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    Blog
    Motor, mount & prop-shaft.
    The prop-shaft, coupling and motor mount that I ordered from ModelBoatBits has arrived so it seems a good a good time to make up a supporting wedge for the mount to fix to. I do have a rigid brass motor alignment aid that I used when building the Crash Tender but do you think I can find it in the workshop?....nope! 😑 I expect it will turn up when I need it least! 🀞 Not wanting to waste time I used a length of
    heat shrink
    tubing over the motor coupling to make it as rigid as possible, a trick I had seen done elsewhere, and this enabled me to position the motor on its mount in the desired position and measure the angle that the mounting wedge needs to be made to. I used an offcut of beech that I had in the workshop which I cut to size and then shaped it on the rotary sander that I bought in Lidl, fantastic piece of kit !!. The wedge was then drilled to take the nylon motor mount and also the fixing screws that pass through the beech block, through the balsa base of the box and into the ply reinforcing plate that I put in during early construction of the hull. After cleaning up the hole through the keel the prop-shaft was keyed with some abrasive, smeared with some epoxy and then pushed through to mate with the motor coupling. I used the excess epoxy resin around the shaft inside the hull and used some packing tape to stop it running out when I inverted the hull to seal the lower end. A quick spin on the motor confirmed that the alignment was spot-on and the hull set aside while the epoxy set. The next step will be to plank the deck.
    11 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Ships-Ladder
    Back at it this afternoon, handrails are very solid after overnight cure. Trimmed the rail ends to the necessary length. Glued in place. Built a ships ladder, first time for this, think it will work. Need to get ships ladder set to finalize railing. Ladder railing is seen in photo, I make bends like on this by applying heat and bending with my fingers. Styrene gets very flexible with heat, but can quickly melt if not careful. I learned not to use my heat gun (used for shrink tubing in my electronics) as it quickly gets out of control. I usually boil water, let it sit and dip the plastic in and out. Easy way to control bends. Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Hello all, since I keep the weekend for me I thought I'd try hooking up all the lecktrickery for my brushless motor. It's one of they outrunning tiddlers. I have a 3S LiPo which is firing on all cylinders at 3.79 volts per. I plug it in to the ESC, some Chinese one I got recently. I soldered wires to a T type plug that fits the Overlander battery pack. I'd already soldered the 2mm connectors to the other end of the ESC wires and protected them with
    heat shrink
    . Plugged tested (6.2 volts) Nimhs into Rx and it starts flashing, then plugged ESC into a channel and the motor, yes , the MOTOR starts beeping! How the hell can that happen? I plug the battery in and the motor beeps even quicker! What on earth is happening? Needless to say, no rotation, buzzing, whistling, just beeps from a motor, clear as you like! Please help. I am already teetering on the edge of getting rid of all my working stuff as it takes up space and is such a damned faff! But what I have, I would like to work. Just long enough to prove it all. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Response
    Sanding done
    Hi Steve, many real IMM rod antennas I worked with were not tapered. So any metal / plastic rod of suitable diameter painted white would do. The relatively short (1m) whips are not always tapered either. If you go piano wire & heatshrink you could put a nice sweep-back into it by lightly bending it back while shrinking. When cool it will hold the shape. Here's a link to the supplier we most often used for the professional 'stick' (we called 'em rod) VHF IMM antenna, with a drawing. http://www.aas.de/special-antennas/vhf-tx-rx-antennas/104-staisf.html Memory playing tricks on meπŸ€”it's actually about 141cm top to bottom. Cheers, Doug 😎 Here's a simple 35" stainless steel whip, also not tapered https://www.ebay.com/itm/Auto-Marine-Band-Antenna-35in-VHF-Car-Radio-Boat-6db-Stainless-Steel-Whip-PL-259-/222260516328
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Sanding done
    Those antenna are normally tapered so I was hoping to find a soft plastic one which would take a few knocks. I could do one in piano wire but cant think of a flexible way of achieving the taper. Perhaps I am making to much of it and a piece of piano wire covered in white heatshrink will do and the lack of taper won't notice.
    1 year ago by steve-d
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Hi Doug, as you can probably guess, I have as much chance of programming an ESC as flying with my own wings to Munich! The ESC didn't come with any instructions. I didn't know they needed them! More to the point, how the Hell can a motor beep? Where's the beeping kit in a motor with one moving part? So, now what. it's a Flysky pistol grip 3 channel (third is a switch) set of Tx and pre bound Rx. The ESC ? Gawd knows, a flat thing inside a big yellow
    heat shrink
    casing. I got it from China recently. All I can do is take a picture of it with my nice new camera tomorrow. Does it matter which way round those three wires go on the motor? I'll post pictures tomorrow. Thanks, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    just need cable (wire)...
    Thanks, guys. Tried Component shop but their PayPal wouldn't let us in so we went back to ebay and found em under 4mm silicon cable. Slow boat job, but I'm not desperate. A nice blue to which I'll add red and black
    heat shrink
    I already have, but I'll keep those links, cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Got the bits, now what?...
    OK, I bought a LiPo tother day and some connectors. This is now what I have.....a motor with little (2mm?) connectors on its wires, a 60Amp ESC with no connectors at all and an Overlander battery with a square plug on the end (Deans, is it) I also have a packet of ten 4mm bullets and
    heat shrink
    . What now? Cut the Deans connector off the battery and replace with bullets, or buy a Deans connector for the ESC to battery? Cut off the little bullets on the motor and replace with the big ones which I should put on the ESC, too? I suppose I'll have to increase the size of the hole in the ally heat plate next to the motor to accommodate the bigger bullets. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Got the bits, now what?...
    Jim, it's a 3S Overlander which my local model shop are doing a deal on. I don't know what XT 60 is or EC3/5. I have no Deans connectors. All I have a re the 10 pairs of 4mm bullets with black and red
    heat shrink
    . I had found an adaptor from 4mm bullet to Deans male, but it's a slow boat from China by the end of November and I ain't that patient! So bullets all round, I guess. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Got the bits, now what?...
    Hi westquay. that looks like a 2200 3 sel battery if it is and it has a black deans connector on it (they are usually yellow) in my opinion they are the best. XT60 if it is put a male xt 60 on the battery side of the esc and your own chosen bullet connectors on the esc to motor. I like to use ec3 or ec5 (depending on current draw) with a different coloured
    heat shrink
    seal, on each one. it helps if you need to reverse the the rotation of the motor. Take a look on line at the way the electric flyboys link it all together you will also get an idea of the connctions. Hope this helps. jimdogge
    1 year ago by jimdogge
    Forum
    Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?...
    find a piece of wood thick enough to take the pin of the plug and drill a hole of the needed size so the plug will sit upright with the hole for the wire to the top and will stay there without the need to hold it ( this will mean a lot less swearing because you burned yourself.) Having positioned the plug heat up the soldering iron and " tin " the inside of the hole Strip the insulation from the end of the wire to be soldered into the plug and tin the bared end. Slip the
    heat shrink
    onto the wire ( if you do not have a battery plug on yet you can leave this step out) Now put the tinned end of the wire into the hole of the plug heat with your iron on the OUTSIDE of the plug and feed solder into the hole until your happy remove heat and allow to cool give it plenty of time and give thanks for the wood because trying to hold it all while doing this HURTS
    1 year ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?...
    Help, Doug!! I just bought a pack of gold plated 4mm plugs for my iMax charger. it didn't come with any! Leads for everything else, but no way of plugging them in unless they're LiPos, which I know nothing about. The plugs turned up today, BUT, the hole in the top is HUGE! How does one go about soldering a fiddly little wire into such a massive 'ole! They come with red and black
    heat shrink
    , but only for AFTER you get the battery wires into the plugs. I'm assuming I'll have an "other half" plug to plug the battery pack wire into, which I can then solder these mahusive plugs onto. Why is all this stuff so bloody difficult?! Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?...
    Heat sink! That's the devil. I kept thinking
    heat shrink
    , for some reason. I see "wall wart" describing plug-in chargers for 4 cells, but why "wart" I don't know. Looks a right mess in there, Doug, but at least you know what to do. Conrad...used to go in for a nose when I was in Munich. I worked in Sauerlach for about 6 months. Loved it. Conrad seemed to have everything, especially for making working scale model trucks. Wonderful place. I really appreciate your helping me out, mate, as I haven't got a bloody clue about charging batteries. But sort your problems out first. Meanwhile I'll make some nice wee boxes to put the batteries and Rx in, to limit any chance of water ingress. Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    Have had a few days of as it was our clubs AGM last weekend so had a lot of paperwork to sort out. The rigging is coming along now, not rushing this as don't want any mistakes . Each rigging line and block has been stitched using matching thread to the rigging line (pic1) then a length of
    heat shrink
    tubing is placed over the stitching (pic2) . Depending how things go over next couple of days I am hoping to have the sails fitted by Monday 😎
    2 years ago by kmbcsecretary
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    Thanks hammer have used the
    heat shrink
    like that on a previous boat and i tend to use the grimb tubes for the nylon line. i did think of making the pulleys but just couldn't get my self motivated to do it. i have my next project ready for starting and thinking will have to make everything for this one.
    2 years ago by kmbcsecretary
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    Tug man, as the splicing is taped over. Sized, I can save you a lot of time. Super glue the join, then cover with black
    heat shrink
    , Nylon cord will melt. But you should be ok. PS. Twist the joint then super glue. Wear latex gloves. Keep up the very good job. Proper job, they say down here.
    2 years ago by hammer
    Forum
    Graupner ranzow refitting
    Here we have the working radar and search light . The radar was easily converted to working by using a micro geared motor rated at 300-1 controlled by a micro speed controller thanks to mr rc world electrics. The original radar mould was first filed flat underneath then a small hole was drilled and a brass rod was glued into the hole with about 5mm sticking out and this was attached to the micro motor using some
    heat shrink
    . The second pic shows the micro motor hidden in the bracket
    2 years ago by kmbcsecretary
    Forum
    NimH advice
    Hi Alex They will be connected in series with the positive connected to the negative. I suggest you carefully cut off the
    heat shrink
    covering, taking care not to cut into the cells. You can then check each cells voltage. The nominal is 1.2v rising to 1.4v when charged. Any around 1v or less will never hold a charge so mark them with a marker pen. Hopefully it will be one of the end cells that has failed. On your type of pack the bottom of the battery (negative) will be in a metal case attached to the top (positive) of the next cell. I use a flat blade screwdriver to separate the cells (they are spot welded) and sometimes you can get the case off the bottom of the dud cell, leaving it attached to the positive of the next cell. I suggest you then charge the remaining good cells to see if they all take a full charge. If they are OK you can get a new cell or just make a lower voltage pack. I use a piece of stranded wire to repair the joint. You will need a 40+watt iron and some solder paste, and may need to scratch the battery case and pin for the solder to take. If you were careful with removing the
    heat shrink
    you can use it to cover the pack with a bit of electrical tape to make good. Please ask if you need any guidance with the process. I have been doing this for many years and may not have explained in enough detail if it's new to you. Do remember if the battery is charged it can short in its unwrapped state so do make sure you bench is uncluttered and kept clear of any metal objects. Good luck
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Response
    Layout and Limitations
    If you are keeping the smoker, follow the leads into the circuit board and mark them same with the lighting. Cut close to the board and the same with the plug leads from the hull. Join them together (solder is best with
    heat shrink
    ) that way you retain the plug and play to the superstructure. Also by removing the radio board a little of the top weight is removed.
    2 years ago by jarvo
    Forum
    JOINING BATTERY & RECEIVER CABLE
    Hi Les, if you can't solder DON'T CUT ANYTHING! How would you want to connect the switch anyway? What you need is this http://www.componentshop.co.uk/jst-male-female-with-on-off-switch.html I don't recommend insulating tape for anything on a model boat! After a while the glue leaches out and makes everything sticky 😑 --> Emergency repairs only ! If you do cut wires and insert a switch Colin is quite right; soldering and
    heat shrink
    sleeve is the way to do it. Wire at least same thickness as the original. You would only need to cut the red wire anyway. But much easier to use the switch above and the existing plugs. Don't cost the earth.πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug 😎 PS What a difference one little letter can make! Would love to hear what 'insulting' tape has to say for itself πŸ˜‰
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    battery charging
    Gentlemen, after charging the packs at 100mA for 24 hours, I stripped off the
    heat shrink
    from one pack for testing. Unloaded, 4 cells in the pack showed 1.40 volts on my multimeter, with one cell showing 1.37V - near as dammit to 7V for the pack. With a load applied, the current started at 0.95A, dropping to 0.9A when the voltage fell to 1.15. The one cell was consistently the lowest, but never more than ~30mV. From this test I calculated that the capacity used was 2250mAh. Not the rated capacity of 2550mAh, but almost there. During these tests I discovered that the recording meter that I had been relying on for the previous testing was giving inconsistent readings, a fact I only discovered when I started using my multimeter. This possibly resulted in my considering the battery discharged in previous tests, when it was not. Roy
    2 years ago by Trillium
    Forum
    battery charging
    Hi Roy A NiMh battery when fully charged is 1.4v dropping to 1.2v under load. I use similar batteries for our display boats and they give about 6.8 volts when fully charged. I am assuming your charger is indicating the 1200mAh capacity? I suggest you connect the battery to a meter and place a heavy 1 to 2 amp load on the battery and see what the voltage drops to. if it's less than 6v very quickly I would suspect one of the cells has failed. Usually caused by over discharging the pack and one cell becomes damaged by being reversed charged. If this is a recent purchase I would contact the supplier and ask for help as cells can fail sometimes. If this is not the case then it is possible to split the pack and check each battery whilst under the load. The faulty one's will have a low voltage. Any less than 1v need replacing as they won't ever take or give the full capacity. I have used pins with the meter to check the cells before splitting the pack but it's difficult. I solder a new battery of the same capacity in place and heatshrink the pack. I would check the battery with the replacement cell before sealing as the other cells may be damaged. I am assuming you are using a NiMh charger set to the correct charge current? AA cells are not as resilient as their larger cousins and do not take well to fast charging with loss of capacity being one of the symptoms. Hope this helps and you can get a replacement or repair your packs. Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    Working radar
    To spline or not to spline? That is the question! πŸ˜‰ Don't over-engineer. My destroyer radar works perfectly well totally independent of the RC! I just use the servo motor and gearing. Output shaft connected to the radar drive shaft with tight PTFE sleeving stripped from cable (13A mains or similar).
    heat shrink
    sleeve also works well. Power comes from a single 1.5V dry cell and switch hidden inside the bridge. A C or D size cell lasts for years & years & ... Simply switch on before launching. Couldn't be simpler and no wasted RC channel 😊 in effect it's just a simple geared motor with no unnecessary frills. Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    The suction hoses – part 4.
    After test fitting the hose ends to establish the correct lengths the hoses were trimmed to size and the fittings were then glued into the hose ends with some epoxy. On the real boat the hoses are arranged to lay on the tops of the foam tanks and they are supported on the stern coaming by a bronze hook. I formed this hook from some brass sheet so that it holds the hoses firmly one above the other, this was primed and finished in gunmetal grey and fixed to the coaming with a couple of brass rivets and a spot of epoxy. For a bit of extra security I cut some large diameter
    heat shrink
    to form some bands around the hoses to hold them together. So now the hoses are all finished and I think they look really good, I’ll probably re-polish the brass fittings and apply a light coat of lacquer to keep them nice and shiny at a later stage 😎
    2 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    The suction hoses – part 3.
    The remaining hose fittings are the male & female connectors and fortunately require nothing more than drilling to take the four short brass β€˜turning handles’ which were soft soldered in place and then filed to length. The suction hoses themselves proved far more difficult to make to a satisfactory standard and after several experiments with different gauges of copper, steel and stainless steel wire I found a 1.25mm galvanised β€˜garden wire’ that proved malleable enough to be formed into a long coil spring that when covered with some black
    heat shrink
    tube looked OK. I used a length of 8mm diameter aluminium tube as a former and hand wound the galvanised wire tightly around the tube to form a spring. This was a painful process, quite literally, and caused blisters on my thumb and forefingers despite wearing protective gloves 😭 The springs were then stretched out on the rod to space the coils evenly and then drawn through the
    heat shrink
    tube, and then a heat gun used to shrink down the tube onto the springs. While the newly formed hoses were still warm and pliable I put them on a former with the correct curvature and applied a little more heat and then left them to cool and set. The hoses were made over length so that, when finished, I could trim them to the correct lengths to fit into the rear well of the boat with the fittings attached. See part 4 for the final assembly...coming soon.
    2 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Propshaft Bearings
    Hi Rolfman, I don't have a link, never looked for one!, but the the following observations - 1) it helps enormously if you own a small lathe, which I admit I do, and also admit not everyone does. πŸ˜‰ Dremeling is OK - as far as it goes! BUT - a little offline (in the original mechanical engineering sense!πŸ˜‰) creates friction and vibration which negates the expense and effort to fit ball races in the first place πŸ€” A lathe with a dead centre eliminates this source of error. 2) The ball race should NEVER be soldered or brazed. (When did you last see a car wheel bearing soldered or welded in?) Any process which includes applying heat to both tube and ball race can, and most probably will, damage the ball race, especially if it is one of the 'packed for life' types. You will boil the grease packing out of the race and possibly distort the rings. Correct technique would be to machine the tube (on a lathe for accuracy) to a few thou less than the OD of the ball race. The machining creates a step inside the tube, with depth to accommodate the thickness of the ball race. The end of the tube is then GENTLY heated and the ball race pressed in. This should preferably be done on the lathe using the dead centre to ensure concentricity. When everything cools down you have a tight 'shrink fit'. No other 'glue' neededπŸ˜‰ BTW: I have been pedantic using the term 'ball race' because that is what Allen has bought and shown in his pic. A 'bearing' can also be a simple bush, which can be soldered or brazed with less problem than ball races BUT - needs even more care with alignment as it has no 'give' like a ball race! I am faced with exactly this problem with corrections to my Graupner Graf Spee where one shaft and it's bushes are out of alignment πŸ€” I will most likely replace the bushes with ball races. Hope I haven't discouraged you but I wondered why you went this way! Good luck, Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Futaba antenna
    Hi Hugh, strip both ends. Twist the wires around each other and solder. Cover the joint with
    heat shrink
    sleeving. I cut the antenna of all my receiver and fit a small 2mm plug and socket so I can take the RX out without destroying half the ship. This was essential with my U Boat as the antenna is led out of the pressure hull through a waterproofed (epoxy sealed) hole in the bow. Topside the remaining wire was fitted with another plug an socket, so I could remove the whole sea-deck for servicing, and stretched over the conning tower and down to the after deck just like the real ones. Plus or minus a cm or so won't make much difference. Wavelength at 27MHz is about 11 metres and at 40MHz about 7.5m. So our antennas are working at about 1/16th of the wavelength. This is normally compensated (a bit!) inside the RX with a coil which increases the effective length that the RX input sees. My first boss always told me "RF is a black art!" πŸ˜‰ Maybe if you try to beat the physics, but it took me around the world! Cheers Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    The mast & rigging.
    I had already made the upper rigging ropes and forward stay rope using black
    heat shrink
    but I thought that the lower ropes might look better with white so I did a search on eBay and found a few suppliers of white (and many other colours) in the very small size I needed. I suppose I could also re-make the other ropes using the white but that's not a priority at the moment. I'm making the Kent Clearview screen at the moment and that is giving me a few headaches 😑, I think I might be obsessing a bit on minor detail but I think the challenges are what makes scale modelling what it is. And they keep the mind and the fingers nimble 😁 Rob
    3 years ago by robbob
    Response
    The mast & rigging.
    I must ask where did you find "white"
    heat shrink
    tubing?
    3 years ago by figtree7nts
    Blog
    The mast & rigging.
    I had previously adapted the mast with lighting and fixing studs and so it’s ready to be fitted to the wheelhouse roof, but I decided to add some rigging detail in the process. Along with some other items, I had previously bought some threaded brass ’eyes’ and wooden rigging blocks by mail order from RB models in Poland. Very good prices and remarkably quick delivery from overseas. http://www.rbmodel.com I drilled the horizontal bar of the mast to take a couple of small brass eyes, and bent the lower part of the exposed thread back at an angle, onto these I fitted some wooden rigging blocks with brass sheaves which I had previously stained mahogany and lacquered. Another slightly larger eye was fitted to the centre of the mast and another to the wheelhouse roof for the forward stay rope, I used some thin white elasticated thread that I found in my local Hobbycraft store for all the rigging. The stay rope end were finished with small brass hooks formed from some thin brass wire and secured with some small diameter
    heat shrink
    tubing, I think this makes for a much neater look than just tied knots. The top rigging ropes were made in the same way. The completed mast was then bolted down through the wheelhouse roof on the threaded studs and the two lighting wires passed through separate holes in the roof. This should allow me to detach the mast and fold it down for transport if necessary. The lower end of the ropes from the rigging blocks were formed into a loop with a spot of superglue to fix them and then some small white
    heat shrink
    tube used to cover the joints. The loops fit neatly over the cleats on the cabin roof so that they can easily be released. I’m hoping that being elasticated all the rigging will stay taut and remain presentable 😁 I must remember to order some ensigns flags from 'Mike Alsop Scale Flags' for a finishing feature as recommended by pmdevlin in an earlier blog post πŸ‘
    3 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    The scramble nets.
    The scramble nets were a particular challenge that I wasn't looking forward to making and at first I looked for something ready-made and I found a manufacturer of sports and bird netting. They make a net for golf driving ranges that looked to have almost the right dimensions and construction so I called them and requested a sample, which they very obligingly supplied. However, when it arrived the β€˜rope’ looked far too thin for a realistic scale and the squares slightly too large and furthermore it could only be bought by the square metre with a minimum order of 4 metres so it would have been very expensive for the small amount I actually needed 😱. And so as I couldn’t find anything else remotely similar or suitable I resigned myself to making the nets from scratch. After some research and scale calculations I decided I needed a 2mm diameter twisted black polypropylene cord for the nets and I found some on good old eBay for a few pounds for a 30 metre length. The next hurdle was forming the netting squares and I initially tried to produce a net by tying β€˜square’ knots which are used to make real β€˜cargo’ and β€˜climbing nets’. I found a helpful YouTube video demonstrating how to tie the knots, at which I had some success, but with such a small diameter cord and big fingers I soon gave up on that idea 😑. The successful method involved marking out a square grid on a piece of ply and nailing brass pins on the edges from which a net of cord was formed, and where the cords crossed I used a hollow needle, which I made from some brass tube and rod ground to a sharp needle point, to form the joint. The needle was used to pierce the twist of the vertical cord and draw the horizontal cord through the twist, this was repeated to form a neat and accurate net structure. After adjusting the cords to form accurate squares I applied a small drop of superglue to each joint to lock the cords together. The completed net was trimmed at the sides and the hot tip of my small soldering iron used to melt the polypropylene cord ends to neaten them up. The net was secured to the rails on the cabin roof by passing the cords through a short piece of black
    heat shrink
    tube and then passed under the rail and back through the
    heat shrink
    tube. I used the clean tip of a small soldering iron to shrink the tubing down around the cords as using my heat gun for the job would also easily remove the paint from the roof 😱. I made a bar for the bottom of the net from some 4mm dowel drilled with 2.5mm holes at the same spacing as the net, this was stained mahogany and given a few coats of lacquer as a finish. The cords were passed through the dowel and secured in a similar fashion as the top fixing with
    heat shrink
    . The end result of this process is a scramble net of more or less the correct scale as the real thing that, when rolled up on the cabin roof, looks pretty good…..at least to my eye 😎. A lot of effort and thought went into making the first one…..now all I’ve got to do is make another one for the other side πŸ˜“.
    3 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    The tow hook & chafing plate
    As supplied, the tow hook consists of two rather ugly lumps of metal that need to be coupled together, and a further piece, the β€˜chafing plate’ which is not supplied, made to complete the fitting. I started be adding some detail to the main component in the form of some steel rod to represent the lever mechanism and operating handle. The body of the tow hook then has to be attached to the retaining plate with an articulated coupling which I made from some brass tube, copper wire and a 2mm nut & bolt. The retaining plate was also drilled to take some 2mm cap head screws for fixing through the tow hook deck. The finished piece, which now looks a bit more like the drawings and photographs, was brush painted in β€˜gun metal’ grey and a piece if
    heat shrink
    added to the handle as a grip. The chafing plate was formed from some 4mm square plasticard rod which was immersed in boiling water to soften it sufficiently for it to be bent to the required radius. The bending process unfortunately distorts the profile so this was restored and improved by rubbing it flat on some coarse abrasive paper. A piece of plasticard sheet was marked and cut to a corresponding radius to form the base of the chafing plate and some further plasticard wedges added to form the end stops. This piece was also pained gun metal grey. The chafing plate is fixed to the deck with 2 cap head screws and I also set a brass pin into the centre position which locates into a hole in the underside of the tow hook to hold it in place. Next on the list of fittings is the davit 😁
    3 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    Making the searchlight. Part one. The metalwork.
    Having decided to make the searchlight a working feature I needed to make a sturdier base for it as the supplied white metal item is far too weak and not up to the job. This is another job for the man with the lathe......😜 I want the new piece to replicate the original as much as possible so I took measurements of the white metal part and produced a dimensional drawing which I e-mailed to my brother. A short while later the item arrived in the post with another as a spare in case I messed up the first! πŸ˜“ I annealed some β€˜D’ profile brass rod and formed it to the dimensions of the original cradle and set this into a slot filed into the top of the turned searchlight base. Before silver soldering the cradle into place I spun the part in a drill and rounded off the base with some abrasive to a profile more like the original. I also filed flats at the cradle ends and drilled them, and the searchlight body, to accept some 2mm brass screws to join the two parts together. The base has a 2mm diameter hole bored through to accept the drive shaft from the servo and a very small grub screw secures the base onto this shaft. The 3 watt LED is already epoxy into the searchlight body but I will replace the wire with something thinner and bring it out through the back in some
    heat shrink
    tubing. I'm hoping that this will be flexible enough to allow free rotation of the searchlight.😊
    3 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    The wheelhouse navigation light.
    While the paint is drying on the hull there’s time to continue working on more of the white metal fittings. The body of the small navigation light on the wheelhouse roof is just big enough to set a small 3mm blue LED into so I started hollowing it out with a fine drill bit in a pin drill. The technique is to start with a small bit and by drilling one or two turns at a time and the backing the drill out to remove the swarf, this ensures that the bit does not jam in the very soft white metal, and then gradually increasing the bit size to the required diameter for the 3mm LED. The wire for the LED was taken from a miniature transformer from a defunct power supply, this tinned copper wire is very fine and is insulated with enamel. The legs of the LED were trimmed as short as possible and the wire soldered to each and insulated with some fine
    heat shrink
    , then the pair of wires were passed through some more
    heat shrink
    to form the connection cable and shrunk down. The base of the LED was also filed down slightly to reduce it’s diameter for a snug fit in the body of the fitting. After a quick test with a battery and dropper resistor the LED was epoxied into the body. Before painting the LED was β€˜frosted’ with a fine abrasive and the body cleaned up ready for paint. I used some Humbrol β€˜Maskol’ on the LED before spraying with some white gloss.
    3 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Aeronaut Pilot Boat
    Hi Glyn An excellent choice if I may say so. I am very pleased with mine, particularly at this time of year with all the onboard lighting. The most difficult part of my build was skinning the hull. Although the plastic sheet is flexible it requires bending in two planes to accommodate the curvature. The skins are held in place with tape then glued to the bulkheads on the inside. My mistake(s) were failing to take enough time positioning the skins, particularly fore and aft, not using enough tape and using too much glue. The chemical reaction created by the glue, caused the plastic to heat up and shrink resulting in the bulkheads showing through - see pic 1. Initially this caused me some concern but when I had finished the build I was pleased with the overall result - pic 2. Best of luck. Steve
    3 years ago by cormorant
    Blog
    The Mast - part 1.
    As the painting process will take some time between stages I have started work on the white metal fittings, starting with the mast, on which I want to put a functional navigation light. The mast, as supplied, is in two parts that need to be jointed, and using a brass tube for the upper section instead of the solid casting will allow some wires to be incorporated internally. I started by adapting a brass dome head nut that I happened to have to hand by rounding off the flats and boring some cross holes through it. The internal size of the nut is enough to take a 3mm white LED so I filed the top of the LED flat and 'frosted' the body with some abrasive paper. The wiring was then soldered to the LED and
    heat shrink
    applied for insulation. The brass tube was cut to length and a slot filed into the lower part for the wiring to exit.
    3 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    Electrics, switching & wiring loom
    Because the fibreglassing process takes a while, there's time to consider other things that need to be done such as the wheelhouse, cabin roofs and hatches, and the electrics. The electrics are very straightforward and my initial drawings are transformed into a panel that also contains the master power switch, fuse holder and a charging socket. All the wiring is in 12awg silicone insulated wire and all connections are soldered and insulated with
    heat shrink
    . Initially I used large Futaba connectors but having assembled and tested the loom I'm not very confident of the current handling of these so I replaced them all with XT60 connector that are rated at 65A. I'll leave the Futaba charging connector in the switch panel as this doesn't need to be uprated. The master switch is a high current DPDT, centre off type that in one position connect the battery supply to the ESC and motor via the fuse and in the other position to the charging socket. Although the ESC has a BEC I will supply the receiver and lighting circuits from separate battery supplies, mustn't forget to remove the power wire from the ESC servo connector! I have incorporated an in-line ammeter in the loom that should monitor and log peak amps and volts, it's only rated at 30A and I'm not sure that it's up to the job, if not I know that 'Component-shop' do something similar that will meter up to 150A for about Β£18 or so. I have chosen a Turnigy charger from Hobbyking that will accommodate the 16 cell NiMh (19.2v) series battery system so that the charging can be done with the batteries in situ, the charger has a 12v DC input so this can done at the lakeside from a car battery if required, but it has no AC input. it will also handle LiPO batteries if I decide to switch chemistry !. That means that I'll need a meaty DC power supply to run the charger on the bench and I have just the thing for the job.....
    3 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Search lights
    Hi Lee I sent for two sidelight bulbs and on inspection they are very good. The wire connectors can be straightened and the white plastic casing just pulls off leaving two wires attached to resistors. Power with 12v and you have a powerful searchlight. Current should be under 100 mA as they are rated at 1W. The metal casing is 1cm diameter and 1cm long so ideal for a 12th scale model. The white plastic rear case could be modified to produce the rear of the searchlight and the wires can be
    heat shrink
    ed and bent at 90deg. I got two for Β£2.49 off ebay, post free. 2x ULTRA XENON HiD WHITE 1W HiGH POWER LED T10 501 W5W SIDELIGHT BULBS 8000K from lightec-autostyle-ltd. Look in 12v ready and select all items, then scroll down about 20 items. I am sending for some more but they appear to have a good stock. What type did you source. Dave
    3 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    Joysway Force2 60 catamaran
    It is not a good idea to charge batteries in hulls where there is no chance of air circulation and condensation can occur. I have seen the after effects of an exploding battery and now always remove my batteries to a safe place to charge. The Rx will also benefit from fresh air to prevent condensation and electrolysis from the residual charges on capacitors. I have a friend who uses a plug socket on his deck with a shorted plug sealed with
    heat shrink
    that works well at the lake but he removes the batteries to charge after sailing. I use vehicle sign makers sticky tape (available in all colours) to seal my yachts and have no problems. Hope you find a solution that works for you. Dave
    4 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    BEC Circuits.
    Shaun be aware that the small switches that come attached to the ESC's can be iffy. I always cut them out and solder the cables together covered with a bit of
    heat shrink
    , and just rely on a switch to cut the main power. In your case perhaps having two batteries you could just use a switch to cut the two positive cables to the batteries. You could probable find a suitable switch at a motor spares shop or Maplins with a high enough amperage. Not knowing the layout of the boat I don't know where you would site it though. Alan
    4 years ago by AlanP
    Response
    Engine Mount Issues
    HI Neil, A domestic hair drier is unlikely to provide enough heat, a DIY hot air gun will most likely give too much heat.... Best job is a hot air gun for use on model aircraft for shrinking coverings, they're not too expensive and will last for years, in fact it was one of my best buys. NB The 34" FB is just a bit too small for dolls house sized furniture whereas the 46" job being 1" to the foot is just right size. Press on, you're doing a great job. Jim
    4 years ago by Aeronut1
    Forum
    Getting wiring to be neat
    If your melting (and casting) that much lead your going to need quite a lot of heat and best done outside. You also need to consider how your going to pick up and pour such a weight of liquid metal. if you NEED 14KG of lead for ballast then you will need around 20KG of liquid lead to allow a decent sized casting gate so your finished casting doesn't shrink to badly away from your mould. I would figure it to be a 2 man job. Have a hunt around youtube for foundry work and see how they handle casting. What are you going to do for a mould. For such a large casting it will need to be 2 part and have a runner and riser the riser having a large casting gate built in. Take precautions full face visor leather gloves and a heavy apron are a MUST. if you have never seen water and liquid lead come together trust me the results are spectacular and best not experienced at first hand. You need to make a pattern ( for sand casting ) oversize so when your casting cools its the right size. Sand casting is probably your best bet.
    4 years ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    Micro Servo wires
    strip the wires and tin each. That way when you join them you have a prepared surface. don't forget to slip some sleeving on BEFORE you solder two wires together ( obvious I know but I have done it and I am sure many many more have ) if you use
    heat shrink
    your soldering iron will shrink it so it grips tight. OHHHHHHH and do please try not to burn your fingers , a usefull tip is to get someone else to hold the wires.
    4 years ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    M, Tronics
    HI Damon Are you sure your capacitors are not shorting out the motor? You should really sleeve bare wires with
    heat shrink
    to prevent this . Same goes for the Deans plugs, especially if you are connecting a Lipo. I can't see the connection to your rx from the Esc very clearly, it looks like you are short on lead length and as a result the connection is under some duress which may be making a bad connection. First of all disconnect the blue and yellow wires and see if the motor runs freely with a direct connection to a battery. if you use the LiPos to test please put a fuse in tyhe positive line near to the battery. I suggest you try a 5amp initially to limit the sparks if there is a short, if you need to use a fuse greater than 10amps I would suspect your motor or the RFI connections. Whilst you have the motor disconnected you can test the ESC, RX and servo. Just make sure the blue and yellow wires are not touching ( some insulation tape on each wire would be good) then switch on the Tx attach the battery and switch on the ESC. After a couple of seconds the Rx should show an orange light and the ESC should flash the green and red leds and then stop with both illuminated. Your servo should respond to the stick. Pushing the stick you have selected for the ESC should result in either the green or red light illuminating at full stick and the other colour illuminating at the opposite stick position. It's possible that you have the ESC plugged into another channel to your selected stick so do try all the sticks to identify the correct one. Maybe the Rx has a fault on the throttle channel. if you swop the ESC with the servo connection to the Rx your throttle stick should work the rudder servo. I always have a problem with selecting the correct channel and the manual is not always helpful. I'm at Haydock during the day so if you post your findings I will look tomorrow night.. Dave
    4 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    fireboat update
    I think I have finally got the upper hand of the gloss black on the hull, its now in the dining room drying and Ill not go near it for a week 😯 In the meantime I have made the bayonet fittings for the ends of the hoses, just need some
    heat shrink
    now, to cover the springy bits
    6 years ago by AlanP
    Response
    Aerokits 46'' Fireboat twin screw brushless conversion
    Oh dear, I would have gone straight to the ESC but as they are both the same it is unlikely, some ESC's can go wrong if they are left in a damp or wet boat for some time. Check the Y lead if you are using one. If you suspect the ESC's I would take them into the house and dry them out, still no joy, remove heatshrink and get something from Maplins the clean them. Before you go this far it would be worth trying another ESC Alan
    6 years ago by AlanP
    Blog
    Aerokits 46'' Fireboat twin screw brushless conversion
    well we are coming to an end soon, the next bit was really cheeky, and made me laugh, inspired by HS93 again. The salvage hoses, Tried allsorts of things, , old shower hose, big drinking straws, plastic pipe, what an earth do you use, to look "right!" Get a spring (model train guys have loads, as do old style diy shops etc), strech it out to required length, pop a bent wire coathanger in it to keep the required shape, put heatshrink on it 😁 😁 Perfect! looks like a rubber hose, ok, I used the lathe to do the ends, but you could easily find something for that!
    6 years ago by pmdevlin
    Blog
    Aerokits 46'' Fireboat twin screw brushless conversion
    Humbrol metalcoat paint is real good, comes in a couple of colours, steel, aluminium etc, paint it on (I find aerosol works best) it looks dreadful and you panic, then you buff with a cloth, and it looks superb! I rubbed a bit hard with the towhook so the brass shows through a bit, to give weathered effect. I am no expert here, it was just trial and error, more by luck really! Plasticard base now looks like metal! πŸ‘ and a bit of heatshrink for the handle. Using the bolts, the handle actually works, as the operator pushes down the hook goes to the pictured position, pull handle up, the hook pivots forward, so the cable can be put on. it means removing a bolt, and slackening the handle bolts, when the boat is running they might vibrate loose so for now everything is tight! 8 bolts holding it all on, bring it on tug boys!
    6 years ago by pmdevlin
    Blog
    Aerokits 46'' Fireboat twin screw brushless conversion
    The crash nets where a real stroke of luck, I could not find anything suitable, so posted on a few forums etc for inspiration. Out of the blue someone sent me some netting, as used to stop birds getting into those small spaces in your roof. The size of the netting was great, but, it was quite hard, as it was a sort of plastic string, looking very stiff and unrealistic, so I thought lets just get it fitted, and put some weights on it, then it might flatten out and be ok. Copying someone elses idea (from this forum I recall) I looped the plastic string around those block things that go on the centre roof, but could not get them to glue together, so ended up using heatsink to join the ends, (difficult to explain until you see the pics). Whilst heating the heatshrink, with a heat gun, there was a divine intervention, the plastic string started to shrink and fall! πŸ˜€ how lucky was that, the nets now sank on the roof and turned out real good! I have really got it in for red paint now, even the lifebelts have ended up another colour! 😢
    6 years ago by pmdevlin
    Blog
    Victory Industries Vosper Fire Boat RC conversion part 4
    It was obvious from the start that the original rudders had to go but how do you control them? I had toyed with the idea of starting from scratch and moving the shafts away from the transom giving a bit more room to attach a lever to the top but surveying the deckless hull it was obvious that this would involve a lot of work including making new P brackets to get the props further forward. The idea of drilling a small hole in the shafts to take a wire tiller facing forward was hatched as this would give a large range of movement but not take any room to the rear of the shaft. First the hole that takes the original rudders is opened out to take a 2mm ID tube and carefully drilled through to the inside of the hull. Whilst it's fairly clear above the mounting bosses stop as soon as the drill breaks through. You will need a 19mm length of tube to sleeve the hole, this will just fit leaving enough room above it for the tillers to fit in the hole you will need to drill in the top of the shafts. The shafts should be 2mm dia to match the tube and 46-47mm long and the centre for the hole for the tillers should be 1.5-2mm from the top. The diameter depends on the wire (paper clip) you use for the tillers. The tillers are bent from wire with a crank in the end. I put a piece of heatshrink onto the tillers to act as a stop when you insert them on final assembly but a piece of tape would be just as good. (Photo 5) The rudder blades can be salvaged from the original and soldered onto the shafts or new ones made from plastic and glued on. I know the purist would baulk at this but if I soldered them on they would fall off just after the boat got out of reach of the shore. I've put my faith in modern adhesives. I do have another cunning plan involving yoghurt pots if this plan fails. Photo 6 shows the assembled mechanism that was designed to be easily fitted through a hole cut in the well deck floor. in practice the word 'easily' is open to interpretation.
    6 years ago by smiggy


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