that into the chuck of a drill and used a file to re-shape the nut to a pleasing taper….who needs a lathe......😜 I had to reduce the height of the inner keel former as the pickup tube is not long enough to get a good fixing with the internal nut, as the inner keel is balsa I fitted a ply reinforcing plate to spread the load. The last ‘photo shows the location of the ESC, main battery fuse and receiver. The hoses will be secured to the ESC with spring clips throughout. I found that the silicone tube I use tends to kink rather easily if the radius of a bend is too small and I found it necessary to form a tight spring coil around the piece that loops the water back through the ESC to prevent this happening.
    5 months ago by robbob
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Thanks Boatshed & Chris, those were exactly my thoughts👍 Glad you said it first 😁 Without direct contact between heat source and sink it's a bit of a waste of time and effort.🤔 Cheers, Doug 😎
    5 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Yes, that is what was thinking. Normally with brushless motors it is the motor mount that is water cooled which draws the heat out of the motor. it may not need
    cooling
    anyway.
    5 months ago by ChrisF
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    I have one on a 540 brushed motor which is a reasonably tight fit on the motor. Also I have a Graupner on to fit Graupner 400 speed motor and that again is a quite tight fit. There is no gap between the motor and the coil. it is acting as a heat sink so therefore surely it should touch to disperse the heat with the water flowing through it. if it isn't in contact with it then doesn't it make it pointless putting it on there. Also wont it make it rattle about when the motor is running and the boat hopping about on the water ??
    5 months ago by BOATSHED
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    You are correct the coils goes over the body of the outrunner motor but does not touch. it was initially formed around a metal tube but when mounted on the motor mount there is a 'cereal packet cardboard' thickness of clearance around the body of the motor. Steve
    5 months ago by steve-d
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Hi it might be the wine but it appears you have put the
    cooling
    coil over the rotating rotor of the brushless motor should be fun when you connect up and run. if it is the wine I will shut up Cheers Ian
    5 months ago by TOWN3810
    Blog
    mini update
    I now have the larger prop shaft installed. Waiting for the glue to set so I can align and mount the motor. I need to fit a water pickup for
    cooling
    the motor and ESC. Are there any rules/tips on where it should be positioned? My first though was anywhere facing forwards as it will only really need
    cooling
    when running at speed. Any thoughts. Next is the paint. I'm trying to match the colours which were a marine 'Toplac' paint but at £25 for the smallest can x 3 colours I need a different route. Paint shops failed to find a match so am going to an automotive paint supplier who assure me they can match anything. So now to the question...what type of paint do I go for, acrylic, cellulose, water based etc.? Steve
    5 months ago by steve-d
    Response
    Internal wiring & bottom skins
    Hi Alan. Thanks for the cautionary comments. Placing the battery up front is the only practical location and I'm using 12 SWG wire so current handling won't be a problem but inductance could be a factor. I could fit a ferrite ring but that would only help to suppress any RF noise so there's not much more I can really do other than put the ESC up front too but that would mean re-plumbing the water
    cooling
    and the motor wires too. I'm gonna have to trust my luck on that score 🤞. Best Wishes. Rob.
    5 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Internal wiring & bottom skins
    Because I am keen to conceal as much of the wiring as possible I have decided to place the battery at the bow and the operational equipment at the stern, the engine on the original boat was central and covered with a soundproof box and this is convenient as the motor can be positioned and concealed in the same way. This means that some of the wires will have to run the full length of the boat and the easiest way to conceal them is to run them beneath the ‘box’ around which the hull is formed, and this needs to be done before the bottom skins are fitted. Holes were bored through the bulkhead formers under the port side of the hull and battery cables were run to the stern where the ESC will be and three motor wires from the ESC run to the centre, emerging near the motor position. For good measure I put in a servo cable and a separate draw wire just in case I needed to put more cabling in for any additional features, perhaps working navigation lights? Satisfied that I had all the cabling in place I was able to fit the bottom skins starting with the starboard side first. Before doing so I put a very slight 'hollow' in former F1 which should help blend the shape of the the hull where the ply skins meet the balsa blocks that will to be carved and shaped to form the bow. This can be seen in the last picture. The process of forming and fixing the skins is the same as for the side skins but in addition to the pins holding the skins in place I used some brown polythene ‘packing tape’ to pull the skins tightly against the bulkhead formers and strakes. The packing tape has a very high tensile strength and is ideal for this, and of course cheap and easy to remove. Once the aliphatic glue had set thoroughly overnight I removed the excess from the skins with a small block plane and finished them with my sanding plate. Before I fit the skin at the stern I will have to arrange the water
    cooling
    for the ESC, with the pickup just behind the prop and the outlet on the stern. I’ll cover that aspect in the next update.
    5 months ago by robbob
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Hi Steve - yours is 1:12 then which is the scale I'm building all mine at. Yes, the building is the best bit (and the drawing in my case) as I doubt I will use them that much. Where did you get your bollards etc. from as I shall need to start getting those bits and pieces together. Chris
    5 months ago by ChrisF
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    This one is 31". Making things difficult for myself by trying to model it on a specific boat. Having said that the building is the bit I like best. Steve
    5 months ago by steve-d
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Good to see another Fairey. What size is your Huntsman? I'm busy scratch building three different Faireys at the moment and the Huntsman 31 will be a future project. I've got one of the Precedent 46" but it's too big and heavy really. Chris
    5 months ago by ChrisF
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Don't suppose it will matter much Steve, since the
    cooling
    comes from the wet stuff and not air flow. And as you say it makes the assembly more stable. Cheers, Doug 😎
    5 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    Too late...all done now. I just thought it would be more stable. Steve
    5 months ago by steve-d
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    I agree not necessary to solder, as long as the coils are tight with no gaps
    5 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    cooling
    coil
    All the
    cooling
    coils I have seen,do not have the coils soldered together.On all the ones I have weren't soldered.They all provide the
    cooling
    very well.
    5 months ago by Donnieboy
    Blog
    cooling
    coil
    Started making a
    cooling
    coil for the motor. Should I solder the coils together? Would make a neater and more stable installation. Steve
    5 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Smoke generator
    Been thinking how I could build a compact sealed electric smoke generator with a pump to push the smoke through the exhausts, along with the
    cooling
    water on my HSL. Are the model train smokers not big enough for your purposes. You could just copy one of those and enlarge it perhaps. From what I remember from my train days they were not too complicated. How about an upside down ic glow plug with a variable voltage regulator in the bottom of a tube with a low temp oil ? You could possibly use a small brushed ESC for the regulator and come up with a controlled drip feed replenishing system. Just seen a site SMOKE EL in Germany which makes smokers for ic and electric planes but they look expensive and complicated,- work well though,-vids on site.
    6 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    fuse holder
    Depends how fast you want it to go! Electrical kit is either rated continuous or intermittent. Continuous ratings are usually conservative - you can exceed them somewhat - but they also assume decent
    cooling
    . The inside of a boat is usually sealed, and so is poor for
    cooling
    unless specific provision is made. Chinese ratings tend to be a bit unreliable - and watch out for cheap kit with phenomenal specs that are only achievable if you plunge them into liquid nitrogen! I typically run my 12v rated brushless motors at 7.2v. That way they just get a bit warm in a sealed boat and need no
    cooling
    . For brushed motors the brushes tend to be the weak spot if you put a lot of amps through them. Check your motors for heat after a run and you'll soon find out if you're mistreating them... If you're thinking about Taycols, the smaller ones were definitely brush-limited. Though the bigger ones are typically rated at 12v, the initial review for the Standard reckoned it could take 20v or more. Open frame motors are easier to cool. But I wouldn't like to guarantee the paxolin bearings if you did that...
    6 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Directory
    (Naval Ship) MTB 49
    Scratch built Thornycroft MTB from a 1960s Vic Smeed plan. Boat is 40yrs old from start till now. Bought plans in 1968 and finished 20 yrs later working on and off. Was twin prop with single Futaba ESC, on 27Mhz then an Electronize ESC on FM 40 Mhz now have just converted it to twin car ESCs and added a sound unit and is now run on 2.4 . Has a 100mm 12v computer fan for
    cooling
    with heat sinks on the motors. Has separate cabin lights and running lights. (Motor: 380 27MM) (ESC: CHINA) (5/10)
    6 months ago by jbkiwi
    Directory
    (Other) RNZAF W1
    36" Scratch built model of RNZAF W1, a British Power Boat 64ft HSL. Has twin brushless motors, twin ESCs, twin sound units, water
    cooling
    pump, full lighting and r/c switches for lights and pump. Took approx 5 yrs to buid on and off. hull is strip planked and f/glassed, deck is ply, wheel house is balsa. (Motor: TGY 28/45 2000KV INRUNNER) (ESC: CHINA) (5/10)
    6 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Arun now sorted. Programming card did not work so I translated the pidgin english instructions for the ESC and it worked using the Tx. I now have forward and reverse, correct prop rotation and no battery protection. Also the water
    cooling
    system for the ESC works with the water exiting from the exhausts on the stern. On the down side the nav lights have stopped working! Pictures of installation and finished boat later.
    6 months ago by rapidair65
    Response
    H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER
    You would actually be better off with motors that have a KV rating of less than 1000. I have a 48" Elco PT with three 780 KV's on three cell lipo's, 40mm 3 blade props, scale planning speed is obtainable at approximately 45% throttle. Very little load on motors, no
    cooling
    necessary on motors or ESC's. You will also find low speed operation much more manageable.
    6 months ago by bubbletop409
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Thanks Doug, always appreciate your thoughts. The relays are in a NO mode, so only operate when selected. On the bench works fine. Perhaps you do not have the same modulation issue as you are using 1000Kv and I am 2200. My motors respond rapidly, particularly around the fwd/rev position, so am always trying to accurately centre the lever. The motors I choose have integral
    cooling
    jackets and are nicely made. if they had been available in a lower rating would have probably used that. Good luck with the PT boat, looking forward to hearing what you decide with the powertrain. Good luck with the "C" check oug. Best wishes R
    6 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Allen Screw Removal
    Thanks chaps. All good ideas some of which will try. it has to be remembered I am chair bound so working "a la main"so to speak. Heat and oil /
    cooling
    has been tried. A very hot radiator to hand LOL. about 85 C. I think ball burrs could be the answer. They will cut through stainless.Eventually. Keeping flat mills central may be hard without a press of some sort. No current access to left handed drill unfortunately. I'll get there one way or three.😁👍
    6 months ago by onetenor


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