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    Blog
    Building the Cabin. Part 2
    Before the front window panels can be added to the cabin structure they need to be shaped to follow the curvature of the front deck as much as possible and then glued together with a reinforcing strip on the back of the joint. Unfortunately I made an error 😑 when shaping and jointing the parts and had to make some new panels from some thin ply that I had to hand using the old panels as a template, hence the roughly cut window apertures in the β€˜photos. This was unfortunate but I feel better for the confession πŸ™. The new window panel was then glued and pinned to the front of the cabin assembly and left to dry while in the meantime I used my hot air gun to heat and bend the roof panel to the correct curvature. The roof panel was then pinned and glued in place on the cabin framework and when dry was trimmed with a small plane and the front window panel trimmed down to the roof profile. I added some additional framing and bracing pieces at the base of the front window panels and a β€˜shelf’ which will form part of the dashboard inside the cabin. I also added some extra framing and an end panel at the rear of the roof and a thin square bead was fitted around the base of the cabin sides and front to improve the appearance where the cabin meets the deck. Before adding further detail to the cabin I used some Z-Poxy finishing resin on the roof panel to strengthen it and provide a better surface for the paint finish which comprised of one coat of white primer, two coats of
    gloss
    β€˜Appliance White’ and two coats of
    gloss
    lacquer, all with a thorough rub down between. When all the paint had dried and hardened I gave the exterior of the cabin a first coat of β€˜Antique Pine’ stain. Next I will add some detail to the deck.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Cabin detail part 4 Steering wheel
    The steering wheel is a simple 3-spoke design; first, I machined a ring and a centre boss in brass. I then made a wooden jig to hold the parts in the correct position whilst soldering, this consisted of a turned block with a recess to locate the O/D, and the taper towards the centre hole to give a β€œdish effect” that locates the centre boss. This just leaves the three arms to machine; these are cut using a slitting saw to cut a 3mm wide strip from a piece of 1.5 mm brass plate. These are the cut to length ready for soft soldering and then the parts are all cleaned and placed in the jig, ideally a minimum of solder is used to minimise cleaning afterwards. The finishing/fettling I find is always easier if you use a sharp craft knife to slice any excess solder away as it doesn’t easily mark the brass in the same way you might using Swiss files, finally finish with 600 and 1000 w&d before priming ready for topcoat of black
    gloss
    . The first wheel I decided was too small so the pics are of that construction; the final larger wheel is in the last 3 pictures
    4 months ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    After the Christmas break its back to the cabin to finish some of the instrument detail. You may recall I detailed the cockpit with some ply constructions to represent the general layout; I also intend to detail the compass, throttle controls, steering wheel, panel lighting, and instrument panel. The instrument panel was copied and scaled from various drawing and pictures and I came up with a three-panel unit where panels 1 & 3 are identical as they are for the two-engine managements system the centre panel deals with electrical things. I intend to make the panel out of 1.5 mm aluminium cut to size on the guillotine I then attached this to a hardwood block with some strong double sided tape this will be more than strong enough to hold the piece for the drilling/light milling operation. I worked out the hole positions using an absolute datum (same as CNC work, if only I was still working) This does take some time using my rather old milling machine making sure any backlash is taken out during the 28 linear movements. I used various sizes of centre drills to produce the holes as they give not only accurate size but also perfectly round holes on thin material and the only ones that needed to be a particular size (6mm dial holes) the others are for switches and LEDs which can all be a 3 mm location hole. Each hole was drilled and then chamfered to simulate a bezel on the dials. Finally, I milled a shallow groove (2mm x 0.3 deep) to simulate the separate panels. I have copied a number of different marine dials from the internet and using PowerPoint I aligned in a complete group and then printed and laminated them, this will be placed behind the aluminium plate using double-sided tape. Having fixed the dials in place I drilled through the holes where LEDSs will fit. The LEDs will be shortened and polished so they are flat to the face; these are then stuck in place. Next, I made all the switches from brass bar with a fine brass pin glued across its face to simulate the lever. These were painted
    gloss
    black and the centre pin picked out in red, they were then glued into the 3 mm location hole. The black knobs/pull switches were turned out of black Perspex and polished; they were then glued into the location holes. The whole instrument panel is then pinned on to the wooden framework which has been left in natural wood finish (ply) as it looks like the original boat was just a varnished ply finish.
    4 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Painting
    Ah! I thought Fairey might prove the exception to the planking rule. Well, it'll look nice, that's for sure. Paint. I always use enamel and my local auto paint shop will make me 1/4 litre tins up, of HMG, which lasts a long time from a small spray gun. Failing that, Rustoleum do some lovely rattle cans in a range of colours that spray very well and are only just over a fiver a tin. One tin would do you if you're careful. I've just given my Darby One Design its second coat of blue after a rub down and I'm happy with that. Dries very quickly, but is a nice
    gloss
    . it is a bit thin, so be very careful how you spray. Better to do two coats than one thick one. But really, if you can get it, HMG is the best bar none. Worth hunting for. Paint, alas, just ain't cheap anymore. Would that we could get tins of Valspar or Japlac, eh? The proper original stuff. Plastikote was a good paint when it was an enamel, now it's acrylic water based muck. No coverage and reacts with itself, let alone owt else. I would be inclined, btw, to do that curved deck in veneer, so all your mistakes will be made before it goes on the boat. in which case, once the planks are made and fit bang on, go up the edges with a black marker pen. it will look like caulking when all is done. Good luck, Martin
    7 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Paints
    Hmm! Let's 'Cut to the chase'! First; I've never been on a ship, naval or civil, and I've been on a few during my 30 odd year career designing COMMS systems for ships, mostly naval, that used
    gloss
    paints OR matt paints. Matt paint, whether for scale or full size, rapidly shows the wear marks where folks tread or grab or where we habitually grab it on models. This rapidly creates a shiny effect, like the seat of your favourite, most comfortable and ancient trousers (which the Missus probably wanted to throw out years ago but you are fighting a REARguard action) 😁 During WW2 the emphasis was on reducing the reflectivity of paints on warships.
    gloss
    on a ship / boat MAY not look any different from satin or matt at a distance BUT; it will reflect sunlight and flash which attracts attention and betrays the presence of the vessel. Furthermore
    gloss
    shows the wear and tear marks much sooner than satin. Whether matt paints were available or not in those days I don't know, but even if they were I don't think they would have been used after the initial durability tests on board. Having seen the paint part numbers, all BS381C xxx, specified on the Thornycroft 'blueprints' that Martin sent me, I would say that the paint colours you need Morkullen are RN Light Weatherworks grey BS381C 676 = Colour Coats M01 RN Dark Admiralty grey BS381C 632 = Colour Coats M16 RN Light Admiralty grey BS381C 697= Colour Coats M23 See page 3 of the colour chart, see attached colour charts from Sovereign Hobbies for their Colour Coats paints, which have been derived from original Admiralty paint chips.. Colour Coats are enamel. If you prefer acrylic try Life Colour set CS33 Royal Navy WW2 Set 1. See page 6 of attached Life Colour catalogue. Happy painting, don't forget to post pics / vids of the resultsπŸ‘ Cheers, Doug 😎 PS have a look at the recent HMS Campbeltown 1/96 thread for further detail of the recent discussion on WW2 RN paints. BTW; if I feel after painting that the finish is still too
    gloss
    y I give it a blast of Lord Nelson satin, or in extreme cases, matt clear varnish. Otherwise I agree with Reilly's commentsπŸ‘
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Paints
    I am a bit stuck as to what type of paints to use on my Thornycroft MTB. Do I use
    gloss
    or matt? What type of paint is suggested Acrylic, emulsion, etc? Who can supply - say - 250ml of any recommended paint as I will probably need to apply at least two coats. I have already applied sanding sealer and undercoat and now need finishing paints. One for under hull and t'other for topsides. Any suggestions for a supplier would be greatly appreciated.
    7 months ago by Morkullen
    Forum
    Paints
    My point was that real vessels of that era didn't get matt paint as it wasn't strictly available. They had satin or, as they called it, "non
    gloss
    ". For anything. I'm not remotely interested in warships of any sort, but I do know about paints and they could only use what was available. Martin
    7 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Paints
    I use Satin enamels as they are more durable than Matt finishes, especially on the hulls, but still go over them with clear matt enamel for realism. The 'scale' appearance is the consideration. From a distance a real boat even if finished with a
    gloss
    marine enamel would not look
    gloss
    y. A WW2 boat such as an MTB would definitely have a Matt finish, and always 2 coats. Working models get scuffed in use.
    7 months ago by reilly4
    Forum
    Paints
    I use enamels, always. They don't react with anything. Rustoleum do a range of colours in
    gloss
    and satin and are cheaper than any other rattle cans. I get mine from a branch of Boyes. The original was always a satin rather than a matt. Totally matt paint wasn't available then. Martin
    7 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Sadolin
    Hi Gardener, Don't know the Sadolin stuff, I use Billing Boats stains meself, BUT whatever you use, esp on balsa, apply a coupla coats of sealer first. Then at least one or two coats of clear satin varnish; e.g. from Lord Nelson range from Holland. THEN AND ONLY then, apply your stain til you get the depth of colour you want. After that seal with matt, satin or
    gloss
    varnish / lacquer according to tasteπŸ˜‰ That's the way I did my Sea Scout 'Jessica' renovation, see blog on this site for results!!! Coupla sample pics attached. The whole process is described in the Blog. Otherwise the balsa will soak up all your stain and still not look right πŸ€” A 'preserver' as such is not normally necessary if the wood is properly treated inside and out; sealer, stain, varnish etc! Or just EzeKote resin inside. Stain no needed inside of course. Good luck and above all have fun with your endeavours. πŸ‘ Keep us 'up to date' ('on the running' as my German friends would say; 'auf den Laufenden'!) 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS I like Danish Blue meself 😁😁 On the other hand; I wouldn't have used balsa for speedboat deck in the first place. I use a close grained marine ply 0,8 or 1.0mm. Takes the stain better and looks more realistic. Balsa is too coarse grained for stain and varnish on scale speedboats. Thick coat of paint ... OK. On the cabin roof and after deck (which I had to renew) I used 1.5mm mahogany veneer. If I had to do it again I would use a close grained 0.8mm marine ply (birch or pear) and cherry stain (also Billing) as I used on 'Jessica's deck.
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Plimsoll Line
    Evenin' Neville, yeah, that colour pic will make a good poster in A3πŸ‘ But print it on a decent
    gloss
    photo paper with minimum 300dpi cos you'll be able to see much more detail than with normal copy paper. Now I'm on tenterhooks waiting for the 'unexpected extra'! We know you and your 'extras' 😲😁 All the best and much success, Cheers, Doug 😎
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    nearing completion!
    Very nice build Sky πŸ‘πŸ‘ If you need some instrument dials, radio / radar / GPS / instrument panels here they are! With suitable pdf or photo software (I use Irfan View) you can scale them to fit. Print on lightweight
    gloss
    photo paper or clear vinyl foil, or even printable decal film. Fix with a photo spray. Have fun, cheers, Doug 😎
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    46Firefloat Mk2 paint
    Have started renovating old kit build of the 93/94 firefloat with no fittings. Can someone please help with paint colours, the Red and Black on hull are they both Matt. On the deck is the Dark Grey Matt non slip and are the roofs with the fire monitors the same. The rest of the roofs are they dark grey Matt or
    gloss
    . The side are they Matt or
    gloss
    light grey. Also has anyone got the main dimensions on the lift davit and the tow hook. Any other info on this build would be appreciated as am copying from two old black and white photos. The model am building is 35” long and I think 16:1 scale.
    10 months ago by Elsrickle
    Blog
    hull
    well thats 3 coats of dark green below water line and 3 coats
    gloss
    white above phots to follow
    10 months ago by jacko
    Blog
    Final Finishing before Sea trials ;-)
    A quick Flashback to May 😲 Got sidetracked with 'lectrickery' an' stuffπŸ€” Hull was given a final spray top coat and
    gloss
    clear lacquer coat. All flatted back in between coats with 3000 grit Tamiya W&D sponges. Used wet with a drop of liquid soap. Then a few hours of polishing with car paint cutting compound and finally with 'anti hologram' polish until it feels like glass.😊 Same polishing procedure for the decks and cabin sides. Fitted a few deck fittings; tank filler caps, which also hold the aft deck down, and 'Jam' cleats fore and aft. Both from the 'Riva' range from Krick. Apart from the cockpit she's done! Need suitable scale crew and cockpit furniture now. Ship's wheel I have but that's it so far. Last pic is a reminder of how the 'old girl' started out last year, after 25 years of neglect in the cellar! Sea Trial soon. Cheers, All, Doug 😎
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Wianno Senior progressing
    https://m.facebook.com/wiannosr/ Had to change hull to red after some bondo work. Deck is painted, just some touch up and
    gloss
    y polyurethane for the mahogany. it is coming along.
    10 months ago by Ron
    Forum
    46Firefloat Mk2 paint
    Unless described as flat, paint was more often a brighter satin than matt and rarely actual
    gloss
    . White will always have been an off white as the components of paints were such that it was not possible to get a really bright white. I know that for a fact as my grandad always made his own and until PEP in the mid 60s (Plastic Emulsion Paint) there was no such thing as brilliant or appliance white. Unfortunately getting an decent off white is not easy these days since Plastikote went acrylic and their previously excellent paints started eating themselves on recoating. I now use enamels exclusively. They are densely pigmented, flexible and modern enamels dry pretty quickly. I am using a black enamel primer on my Crash Tender, which I will then spray with black "
    gloss
    " from the same range, which, once thinned with white spirit, will dry a little less than
    gloss
    y. I still don't have a matt brick red for the undersides, but it can be made matt-ish with a careful rub down with 1000 grit wet and dry used wet and soapy, but be careful not to sand through, so very lightly does it, even 1000 grit can cut well when new. Decks were said to be Cerrux Light Deck Grey, anti-slip, which means a textured surface. That would be darker looking due to the surface texture's way with the light. The cabin sides were described as "smooth", i.e. same as the decks but not anti-slip. The roofs? Well, on Vosper's drawing "white" is crossed through and "Grey" written in. But, some pics do look white, the best pics look darker by a whisker than the sides and the roofs are clearly textured as they show evidence, as do the decks, of filth which will sit in the texture. You choose. NOBODY has yet given us chapter and verse. The fact is, an already very handsome boat looks so very pretty with white roofs. But they too should be off white if you can get it! Good luck. Fittings, btw can be had from SLEC in Watton in white metal. Basically the old Yeoman fittings, masters now owned by IP Engineering who bought them to cast when they owned Vintage Model Boat Company. Now they've sold that to SLEC, but I don't think SLEC have white metal casting facilities, so probably cast by Ivor still. I have just had a set for my birthday and they're excellent. They do need careful cleaning up as in mould lines need to be filed/scraped/sanded to a decent finish and then given good primered surface. No hook though, but it does include nav and riding lights. This site also has masts for sale in plastic, but I made my own in brass as I will the hook and davit. I have also just had a set of crew figures cast from my patterns and they will be available soon...a driver(Helm), a boss with binoculars and a lazy slob laying around in the after cockpit. Needs a roll-up to finish his look. No idea of price yet as don't know how much rubber to mould or resin to cast for a set. Yes, 1/16th scale. All this to finish a model I had 55 years ago! But I reckon it deserves it. Martin
    10 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Norfolk Wherry Fans
    Still a bit on the heavy side. Fine silk "might" do but I might end up making loads of suits with Esaki tissue. There used to be a type of processed tissue with a slight
    gloss
    on it and a clothlike feel to it.Anyone know what it's called or where I can get it.The Barge is ten and a half inches long, not 8,with an open well deck. I could fit mini RC and a motor etc but it would be exposed. I could I expect cover it with a tarp as though it was carrying cargo. Some of you might suggest it's too small to bother with but it's like the peanut scale in the aircraft world. ORπŸ‘πŸ‘ A novelty TOY. Cheers all.
    10 months ago by onetenor
    Response
    Window Painting!
    So you'll be finished on the 29th ?? 😲 Just like Newport News - time and cost overruns 😁 3 coats sounds extravagant to me Ed. Humbrol enamel is pretty thick stuff. Matt covers better than
    gloss
    as well, 2 should be enough I think. Cheers, Doug 😎
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    54 year old Crash Tender
    Here's last night's first spray primer. I like this grey and will use it as the matt finish. Maybe then mask up and use the Baufix Grey for the cabin sides, with, OK, the Baufix white for the tops. I have black enamel primer for the hull and black enamel
    gloss
    . When you rub it down it's like soot! Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Windows, stoopid question.
    Doug, sorry, I should have answered you last time on that. A good impression of a dummy screw can be made in aluminium with a piece of tube sharpened on the end so it looks like a miniature leather punch. Obviously better if you can do it with something you've done in the lathe, in steel, but you don't have one. SO....PM me your postal and I will send you something I will knock up for you tomorrow in steel. That will last you into your dotage, when you will be found dribbling into the geraniums with this little tool in your mitts making impressions on the window cills of Frau Schmutterputz's Home for Englische Modelbauen. You will be able to "sharpen" it buy running it round on a stone lightly, rolling it as you draw it backwards. Can't add to Squire Turpin's words at all. I have a slide tailstock on my wee Taig lathe which makes screw forming easy as the thread takes the tap/die as it wants it, square and true. The piercing saw has clamps for much finer blades rather than the relatively big fret saw blades which generally have a pin at the ends. Sometimes you'll break a blade at one end. Then the adjustability makes sense as you just re work the length and re-use the broken blade. Tight wads like me appreciate such things. Car booked in tomorrow for repairs. About Β£300, so not as bad as I thought it might be. it's passed for the last two years. Busy boy today as I sprayed the Crash Tender grey on its upper works and by the looks of it it just needs a few areas of fine filler and a rub down on the toe rails and one more coat then it'll be ready for the
    gloss
    sides and the hull proper. Then I even used my brand new saw to mitre the corners of the topping to Chris's new garden pond casing. it's a stand up one to save our backs. So now, I am gonna sit and watch shite telly, even shiter than normal as it is all infested by ball kickers playing grown ups and failing miserably . G'night. Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Response
    54 year old Crash Tender
    Boaty, it's amazing how many people HAD Taycol motors, but don't anymore, apart from our chum Doug in Munich. And I'll pick his brains later maybe for info on controlling the Taycol Supermarine in the Crash Tender. Then again, I might just set it off on one pack for slowish and switch in another for faster. I ain't into reverse. Boats don't go backuds. I've had enough real ones to know that! Two of those didn't have any gears. One had a clutch and the other didn't even have that. it starts, it goes, quickish! Always had a paddle handy in the Albatross! I'm not really into the boat club festivals of steering round stuff or backing into docks, so why trouble myself with ESCs which seem to fail often still and weren't around when I had the boat originally. I have gel cells, but the damned things have all gone dead on me, so I might see about Nimh packs when the time comes. I went to get some one shot cellulose putty to fill the cracks and grain bits and the old nail head dips. But my favourite auto paint shop said they hadn't sold it in ages and offered me some acrylic crap in a tube. Not a bloody chance!!! "Gimme the thickest brushing primer you got and it better be cellulose". Yeah, got that, he said. "So why ain't you got stopper?" No answer. Anyway I get this stuff home and it's thick, cellulose (skin forming after 3 minutes) and bang on the right shade of light grey for a Crash Tender. I shall experiment with my Chinchila dust next for the non-slip areas and mix a pot of the primer with a bit of white to do the cabin sides, when I finish spray. For the moment, I very quickly slapped it on with a brush and will leave it for today to harden then start a very big, dusty, rub down session tomorrow. OK a litre of primer ain't cheap, but it's cheaper from a car paint suppliers and it's bang on colour. it'll also do a LOT of boats! I have a black primer in enamel for Vanity, which will also go on the sides of the Crash tender, followed by black
    gloss
    enamel, but's a way down the road yet. Talking of old stuff boaty, the white enamel my dad insisted on painting the boat back in the early 60s is hard as rock! He used to get it by the 20 gallon can from a "mate on the docks". We had docks in those days. Dad called it ship enamel. We all knew what he meant. Our entire house was shades of pastel tinted ship enamel! Tints courtesy of another mate on the docks. He had a lot of mates on the docks. it was difficult to be a Cockney family and not have mates on the docks! Pics later of the slapped on grey primer, which, I should say, argued a bit with the sanding sealer. Nuffin' a good rub down won't sort out. Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Warped wood
    Hi Martin, Yes I'm very happy with it. 😊 Not the cheapest but very good. I use the whole range from Base coat Pore Filler (Sanding sealer) through matt, satin and full
    gloss
    varnishes. in both brushing tins, for small part brushing, and spray cans for the bigger stuff like hulls and decks. The cans don't reveal what the base is but the thinners is white spirit or any of the usual 'universal' substitutes. It's made in Holland, supposedly specially formulated specifically for model builders! But it's available all over the shop, I get mine here from Krick. Just Google Lord Nelson varnish and you'll find loads of outlets, and Hotels πŸ€”! For Sea Scout I used all spray; 2 base coat, 2 coats of satin varnish, as undercoat! Then 2 coats of
    gloss
    varnish. Needless to say thin coats! And left to harden under a 300W halogen lampπŸ˜‰ Lots of 'flatting' back in between culminating with 3000 wet & dry, wet with a little liquid soap. Final polish using two stage paint cutting / polishing paste from the Petrol Head world. See pics. Full details (including the bloopers😑) in my Sea Scout Build Blog. Have fun with it, cheers, Doug 😎 PS Shame about the Lupins😑, that hybrid sounds fantabulous! πŸ˜‰ BTW: if you use the brushing stuff thin with 10 to 20% white spirit, otherwise you'll find, as I just did with base coat sealer on the deck of my PTB, that it takes yonks to get the brush marks out πŸ˜†
    11 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Warped wood
    Evenin' All, I had the same problem with the cabin roof of Dad's 1962/3 built Sea Scout. First I thought I could just remove the ply tops and flatten them, hot water and then under a car battery overnight. But the ply was cracked and curled just at the overhang so even after gluing, soaking and straightening it was still cracked and useless. So finally I soaked the frame alone in hot water and left it under the battery for a day and a night, with suitable wedges to get the right shape . In the meantime I made new roof skins from 1.5mm mahogany. Worked out quite nice in the end. Took a while though to get it right, especially along the centre line seam. Then I set 5mm round neodymium magnets in the corners, with counter parts set on wooden brackets inside the cabin walls to hold it on at speed on the wet stuff. Before assembling and varnishing with Lord Nelson spray
    gloss
    varnish I sealed all parts with two coats of Lord Nelson spray wood seal. Survived it's sea trials quite well. https://youtu.be/zPgYicA0yGw Penultimate pic shows the before πŸ€”, last pic shows the after πŸ˜‰(while fitting new tinted windows) Cheers, Doug 😎
    11 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Tamar deck colour
    Hi Alan, Ford Polar Grey looks about right πŸ‘ See pics of original here http://modelslipway.com/tamar/tamar_fullsize_arles_gallery/index.html Maybe a final coat of matt or semi matt lacquer to tone down the
    gloss
    a little? Spigots are a good idea. For the small deck cleats on my Sea Scout I drilled 1mm holes using my mini milling machine as a drill pressπŸ˜‰ Then Loctited 1mm spring steel rod into them. Deck was varnished and polished before fitting with Deluxe Materials Roket gluper sue! The larger tank filler caps on the aft deck I drilled and tapped 3mm fitted studs with Loctite and glued domed nuts into the frame underneath, cos I need to be able to remove the deck for rudder servicing. Happy spraying, cheers, Doug 😎
    12 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Spray painting hulls.
    Ah, cellulose, of blessed memory. I still have some, come to think of it, but forgetfully, I bought black
    gloss
    enamel for Vanity and some enamel primer for it also in black First coat on today. But I will definitely experiment with spraying the final coats. I sprayed an old pre-War Marblehead with enamel and it went on well. You can still get cellulose if you can convince the dealer it's for your classic car. My son has a 1951 Renown so I could always quote all IT'S details to get it, but I don't think they'll post it and I'm nowhere near any suppliers geographically. I couldn't see the point in paying for epoxy tissue so I bought a huge bag of J cloths from Poundland and used that with epoxy. Slarred the epoxy on the mahogany hull (made from old chair legs my Grandad had made a dining suite with) and then laid the J-cloth on the tacky epoxy and slarred more on with an old credit card. All my credit cards are old now and a damned site more useful as epoxy squeegees than they ever were before. Got a few ridges where they overlapped, but filler sorted that out. The hull is still very light, so will need all the large lead weights on the end of a long fin keel (removable) as it carries a big rig, (see avatar). Good luck, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Spray painting hulls.
    A synthetic Lawyer, Colin. Ain't they all, mate, ain't they all? I always use enamel as I hate anything water based except my tea. I have a middling sized compressor and tank and use a spotting gun. I could use a bigger spray gun, but I'm too tight with paint wastage. it's silly expensive stuff. Having said all that i just primed my sailing model of Vanity with a brush. Went on a treat, but the final
    gloss
    coat of good old British yacht Black will be sprayed. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    gloss
    Varnish?
    Thank you, all the best Richard
    1 year ago by Richard7
    Forum
    gloss
    Varnish?
    Hello everyone, Does anyone out there know of a
    gloss
    varnish that is β€œclear”, l have used in the past β€œyacht
    gloss
    varnish” but it leaves a very slight brown tint when applied to a white surface. Is there anything out there that leaves a nice clear crisp
    gloss
    varnish? Thanks guys Richard
    1 year ago by Richard7
    Forum
    gloss
    Varnish?
    Thanks chaps, much appreciated!
    1 year ago by Richard7
    Forum
    gloss
    Varnish?
    Dont know if you want to brush or spray ,Rust-Oleun spray
    gloss
    is very good as long as you don't try to put it on to thick (milky sheen)but if you follow the instructions thin coats and drying time between coats it is a good finish. Cheers Marky
    1 year ago by marky
    Forum
    gloss
    Varnish?
    There is this one https://www.sadolin.co.uk/a-clear-
    gloss
    -finish-outdoors-with-new-sadolin-yacht-varnish/
    1 year ago by kmbcsecretary
    Response
    After Deck / Hatch - If at first you don't succeed ...
    Evenin' MT, Go to the Top of the Class! πŸ‘ I came to the same conclusion so I built Mk2 like the Proverbial Brick S..t House 😲 Pics 1 & 2. in the meantime my 6mm lime boards had arrived from Krick so this time I cut formers and didn't bend or slit anything so it's good an' rigid 😊 Pic 3 clamping, Pic 4 trial fit prior to final trimming, Pic 5current status; 3 coats pore filler, 2 coats Lord Nelson
    gloss
    varnish flattened with 3000 grit. Still a little way to go, CU tomorrow, Cheers Doug 😎 BTW: had never thought of filling the slits, πŸ€“ damn good tip, must remember that πŸ‘πŸ‘ Could come in handy on my HMS Manxman build - last pic is from the the Deans Marine instructions for the hull preparation! Reckon I can do it a bit neater πŸ˜‰
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    After Deck / Hatch - If at first you don't succeed ...
    I like the new clamps, you won't lose them in the dark. another matching
    gloss
    finish, very satisfying
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    Thanks Doug it took about 4 weeks in total to complete the planking. The varnish is Wilko's own brand clear
    gloss
    yacht varnish which was sanded with fine wet and dry sand paper between each coat to get that smooth finish on the final coat. I will show all the hand made fittings next which I have already started making Ron
    1 year ago by kmbcsecretary
    Response
    The Lone Ranger Rides Again or Hull Finishing ;-))
    Thank you Boatshed, much appreciated 😊 All the materials used, and the sequence, are shown above with some links to the suppliers. Secret ingredient is patience! What makes the big difference to the final
    gloss
    is the protective lacquer from the two part system used on cars these days, followed by two stage cutting back and polishing - WHEN the lacquer is fully hardened! I use a halogen lamp to speed up the hardening a bitπŸ˜‰ Big difference from what I started with - see pics!😁 Happy lacquering, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    The Lone Ranger Rides Again or Hull Finishing ;-))
    She is looking fantastic. Great
    gloss
    y finish on the hull and the deck finish is like glass. What varnish have you used on there ?? Looking forward to seeing her in action on the water.
    1 year ago by BOATSHED
    Response
    The Lone Ranger Rides Again or Hull Finishing ;-))
    Hi Mark, here's the link to the manufacturer website. http://www.kwasny.com/en/products/ Forgot to mention, the
    gloss
    white I used is also from them, from the 'belton' series. The Primer Filler and Protection Laquer are from the 'Auto K' series. Don't know if they can send paints to UKπŸ€” Maybe they have a British distributor? look forward to pics of the Puffer πŸ‘ Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    The Lone Ranger Rides Again or Hull Finishing ;-))
    Hi Mark, thankyou 😊 The paint is, not surprisingly for me, from a German manufacturer: Peter Kwasny Gruppe. They also make the pro car paints I sometimes use. It's article number 320 078. Kânigsblau / Royal Blue. The can top is darker than the finish actually turns out! To me it's lighter than Royal Blue but I'm happy with it. I also used - the white primer from the same company; article number 320 411, before that light grey filler primer, # 233 032, and finally clear high
    gloss
    protective lacquer # 633 017. The blue and the white primer I found in a local building supplies store under the name 'Hit Color Decospray'! They are specified for indoor and outdoor use; emission class A+. πŸ‘ You might find something similar in your local DIY shop. I think your Puffer would look superb in this colour. if you want a darker shade you might try a thin coat of matt or satin black after the primer? The primer filler and lacquer I bought online some time ago as part of a Pro Scratch Repair kit for my last car. Now what can I do with the rest of the Toyota Navajo Red ??? I sent them the paint code from my car registration and they mixed up an absolute perfect match and delivered in about 10 days 😊 I'll dig in the archive for the web link. Ciao, Doug 😎 PS I think you're right, I'll go for Gold (πŸ˜‰) and hope I don't mess up the hull! Tamiya tape should help.
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    The Lone Ranger Rides Again or Hull Finishing ;-))
    Sooo ... Happy with the cabin and main deck so onward and upward with the hull. At a previous stage the hull was already sealed, primed and two coats of
    gloss
    Royal Blue, or at least what passes for Royal Blue in Germany - seems a little light to me but I like it anyway. Over-spray from other operations was sanded off with a 600 grit sponge. This revealed a few imperfections around the bow that needed sealing (EzeKote) and re-flattening. No one's perfect!πŸ˜‰ These areas were re-primed using a primer-filler from the pro auto branch, flattened off with 1000 and 1500 W&D and the whole hull given a quick blast of Royal Blue again and flattened with 2000 grit wet. Pic 1. The finishing coats were then applied: 3 coats blue and 3 coats protective lacquer (contains a UV filter😎). Flattening with wet 3000 plus liquid soap between each coat. Finally cutting polish and finishing polish, as for cabin roof and main deck. Polishing might give her an extra knot or so, scale of course😊 Results of all this can be seen in pics 2-6. After removing all the masking tape full effect is shown in pics 8-10. Minor Arrrgh!: the masking tape on the main deck had been on too long and the white on the cabin walls had hardened, so when I removed the tape some paint came with it 😑 No sweat! I'll trim the cabin with a mahogany moulding 😁 BTW: the W&D used here are all Tamiya sanding sponges. Not the cheapest sort of W%D but I'm so impressed with how they work and their longevity that I've acquired a modest stock of grits from 240 to 3000πŸ˜‰ Only slight disadvantage; it's virtually impossible to get old colour out of them, unlike W&D paper, so you need new sponges for a new colour! E.g. I didn't want to use sponges I'd used on the blue hull for the white cabin walls!! Big advantage: you can use them wet on raw wood without staining the wood black! So, that's how I've spent the last two weeks, what have U lot been up to??? πŸ˜‰ Happy painting people, cheers Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Main deck and cabin walls
    Sorry the advertised Flash Gordon reel has gone 'walkies' so you'll have to make do with this boring description of how to occupy a day or three and stink out the house!😁 After the eventual success with the cabin roof I continued with the main deck using essentially the same process. First I had to extend the planking (engraving) from cabin leading edge back to the transom. Dad had only done the foredeck. Pic 1 shows starting point. AKA Square One! Pic 2 after initial staining, pseudo planking and sealing. Plank engraving was done with a fine hardened steel scriber / centre punch and a steel rule clamped at 7mm centres. Rule was aligned so that the wood grain pushed the scriber against it. Don't ask how I realised that that was the way to do it (minor Arrrgh!)😑 Anyway, worked out in the end. I had started with cherry wood stain but it came out too bright red so from Krick I obtained some Jotica mahogany stain (also some Oak stain for the decks of my Prince of Wales and Bismarck - but that's another pair of Sagas to be.) Using basically the same process as for the cabin roof: two sealing coats, two matt varnish primer coats, two
    gloss
    varnish coats, two protective lacquer coats, polishing with cutting polish and top
    gloss
    polish, and lots of patience and elbow grease (this time an italian LuganaπŸ˜‰) pics 3 to 5 show the result. I'm 'appy with that 😊 Note: to remove build up of sanding residue from the 'planking caulking' I had to resort to an old toothbrush or nail-brush from time to time. The sponge couldn't hack it. The aft deck 'hatch' is still the temporary bodge-up I made 25 years ago to quickly get the boat going for my daughter. Think the ply (ca 4mm) came from the back of an old bureaux! Haven't decided yet whether to make the new one from the same mahogany as the roof or thin ply and stain like the main deck. Suggestions welcome please. After the deck time to turn my attention to the cabin walls, looking pretty shabby and full of over-spray - pic 6 😲 Step 0: masking off, pics 7 & 8 'All Dressed Up and Nowhere To Go'πŸ€” Step 1: mucho sanding starting with 180 grit and working through to 600 ensuring removal of all traces of blue as I wanted the final finish to be Arctic White (not Ice Blue!) Step 2: two sealing coats, flattening with 600 grit. Step 3: spraying with Revell white primer, not impressed, gave a rough dusty finishπŸ€” Step 4: sand off Revell muck, flat back with 1000 and 1500 grit sponges, respray with two coats of pro white primer, flattening with 1500 and 2000+ soap respectively. Much better 😊 like the proverbial baby's ...! Step 5: two coats of
    gloss
    white, same make as the primer!!!, flattening with 3000 grit sponge, wet + a drop of liquid soap. Step 6: two coats of protective lacquer as with the varnish. Flattening with 3000 and soap between coats only. Interesting effect with this lacquer and the paint (as opposed to the varnish); it seemed to 'melt and fuse' with the paint surface and smooth it out.😊 Just had to be careful not to apply too much at once in case it all ran down and took the paint with it! Step 7: finishing with cutting polish and anti-hologram polish. Results: pics 9 - 11. Final effect makes it look and feel like plastic or fibreglass, almost forgot that there is wood underneath😁 Next in this theatre "Hi Ho Silver Awaaaayyyy!" (Sponsored by KiOra!) or 'I'm gonna finish this hull if it kills me!' (sorry Flash reels got lost in the post😑) Cheers Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh!
    Evenin' MT, ThanksπŸ‘ Yep I know blooming from my car restoration days. Causes a dull satin effect with some whitish fogging 😑 That's not what happened here, suddenly a patch of yellowish spots appeared under the
    gloss
    !😭 Only thing I can think of is that with the last flattening with 3000 grit I used a drop of liquid soap to lubricate the sanding sponge, gives that almost glass finish. Maybe some soap residue was still there and the next lacquer coat reacted with it? The soap is a trick I learned during car repairs. Of course then I could wash it all off with a big sponge and chuck a bucket of water over it! Not such a good idea with a model wooden boatπŸ€” Re 'Your skins' 😲 I used mahogany 'because it was there' and I suddenly had a picture in my mind what it could look like (Riva styleπŸ˜‰) if I could do the job right! I'm pretty happy with how it eventually worked out 😊 Not sure that a mahog roof fits the image of an RAF boat? and painting it would be a shame πŸ€” But if you do decide to use it you may have more luck with 0.5mm, mine was 1mm+. What are the 'existing skins'? Re clothing: I didn't do that, didn't want to risk obscuring the wood grain on the outside and the inside I had sealed with two coats of EzeKote anyway. Cloth would have been superfluous. But if you're going to paint the roof anyway then - why not? Would give strength and rigidity. Thicker ply? More than 0.5 / 0.6mm and you may have the problem I had with the compound curve!!! Cheers Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh!
    Typical of Aeorokits the cabin roof skin was made of two thin pieces of ply < 1mm. Over the 50 years or so the overhang corners had started to curl up and crack 😲 Pics 1 & 2 show the 'off the shelf' condition after 25 years of neglect πŸ€”. First I tried to correct this by soaking in hot water and flattening under a car battery (flattens most thingsπŸ˜‰). So far so good. Then some super glue in the cracks and back under the battery. After a day or two it just curled up again. Ho hum! Pour a glass of wine and back to the thinking board. Seconds Out - Round Two! Thought, OK make new pieces from the 0.6mm ply I still have and paint it - then my eye fell on some 1mm mahogany sheet (Ouch 😭). Tried to make the whole roof skin in one piece of this but the compound curve defeated me. The skin was steamed and soaked in hot water and clamped across the roof frame. Next morning - Arrrgh! Had started to crack along the centre line 😭 More thinks!! Carefully cut down the middle and glued and clamped the separate pieces; pics 3&4. Getting the two pieces to match in the middle was a tedious ***!!! Pic 5. Then mucho sanding. followed by 2 coats of Lord Nelson sealer, sand back with 600 grit sanding sponge. Then two coats of Lord Nelson matt varnish, sanding with 1000 grit in between. then two coats of Lord Nelson
    gloss
    varnish, sanding with 2000 grit in between. Pic 6. So far so good, pic 6. 3rd coat of varnish and - Arrrgh 2! 😑 Pic 7. No idea why! Sand off and start again, pic 8 😭 Treated each side separately, pics 9 & 10 and flatted off with 2000 grit. Then applied three coats of clear protective lacquer, sanding with 3000 grit between coats. Finally cutting back with auto paint restorer / cutting polish and finally polishing with anti-hologram finishing polish. Pic 11. Now I'm happy 😊 Pic 12. Only took a week πŸ˜‰ Next week in this theatre - "I love you too Flash but we've only got 15 minutes to save the world"! or 'Will I ever get this hull finished?" 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Ranking System
    Sure did Ed! I'm on the second glass now πŸ˜‰ Down the hatch! I'm down to the 3000 grit now - just about to start the
    gloss
    coats. Sorry Steve πŸ€” this has nowt to do with Ranking 😲 Glad to see you found some inspiration in my graphics thoughπŸ‘ Will continue with an updated Build Blog later. Cheers Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Ranking System
    Guess the Nitro makes it 'Go Faster' Ed πŸ˜‰ Main thing is the guys can open the files without fear of any nasties. BTW: First coat of primer varnish is on, when it's dry (about a glass of French Rose long 😜) I'll flat back with a 2000 grit sanding sponge and start with the
    gloss
    lacquer! Cheers Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Media
    HERMANN MARWEDE
    REWELL Kit 1:72, fitted with 3 MIG 280 DC motors, 3 DC controllers up to 20A, 1 LiPol battery 2200mA, 4 channel Turnigy receiver, one microswitch for two rudders. it is dyed with REWELL semi-matt colors in synthetic colors and at the end over decals and the whole ship three layers of
    gloss
    y REWELL lacquer. The ship was imported with lead by the keel so that it did not curve on the opposite side in turns. Because I did not reach the four-bladed bolts, I modified three-blade brass. For the time being, the boat has only been tested in a bath at home due to winter weather in the Czech Republic. For its 64 cm it is designed for riding on a calm surface. if I can evaluate this kit it is excellent. I can only recommend.
    1 year ago by Inkoust
    Directory
    (Life Boat) HERMANN MARWEDE
    REWELL Kit 1:72, fitted with 3 MIG 280 DC motors, 3 DC controllers up to 20A, 1 LiPol battery 2200mA, 4 channel Turnigy receiver, one microswitch for two rudders. it is dyed with REWELL semi-matt colors in synthetic colors and at the end over decals and the whole ship three layers of
    gloss
    y REWELL lacquer. The ship was imported with lead by the keel so that it did not curve on the opposite side in turns. Because I did not reach the four-bladed bolts, I modified three-blade brass. For the time being, the boat has only been tested in a bath at home due to winter weather in the Czech Republic. For its 64 cm it is designed for riding on a calm surface. if I can evaluate this kit it is excellent. I can only recommend. (Motor: MIG 280) (ESC: mini dc 20A - Czech rep) (8/10)
    1 year ago by Inkoust
    Forum
    Spraying/hand painting
    After modding my Sea Queen with the new prop shaft I decided to smarten it up as the previous spray job I did was not too good, well I have had terrible trouble with it, the first attempt saw the original paint raise as I sprayed it with a primer that was supposed to be safe with all paints, so I removed as much as i could using the heat gun and a scraper, after sanding down and filling, I started again, i had some small patches raise up where I could not get the original paint completely removed, but after letting it dry and some wet and dry I managed to get a good primer coat on it. I then decided to spray it all white, so as I have always had good results with halfords own brand I gave it some light coats of white
    gloss
    , I was unable to get a reasonable
    gloss
    finish and it also needed some more filling, funny how a
    gloss
    coat show up all the defects, well subsequent attempts at spraying were useless, run after run and a poor
    gloss
    finish. All I can think is that I could not have had the area blanketed off in the workshop warm enough and the thinners in the paint was not drying as it hit the boat and just ran. I am now half way into sanding it all back and have decided to hand paint, What is the best paint and method to getting a near spray paint finish by hand brushing?
    1 year ago by RichardSReade
    Forum
    Spraying/hand painting
    The Upol Barcote product recommended is intended for industrial use mainly in car restoration. The spec sheet can be seen at http://www.u-pol.com/files/6689/up0720-SDS-EN. If you are intending to use this Full PPE equipment should be worn and only use in a well ventilated area. Personally I use paintstrippers, scapers and a hot air paint stripper to clean wooden hulls back to bare wood. This allows me to see any damage caused by fuels used with IC engines. I agree its messy, takes time and is best done outside, but you do end up with a solid hull with no hidden soft spots. I agree with Jarvo's use of Clear Cote either in
    gloss
    or semi matt finish. If the air temp is much below 20 deg most rattle cans will not give a good finish and runs will be difficult to avoid.
    1 year ago by Dave M
    Forum
    Spraying/hand painting
    I have used Halfords acrylic when restoring an old Aerokits Fireboat. However, it was not the easiest paint to work with and only got a good finish when everything was stripped down to the bare wood. I applied sanding sealer followed by Halfords primer then built up several coats of acrylic , leaving 3 hours between coats. When finished I used rubbing compound to get a good
    gloss
    . I am sure there must be better methods of painting model boats especially vintage ones that have already had coats of paint in the past.😁
    1 year ago by boaty


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