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    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the β€˜Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a β€˜Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately Β£2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of Β£48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more β€˜hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The
    glazing
    for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as β€˜strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone β€˜off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.
    1 year ago by robbob
    Forum
    Aeronaut Pilot Boat
    Hi Peter It seems so long ago and I can't remember exactly how I did it. However, I used canopy glue (which dries clear) to stick the
    glazing
    to the window opening as centrally as I could. Any gaps were successfully covered by the metal trim, which I fitted before the canopy glue dried so I could reposition the
    glazing
    if required. Sorry I can't be any more specific but the end result was 'gapless'. Steve
    1 year ago by cormorant
    Forum
    Aeronaut Pilot Boat
    Hi Steve. In have been reading this thread with great interest as I am currently making this Pilot Boat kit. I am about 70% there but have hit a snag that I have no answer for and hoped you could help. I am trying to fit the
    glazing
    but have found it to be fairly loose in the holes. Can you advise as to how you glued yours in place without sticking the protective tape in place and how it stays there due to the gaps around. When did you fit the metal trims. Thanks.😊 Peter.
    1 year ago by MouldBuilder
    Response
    Cabin roof hatches
    Hi Boatshed, I have used cascamite on some of the older boat restorations, but they are mainly for display boats, but it's rather expensive for most modelling jobs, so now tend to stick to using epoxy and the best one in my humble opinion is from the poundland shop, it dries quite quickly and crystal clear, I've even replaced port holes
    glazing
    with it. (it features Tommy Walsh on the package.) Comes in a syringe, so really easy to use. Cheers Colin.
    1 year ago by Colin H
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    real gentleman who started selling timbers for modelmakers, but had to stop that as he got a sensitivity to the dust of woods, but he also had a range of amazingly good stuff for amazingly low prices, including various stanchions. I bought all the remaining portholes from him because I hate
    glazing
    portholes! I have tiny working compasses, rigging scissors, tiny woodscrews, rigging cord, bottle screws, all sorts from him and all cost me very little. Alas, health issues have caused him to cease trading and he has been flogging of his stock on ebay. A great loss. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Styrene Allergy?
    Styrene fumes? You'll only get fumes if you heat it. My chum works a vac-former to make model car
    glazing
    and he thoroughly washes every sheet of PVC before forming it. Stops micro-bubbles forming. I use blue nitriles when epoxying. I always found latex melted on contact with most of the things I used, like enamel paint, Marineflex, etc. Nitriles stay put. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Making and Fitting tinted windows
    This was actually done back in April, somehow it ended up in another thread and I forgot to put it here!πŸ€“ After spraying the cabin white I used the windows 'oles to mark templates for the windows. Which I then transferred to 3mm tinted perspex / acrylglass and cut out on the table scroll saw. Despite careful marking and cutting still had to fiddle about with filing to get 'em to fit right 😑 Pics 1 to 3 show fitted windows still with protective film. Pics 4 to 6 film removed but still to be polished. 7th pic; Les piΓ¨ces, 8th pic; ze glue πŸ˜‰ I chose 3mm 'glass' a) to match the 3mm ply of the cabin walls - makes it easier to get a flush fit, b) could get it in green tint 😊 Think there was also grey and red !!!! Red for a 'Fun' Boat perhaps 😲 Glue used; Deluxe Materials Canopy Glue; "Thick, flexible glue. High grip. Dries clear. Fills gaps." Here endeth the advertπŸ˜‰ Last pic shows final result after polishing. Maybe sometime, when I haven't got more interesting things to solve and build, I'll make some alu or mahogany frames! πŸ˜‰ Happy
    glazing
    folks😁 Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Spektrum, new, useless...
    Westie if you want more "OH"s I think my namesake Mantua Models have some. Re unglazed ones if you get a look at them before you buy there should be a little ridge inside that the "GLASS" sits on. if you cut your
    glazing
    material carefully--- A sharp tube is best to cut it with. A drop of canopy glue secures it well. Re insurance etc. I was hit behind the eye on the temple by a model weighing less than half a pound. A low speed bipe at that. it hit at an angle from behind & I was almost knocked out by it. A strong breeze took it off course. Anything bigger could have killed me I think. Quite a few planes went adrift that day with the wind strength what it was. 15 -18 MPH I think it was. No harm was done luckily Therefore I would have insurance from one source or other. Bring back MAPπŸ‘
    1 year ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Spektrum, new, useless...
    Yep, he done good, did the Naval man in Munchen. I'm in his debt and if I use the TX to fly I promise I'll insure myself, but I ain't joinin' a club unless the local one is as cheap as someone recently suggested. And the only decal on my wings will be the SMAE, if I have to hand paint it! Now...back to boats. Tis my birthday and my dear bride bought me a set of the old Yeoman white metal fittings for my Crash Tender, so now the kids have departed I will have a wee clean up of them. Then, a Chicken Achar from the new indian restaurant. A bonus is that she also bought me a pack of 20 beautifully made turned brass portholes, glazed, that I've just realised will fit the Crash Tender wheelhouse. Result...I HATE
    glazing
    portholes. I did 9 on a scratchbuilt canal boat and it drove me nuts. 4 down, 16 to put back in storage, the last of Modelling Timbers' stock of them and the manufacturer no longer does em. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Windows, stoopid question.
    Well back to the windeys,thanks for the info on windey fitting,been wondering meself how best to glaze em.now I iknow. Never tried it but my mate says he makes his frames from>> model railway lines the flexy type>> glued round the
    glazing
    and poped in the hole,anyone else done it this way ? Jim
    1 year ago by Jimbo
    Forum
    Windows, stoopid question.
    Very neat job, Doug. On the front windows of the Crash Tender the material is 1/16th Perspex and I've done pretty much what you have, mark, saw and file to fit, but of course the missing window frames have to be made up, so I did them in 1mm styrene, of which I have a huge stock, thanks to the generosity of Ivan at IP Engineering when he was starting the Vintage Model Boat Company and I was designing kits for him. What I've then done is glue the
    glazing
    to the frame material and will have to hand paint the frames with the same paint as the superstructure. Not ideal, but I can't see any other way. At least the unit just pops into the hole. On the 3mm ply cabin windows I will have to do what you have when I can find some 3mm Perspex. I have some somewhere. There are no visible frames on those, contrary to what the fittings companies might say, only gutters over the tops which I can do with brass wire. Thanks for the confirmation of DON'T DO IT! Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Windows, stoopid question.
    Evenink Martin, On ABSOLUTE NO ACCOUNT fit windows before prepping and painting 😑 I did all the painting and lacquering first (see 'Sea Scout' Build Blog). Then used the windows 'oles to mark templates for the windows. Which I then transferred to 3mm tinted perspex / acrylglass and cut out on the table scroll saw. Also answers your second question, only mine were green tinted not grey. Despite careful marking and cutting still had to fiddle about with filing to get 'em to fit right 😑 Pics 1 to 3 show fitted windows still with protective film. Pics 4 to 6 film removed but still to be polished. 7th pic; Les piΓ¨ces, 8th pic; ze glue πŸ˜‰ I chose 3mm 'glass' a) to match the 3mm ply of the cabin walls - makes it easier to get a flush fit, b) could get it in green tint 😊 Think there was also grey and red !!!! Red for a 'Fun' Boat perhaps 😲 Glue used; Deluxe Materials Canopy Glue; "Thick, flexible glue. High grip. Dries clear. Fills gaps." Here endeth the advertπŸ˜‰ Last pic shows final result after polishing. Maybe sometime, when I haven't got more interesting things to solve and build, I'll make some alu or mahogany frames! πŸ˜‰ Happy
    glazing
    😁 Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Cabin windows again
    Interesting solution ! What you are actually describing is otherwise known as 'secondary double
    glazing
    '...😜 Keep up the great work. Robbob.
    2 years ago by robbob
    Response
    Fairmount Alpine - TUG!
    yes also building one A lot of work to complete yet. Fitted with 2x mfa 6/1 motors and bow thruster ,kort nozzle, becker rudders,all windows fitted with individual
    glazing
    a lot of time consuming, still a lot to do
    2 years ago by thepirate
    Forum
    HMS HOOD by Trumpeter
    Yes I was that person with the transducer( amongst others). I originally had a speaker inside the lower superstructure of the tug, where there are window openings, but without any
    glazing
    , so in theory the sound should have been able to escape. The engine sounds were OK but the other sounds, on a different sound module, were only audible if the model was more or less within arms length, which I thought unsatisfactory! Aha I thought, use a transducer attached under the deck, other people seem to get satisfactory results. I didn't. I think that there is too much clutter on the deck of the Southampton,which is not that big, preventing the hull from doing what it is supposed to do. Next idea is to conceal a normal speaker on the deck disguised as a pile of pallets, with lots of lovely gaps to let the sound out. Chris
    2 years ago by octman
    Response
    More Bulkheads
    Hi Michael. You might want to consider enlarging the cut out in CF2 to allow you to get your hand easily into the interior of the cockpit. I think the small 'door' cut out will restrict access if you intend to detail this area with a wheel, throttles and instruments etc. And getting your hand inside is really helpful when it comes to
    glazing
    the windows. Apart from that it looks like a 'proper job' πŸ‘ Robbob.
    2 years ago by robbob
    Response
    Decks
    Hi Norm, The whole Operation Pedestal story is incredible! What else could they do with Ohio? Broken back and had been sitting on the bottom for a few years! For some time the upper (dry) decks were converted to troop accommodation. Re Carley floats: "The Carley float was formed from a length of copper or steel tubing 12–20 inches (30–50 cm) in diameter bent into an oval ring.[3] The ring was surrounded by a buoyant mass of kapok or cork, and then covered with a layer of canvas rendered waterproof via painting or doping.[4] The metal tube was divided into waterproof compartments with vertical baffles.[4] The raft was thus rigid, and could remain buoyant, floating equally well with either side uppermost, even if the waterproof outer was punctured. The floor of the raft was made from a wood or webbing grating. Boxes containing paddles, water, rations and survival equipment were lashed to the floor grating. Men could either sit around the rim of the raft, or, if in the water, cling to rope loops strung around its edge.[5] The largest model could accommodate up to fifty men, half inside the raft, and the others in the water holding onto the ropes." By the way; the Carley rafts on the stbd side of Lusty seem to be at least double stacked and lashed! Pic 1 shows detail of Carley rafts on HMS Rodney. You can just make out the boxes with paddles an' stuff! Note what looks like an ER Artificer lounging in a doorway while the 'matelots' are swabbing the deck! πŸ˜‰ Pic must be a fairly early one cos you can see a useless Vickers Quad 0.5" machine gun on the upper sponson. These were rapidly replaced with 20mm Oerlikons after the first experiences in action! Re 'round structure on mainmast': NO! No
    glazing
    , it doesn't seem to have been manned and certainly wasn't a 'Fighting Top'. Seems more likely it was a canvas protection ( from weather and curious eyes!) for a radar antenna. Best pic I have of it shows it as not really round but 'panelled'. No openings at all. Access to it is by a short ladder at the rear from the small deck just below it, see pic 2. From the uniforms of the MPs I would guess that this was taken during her repair / refit in the US. Curious is that it is difficult to ascertain when she had this 'thing' and when it was removed. Probably during one of the many radar upgrades. Most early pics seem to show it, by 1945 in Sydney it was gone (pics 4 & 5). Re rebuilding the island; a razor saw would help to remove it, then sand the deck flat. But sometime we have to decide what date and refit / repair status you want to depict!! πŸ€” Have fun in UK, say hello to 'Blighty' and sink a pint (or twoπŸ˜‰) of 'Spitfire' and/or Breakspear XXX for me. πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Dave, you got my interest alright! πŸ˜‰ Have decided to buy a 250ml 'sampler' for starters. Thanks for the short shelf life tip πŸ‘πŸ‘ I have a dead bumble bee πŸ€” I found in the bedroom. Alas no flowers for him! DHL just told me my Glue 'N Glaze an' stuff should arrive tomorrow😊 Time to go now - bowling training evening! League starts again in 4 weeks. Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    I am trying to fit, well glue really, Perspex ports, with outer metal frames into my build. I'm having a real problem with it. Can some one give me the heads up on the tried and trusted method. Do I fit/glue the Perspex into the cabin and then fit and glue the outer frame on top, or glue the clear plastic into the frame and then fit into the hull. I've tried both, but always finish up with the thing falling out, or glue being visible, or both! There must be a trick of the trade that will make life easier, and make a better job than I seem to be capable of. It's the worst part of the build, for me, and it's putting me off assembling another model that has any windows! Advice greatly appreciated.
    2 years ago by glyn44
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Doug I was keen to get your interest and yes its not cheap. Can buy in 1Ltr cans locally. if you have a local scale model group they may let you have 20cc for your portholes. Problem is you add hardner as a percent about 2% so measuring and mixing is difficult. I usually find a dead fly and encapsulate it in the spare mix. if you can get a spider they send the female of the species quite frantic especially as they don't squash under foot. The real problem is the relatively short shelf life once opened. Have fun Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Dave, I'd sussed that when you mentioned 'casting' πŸ‘ Just found some at Conrad 'round the corner' in Munich 😊 "Certainly Sir, how many gallons do you need?" !! Not exactly cheap is it!? Saw some applications on Dioramas, neat πŸ‘ Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Doug It's not ordinary resin, but crystal clear casting resin, wot they use to encapsulate bugs etc. Also used by modellers to represent lakes and rivers etc. It is very runny and thin. Best part is its UV safe so won't discolour in the sun - if you are lucky enough to have any! Cheers Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Dave, Vielen Dank πŸ‘ I suspected as much with the water jet, but then you had many many more to do than I have. I also tried the filling with resin, evidently the wrong sort as I could never get them completely bubble free 😑 Good tip with the syringe.πŸ‘ Your resin was obviously thinner than mine was. I don't trust cyano near water either, despite the fact that some are now advertised as 'waterproof', resistant maybee! With the acetate I was thinking of cheating and using strips! πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Doug I used a trader (Steve Tranter- Model Boat Bits) to get the waterjet cutting done. The machine needs programming and I provided a spread sheet with the dimensions and they produced the file and did the cutting. As we were building two large models this was the only way we could get the project finished on time. I have been experimenting with crystal clear resin to produce portholes for a Confiance Class tug I am building. I made portholes out of brass on the lathe then filled the centre with the clear casting resin. I had bubbles in the initial attempt but by using a syringe and flicking the tube the bubbles all go to the top of the syringe and the result is to my liking. I do paint the portholes first. When dry I just glue in the fibreglass hull with epoxy. Mine are near the waterline and whilst cyano would work I don't trust it when wet as experienced with the Olympic. You could drill and fill your portholes with this, just need to place a blanking plate behind each porthole til the clear casting resin sets. I suspect this would be quicker than using acetate. incidentally I used to cut my acetate portholes with a heated brass tube. I used a piece of stainless rod inside the tube to push the portholes out. Cheers Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Mornin' Dave, many thanks for the Titanic info. Some good tips πŸ‘ Haven't decided yet whether to make brass T section frames or flat wooden ones! Daft thing with my destroyer is that the portholes were fitted in the original balsa hull. Later I covered it in glass fibre for extra knock resistance so would have to do it all over again😑 The portholes were ~5mm diameter brass into which I had to glue tiny plastic discs. How to go bonkers in stages πŸ€” However, I now have a Fleetscale H class hull which has moulded in plating and portholes so I only need to drill them out and fit
    glazing
    from within 😊 The old ones I will save for the new superstructure. Lighting will be general for some compartments not individual. The old original ship I think I will leave 'as is' as a momento of my standard of 50 years agoπŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug 😎 PS Water jet cutting is beyond my means but I have been toying with the idea of buying a stencil cutter. The better ones cope with up to 1mm or so. Should be enough for
    glazing
    sheet!
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    In case anyone is wondering 18/8 means 18% chrome and 8% nickel in the alloy. 18/10 is even better for rust resistance. Check your table cutlery πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Glyn The frames you have should be fine. I mentioned painting as it is best done before the windows are fitted. Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Glynn, if you are sure it is stainless then no problem! Test a scrap piece by sticking it in water overnight, see if a thin rust film develops! Even then there is stainless and 'stainless'. if you are sure it is 18/8 then OK. If you bought the frames made up I would suspect they are light casting alloy which may well corrode and look 'orrible. 😑 Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Shucks Dave W! πŸ€” What happened to the the Aerobic boat!!?? I was so looking forward to the videos πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi, Rolfman just google acetate sheet, and take your pick. Loads of of it out there. I use it for aircraft cockpit screens, 99% of which are curved. I have ordered some glue and glaze so will try it soon as. One thing I noticed from your posts is you mention painting the frames. I had no intention of doing that, I was going to leave them untouched, silver( I guess it's stainless) is this a no no.
    2 years ago by glyn44
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hope you don't mind me butting in on this thread, but I'm trying to find out what kind of
    glazing
    is used for the wrap around screen on the Huntsman 34" + 44" boats from Precedent, and where I might purchase some from ? Hoping someone will be able to help me with this. Kindest wishes to all, Dave W 😊
    2 years ago by rolfman2000
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Doug The Olympic and Titanic used 5mm and 3mm LEDs in the portholes - all illuminated. The cabins were glazed with overhead projector film, printed with the frame details then individually cut and stuck into each aperture. We had the cabin windows water jet cut so the were all the same size. I used Canopy Glue and the frames had all been acrylic spray painted. All were a close fit and stuck easily. I can appreciate your difficulty with the destroyer, I cheated with my HMS Grenville (1:96), and just cut small holes in the plating and added a dab of black paint to represent. Using the method I described with the frame on the face of the cabin leaves an aperture to glue the window into. A bead of glue will keep the window in place once dry. I find it dries quite clear and rubbery so with sufficient flat surfaces it works very well. Glue'nGlaze is tried and tested if you can get hold of some Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Gyn, Canopy Glue may not cut the mustard with metal frames. it's only specified for wood, plastics and painted or varnished surfaces. Glue 'n Glaze is also specified for metal. "Glue 'n' Glaze Model AD55 50ml For making crystal clear windows and bonding canopies and most plastics Bonds wood, plastic, metal, painted surfaces. For
    glazing
    windows up to 6mm. Use with micro-tips." Don't stick your fingers to the ship😑 Cheers Doug 😎 PS For my little tasks have just ordered Glue 'n Glaze from Krick, the German distributor for Deluxe Materials! So let's see how we goπŸ˜‰ To be continued - Tune in next week, same time, same channel, when 'Once again it's time to play .........'πŸ€”
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Dave, I don't propose to glue to paint! That's a lesson we learn as children with plastic kits πŸ˜‰ I clean both sides first. Fitting portholes from inside the destroyer hull would have been impossible. There's also many more of 'em than on your average Fireboat or similarπŸ€” Patience is, or becomes, a virtue! Doug 😎 PS I know you had quite a few in your Titanic, but bigger than the 1/4" portholes in my destroyer. Did you do them individually or in strips?
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    I've got canopy glue, but sure if it stick metal( the frames ) to the plastic hull and the windows. I'll try it. Thanks for tips so far.
    2 years ago by glyn44
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Plenty of room if you make some tools to hold in place. if you glue to paint it makes a weak joint and will pop out when you try to fit the perspex. I do believe Glyn has already tried that without success. Glue 'n Glaze makes the process much easier. Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Dave, I can do it that way on the Sea Scout but not so easy from inside with Glyn's ship and lots of small windows in a cramped superstructure. πŸ€” In his case I would paint the ship then paint the frames separately, glue in the 'glass', then glue the whole assembly into the ship. Like I did with the portholes on HMS Hotspur. Unfortunately Glue 'n Glaze & Co didn't exist then so some ended up 'steamed up' πŸ€” Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Glue (epoxy, Cyano or MEK) the frames to the outside before you paint. This will leave a lip all round the inside of the window aperture. Paint, then apply the windows from the inside using canopy glue. Cheers Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Yep! it's also from Deluxe Materials πŸ‘
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Glue 'n Glaze Glyn. No one will see the mistakes. No matter how much it seeps out from the frame it becomes transparent.
    2 years ago by AllenA
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Ah knowed dere was summat like dat! Thanks Wayne πŸ‘
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Here you goπŸ‘
    2 years ago by Midlife306
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hmm, that will be canopy glue, I've got some somewhere I'll dig it out & post a pic Cheers Wayne
    2 years ago by Midlife306
    Forum
    glazing
    help
    Hi Glyn, I am about to be faced with exactly the same problem with my Sea Scout renovation! After some cogitating (not painful if you do it slowly in an armchair with a decent single maltπŸ˜‰) I propose to make T section frames to fit the openings. Then glue the window into the frame and glue into the boat from the outside. There is a sort of super glue (Glue & Glaze?) that apparently does not show up white on the plastic window! Let us know how you get on.πŸ‘ Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    The window
    glazing
    & frames.
    ??....not sure I understand you comment but thanks anyway πŸ‘
    3 years ago by robbob
    Response
    The window
    glazing
    & frames.
    Luxurious work, I have not seen a man so muddy for a long time. Hats off. ZdenΔ›k
    3 years ago by Inkoust
    Response
    The window
    glazing
    & frames.
    Hi Boatshed. I have been using a product called 'Procan', I don't recall offhand where I bought it but it's clearly a very similar to the Deluxe product, please excuse the pun 😜
    3 years ago by robbob
    Response
    The window
    glazing
    & frames.
    What glue are you using for the windows ?? I haven't used a up to now but I purchased this for gluing in windows. deluxe materials glue & glaze
    3 years ago by BOATSHED
    Blog
    The window
    glazing
    & frames.
    A full set of laser cut perspex windows is supplied in the VMW kit along with corresponding frames for all and they are all a pretty good fit in the window apertures of the engine room, forward cabin and wheel house rear walls, only requiring a light easing with a file for a secure fit. I left the protective film on the screens whilst gluing them in place with a very small amount of canopy glue applied to the window edges with a dressmaking pin and pressed into place so that they were flush with the outside of the cabin walls. The wheelhouse windows were a bit trickier as they are glued to the inside face of the panels and I had to remove the protective film around the edges of the outer face of the windows by running a fine sharp blade around the window aperture with the perspex held in place by hand. Canopy glue was then used very sparingly on the face of the perspex and the windows clamped in place. The central screen of the wheelhouse has the Kent Clearview in it and this needed to be carefully centred before fixing in place. When all had dried and set the protective films were peeled off to reveal nice clear β€˜panes’ without any unsightly glue smudges. The CNC cut window frames are made from a flexible plastic material with accurate and well defined edges. They were all given a light sanding with abrasive paper as a key for the paint and were then laid out on a large piece of card paying particular attention to getting them the correct side up, in particular the wheelhouse frames which are β€˜handed’ for either port or starboard. They were all held to the board with small pads of double sided foam tape and sprayed with two coats of Halfords metallic silver paint followed by two light coats of Halfords gloss lacquer. After a couple of days to dry they were removed from the board and fixed in place with canopy glue applied with a pin as very small dots around the inside face, aligned with masking tape β€˜guides’ and a straight edge and then held in place with small tabs of masking tape. The installation of the
    glazing
    in the wheelhouse was made a lot easier because I had previously cut away some of the bulkhead and rear wall to give better access to the wheelhouse interior for detailing. This is not mentioned in the building instructions but is well worth doing for all the above reasons 😁
    3 years ago by robbob
    Response
    The deck anti-slip finish.
    Hi Canabus. That does look like a pretty good example you have picked up thereπŸ‘ As Paul says it's good to put your own spin on the refurbishment, yours appears to be 180 degrees judging by your 'photos 😜. I made the opening wheelhouse hatch to allow me to get to the servo that turns my searchlight but I soon realised that I would need much better access to fit the wheelhouse
    glazing
    , portholes and all of the metal fittings that are on threaded studs, and of course all of the servo and lighting wiring. I have also got a great deal of inspiration and ideas from this site, for instance I also took a leaf out of Paul's book and cut away some of the wheelhouse bulkhead and cabin former to give me room to get a hand inside the space. It looks like you intend to do the same judging by the pencil marks on the cabin former in your last picture. I can now also, at a later date, put some detail inside the wheelhouse such as steering wheel, instruments and controls fairly easily which would have been impossible before. Good luck with the re-furb. Rob.
    3 years ago by robbob


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