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    Blog
    Robbe PT15
    Hi y’all. Did a little trading with my buddy Larry Buchwalter a few months back, came home with a just started Robbe Paula III and a NIB Robbe PT15. I don’t have a military boat in my fleet, and, since I’ve wanted one of these kits for quite a while now I decided to start building on her last week. I’ve made a few changes, laid the rudder servo on its side instead of standing up. To me it’s more secure that way. I had to make up a servo mount from scrap balsa and ply. However, where it mounted made it difficult to install or remove the servo arm as the
    hatch
    edge of the deck would be in the way. I mounted the servo with Allen head servo screws, and an Allen head screw retains the arm. I also enlarged the aft
    hatch
    , which gives me room to service the servo if needed. I also cut downs the stock battery tray to save room, and mounted it off just off center. I’ll either be using a 6 cell pack or 2 cell LIPO for power. Speaking of power, this kit came with both the fittings kit and a Robbe navy geared drive. I’ve decided to use the gearbox, shaft and prop, but I’m ditching the EF76 motor for a silver can Mabuchi 540, my resining being that the stock motor has a lot of torque, but might fall on its face on 6 cells (the plans originally called for an 8 cell 9.6 volt pack). I think the 540 will do fine, but I might try to dig up a Graupner Speed 600 and use that. I’m still open on power. Anyway, the hull is built, gearbox and rudder servo installed, rudder linkage and rudders mounted. This boat will challenge my skills, as it’s not quite as easy to build as some of the other Robbe kits I’ve built. There’s lots of details, but fitting the deck to the hull in this boat was...well, it was a job. It looks okay, everything is straight, but I do need to do some filling and sanding to make it really right. I have pics of what I’ve done so far, any questions or comments fire away! Cash
    23 days ago by Cashrc
    Blog
    Deck Fittings 2
    Have continued with deck fittings.power switch fitted in deck and front
    hatch
    made to hide switch. Fish pond,
    hatch
    , trawl boards, winch and stern duck boards all completed and varnished. Bow railings made on template and painted as well as funnel and side gallows also completed. Water tanks have made on printer get nice rectangle cubes to size and painted ready for fittings.
    12 days ago by Elsrickle
    Response
    Re: Veronica
    Ply deck made, but had to do it in two pieces, as I only had 36” lengths of ply. So its one piece from the stern up to the forward
    hatch
    , then the rest from there to the bow. Next , I’ll score lines with a scriber to represent the deck planking. Cheers for now Ken
    14 days ago by KenThompson
    Blog
    Deck Fittings
    Have decided rather than the follow the instruction to build each section. I am going to build most of the deck fittings before going further in the build. Some of the instruction are a bit vague and the drawing is not to scale, it will be easier to place items if already assembled. Have also made the small steps for access to superstructure from the deck as the drawing does not show any. Made with some old railing wire and plastic card chequered plate. Saw them on an old photo of the Sir Lancelot which was of the same class. Have fitted smoke generator in funnel and also fitted 2mm studs on base of funnel for better fixing to superstructure. The funnel is made from plastic drain pipe same diameter as the styrene pieces. The loudspeaker box will be fitted in the stern below the wooden slats where the ships boat sits this one is for the steam sound generator. As I didn’t like the printed sheets for fish pond and
    hatch
    es have made them from strips of walnut and lime wood the same with the trawl boards. Fishpond will also be used as battery cover and front
    hatch
    will be the removable cover for the power on/off switch, the superstructure
    hatch
    is the cover over the steam whistle loudspeaker which will be fitted in the superstructure.
    19 days ago by Elsrickle
    Forum
    Analog or Digital
    Glad to help Peter, Just "repay" me with a great vid of Gato's sea trials please👍 What will you name it? Selection list below. From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gato-class_submarine#Ships_in_class Personally I would go for Harder or Wahoo😉 Then I'm biassed having recently seen both in episodes of "Hell Underwater". Cheers, Doug 😎 "Albacore sank the Japanese aircraft carrier Taiho. Taiho was the flagship of Vice-Admiral Jisaburo Ozawa's fleet during the Battle of the Philippine Sea. Barb, on her 12th patrol in July 1945, landed a small team from her crew on the shore of Patience Bay on Karafuto. They placed charges under a railroad track and blew up a passing train. The Barb also conducted several rocket attacks against shore targets on this same patrol, the first ever by an American submarine. They used 5-inch unguided rockets fired from a special launching rack on the main deck.[35] Cavalla sank the Japanese aircraft carrier Shokaku. Shokaku was one of six Japanese carriers that had participated in the attack on Pearl Harbor. Cobia sank a ship carrying Japanese tank reinforcements which were en route to Iwo Jima. Cod went to the rescue of a grounded Dutch submarine O-19, taking its crew on board and destroying the submarine when it could not be removed from the reef, the only international submarine-to-submarine rescue in history. Corvina was the only U.S. submarine sunk by a Japanese submarine (I-176) during the Second World War. Darter along with Dace conducted an aggressive and successful attack against Japanese fleet units during the lead up to the U.S. invasion of Leyte Island in the Philippines in October 1944. The two boats sank the heavy cruisers Atago and Maya and severely damaged the heavy cruiser Takao. A few hours later, while maneuvering back to the scene to finish off the crippled Takao, Darter ran hard aground on Bombay Shoal off Palawan. Her entire crew was rescued and subsequent attempts to destroy the wreck were only partially successful.[36] As late as 1998, portions of Darter's hulk were still visible on the reef. Finback recovered downed pilot LTJG George H. W. Bush, future President of the United States, after his Grumman TBM Avenger torpedo bomber was damaged and eventually ditched during a bombing mission at Chichi-jima in the Pacific. Flasher was the top-scoring U.S. boat of the war, with 100,231 tons officially credited to her by the Joint Army-Navy Assessment Committee JANAC. Growler's skipper, Howard W. Gilmore, earned the submarine force's first combat Medal of Honor for sacrificing his life to save his boat and his crew. Alone on the bridge after being wounded by enemy gunfire, and unable to reach the
    hatch
    after he had ordered the others below, he pressed his face to the phone and uttered the order that saved his boat and sealed his doom: "Take 'er down!" In Grunion, Mannert L. Abele earned the submarine force's first Navy Cross, when his boat engaged in a running battle with Japanese ships off Kiska in July 1942. Grunion was subsequently lost in this action. In 2006 and 2007, expeditions organized and led by Abele's sons, Bruce, Brad, and John, located and photographed the wreck of the Grunion using side scan sonar and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Halibut was essentially the 53rd U.S. submarine loss of the war. Terribly damaged in an aircraft-borne depth charge attack on 14 November 1944, she barely limped back to port in Saipan. Temporarily patched up, she was sent back to the United States. Examined by engineers, she was found to be beyond economical repair and was decommissioned on 18 July 1945, never having made another war patrol. Her entire crew survived.[37] Harder was commanded by Samuel D. Dealey, the only submarine commander of the war (perhaps the only one ever) to sink five enemy destroyers, four in a single patrol. Mingo, which sank two Japanese ships during her patrols, was lent to the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force after the war, serving under the name Kuroshio. Trigger became famous in Edward L. "Ned" Beach's book Submarine! (which was a kind of eulogy to her). Tunny sank the Japanese submarine I-42 on the night of March 23, 1944, after the two subs dueled for position for over an hour. A week later Tunny engaged the battleship Musashi and inflicted enough damage for Musashi to return to dry dock for repairs. Wahoo, commanded by one of the submarine force's most famous skippers, Dudley W. "Mush" Morton, engaged in a running gun and torpedo battle with a convoy of four ships off the coast of New Guinea and destroyed the entire convoy. She was also one of the first U.S. subs into the Sea of Japan. She was sunk while exiting the Sea of Japan through the La Perouse Strait in October 1943 while on her seventh patrol."
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Rear Deck
    The rear deck gives plenty of opportunity for adding some model detail. The original cockpit floor was plain painted grey with a 'power bulge' to cover the 1970's rudder servo. A new smaller servo and servo mount were installed to allow a flat floor to replace the original power bulge version. The new floor has been planked with lime strips grouted with 0.5mm black plasticard. The central
    hatch
    is easily removable to check that the servo compartment is dry. It is held in place with magnets. The two foam tanks are made from 2mm ply with mahogany trim and pieces of a commercial grating fixed on top. The tanks are also held in place with magnets. The ladders are 2mm mahogany with the runners glued and pinned to the sides with brass pins. The ladders are mounted using M1.6 threaded rod glued to the bottom of the ladders and passing through the cockpit floor. Foot pads had to be added to the bottom of the ladders to provide a sufficiently large fixing point for the threaded rod. Springs on the underside of the floor hold the ladders in place with the top of the ladders simply pressing against the bulkhead. This allows the cockpit floor to be removed with the ladders in one piece. The towhook is made from plasticard, with a few details added with brass rod and M1.6 nuts. The towhook stays are also plasticard. They locate into brass bushes in the cockpit floor with the top end held with a locating pin and two small magnets. The hose fittings were turned from brass using Robbob's drawings with the dimensions scaled down to 1/16th scale. The hoses are the normal coiled wire covered with black heatshrink. A brass hook at the rear of the cockpit holds the hoses in place. I was concerned that this was not sufficient in itself and do not want to loose these hoses in the lake, so black elastic cords were looped through the tops of the foam tanks. These loops pass round the hoses and hold them securely. The hose bulkhead fitting has a 5mm round magnet set into it's rear face which holds it in position against a similar magnet set into the bulkhead. Using magnets for fixing the foam tanks, the towhook stays and the hose bulkhead fitting allows them all to be quickly removed thus allowing the cockpit floor to also be removed for access to the steering servo. My thanks to Robbob and MTurpin103 for their excellent Crash Tender blogs. Much of this work on the rear deck has been based on their blogs.
    2 months ago by Graham93
    Blog
    Graupner Taucher Wulf-an ongoing drama
    Hi y’all. Just over a year ago a I sold off some of my hobby stash and decided to use the funds for more hobby stuff😁 The Taucher Wulf kit from Graupner caught my eye, and I thought it would be a fun build..boy was I wrong! To be fair, at the time I bought the Wulf my only scale type boat was a Krick Felix and a Robbe San Remo that I had built in the early 90s, and again a few years ago. I knew nothing of ballast as the boats I had built besides the aforementioned were race type boats, and if you said “geared motor” to me then I’m thinking of a Robbe or Graupner surface drive for fast electrics..but I felt confident in my abilities to build the Taucher. I knew that Graupner had been bought out and production move to Asia, and that the manuals weren’t quite up to snuff as I had just completed a Micro Magic from their latest production run, so I figured I could handle the build. Now as far as the kit goes, it’s pretty nice. The hull and fwd deck are one piece and molded from fiberglass and primered. The fittings and parts looked decent, and there was a lot of brass and plastic rod plus laser and die cut parts. The real problem with the Taucher is the manual and plans. There are a lot of exploded views, but very little, if any verbiage, no mention of ballast at all, no measurements, nothing. No recommendations for batteries or any idea or mounts for the batteries. The
    hatch
    is a little bigger than a large cell phone, which gives very little room to access drive batteries, and it’s location leaves you no room between just aft of the motor and the rudder. In short, it’s frustrating, especially since it’s touted as an “easy build up” kit. So, halfway thru the build I shelved it before it became a Viking funeral boat. I built 2 more boats in the past year, the Neptun and a Springer tug, and I learned a lot from both of them, so I pulled the Taucher from it’s hiding spot and began anew. I will post some pics from last year, then I’ll post the most recent. I made some changes that would have been much,much easier earlier in the build, so they had to be done..so some of the pics are rather graphic and not for the squeamish🤣 Anyway, here we go, anybody with any good info on these kits feel free to chime in. Cash
    4 months ago by Cashrc
    Forum
    Night Watch
    WO Nerys! You are herewith relieved of Watch Duty for tonight, and reassigned with immediate effect to Splicing the Mainbrace duty to celebrate your promotion. Down the
    hatch
    😉 Sgn: Fl. Adm. 😎
    3 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Re: HELP needed on a hull.
    Back to the request! My method for
    hatch
    as l like to disguise them. After screwing down the cover planks are pressed in ( tight fit ). I use rubber from split wiper blades, & window seal.depending what l have. Of course a square will be easier. You should also get or make the punt.I did post a tutorial here a while back. Note only one oar, always sculled.
    3 months ago by hammer
    Blog
    Ballast and underdeck
    So I finally decided how to ballast the Taucher and what with. Lead is hard to find now, best I’ve found is some 4 oz flat disc sinkers at Academy sports. Bought 2 pounds worth of those (all they had) and a couple of packages of copper coated BBS. I then went to a local home improvement store and picked up some short pieces of PVC pipe and end caps. I decided to make 2 pvc “weight bombs” for the ballast to the sides of the batteries, epoxy and bbs mixed for the aft ballast, and the sinkers to adjust after the bathtub ballast and amp draw test. The static draw in the water at WOT is about 4.5 amps, so I should be okay. I also cut the esc switch lead and added Deans micro connectors so I could mountthe switch deck side and disconnect when needed. At this point she’s seaworthy, minus the aft
    hatch
    at the rudder that somehow went MIA in the past few weeks. Cash
    3 months ago by Cashrc
    Blog
    Getting closer
    Sooooo....tonight I got a bit done. Companionway and some other small parts painted, the companionways installed, holes drilled for red railings and a test fit. Very close to getting above decks done, need to paint the seating and install that, finish the deck and
    hatch
    , and paint and final install on rails..then it’s ballast and electrics. Cash
    3 months ago by Cashrc
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    Hi Red, "Am I being paranoid or is there an easy way to seal removable decks ? " The only suggestion that I can come up with is :- If you shave a bit of material off of the
    hatch
    all the way around then glue an elastic band around the edge so that it is a snug fit in the
    hatch
    opening. It will be tricky to do but this will prevent a lot of work now that the boat is finished. Martin555.
    3 months ago by Martin555
    Blog
    The catwalk frame
    Did a little soldering last night on the catwalk support frame. I then did a lash up to see how it will fit on the deck. One I get this all fitted, I can start re-detailing the pilot house and start finishing all the details on the deck and
    hatch
    .
    3 months ago by Cashrc
    Blog
    Up to now
    So, I mentioned in the first part of this blog some of my frustrations with the Taucher. One I failed to mention is the deck details over the
    hatch
    . On the deck you have the pilot house,
    hatch
    , then what looks to be a boiler and exhaust and a work table. Between the pilot house and the boiler is a catwalk, that extends from the pilot house and terminates in a ladder right up next to the boiler and table, and is directly over the
    hatch
    . This means this would have to be removed to access the
    hatch
    or one would not be able to get the
    hatch
    open without possibly breaking the catwalk. Dumb. Just not well thought out..so, I decided to make a larger
    hatch
    , extending from under the aft of the pilot house all the way to just aft of the deck machinery. The pilot house, machinery, catwalk, any details in that general area will be glued to the
    hatch
    and removed as a unit for servicing..the pilot house fwd rests on the upper deck, there will be false bulkheads glued to the deck to help keep the pilot house lined up when the
    hatch
    is installed. Anyway, sounded like a grand plan, but I didn’t have a saw that would really cut the
    hatch
    out, as the deck is by now bonded to the hull, and I just couldn’t get a good angle on it with the Dremel. Soooo..I drilled just inside the lines I had drawn and then just connected the dots. Then I was reminded of a little saw that a few of my friends use, a small hand held oscillating saw. I purchased one with the half moon blade and a sanding kit. This thing is great! It made short work of my “butchery” and I was able to clean up the
    hatch
    opening nicely. I’m waiting on the first coat of the repaint to dry co I can sand and apply a final coat, then I’ll start work on the rest of the
    hatch
    /deck details and paint and install the rails I’ve soldered up. Cash
    4 months ago by Cashrc
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    Koverall is doped onto the surface as you would tissue. You give the wing frame a coat of non-tautening thinnish dope (not tautening unless you want your frame to look like a pretzel) drape the Koverall over the wing (you can do it in one go right around the wing or do the bottoms first with an overlap at the leading edge, and the top surfaces coming down over the leading edge overlap) and brush the dope through the cloth onto the outer framing and sheeting-(not the rib caps,) keeping the fibers lined up down the wing and the cloth pulled as firmly as poss in all directions to remove creases. You don't have to worry if it's very slightly baggy over the open sections, as once you start heating it it will shrink up tight (know when to stop as soon as it looks tight,) and has a drum sound when flicked). You can work any creases out by re doping to melt the previous dope and rubbing/pulling the crease/bubble to an outside edge. allow to dry (only needs a few minutes) then apply a few more coats of dope over the cloth till it's sealed. You will need to really seal the cut edges as when you light sand it later (600 paper -you don't want to go through the covering) you will find they feather up. (I have found that with any problem edges, I just run thin cyno along the edge which hardens it up for sanding) Once happy you can undercoat it with acrylic primer/filler, and topcoat it with an acrylic or enamel finish. As mentioned, you can use this cloth for anything which requires a thin tough durable covering, (I even use it for
    hatch
    hinges on boats and planes,- doped on and painted over) If you have something large like a plane, you will need a reasonable quantity of dope, but the beauty of this stuff is that even if you run out 3/4 way through, you just re dope/melt where you left off and carry on. You can also brush the dope with acetone to melt it as well. Once you get the hang of it, it's a piece of cake and very authentic looking (especially on planes etc). Probably compares cost wise to covering with Solarfilm or similar (think they are NZ $60-$80+ a roll) the Sig Koverite cost me about $20 for a 6ft x 5ft sheet (there are various sizes) plus $45 for a quart of proper aircraft non tautening dope (average 48" plane would only use around 300-500ml including doping the balsa fuselage, just bought the Quart because it was the smallest the aircraft supply shop had and it was 1/2 the price of the model shop, and the 'real stuff'). I might make a quick You Tube vid to show this stuff being applied, (or you can watch this lovely young lady applying the thicker similar polyester material to a full sized aircraft frame. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk-vaAxd2eE ) Enjoy. John B
    4 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Hi Martin, it's pretty tight but I've made provision for accessing everything but the steering 'quadrants' but they should be ok for life (hopefully!) otherwise I would have to make another
    hatch
    at the stern. The front
    hatch
    es are hinged, behind them is the large access
    hatch
    with the lazarette (which also comes off, as do the other 2). The second lazarette has the REC sw under it, the wheelhouse lifts out, (the top of the wheelhouse also is removable, held by magnets and has spring contacts for the riding light). Wheelhouse unplugs (JST plug) from the light circuit Behind that is the large engine
    hatch
    and then the 3rd lazarette which has the aux light sw under it. Both the life lines and the aerial are clipped on with springs and are removable. Large
    hatch
    es are held down with toggles at each corner. Mast can be unbolted if needs be. Took a bit of work but seems to have done the job. John B
    4 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Ik, That's quite an easy set up compared to what I had to deal with on the 36" HSL as I had a lot to fit in a small space. The center of the boat is inaccessible due to the wheelhouse (which is removable) having a drop floor, (apart from 1 1/2"under it where the ESCs and one speaker sit) and the bow area originally having no large
    hatch
    es. I had to make one to get the 2 sound units (plus speakers) and radio gear in. Rear deck behind the engine room is the same with only one lazarette and the dinghy on top. I didn't want to make another non standard
    hatch
    , so I managed with the space that I had. Had to do a similar thing to my 36" Thornycroft MTB. Thought about transfer boxes (see pics) but was too much work to get all the angles right, (although the one with a motor might be tempting on a future build) and motor space wasn't wide enough. Also the weight in the stern was another factor, (sits too deep in the water at the stern already but luckily runs nicely anyway.) It's fine if you don't have floors or interior detail, as you have a lot more room to play with, but I prefer to keep everything up off the bottom in case water gets in. Also the floors give you somewhere to place everything on a flat surface . John B
    4 months ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: Evolution
    "A 2 channel drinks bottle. Brilliant." One channel to open, the other to pour!? Cheers all, Down the
    hatch
    , 😎
    4 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Boat retrieval
    Welcome to the 'Dog Watch' Nerys 👍 Cheers, Down the
    hatch
    !
    4 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Re: Upnor, Thames Sailing Barge
    Thank you, Doug, for those very kind comments. I am afraid we do not have a video camera. I think photos of the interior showing control lines would be a bit too vague, but, both the mainsheet and the vang fall come via plastic piping at one end of the main horse through the deck. Both go to screw eyes on the false floor, called the ceiling in a barge, then forward the full length of the main
    hatch
    to two more screw eyes, then back aft again to the servo arm. Both being tied off on the arm, Thus the one servo controls both ropes. Hope that's clear. Cheers, Nerys
    5 months ago by Nerys
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Hi Rob , the information has been very helpful and much appreciated I contacted Battlefields and they have 3 x Boathooks 1/24th scale 20 mm long ~ your blog shows 2 x 25mm and 2 x 16mm ~ did you extend Battlefields hooks or will 20mm be ok I intend putting the floor in where the motor sits ~ you show a door where the sliding
    hatch
    is , could you please let me know the dimensions you made the door and also the depth of the floor from the top of the bulkhead ~ many thanks Ray
    5 months ago by MaggieM
    Blog
    Wheelhouse detail
    The detail in the wheelhouse is nearly complete. The fire extinguisher is my favourite piece. The chair does swivel.. I will add some spare oilskins and a newspaper. Installed the lights and a fake forward
    hatch
    and towing posts.
    5 months ago by GrahamP74
    Blog
    Re visit Rear upper deck & Aft cockpit deck
    I have decided that the rear upper deck and the rear aft cockpit will be a one piece unit. After see another boat with a similar set but not both decks were joined. This means that the upper deck and lower deck and the sides of the cockpit will all be joined forming a box. This has a number of benefits these are:- 1. It makes a water tight compartment which can be emptied if required. (except for the removable
    hatch
    I did in the initial build, this will have to have an “o” ring type seal) 2. It makes it easier to get to the servo area without taking all the smaller parts out e.g. foam tanks ladders etc. 3. Fitting the ladders made easier with a single 10 BA bolt Disadvantages A lot more work!. Because the individual parts are already made and in some cases painted I need to make sure that all surfaces that will require gluing are suitably abraded before applying any type adhesive. Additional work will be required around the top edge of the cockpit to give a lip to stop any water from entering the servo area. I decide this would look nice in mahogany to match the floor edging, along with some corner pieces in polished brass this edging will also add substantial rigidity to the whole structure. The mahogany was cut from a spare piece of old table top to 9mm by 6mm and then a 1.5 mm x 2mm deep groove was cut along the length to slot onto the top of the box section. The corner brass pieces were fabricated from 0.5 mm brass sheet and the joints soft soldered with a strengthening piece underneath. The box section sides were already made and painted so had to have their edges prepared for gluing by removing a 2mm wide strip along each edge. The area where the box fits had to be prepared with spacers of 0.6 mm card and strips of baking sheet to stop the glue sticking to the sides of the boat. This method ensures that the box fits exactly in its hole. After epoxying the box section to consolidate the Rear upper deck & Aft cockpit deck I could then glue the mahogany rail to the top along with the brass corners this was left to set overnight. The top rail was then radiused to finish it off and a first coat of varnish applied  
    6 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Veronica
    Cheers Nerys I’m at the stage , planking finished, all corners rubbed down holes filled in, ready now to epoxy resin the inside. I wanted to fit the servos in so I can get all the wooden bits in place , remove the servo, resin the inside. My steering servo is fitted as yours is as far back behind the rear
    hatch
    . I’ll have a look at Peter Simons video, I think that should show me .? Cheers for now,,, ken
    6 months ago by KenThompson
    Forum
    Veronica
    Hi Ken, You must be coming on well! I've put my steering servo right aft under the after cabin top, which on my barge lifts off. The sail servo, I am planning on fitting at the after end of the main
    hatch
    and on Richard Chesney's advice am fitting a standard servo with arm. He has had trouble with winches. Dave Watts, when I saw him at Ellesmere Port showed me the new Ducks Foot keel that he is making for 1/24 scale barges. He recommends it. Best wishes., Nerys
    6 months ago by Nerys
    Response
    Re: Capping
    The main
    hatch
    is held down currently by the weight of the winch, it seems to be ding the job mainly due the the steel washers being used as brake drums! I intend to put a raised
    hatch
    in the large
    hatch
    for access to the switches. Previously I have put a screw through the deck into a cross beam and then hidden by painting the same colour as the deck and covering with fish boxes as an example...
    6 months ago by GrahamP74
    Response
    Re: Capping
    Hi Graham, Looking great. How do you intend to hold down the
    hatch
    es? Martin.
    6 months ago by Martin555
    Blog
    Hull sprayed
    First coat of paint on the hull, offered up the whaleback and wheelhouse to see how it fits. Deck now fits but need to cut the
    hatch
    before glueing.
    6 months ago by GrahamP74
    Forum
    Veronica
    Cheers Ken, Down the
    hatch
    😋 Looks like you're gonna need a pound n a half or two of filler for that bow 🤣 Er.. Shouldn't this be in a Build Blog? 👍
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Soykils (Brooklyn for Circles)
    In 1856, Constellation had two 10 shell guns mounted bow and stern as "pivots" or shifting guns. To make shifting them easier, and prevent them tearing up the deck, sectional iron plates were screwed down to the deck, a bit like model rail-road track, these were referred to as "circles" or "gun circles." What pattern was actually used on Constellation is so far unknown. The museum folks think there was just a basic circle under each gun, but I think they've interpreted the name a little too literally, as I can find very few examples where just a single simple circle was used. I decided to base the model on the more complicated patterns I found in photos and a diagram in the Navy's 1852 manual: Preparation of Vessels of War for Battle. I cut the circles from 1/32" (.5mm) sheet styrene, painted black, and glued to the deck with gel CA. Both guns on the model sit on access
    hatch
    es that don't correspond to any actual
    hatch
    , so the bow circles, especially, had to accommodate the seam of the
    hatch
    .
    7 months ago by Jerry Todd
    Blog
    Rear deck test
    So while 2nd layer of gunwhale stringers glue is setting on 46” boat I thought I’d do some renovations on the recently acquired 36” boat, starting with the rear deck. This will be a useful practice for when the 46” boat needs doing. The original deck was painted white and was screwed down. I’m replacing it with a planked deck, some removable foam tanks, hose & deck
    hatch
    with brass handles. The foam tanks need to be removable to get at the screws to lift the deck (access to rudders &servo) here’s where we are up to. Deck is planked with recess for
    hatch
    . The cross
    hatch
    grid for the foam tanks was made on my 3D printer and once painted will be OK. I’ll make the brass connectors for the hose on my lathe, and the
    hatch
    needs a recess milled out for the handles. The hose I have is a bit of corrugated plastic probably from Lego. We’ll see how all this comes out and adjust for the 46” boat in due course. 👍
    7 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    Battery Box
    Having decided to make the system 12volts DC. I made a battery box to fit into the hull to ensure it was secure. The battery was rated at 3.7AH. I had to temporarily remove the paddles drive to allow the battery to fit. Please note the extension to the
    hatch
    . The top walls of the battery box are well above the battery. This is to allow a panel to be secured housing fuses, switches etc
    8 months ago by Hillro


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