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    Workshop
    Here's my downstairs man cave, bit untidy as was having a big clean out Bike went to the op shop). Have hand tools, power tools, vice, large Taiwanese Lux
    drill
    / mill, welders etc in one end, a large industrial
    drill
    and vice down the end of the garage on another bench, (
    drill
    painted by my son when he was about 12,)-
    drill
    looked a bit sad when we bought it but came up well with a scrub and a bit of paint. Was 3 phase but I converted it to single phase as I don't have 3 phase on the house. I bought most of the heavy tools years ago as I was making boat trailers, modifying cars etc. The most useful tool I have is an Austrian Emcostar multi purpose machine, (if you ever see one cheap grab it!) it has a bench saw, band saw, disc sander, belt sander, and jigsaw all in one (plus other attachments are available, (ie wood lathe attachment.) You can tilt it horizontal for the sanders and saw, or flip it up and use the bandsaw (and disc sander). All the functions are engaged with dog clutches and everything tilts or adjusts in one way or another. Whoever designed it should have got a medal for being a bloody clever bastard! A guy at work gave it to me as he wasn't using it and it was down the back in his garden shed! My main modelling cave is upstairs in whatever room I want, (missus lives elsewhere😊😊😊) I just do the really dusty stuff downstairs, (painting, sawing sanding etc) Problem is I have to go outside to get there, (pain if it's raining) Aircraft hanger -(ceilings in 2 rooms plus wall rack in another) I used to have one plane left 11 yrs ago, and was very happy until a guy at work started giving me his write-off planes and got me started again, now have 18 + 6 boats and need serious help! -certainly don't need what Martin's on , I'd be 10x worse!
    1 month ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    Mast assembly
    The supplied mast is of white metal and although OK it has a number of minus points for me. 1- The mast does not lend its self to being hinged. 2- It really needs navigation light on top and the supplied casting is not suitable for this. 3- wiring needs to be hidden, not easy with the casting 4- it’s quite heavy Having said all that it’s ok if you don’t want my wish list. So on with the manufacture of a replica, I chose brass as the preferred material because it’s easy to silver and soft solder. The main legs are made from 6mm round tube, which I squeezed in my machine vice to an oval shape to look like the castings, each of the ends were then squeezed again at 90 degrees to allow then to join to the cross mid-section. I made some brass inserts for the hinged end from 2mm brass sheet, which are bent by 25 degrees to allow the hinge mechanism to sit at 90 degrees to the cabin roof, these are
    drill
    ed and tapped 8BA. These pieces actually block the end of the oval tube and need to have a 2mm slot milled in them to allow the wires to exit the tube; these are soft soldered in place later. Two feet were made from two pieces of 2mm brass plate the base plate being slotted to accept the upright and finally silver soldered together. (A point here for silver soldering is to use as little solder as possible and allow it to flow with the heat around the joint this means that no filing is needed. I find it’s also good practice to quench the part when nearly cool to break the glass like residue of the flux then just steel wool is required to clean the parts). The feet upstands were then
    drill
    ed 8BA clearance and the base fixing holes
    drill
    ed the same size. The cross mid-section is made from 1mm brass sheet and is bent through 360 degrees whilst placing a 6mm round bar in the centre to create a hole for the top mast. A small wooden former was used as the piece was pressed together in the machine vice, this was then silver soldered to give stability and then filed to shape. This piece has to accommodate the wires passing through, so again a 2mm slot is milled from each leg location to the centre to create passage up to the top mast. The top mast is just stock tubing which then has a turned top with four 5mm holes machined at 90 degrees to accommodate the LED. This is a 5mm Flat top wide angle LED this will direct the light out of the four holes. Finally the cross piece, again stock tube with small ball finials at each end soft soldered in place and tapped 10 BA for the pulley blocks. All pieces now made, it’s time to assemble the parts using a combination of soft soldering and epoxy resin. The wire that I used was silicon sheaved, and when I soldered the legs to the mid-section and lower hinge piece I made sure there was enough wire to pull through to check if the process had damaged the wire, but it hadn’t. So having soldered the LED, the top was epoxied to the upper tube and the tube epoxied to the mid-section. Finally the mid-section was filled using Milliput but first putting some Vaseline on the wires to avoid them being stuck should I ever have to rewire the unit. Next the cross beam was added and epoxied in place. The bottom of the legs looked plain compared with the cast version so I have made some thin gauge brass covers with mock bolts as per the original. The whole assembly was cleaned up ready for a first coat of etch primer, and white primer, followed later with a final coat of appliance white
    6 months ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    funnel mounts and deck hatches
    Fitted the "legs" to the wheel house so now at correct height when on the deck. Funnel mounts done (just need to finish the funnels, workout what holes to
    drill
    and then mount the funnels to the mounts) so we added 2 hatches to each mount, painted white with brass hinges. the one placed between the Cowl vents is open, the one at the back is closed. as we only had "closed" hatches put a triangle shaped bit of plastic under the "open" hatch to prop open. When dry mounting the Cowl Vents found an issue with the rear vents as they are suppose to be higher than the wheelhouse and the ones i got where not, so found 2 wooden cotton reels the right height and turned then down to the correct width using the pillar
    drill
    as a lathe, painted them up and then placed the Cowl vents on those. also painted the "flat" vents chrome and stuck those to the mounts as well. to finish off these all we have to do is fit the breather pipes and ladder to funnels and fix the funnels to the mounts (allowing for the front funnel to have the hole for the smoke generator. Started work on the 2 deck hatches using 1mm plastic sheet. Made the 2 housings up and the planked and varnished them ready for the hatches. found out i had only enough hatches to do 1 housing, so
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    ed a 7mm hole in the hatch for a 10mm brass porthole, painted white with brass hinges. once dry stuck them on the housing ready to go. (ordered some more hatches to i can complete the other housing lol) one last thing was to start on the wheel box. Found in "The Works" in town a heart shaped box which was almost perfect for a mold for the thin wood that was steamed to shape and then held on the heart to fix the curve in place. next to do is to make up the front and back of the wheel boxes and stick the "curved" wood to that
    6 months ago by barryskeates
    Blog
    Cooling the motor – update.
    I’m grateful to mturpin013 for commenting that he considered using the propeller adaptor supplied with the Turnigy motor as it prompted me to retrieve mine from the box and adapt it to secure the fan on the end of the motor. I cut off the threaded shaft from the prop adaptor and the end was ground flat and then I placed it on the end of the motor stub and used a scriber through the bolt holes to mark the positions on the flange of the fan. The fan was then removed and the holes
    drill
    ed through and opened up to 3mm and then it was a simple matter to put the fan back on the motor and attach the new piece to the motor using the three 2.5mm cap head screws which are supplied with the prop adaptor. I think this is a far better β€˜engineering’ solution to securing the fan to the rotor than a spot of CA. Because the addition of the fan was so straightforward and effective I have decided to implement it on the model anyway so I cut an opening through the end panel of the motor cover and put some stainless steel mesh over that to finish it. The motor is now connected to the ESC and I have done some tests with the motor running and I’m delighted to report that there’s a very healthy airflow through the motor cover πŸ˜πŸ‘. It turns out that my modification is not unique at all and credit is due to reilly4 who did something similar to the twin motors on one of his boats long before I came up with the idea. He posted a β€˜photo of his boat when replying to mturpin013 on the subject of servo mounts. Take a look at the motors in his picture!
    6 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    end of week report LOL
    good week this week, i should of said that there are 2 of us working on this Tug, myself and my father. this means that we are splitting the work up and as he is retired he can spend some more time on the boat than i can. so, (and i forgot to take the "before" photos) we have the wheelhouse and the platform it sits on (as the platform is held above the deck on a number of legs. plasticard and wood veneer outer cladding with a (removable) roof. going to put lighting in the table, telegraph, binnacle, map table and ships wheel. painted the 4 Cowl vents then we dry fitted (placed no glue) the various parts( wheel house, funnels, mounts) into place on the deck to see how it looks. finally painted the funnels yellow to match the Cowl vents still to do on the Funnel mounts is to paint and place the vents (flat vents), fit the Cowl vents, paint and fit the hatch covers (white hatches with bronze hinges) fit the pipework to the exterior of the funnels
    drill
    holes in the front mount for the steam generator funnel and finally mount the funnels to the mounts (so not too much just for those 2 bits)
    6 months ago by barryskeates
    Response
    Servo Mount
    The aluminium servo mount is similar to what I have used, but the quality here is a step above excellent. πŸ‘ I use aluminium angle sections as well, so they can be made into a Z section depending on the application. I use 2mm to 3mm diameter bolts and
    drill
    and tap into the sections to secure the servos. This method can be used on any size of servo as they come in various sizes. I have also noticed that some modellers put two linkages on rudder servos. if both linkages worked in tension only (ie both pulling), then this is necessary, but if the linkage is a rod that works in both tension (pulling) and compression (pushing) then there should be no need for duplication. None of my models have this arrangement.
    7 months ago by reilly4
    Blog
    Deck Parts
    good weekend Made up, painted and planked up the engine cover and the 2 funnel stands. Funnel stands need to have the Cowl vents, funnels, hatches and tow mounts fitted to them. Need top make up, create, paint all of those first of course😁 also looking at a steam generator to go into the front Funnel so a hole will be
    drill
    ed into the mount for that as well
    7 months ago by barryskeates
    Forum
    soldering
    If your using an electric soldering iron avoid " active" fluxes if your willing to use a flame then good old fashioned " killed spirits" is as fine a flux as your going to find for soft soldering. Thinking about things if your using an IC engine and your making a prop shroud then please consider hard ( silver ) solder. Just think about the effect of a failed joint and a rapidly spinning prop. if your joining tubes at app 90 degrees think about
    drill
    ing the tube your going to join to and fitting a spigot to solder the joining tube to. Making a good mechanical joint is an almost essential requirement for a sound long lasting soldered joint.
    7 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    vice suitable for Dremel Workstation
    Good morning folks, I have a Dremel Workstation, or
    drill
    stand as I call it, and would like to get a small machine vice (is that the correct name?) to go with it. I have seen a few smallish ones but they are usually too big to bolt to the base. Can anyone out there offer any workable suggestions please? Also, is the material the vice is made from of make any relevance at this small size, i.e. is cast aluminium any good? ( I had a screw-on table top vice made of cast aluminium which snapped in half the first time I used it.) I feel the need for this vice as I am about to
    drill
    a 1mm hole in a model yacht's mast to locate the boom vang and with my shaky hands it could end up being big enough to pass the boom through without some sort of support!! Chris
    7 months ago by octman
    Blog
    Rudder location, blocking, fabrication
    Looking at the proper rudder location, I added some 1/4 triangular hardwood blocking to both sides of the centerboard. Needed blocking to
    drill
    through. Was able to pickup the work board and all fit under my
    drill
    press to keep the hole plumb. Rudder post will be a 1/4 brass rod with brass tube as a bushing. See photo, brass tube in hull. Next, I built a rudder substructure assembly which will be covered later with a wood or styrene full size rudder to fit the era. Took some very thin brass and formed it around the post, some brass plate and soldered as seen in photos. Brass heats up and solders well using my soldering station.
    7 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Keel
    Printed out the frames /ribs drawings and outlined each in orange so I could easily see the correct lines. Cut those out and pasted to some plywood. The plywood is Baltic Birch 1/4" -5 ply, very nice quality that I get from a local woodworking supply store. it's a bit nicer than from the local warehouse hardware lumber yard, but that would work also. Used some spray rubber cement, sprayed only the paper back and stuck on the plywood. Spraying just one surface allows quick removal of the paper once cut. I don't have a bandsaw of scroll saw, so I use a sabresaw/hand jigsaw mounted upside down on a surface that secures to my
    drill
    press. Works pretty good. My shop is so tiny that I just don't have a space for larger tools. Maybe someday. Keel board was glued up, will show more tomorrow on that. Joe
    8 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Fairly Hunsman renovation part 1
    Pictures Rubbing down hull, Close ups of hull repairs
    drill
    holes in transom for the exhaust pipes (water cooling outlets). Added spray rail to side of hull. Have found that I am having bad reactions to the fumes from Gorilla Glue.
    1 year ago by CB90
    Blog
    Rubbing fenders, more epoxy & hatch coamings.
    With all of the deck planking fitted I can now fix the rubbing fenders to the hull where the deck meets the hull sides. These are made from 6.5mm x 5mm obeche strip steamed and bent to shape and fixed with 30 minute epoxy, unfortunately the strips are not quite long enough to do this in one piece even with the rear rubbing fender in place at the stern so a join has to be made which I hope won’t be too conspicuous. The fender tapers in height from bow to stern and the piece that runs across the stern was made from 5mm x 5mm obeche. All the fenders were β€˜pilot
    drill
    ed’ for the pins that held them in place while the glue set. The complete hull was then given a further two coats of epoxy resin with a rub down between coats and a final β€˜polish’ with 240 grit paper used wet. The resulting finish is perfectly smooth and ready for paint. The front and rear hatches were fitted with the coamings that will hold the hatches in place. The rotary disk sander that I bought from Lidl is certainly proving to be very useful in shaping small parts at this stage of the construction. I note that it’s back on sale now (Feb 2019) so if you have the opportunity and Β£30 ….go buy yourself one! The next stage will be to assemble the cabin.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Cabin detail part 6 panel light
    Cabin detail part 6 panel light The panel light presented a difficult challenge in that I assume the real one has a tubular light fitting in it, difficult in 1/12 scale. However, creating the tube assembly was not difficult using some annealed 1/8” brass tube and making a bending jig, (simply a 1/8 grove milled using a ball ended slot
    drill
    into a piece of hardwood I formed the tube into the required shape. I used the back of the jig to hold the piece while I filled the tube half way through along it top inside edge @ 45 degrees this is where the LED tube will fit. The LED tube is from one of the new type LED garden light bulb that use a small solar panel to illuminate it during the during dark hours. Smashing the bulb leaves 4 filaments which can be used independently, these are very delicate and need the wires attaching very carefully finally feeding it into the brass tube and then after all this fiddling, if it still lights, epoxy it in place. The next job is to make some brackets to fix it to the instrument panel. The bracket was made from 1/8” bore tube and some 0.010” brass shim I
    drill
    ed some holes in the sheet prior to cutting to size, this was done using only a 1/8” dia centre
    drill
    and then enlarged with a clock makers reamer until the tube fitted snugly through this was then soft soldered in place. The whole unit was then epoxied in place on the instrument panel. All the wiring for the panel LEDs can now be completed ready for connection to the random flashing circuit board. (this came as a kit for just Β£3:90) The circuit board is fastened to the panel with a sub-board made from a scrap piece of ply with PCB supporting pillars in the corners, when this is completed I will post a video of it working. The LEDs on the circuit board are only for testing and will be replaced with the panel LEDs.
    8 months ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    Tin Work
    The tin can that I used is from a small tomato paste sauce from the market. Use whatever tin that you would like or can find. Look at my sketch to see how it needs to function and adjust your design to what enclosure is available to you. Lots of ways to do it, just make sure you have these points covered: 1. Method of attaching a fan to push air into the unit. 2. Place for output stack / tube. 3. Method of mounting a wick with heating element attached that can sit above the fluid level. See sketch in previous post. First photo, I cut three holes, each sized to fit the brass tubes and fan opening. This tin is thin and easy to poke holes in. I start by marking the opening locations with a marker, them I use a small sharp awl or pin to stare a hole. With hand tools ( power
    drill
    will easy shred the can, be careful) I enlarge the holes with small hand
    drill
    s or reamer, found files, etc, I rotate the tools slowly in the opening and gradually enlarge it to size needed. Then I cut brass tubing to length with a small hand held hobby razor saw. Our in place, apply flux and solder. Once heated properly the solder flows easily.for the larger fan opening, I then used a dremel tool with sanding drum to make a nice round opening. The fan has corner openings for screw mount. Secure with some tiny sheet metal screws. Next I will build an enclosure around the fabpn edge to fit the round can. Might just use silicone caulk. Note, I did not open the can with a can opener, left the ends in place and poured the content out thru the holes made, Yes, it's a bit messy and wasted the sauce, but it's a cheap way to get an tin enclosure. More to come. Please give me feedback, am I being clear enough? Thanks, Cheers, Joe
    8 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Rubber stopper wick & element
    In the previous post in the video, note that a black rubber stopper is inserted into a brass tube soldered to the tin container. Starting with the element again, select proper length of heater wire by applying voltage to lengths as show previous. Crimped wire to one end. Next photo shows a rubber stopper, I use my
    drill
    press to
    drill
    to straight holes to allow the voltage supply wire to pass through it. Then I put together a wick with a brass rod (1/16") to provide support and to secure it to the stopper. Brass rod with wick is pushed thru the stopper,
    drill
    a pilot hole for the brass rod centered in the stopper. See photos, the supply wires will come thru the stopper at each side of the wick. Put one wire through the stopper, then I wrapped the heating element around the wick. This is tricky and took several attempts to get it done cleanly. The supply wire for the end is then fed back through the stopper. This is a weak part of the design as it must run back to the stopper without touching the heater element. it does work, but I will try to improve on this. This entire assembly fits into the tin can and is the correct length to just submerge the bottom portion of the wick and not the wires. I forgot to do a sketch showing a section through this, but will try tomorrow. Joe
    8 months ago by Joe727
    Place
    E s c
    Hi I am using a Blue Rain esc rated at 60 amp 480 amp stall current .Has all the features of the viper plus a finned heat sink and cooling fan . Powers 2 black and decker 600
    drill
    motors with Graupner series 162 props motors approx Β£3.50 and esc Β£6.43 All on E BAY Or motors can be had from Potts in Derby .The motors draw 30 amps at full speed and I use a 5000 3 cell lipo The expensive bit Hobbyking supplied .The boat is a Jules Verne Cheers Ian T
    8 months ago by TOWN3810
    Blog
    Build
    The heating elements in the hairdryer had two different wire gauges as elements. I removed the lighter gauge thinking they would probably draw less current. I am attempting to use 6 volts as that is what my boat is. 1. First Photo: Took a length of element and stretched it out as shown, started with a longer piece about 8". if you are at 12v probably longer. Use some alligator clip jumpers and attached to one end, ran it to negative terminal of my 6v SLA. Took another jumper and attached to a point on the wire, say about 7". JUST TOUCH the other end to the battery positive to see if it glowed, it did not. So just moved about 3/8" at a time till it glowed - See Photo. CAUTION, make certain you have a nonflammable surface to work on, I used a tile scrap. IT GETS HOT FAST AND WILL BURN, DON'T ASK ME HOW I KNOW. That's why I just touch the terminal till it glows then stop, let it cool for a while. 2. Cut element to length, than take your 16 gauge wire and the crimp tube shown in earlier post. insert both into the tube and crimp it. I used a side cutter and carefully just squeezed enough. Make sure that the element will not pull out. Do the other end. Because I am using only 6 volts, I had flattened out the wire to give me more wraps on the wick. See photo and note. 3. in the lid of the box, I located the fan at one end, the exhaust stack at the other.
    drill
    ed a hole matching the fan opening and secured with two screws,
    drill
    small pilot holes so as not to crack the plastic.
    drill
    hole to match brass tube OD, tube is about 1" long or so. Super glued brass tube in place. Excuse the sloppy copper sheet work on the inside of the lid, it was an experiment at the time. I added this a a bit of a heat sheild as the wick and element would sit below this. 4. Next photos show the interior of the box, not the best photos of the process as this was already built.... The mint tin set inside the plastic box was an idea to do two things; first isolate the heating element from the plastic,and two, provide a smaller vessel for the fluid. You may want to just use a metal container instead of the plastic box, again I was just using what I had on hand. The wick is laying in the tin with the element propped up at on end to keep it out of the fluid. Photo shown does not show much fluid in place. This needs some work, but worked for this test. Experiment, just be sure that the lower portion of the wick is in the fluid and the element wire wrap is above the fluid level. For the test, I used some mineral oil and a bit of glycerin, smoked very well. it's late so I will run it and photograph tomorrow. Cheers, Joe (Excuse the Imperial rather than metric)
    8 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Motor, mount & prop-shaft.
    The prop-shaft, coupling and motor mount that I ordered from ModelBoatBits has arrived so it seems a good a good time to make up a supporting wedge for the mount to fix to. I do have a rigid brass motor alignment aid that I used when building the Crash Tender but do you think I can find it in the workshop?....nope! 😑 I expect it will turn up when I need it least! 🀞 Not wanting to waste time I used a length of heat shrink tubing over the motor coupling to make it as rigid as possible, a trick I had seen done elsewhere, and this enabled me to position the motor on its mount in the desired position and measure the angle that the mounting wedge needs to be made to. I used an offcut of beech that I had in the workshop which I cut to size and then shaped it on the rotary sander that I bought in Lidl, fantastic piece of kit !!. The wedge was then
    drill
    ed to take the nylon motor mount and also the fixing screws that pass through the beech block, through the balsa base of the box and into the ply reinforcing plate that I put in during early construction of the hull. After cleaning up the hole through the keel the prop-shaft was keyed with some abrasive, smeared with some epoxy and then pushed through to mate with the motor coupling. I used the excess epoxy resin around the shaft inside the hull and used some packing tape to stop it running out when I inverted the hull to seal the lower end. A quick spin on the motor confirmed that the alignment was spot-on and the hull set aside while the epoxy set. The next step will be to plank the deck.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Fitting the rubbing strakes.
    Before I can apply the final coats of epoxy on the hull I need to fit the two rubbing strakes. I started with the bottom rubbing strake which runs along the chine where the side skins and bottom skins meet. The strakes meet the external keel at the bow and also extend across the stern. I used a length of square section of obeche which needed a gentle curve towards the bow, rather than steam the wood I soaked it in water for a few minutes to soften it and then used a heat gun while bending the strip gently to the required curve. When the wood had cooled and dried the bend was set I did a test fit and
    drill
    ed very fine holes through the strip so that the modelling pins I use to hold the piece in place would not split the wood. A 30 minute epoxy was used to fit the strakes on both sides of the hull and stern. Above this bottom strake is a second rubbing strake and this also meets the keel at the bow and runs across the stern, I used a broader and thinner obeche strip for this and it was prepared and fixed in the same way. The final pieces to fit will be the gunwales which run around the hull where the sides meet the deck but I will not fit them until I have planked the deck.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Railings
    Last night I had done a quick railing mockup as seen in the first three photos. Decided to go with styrene and use a rectangular stanchions (verticals) and top handrail along with horizontal round intermediates.
    drill
    ed holes through the verticals and inserted the round rods, then glued. Worked pretty well. Next few shots show how I typically sketch up to scale and determine proper spacers, dividers come in handy for this. Then drew some guide lines for assembly, taped it to my tack surface, covered in wax paper and pinned the assemble in place. Pins do not penetrate anything,just uses pressure to secure. Some drops of styrene cement and the parts are welded together. Then on to all the railings needed. Will let dry overnight and trim ends in place. FYI -- Tack surface is just a piece of acoutical ceiling tile, I cut down the 2'x4' size to make smaller ones for my tiny workbench use. I learned this pinning method from building balsa airplanes, comes in handy a lot...... Joe
    8 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    After the Christmas break its back to the cabin to finish some of the instrument detail. You may recall I detailed the cockpit with some ply constructions to represent the general layout; I also intend to detail the compass, throttle controls, steering wheel, panel lighting, and instrument panel. The instrument panel was copied and scaled from various drawing and pictures and I came up with a three-panel unit where panels 1 & 3 are identical as they are for the two-engine managements system the centre panel deals with electrical things. I intend to make the panel out of 1.5 mm aluminium cut to size on the guillotine I then attached this to a hardwood block with some strong double sided tape this will be more than strong enough to hold the piece for the
    drill
    ing/light milling operation. I worked out the hole positions using an absolute datum (same as CNC work, if only I was still working) This does take some time using my rather old milling machine making sure any backlash is taken out during the 28 linear movements. I used various sizes of centre
    drill
    s to produce the holes as they give not only accurate size but also perfectly round holes on thin material and the only ones that needed to be a particular size (6mm dial holes) the others are for switches and LEDs which can all be a 3 mm location hole. Each hole was
    drill
    ed and then chamfered to simulate a bezel on the dials. Finally, I milled a shallow groove (2mm x 0.3 deep) to simulate the separate panels. I have copied a number of different marine dials from the internet and using PowerPoint I aligned in a complete group and then printed and laminated them, this will be placed behind the aluminium plate using double-sided tape. Having fixed the dials in place I
    drill
    ed through the holes where LEDSs will fit. The LEDs will be shortened and polished so they are flat to the face; these are then stuck in place. Next, I made all the switches from brass bar with a fine brass pin glued across its face to simulate the lever. These were painted gloss black and the centre pin picked out in red, they were then glued into the 3 mm location hole. The black knobs/pull switches were turned out of black Perspex and polished; they were then glued into the location holes. The whole instrument panel is then pinned on to the wooden framework which has been left in natural wood finish (ply) as it looks like the original boat was just a varnished ply finish.
    8 months ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    Plumbing the water-cooling for the ESC
    The HobbyKing ESC I’m using has the facility for water cooling and as it will be in an enclosed location without any free ventilation it seems sensible to utilise this feature. To keep the water circuit as short as possible I will put the pickup just behind the propeller and the exhaust on the stern but as the boat has a bulkhead just in front of the stern skin I need to make an access hole through it to allow me to secure the nut on the stern skin. I made a hole through the bulkhead large enough to get a socket on the nut and reinforced the hole with a ply plate, similarly I reinforced the inside of the stern skin where the outlet passes through it. When I was happy that the arrangement worked and I could attach the hoses and securing clips easily I glued and pinned the stern skin to the hull. The water pickup is a standard one that is readily available but it’s supplied with overly large and ugly fixing nuts, the inside one is of no consequence but I thought that the outer one needed smartening up so I put it on a threaded rod and locked it in place with another nut and put that into the chuck of a
    drill
    and used a file to re-shape the nut to a pleasing taper….who needs a lathe......😜 I had to reduce the height of the inner keel former as the pickup tube is not long enough to get a good fixing with the internal nut, as the inner keel is balsa I fitted a ply reinforcing plate to spread the load. The last β€˜photo shows the location of the ESC, main battery fuse and receiver. The hoses will be secured to the ESC with spring clips throughout. I found that the silicone tube I use tends to kink rather easily if the radius of a bend is too small and I found it necessary to form a tight spring coil around the piece that loops the water back through the ESC to prevent this happening.
    9 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    Are these any good
    One thing to perhaps change is to run the small
    drill
    s slower. I know the usual wisdom says to run at high RPM but without a high feed in rate to with it, the
    drill
    s will just rub and heat up. Slower RPM allows hand feeding without that overheating risk. Feed pressure of course needs to stay within the limits of the
    drill
    size, a 1mm
    drill
    can only take so much axial load. A side benefit in stainless is less risk of work hardening.
    9 months ago by gerritv
    Forum
    Are these any good
    You are getting HSS
    drill
    bits (the ones from Microscrews are HSS) or you are going to try
    drill
    ing HSS? HSS is generally rock hard and them tempered. I will verify that the
    drill
    s I bought from Microscrews work on Allen screws, I think I have already done that but will check. If the screws are stainless, then it is likely that the screws work harden while
    drill
    ing making the task challenging. Stainless can be a major pita to work.
    9 months ago by gerritv
    Forum
    Are these any good
    I'm only
    drill
    ing Allen screws but not making much progress. I'll get some HSS to see if theyπŸ‘ do the job. Crimpers arrived today. They seem to be good and solid with plenty of interchangeable heads. Not played with it yet.πŸ‘
    9 months ago by onetenor
    Blog
    Day Three
    Hi, Using 3mm Baltic birch plywood, I skinned the hull. Used Titebond III wood glue, bent by hand,
    drill
    ed and tacked in place with small brads. I cut the bottom oversized so it was easier to position, after drying 16 hours I cut the edges flush with the sides using a Japanese pull saw. Built the core for my rudder, see photos, solder my own arm as I did not have one. Used a 3/16" set collar, filed the surface to expose brass and solder a piece brass. Will
    drill
    the second hole later. Attached brass plate that will be inside the actual rudder, will build from either plastic or wood. Next, laid out the placement of the stuffing tube, then
    drill
    ed the hull then I built a motor mount from wood and added some green foam to limit mount vibration and sound transfer. Set the rudder post and block. Time to let everything overnight. Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Day Two Springer
    Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade
    drill
    press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    Are these any good
    Perhaps it is what you are trying to
    drill
    and thus using the wrong
    drill
    technology? if I can
    drill
    silver steel/
    drill
    rod and stainless all day long with them then it is not the
    drill
    s. (My main hobby is machining)
    9 months ago by gerritv
    Blog
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were
    drill
    ed out with a 7mm
    drill
    and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the
    drill
    and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then
    drill
    ed through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended
    drill
    s and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power
    drill
    the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I
    drill
    the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.
    11 months ago by teejay
    Response
    Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug
    Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade
    drill
    press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    flue
    Double thickness of tinplate formed by folding along it's length shaped round a former and soldered in place. Epoxy if on alloy .If you want lugs just fold and pinch in a vice or pliers.
    drill
    holes as required for stays. Or just solder on.πŸ‘ Takes patience but very effective.
    9 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Are these any good
    The
    drill
    s not very effective and blunted quickly and as a result they overheated. Very disappointed.Will source from U'K Cheaper postage and
    drill
    s Ha HaπŸ‘
    9 months ago by onetenor
    Blog
    Rear deck continued
    The rear deck has a few features that need to be done to finish the deck. 1) The hatch part needs the magnets putting in to hold it in place, which requires the deck to be milled out to accept the magnets. Having milled the recess out in both the base and the hatch in four places the magnets can be epoxied in the base. Now these have been set in place the upper magnets can be placed on top of the base magnets to get the correct orientation and glued in place, but I made sure to place some silicon baking paper between the magnets so they don’t accidently get stuck together (with epoxy). 2) The handles and recess to lift the decks out have to be milled out. Using a 2 mm slot
    drill
    I cut a 10mm x 5mm 1.5 mm deep recess in 4 places. Each recess has two holes
    drill
    ed in the corners to accept the brass handles which will be epoxied in later 3) There are two drains at the rear of the deck. These were made from a machined piece of tube, which had vee groves milled in one end to accept a 1.5 mm brass rod in each, which were then soldered in place. After some cleaning up of the excess solder the underside was filled in using epoxy resin coloured black (with Graphite) to simulate a dark hole. The ends were then machined flat, polished, and finally epoxied into the deck. 4) Finally the foam tanks need to be secured, once again using round magnets this time , they are sunk into the deck and similarly the opposing magnets are sunk into the base of each foam tank, this gives a real sturdy fastening the tanks jump into position as soon as they are placed near their position. 5) The deck has had a number of clear lacquer coats during manufacture so now for a couple of final coats.
    9 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Are these any good
    Are the
    drill
    s not sharp?
    drill
    ing oversized/undersized? I love mine, in steel (esp
    drill
    rod/silver steel), al and brass (although most
    drill
    s unmodified are a bit grabby in brass).
    9 months ago by gerritv
    Forum
    Are these any good
    Hi all I managed to order crimpers Β£24 odd also got
    drill
    s but not impressed. A new tool display coming up. Any use to us? https://www.banggood.com/search/grooving-tool.html?sbc=1 Groovy or what?πŸ‘
    9 months ago by onetenor
    Blog
    Fitting the side skins.
    The side skins are made from 1.5mm ply and require a slight curve towards the bow and I found that this is best achieved by gently warming with a heat gun, which seems to relax the glue between the laminations, so that when bent to a gentle curve and allowed to cool will set the shape very easily. The skins are supplied are slightly oversize and when the skins have been bent they can be roughly clamped to the hull and then marked for trimming, also while the skin is clamped in place the positions of the bulkhead formers can be marked on the skin. Back on the bench the skins were trimmed with a craft knife (with a fresh blade) and then
    drill
    ed with a 1mm bit to allow pinning through into the formers and strakes. Aliphatic glue was applied to the hull formers and strakes and the skin positioned so that the
    drill
    ed holes were in correct alignment with the formers and then clamped and pinned in place. Because the skin was pre-formed to the hull shape the clamps and pins are not under much tension and the hull was set aside while the glue set. When the port skin had fully set overnight, the pins and clamps were removed and the skin was finished with a plane to remove the excess down to the strakes and the F1 former at the bow and the sanding β€˜plate’ used to finish it all off. Where the side skins meet at the prow there needs to be a wide flat area for the external keel to butt to and so the trimming and sanding there will be done at a later stage before the bow blocks are fitted and carved. The process was repeated for the starboard side skin and while the glue was setting I gave some thought to a means of concealing some of the wiring that needs to run the length of the hull πŸ€”.
    9 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    small servo's
    thanks bike spokes looks / sounds great but then found out a 1.6mm
    drill
    works ok this morning as a 1.5 was tight,,
    drill
    ed holes 1 3 5 one side and 2 4 the other thanks for all input
    9 months ago by jacko
    Forum
    small servo's
    Hi Jacko, So what's the problem!?πŸ˜‰
    drill
    out the servo arms to match. Or; forget the clunky commercial clevis pins and simply make a push rod from spring steel rod. Don't let the manufacturers dictate to you!! Use your imagination; and a couple of pairs of pliers 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Tow hook assembly
    The white metal fitting has an awful lot of detail on it but lacks definition so some time spent on filling the body to better define the components. The anchor part has six hex dummy bolts cast into the base but I intend to
    drill
    these out and then use 8BA brass bolts to secure it to the woodwork. Looking at pictures of the assembly it is obvious that there is a handle arrangement missing so I made this from a piece of brass wire and epoxied in place. The two parts have a linkage to fasten them together so again using brass wire and a piece of scrap tube a linkage was made and holes
    drill
    ed and tapped to secure the assembly. Finally, a couple of coats of primer followed by a β€œGun Metal” finish and the items are finished. A pleasing result, however taking some time to do, now for the circular running rail, and supporting posts to complete this unit.
    9 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Are these any good
    Maybe but someone else had 8 years after her along with the union to get to today's place. Esp. in recent years the union demand history reminds me of Billy Connolly's Demands Keep Changing skit. To the original poster, sorry for the diversion. I hope you are not disappointed in the
    drill
    s!
    10 months ago by gerritv
    Forum
    Are these any good
    I've ordered some Cobalt
    drill
    s from Microscrews . Blimey aren't the postal charges a killer. About 6 Euros for 3
    drill
    s With VaT about 11 quid odd. Mind you they'll last a long timeπŸ˜‹πŸ‘
    10 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Boat shaft connectors (which stuffs to use and which is good)
    Hello all! I have been modeling for some time now. It's been quite fantastic everywhere but this one spot I really suffer. First times when I was kid I used pens and
    drill
    ed them as shaft connectors. Then I found out about latex rubber tubes. They works good . But when I use latex in fast boats they are ripped. I used some uni joints from Ali express and they are not that good. They are shaky and after sometimes the joints gets loose. The materials ain't that good. Normally I do build small boats. Between 50-30 cm . Here I need help, what else is good as joints and where can I get bad ass universal joints ?😭
    10 months ago by Sakibian
    Forum
    Are these any good
    Those would not be HSS (which is rock hard in layman's terms). Any good quality
    drill
    bit will go through those. The ones from microscrews will work nicely.
    10 months ago by gerritv
    Forum
    Are these any good
    I'm thinking of using MASONRY
    drill
    s sharpened up. I've seen a demo on U tube of this. Some yrs ago I got a set of those
    drill
    s that are supposed to
    drill
    through anything. First one I tried now has a flat end.I couldn't find my membership no so can't send them back.BuggerπŸ˜€πŸ‘. They have tips like masonry
    drill
    s so might touch them up and have a go. it's the carbide tips that do the job. it'a allen screws I'm
    drill
    ing so what is that HSS or tool or something in between?
    10 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Are these any good
    I buy my small
    drill
    bits from https://www.microscrews-shop.nl/ Excellent quality. I use them in steel and stainless as well as aluminium. For brass I dull them slightly and keep in separate box. Are you
    drill
    ing tool steel (aka silver steel) or High Speed Steel? Tool steel is no problem for the
    drill
    s I buy above. His hardware is also of excellent quality. (I don't pay the VAT because in Canada, which offsets the shipping cost.)
    10 months ago by gerritv
    Forum
    Are these any good
    Mornin' John, Re
    drill
    bits: not really my field, as a 'lecktrickery eng., but to
    drill
    tool steel I would guess cobalt or at least titanium. I'm sure one of the many Toolmakers on the site can correct me. Good luck with the crimper. Advantage of that set is that there is also a versatile wire stripper with itπŸ‘ Alles in Ordnung in MΓΌnchen, but bl***y cold 😲 All the best, Doug 😎
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Are these any good
    Guten morgen meine freunde. An Munchen alles gute Ja? That'll do for now as my deutsch is not very good. I've tried to order the crimper but the Pay Pal will not go through for some reason. I'll try again later. Danke meine Freunde.πŸ‘ Which are better
    drill
    s . Cobalt, titanium,or tungsten? I have a
    drill
    that will go through taps and
    drill
    s but it is a bit too big for the job I'm doing. That's assuming I can ever find it again. I would order a smaller one but can't remember where from. it was ground to an odd geometry and cut in chips in low speed but high pressure.πŸ‘
    10 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Allen Screw Removal
    I have some 3Mm bolts/screws with allen heads. The sockets have almost totally rounded out so can't remove them. They are pocketed (recessed) so can't grip them with anything.
    drill
    ing heads out seems to be the answer as welding would damage the surrounding alloy. What does anyone suggest I should use.
    drill
    s,burrs,mills etc ??????πŸ‘
    10 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Allen Screw Removal
    Try using a left handed
    drill
    I have a couple from Tracey Tools Devon. Very Useful
    10 months ago by Ianh


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