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    Blog
    The Flagstaff
    This is another fitting that needs to be detachable and the construction is very similar to the others. The base was formed from some brass bar and β€˜turned’ to the desired size and profile on my β€˜Black & Decker Bodge
    lathe
    ’ and then the centre hole was enlarged with a needle file at an angle to accept a 5mm brass tube which was silver soldered into the base. The piece was then cleaned up with some abrasive paper and wire wool. A 2mm brass nut was press fitted into the base of a short piece of 4mm brass tube and soft soldered in place and this this piece was inserted into the base assembly to act as a threaded retainer and spacer. I continued making the flagstaff from some brass rod with a 2mm threaded end and some tubing to make up the diameter but having mostly completing it I decided that it just didn’t look in keeping with the boat ☹️....... and so I made a new mast from some 4mm beech dowel which I sanded to a taper and made a rounded plasticard β€˜finial’ top button 😊......... much better. A short piece of 2mm rod, threaded at the end, was cut to length and inserted into the end of the new wooden flagstaff and the whole piece was finished with three coats of antique pine stain. Some thin brass wire was formed into a double loop and fitted around the top of the mast to form the upper fixing for the halyard and a short length of 5mm tubing with a brass wire loop soldered into it forms the lower fixing for the halyard. The flagstaff base was painted with etch primer and two brushed coats of gunmetal grey before being epoxied into an angled hole bored into the rear deck. The flag was made for me by Mike Allsop of Scale Flags & Ensigns to the correct dimensions for the boats scale. The halyard is actually elasticated cord finished at each end with some thin white heat-shrink tubing with another short piece at the bottom of the ensign to keep it in position. The elasticated cord is in tension and as it’s fixed to the flagstaff top and bottom the whole assembly can be easily screwed in and out of the base with the ensign attached, the threading of the flagstaff is also set so that the halyard and ensign always ends up on the trailing edge 😁.
    2 days ago by robbob
    Blog
    The Radio Aerial
    Another cabin roof fitting is the radio aerial, this also needs to be detachable for transport and storage. For the base I cut and formed a disc from some brass bar and β€˜turned’ it to the desired size and profile in my makeshift '
    lathe
    ' (a Black & Decker horizontal drill stand) and then the centre hole was enlarged to take a 4mm brass tube which was silver soldered into the base. The piece was then cleaned up with some abrasive paper and wire wool. A short piece of 3mm brass rod was then threaded and soft soldered into the bottom of the base to form the fixing stud. For the aerial rod I used a short piece of 3mm tube and some 2mm brass rod, the tube fits inside the base tube and the rod in the centre, and this was soft soldered together into the base. Finally a piece of 3mm tube was soldered to the end of the rod and turned to shape it into a ball. The rod was also given a slight taper with files and abrasives. The whole piece was sprayed with grey etch primer and when dry the base was brush painted with some black acrylic and finally some clear satin lacquer finishes off the part. πŸ˜€ The aerial fixes to the roof through a white plasticard base with a 3mm wing nut.
    14 days ago by robbob
    Blog
    The Searchlight & Horns
    When I built my RAF Crash Rescue Tender my brother made a searchlight base for me on his
    lathe
    from a drawing I supplied and at the time I asked for an additional one in case I made a hash of it. Fortunately I didn’t need it at the time and still had the spare one in my bits box and so it made sense to use this for the searchlight on the Thames Police Boat. The new base was made in much the same way as the previous one, the detail is in my Crash Tender blog: https://model-boats.com/blogs/23951 The white metal casting of the searchlight body is very well made and only requires a little fettling to remove casting lines and as this searchlight will not be a working one I used the prototype lens from my previous searchlight build to fit into base. A short plastic rod was push fitted into the lens base with a disc of silver foil at the lens end to enhance the reflection in the optical path. This piece acts as a support for the lens instead of the LED unit and is glued into the body which I had previously painted black internally. A perspex disc was made to cover the front of the lens, and a β€˜tri-form’ front piece was made from some 22mm copper pipe and some brass wire which was soft soldered together. Before the front was glued in place all the parts were sprayed with a grey etch primer and a couple of coats of satin lacquer. The finished assembly is fixed to the roof with a 3mm threaded stud and a wing nut to make removal easy with a circular plasticard base between the two. The twin horns are from RB Model in Poland and they just needed to be sprayed with etch primer and lacquer before fixing to the roof. The boat is now looking more like the real thing, just a little more detailing to add including the life ring, roof aerial, flagstaff and a few more deck fittings. 😊
    19 days ago by robbob
    Blog
    Rear deck test
    So while 2nd layer of gunwhale stringers glue is setting on 46” boat I thought I’d do some renovations on the recently acquired 36” boat, starting with the rear deck. This will be a useful practice for when the 46” boat needs doing. The original deck was painted white and was screwed down. I’m replacing it with a planked deck, some removable foam tanks, hose & deck hatch with brass handles. The foam tanks need to be removable to get at the screws to lift the deck (access to rudders &servo) here’s where we are up to. Deck is planked with recess for hatch. The cross hatch grid for the foam tanks was made on my 3D printer and once painted will be OK. I’ll make the brass connectors for the hose on my
    lathe
    , and the hatch needs a recess milled out for the handles. The hose I have is a bit of corrugated plastic probably from Lego. We’ll see how all this comes out and adjust for the 46” boat in due course. πŸ‘
    20 days ago by Harvey Kitten
    Response
    Re: Bollards!
    What lovely quality work Rob, you don't need a
    lathe
    when you can produce fittings this good, wish I could do itπŸ˜” cheers Peter
    22 days ago by Rookysailor
    Response
    Re: Bollards!
    You always have this
    lathe
    , of course. It's making torpedoes for the EeZeBilt PT Boat..... 😊
    23 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Bollards!
    The fittings supplied with the kit include some bollards for the deck but I’m less than impressed with them and decided to make my own by adapting some brass handrail fittings intended for locomotives. As readers of my blogs will know, I don’t have a
    lathe
    but there’s a lot that can be achieved using a horizontal bench drill and files. The first job was to reduce the diameter of the base to fit inside a couple of steel washers that were superglued together and then to the reduced base to form a large flange for the bollard. This was then spun in the drill and files used to radius the edges and blend them into the base. Some brass rod was then used to form the cross piece of the bollard, some tape the same width of the β€˜ball’ was used to protect the centre section and the outer end reduced to a taper with a file, finally the pieces were reduced to the correct length and the ends rounded off. The cross piece was then superglued into the bollard base and then all four were given a coat of etch primer and then two brushed coats of Tamiya gunmetal grey. There is another bollard on the foredeck and this is just a simple wooden post with a brass cross piece, it’s fixed through the deck into the underlying structure by a brass pin.
    23 days ago by robbob
    Guestbook
    Guestbook
    further to my previous guestbook entry, my wife now fully understands a love a man has for his precious objects like
    lathe
    and a tower Drill and custom made workbench, and while I can't bring them back into the bedroom she will arrange for my bed to go to the workshop!!! hope summer come soon....πŸ™„ Steve
    1 month ago by boatiebennett
    Blog
    funnel mounts and deck hatches
    Fitted the "legs" to the wheel house so now at correct height when on the deck. Funnel mounts done (just need to finish the funnels, workout what holes to drill and then mount the funnels to the mounts) so we added 2 hatches to each mount, painted white with brass hinges. the one placed between the Cowl vents is open, the one at the back is closed. as we only had "closed" hatches put a triangle shaped bit of plastic under the "open" hatch to prop open. When dry mounting the Cowl Vents found an issue with the rear vents as they are suppose to be higher than the wheelhouse and the ones i got where not, so found 2 wooden cotton reels the right height and turned then down to the correct width using the pillar drill as a
    lathe
    , painted them up and then placed the Cowl vents on those. also painted the "flat" vents chrome and stuck those to the mounts as well. to finish off these all we have to do is fit the breather pipes and ladder to funnels and fix the funnels to the mounts (allowing for the front funnel to have the hole for the smoke generator. Started work on the 2 deck hatches using 1mm plastic sheet. Made the 2 housings up and the planked and varnished them ready for the hatches. found out i had only enough hatches to do 1 housing, so drilled a 7mm hole in the hatch for a 10mm brass porthole, painted white with brass hinges. once dry stuck them on the housing ready to go. (ordered some more hatches to i can complete the other housing lol) one last thing was to start on the wheel box. Found in "The Works" in town a heart shaped box which was almost perfect for a mold for the thin wood that was steamed to shape and then held on the heart to fix the curve in place. next to do is to make up the front and back of the wheel boxes and stick the "curved" wood to that
    2 months ago by barryskeates
    Response
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    I look with amazement at some of the work that these people do on here. I visualise things in my head but do not have the tools or the nerve to even attempt doing them. No
    lathe
    or decent soldering iron or good enough workshop or the money to start with. How I envy the work they do. And as for some of the electronics< i'm lost. Awesome springs to mind on it all.
    2 months ago by BOATSHED
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona - the hull
    So... here is a compressed build blog of my paddle tug Iona... and I'm playing catch-up as the vessel is 95% complete and has been sailed already, but there may be some interest in what I've done. Iona was scratch-built off plan and has turned out to be the cheapest build so far out of 3 I've made, mainly because I was able to source materials from the leftovers box! it's a 'mixed-media' boat 😜using traditional methods of plank on frame hull, with paddles made on my 3D printer, and other parts turned on the
    lathe
    . So starting with the hull, frames were drawn out, transferred to some scrap 9mm ply and cut out on my bandsaw, along with the keel. These were assembled on a build board with some right angle brackets / measuring tools and test fitted before being stuck in place with epoxy. This was quite difficult as the shape of the hull is critical and comes right at the start of the build. I did remake 1 frame to correct alignment. The deck stringers need to bend in 2 directions, so some steaming with a carpet steam cleaner attached to some tubes worked and the wood clamped in place to dry. Outboard sponsons (?) were fitted to make a frame for the paddle boxes to fit on. Then a large sheet of ply forms the bottom of the hull, and the only job left to complete was the (tedious) planking. This was my 1st plank on frame ship... and it took ages. I think it came out reasonably OK but I'm not a perfectionist and I know if I'd spent more time it could be better... but I didn't! Next blog will feature building the paddle boxes and superstructure.πŸ€“
    2 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    PS Iona - misc fittings
    A bit of a miscellany here - the funnel fittings or mounts at the top are 3D printed and the 'rope' is some sort of elastic string used in jewellery making. This... 1) keeps it straight which is difficult with regular string or wire, 2) doesn't get damaged when you catch it with a stray arm, tool, etc. Brass steam fittings turned on my
    lathe
    . The forward hatch was built in case extra ballast was needed, but has had a beneficial side effect. No ballast was needed and the hatch is filled with foam, so I can wedge in a mini tripod and mount a camera up front. Only briefly tested but looks promising The windlass is a kit from mobile marine models. Easy to construct and looks the part. Tow hook 3D printed.
    2 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Response
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    'tis true but I just provided drawings to my brother...him with the
    lathe
    😁
    4 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Cabin detail part 5 speed control & compass
    When you look at the last picture it could almost be a full size cabin control panel. Beautiful bit of work there. I just wish I had the tools to do all that turning on a
    lathe
    . Awesome.
    4 months ago by BOATSHED
    Response
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    Hello, I think I read in one of your posts that you said you were a better builder than skipper, I always say that about myself. I enjoy sailing at the pond but then look forward getting back home to continue building. Your work is exceptional and I enjoy seeing you make everything. Wish I had a
    lathe
    like yours but have done without for years as they are beyond my budget. Keep the good work! Joe
    4 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Plumbing the water-cooling for the ESC
    The HobbyKing ESC I’m using has the facility for water cooling and as it will be in an enclosed location without any free ventilation it seems sensible to utilise this feature. To keep the water circuit as short as possible I will put the pickup just behind the propeller and the exhaust on the stern but as the boat has a bulkhead just in front of the stern skin I need to make an access hole through it to allow me to secure the nut on the stern skin. I made a hole through the bulkhead large enough to get a socket on the nut and reinforced the hole with a ply plate, similarly I reinforced the inside of the stern skin where the outlet passes through it. When I was happy that the arrangement worked and I could attach the hoses and securing clips easily I glued and pinned the stern skin to the hull. The water pickup is a standard one that is readily available but it’s supplied with overly large and ugly fixing nuts, the inside one is of no consequence but I thought that the outer one needed smartening up so I put it on a threaded rod and locked it in place with another nut and put that into the chuck of a drill and used a file to re-shape the nut to a pleasing taper….who needs a
    lathe
    ......😜 I had to reduce the height of the inner keel former as the pickup tube is not long enough to get a good fixing with the internal nut, as the inner keel is balsa I fitted a ply reinforcing plate to spread the load. The last β€˜photo shows the location of the ESC, main battery fuse and receiver. The hoses will be secured to the ESC with spring clips throughout. I found that the silicone tube I use tends to kink rather easily if the radius of a bend is too small and I found it necessary to form a tight spring coil around the piece that loops the water back through the ESC to prevent this happening.
    4 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    flue
    Hi Rick, photo as promised and a rough idea of my solution for the chimney problem, I think this needs a bit more work as yet? Question, do you have access to a
    lathe
    ? Regards Gary.
    4 months ago by GaryLC
    Forum
    flue
    Hi Rick I favour aluminium tubing as you can buy any diameter you want, a 12" length is not expensive, then using milliput putty mould a few rings of putty around it say top, bottom and an inch from the top, square them up on a
    lathe
    then you can fix the four stays into the putty, which looks just like the real thing in miniature. Regards, Gary. (I'll bung you a photo.)
    4 months ago by GaryLC
    Forum
    Boat shaft connectors (which stuffs to use and which is good)
    I'm not sure what you mean by 'earthquakes' - do you mean there was lots of vibration? The prop-shaft and the motor shaft should be aligned as precisely as you can manage. Though a universal joint will accept some misalignment, you should aim to get things so precise that there is no need for a joint! That tube looks rather thin. I use tube which is 10-12mm in OD, with about 3-4 mm thick walls. You are correct that I 'make the shafts larger' by putting little knurled knobs made from aluminium bar on them. if you do not have a
    lathe
    , you can buy similar couplings like this: https://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/acatalog/Robbe-Flexible-Coupling-3.2-4mm-R1445.html#SID=1586
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Mini
    lathe
    Aha! You mean the 'Lego
    lathe
    '!! Lotsa blocks you can shove together to make a
    lathe
    or milling machine or .... Agree about the motor, not big enough or man enough for the job. I bought one at an exhibition some years ago, it's buried in the workshop somewhere.😲 Nowadays I mostly use my little Proxxon FD150/E. Just used it to make some parts for Colin's Taycol Supermarine renovation. Simple uncomplicated machine, good for small parts. Cheers, Doug 😎
    5 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Mini
    lathe
    Hi y'all.I was thinking of getting one of these--https://www.banggood.com/DC-24V-Mini-
    lathe
    -Beads-Machine-Polish-Woodworking-DIY-Tools-80-100W-p-1121255.html?rmmds=category&cur_warehouse=CN-- Is Raitool a good make. Seem to be. Has anyone got one Or similar? Can it be used for steel and screw cutting (with the right accessories of course)? All ideas welcome.
    6 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Mini
    lathe
    Greetings from Australia. Hi The only Mini Metal
    lathe
    to buy is the UNIMAT. it is made in Austria.I have had one for years and love it. it has 1 downside, You can only use it for about 8 minutes before the motor gets hot and you have to let it cool down. I use a small fan blowing on the motor and I can use it for about 20minutes. They may have corrected this since i bought mine. You also have to remove the belt when letting it cool down or the belt will break.I had a TAIG but did not like it. Hope this info helps. Regards Sid
    5 months ago by sidley70
    Forum
    Mini
    lathe
    Unless you can get something second hand, the only new small
    lathe
    worth a toss is the Peatol (Taig) from Harborne in Brum. Cheap, but very well made. You have to buy the tailstock, oddly, but it's still very inexpensive. I have had mine for over 30 years and it is as good as new. My son got one s/h off ebay with every attachment, on a base, with a book and it was Β£200. Martin
    6 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Mini
    lathe
    This is simply a revolving drill chuck.it doesn't have any longitudinal or cross feed travelling tool post and at best its only good for wood turning of very small diameter pieces of wood or polishing small parts. I don't think it suits your requirements. Colin you beat me to it by 60 seconds
    6 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Mini
    lathe
    Forget it, it's just a little freehand turning
    lathe
    for hobby work in soft wood and other soft materials. Meant for craft jewellery and beading work. Look for something that has a traversing tool post with crosswise adjustment. I'm lucky enough to have my late father's Unimat with a screw cutting adapter as well as a milling attachment, for larger work I have a Chester universal combination
    lathe
    /milling machine. Look in local auctions, as they are often in our local auctions in Herefordshire. Happy hunting, cheers Colin.
    6 months ago by Colin H
    Directory
    (Other) Vosper
    I always liked the sound of a fourstroke engine so I thought I would replace the brushless motor in this boat with an aircraft Os 40fs which I converted with a water cooling jacket that I turned up on my
    lathe
    . I also made a reverse gearbox with a clutch, the gearbox is operated by a servo and works well, I also fitted a water pump so could still cool the engine while ticking over stationary, boat has been weathered and is fitted with lights and a searchlight that swivels around operated by another servo, there is also a cooling fan above the engine just to help keep things cool. (Motor: Os 40 fourstroke) (10/10)
    6 months ago by Biscuit
    Forum
    Aldi excellent service
    I thought a minidrill had gone west on me, but then found the motor was OK, so , with items from a discarded fax machine I made a small mill/drill attachment for the vertical slide of my modelmakers'
    lathe
    . it had made an awful lot of wheels since! I use it to mill out spokes and drill holes on things like BRM and Dunlop wheels and it did all the series of British Touring Cars models I made for the teams back in the Cavalier/Mondeo days, when you could tell what they were and there were no stinking grunty oil burners. Martin
    6 months ago by Westquay
    Response
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Heartily agree TJ above all never wear a tie or loose clothing while working with rotating machinery. And never ever leave the key in the chuck! Remember at school in the metal workshop seeing a chuck key whizz across the room and out the window - without bothering to open it first! I thought the teacher was going to have an apoplectic fit. Any half decent tutorial book on
    lathe
    -work will have a chapter devoted to safety. Cheers, Doug 😎
    6 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi all I have been reading the post concerning
    lathe
    s, my little
    lathe
    suits my needs and my pocket its great. I also forty years experience working with manufacturing machines, wood
    lathe
    s ,bandsaws, milling machines, and metal turning
    lathe
    s, and more. I was also a first aider most of working life, And what I would advise for people who have no experience in using any of these type machines weather full size or mini is to get instruction preferably from a time served machinist who have trained apprentice's or a course at further education college. I have had to attend three
    lathe
    accidents and all were life changing. you can see what I mean if you Google
    lathe
    accidents and good look at the images. full size or mini makes no difference
    6 months ago by teejay
    Response
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Will check on amazon Doug, for an idiots book on
    lathe
    sπŸ˜†, I'm sure there are real friends at the club, and I also count you in there, for the help you have been on so many builds. really appreciate the help Doug.πŸ˜‰ Peter BTW, I meant the dogs Bo---ks ie The BestπŸ‘
    6 months ago by Rookysailor
    Response
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi peter, Wow! Price has gone up since I bought mine! But it IS good, I'm very happy with it. With the really really cheap ones I'm always a bit sceptical of the fine control, accuracy and concentricity etc. These are even more important when working on very very small parts - aren't we always!? Afraid the only book I have on
    lathe
    work for model builders is in German. Must be similar books over there!? Try searching Amazon. BTW: I hope you meant 'The Bee's Knees' and not the 'Dogs Breakfast'! 😲 Re 'pestering friends'; You CAN'T pester real friends! πŸ˜‰ I'm sure they'd be very glad to help and advise. If not; they ain't friends πŸ€” Cheers, Doug 😎
    6 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Evenink Doug, Many thanks for the link, but no mention of a Proxxon, but googled that and found your FD 150/E, best price so far is Β£400.00 gbp. The major problem is I do not know one end of a
    lathe
    from the other😱, I do have friends with
    lathe
    s who I could pester...but don't want to be a pest! any good books you can suggest, on learning the
    lathe
    😊. cheers Peter BTW, The proxxon
    lathe
    looks like the dogs ......😲
    6 months ago by Rookysailor
    Response
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi Rookysailor I got from site called Banggood great peace of kit. but I would advise you to type in mini
    lathe
    in your search engine and have a good look around. And also look for one that has a tail stock that you can put a chuck in , I bought mine separately and the tail stock have be altered a bit. no big problem just inconvenient . The site also have a mini milling machine that bought,not to bad if you take your time. I will post a pic when I can hobble out to the garage
    6 months ago by teejay
    Response
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi TeeJay, just a follow on from the question from Doug earlier, 'where did you get that great little
    lathe
    ,? would be very interested for one for myselfπŸ˜‰ cheers, PeterπŸ‘
    6 months ago by Rookysailor
    Response
    Rudders and Propellers
    Agree, Excellent workπŸ‘ But do us a favour TJ; hit the return key now and again to break up the text a bit. Such big blocks of continuous sentences are difficult to follow and hard on me old eyeballs πŸ€“ Where did you get that mini
    lathe
    ? Looks nice. Cheers, Doug 😎
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi all this is my first blog, last year I post my intention to do a project about an RAF D boat that my Father served on and as a precursor to that build That I was going to do this S/E boat as the hull design is shared by both, and as plastic kit modeller the kit great the first stage was to put together the decks and superstructure as normal, with the exception of all the bits that would be easily broken as most kit aircraft modellers aerials and guns tend to brake ,so long ago I got into the habit of making these out brass rod or bar using a mini drill and a set of needle files, holding the drill in my left hand and the files in my right, when started this I saw the number of stanches I needed so I came across this little beauty a mini bead
    lathe
    it is a great bit of kit and not expensive less than Β£50 and plenty of types and accessories available so all the stanches aerials hand rails, gun rails, horn, and some of the components for the rudder and tiller were made on this
    lathe
    . so good time being had in my first radio control boat. the next post will show all the parts for the rudder/tiller setup ( I have reposted blog because I think I did not do it properly first time round)
    7 months ago by teejay
    Forum
    Taycol Supemarine Resurrection
    IN THE BEGINNING there was what looked like a pile of rust😲 which got soaked in WD40 for 24 hours! After washing off with warm water and washing-up liquid, and drying in the sun for a few hours, the bearings (and copper wire brushes) were oiled, missing connecting links bridged, and 6V (with current limit 3A set) was cautiously applied. Lo and behold she rattled and protested BUT RAN! Oh! That nostalgic smell of ozone, and enough sparks to read a book byπŸ€” Next connections were changed, to separate field and armature coils (brush gear), and connected to a standard brushed motor ESC (Graupner Navy 30A) via my prototype converter board, and a Robbe Servo Tester to simulate TX and RX. lo and behold chapter 2; she ran forwards and backwards😊 and no sparks! Now dismantled (last 3 pics) to start clean up and replacement of corroded parts. Sorry Col, I broked your motor😁😁 Armature was cleaned up and commutator polished; surprisingly lots of 'meat' on it so motor has not been run much. Next stop;
    lathe
    to make some new frame spacers. After that new bearing bushes cos the old Paxolin end plates have worn so that there's about 1/32" slop! Will probably have to turn the drive shaft down from original 1/4" (6.35mm) to 5mm to remove last traces of rust and pitting. Cheers All, Doug 😎
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Taycol Supemarine Resurrection
    Wha? I bet it's that bloody Post Office crap, where some peaked hat wants money off you for a parcel. Well, in that case, you have to deal with Peatol, who are OK, but not sure if he sells all the goodies that Carter make and sell. He actually remembered selling and delivering mine in an MG Metro Turbo, red and black. After 30 odd years he recalled me living by a river and taking away the Emco PC pile of dog turds in limited P/ex. I would love their milling machine but that ain't cheap like the
    lathe
    . I'm never gonna get to make my working model petrol engine, dammit! Sorry to wrong steer you, Doug. I had no idea they'd stopped selling abroad. I would just get my mate in Cal. to buy and send it on to me. Cheers, Martin
    7 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Taycol Supemarine Resurrection
    Ah, some of my Taycols are also plastic capped, so nice move trying to fit brass bushes invisibly. BTW, if you're after small tooling for your
    lathe
    , try Carter Tools in the States who deal in Taig
    lathe
    s like mine, although I got mine from a company called Peatol. Cartertools are a great company and sent me spares for a very good price when I needed a new drive belt and an indexing attachment. Cheers, Martin
    7 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Taycol Supemarine Resurrection
    Hi Colin, my mini
    lathe
    I'm using for most of the work on your motor is a Proxxon FD150/E. Great for such stuff. Only minor drawback is that there's no auto feed. But then, you can't expect everything for sixpence!😁 So far I've been very happy with it, although it's a bit finicky with setting up the clearances on the cross table. Patience is a virtue!!!! I also have a much bigger Proxxon bought ca 20 years ago but it's seldom used now that I have the littl'n. cheers, Doug 😎 PS I'll have a look at the Oilites, may be handy in the future. But for your motor I'll make some 'bespoke' bushes - 1 Cos I love a challenge! 2 They'll have to be tailored to fit the shaft and to hide 'em inside the existing end caps. Hence 'bespoke' 😁 'Never mind the quality - feel the width'! Anyone else remember that hilarious nonsense!? Cheers, Doug 😎
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Taycol Supemarine Resurrection
    Hi Doug, looks like you got it just right, no need to reduce any more as I have 6mm couplings and as the fan has yet to be sourced I will adjust to suit what you make the shaft. What's the
    lathe
    you are using, I may have some suitable items for it in my machine spares cabinet. Cheers Colin.
    7 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Taycol Supemarine Resurrection
    So Colin, Last instalment for today. just finished fettling up the armature and drive shafts. Pic 1: having flattened off the ends I used a centre drill to prepare the shafts for machining using the 'live centre' on the mini
    lathe
    . Pic 2: machining the output end. Pic 3: polishing up the brush gear end, this is where you can attach your fan Colin. As shown on the micrometer I stopped at 6mm, less 2/100mm clearance, and will make the bearing bushes to suit. If you want the shafts turned down a bit more for the drive coupling and/or the fan attachment let me know Colin. I'll keep the actual motor bearing sections of the shaft as it is at 6mm to fit the bushes I'll make tomorrow. All the best, Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Ain't never no not 'eard of Iolite neiver!😲 But then I'm only an igorant lectrickery engineer 😁 Learnin' fast with all this mechanical magicery! All good fun folks, and MOST of it actually woiks!😊
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Taycol Supemarine Resurrection
    Evenin' Colin, Thanks for the offer. I'm going to use some stuff the Martin sent me, called Chrodite apparently, although I can't find any description or reference to Chrodite anywhere! Looks like brass with an extra ration of tin. Supposedly harder wearing. Anyway, stator and frame spacers etc are now finished.πŸ‘ So after feeding the inner man I'll start measuring up for the bushes and see what I can do about tidying up the drive shafts. Have just sorted out a 'Live Centre' for the mini
    lathe
    which should help. I want to hide the bushes inside the original Paxolin cards and the external end plates which contain the felt oiling pad. So ball races are out of the question unfortunately; too large diameter and too thick πŸ€” Needle roller bearings would be nice, but I ain't got none that small😭 (Nah, admit it Doug you ain't got none at all, they're way too expensive😭) Amused myself today polishing up all the brass nuts and bolts! Confucius he say "Polishing nuts - very painful" 😁 Weather should be good for spraying tomorrow so I might fire up the compressor and give my PTB a blast of Pacific Green. 😊 Cheers All, Doug 😎 BTW: where are the pics of your Avanti? Harbour posts without pics are pretty dead πŸ€” Cheers, Doug 😎 Oops! This doesn't belong here!πŸ€”
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings...
    Hi folks, I've been filling in spaces in the Vincent epic with making deck fittings for the Chris Craft Special Runabout. I can't find or, probably, afford to get them nickel plated, so I will give the brass fittings to a chum who does casting of white metal, then I can a) get more than one of some and b) burnish them to look like chrome and then lacquer them. I'm assuming there might be a measure of interest in how these are done. I'm afraid I can't tell you how to do these without a
    lathe
    , because I've always had or had the use of, a
    lathe
    . They can be bought for a fraction of the price of a kit, off ebay. My No 1 son bought a
    lathe
    exactly like mine (a Peatol, which is same as the Taig), only on a huge base with a nice big motor, a tool rack to hold every supplied, additional tool they make for it and even the book on how to use it and make even more tools for it, virtually unused, for Β£200. Similar small
    lathe
    s can be had for even less. It's the brass that costs these days! Anyway, the trick is to break down the shape to that which can be cut, turned or bent. You can do all those things, so all you need to be able to do is silver solder and soft solder. If you can't yet, learn, sharpish. Silver soldering has enabled to earn a living till I retired. It helped me bring up a family of 5, so it's clearly very useful. I won't describe it in boring detail as these days there's a Youtube for every damned thing if you can tolerate that ghastly delivery that so many of them have. I can't, so I'm happy to answer questions if anyone wants to be told straight what to do. Golden rules....make it totally clean with a Swiss file, have sufficient heat, use the right flux. In silver soldering, just sprinkle the powdered flux on, don't bother making a paste, it'll just fizz and shift your little parts. For this part, one of the various patterns of deck lights/flag pole holders that Chris Craft used, I started by turning the main shape of the bulbous bit to be rather like a thimble. I then cut gaps out of it in the vice with a junior hacksaw, so that it had three legs, oversized for now. Then make a teardrop shape out of 1/16th" sheet and cut a hole in it to match. Why the hole? Well, if this is to cast successfully, I don't need any undercuts or "hooks " in the mould so it has to be hollow. Also, I need to put the light lenses in after it's all finished as these units had riding or nav. lights in them. They also had a small jack staff in the top with a burgee or even a national ensign attached. To make the rather art nouveau-ish back end I made a cardboard pattern of what had to be cut from 1mm brass sheet to be folded, hammered a bit and rolled a bit to fit onto the back of the thimble section. I silver soldered the thimble on first, to make it easy to fit the back rolled and folded bit, which was itself then silver soldered on. After that, it's all down to filing to shape, then as you can see from the pencil lines, cut out the teardrop shaped holes in the back which leave a central spine shape. I would first drill a 3mm hole and then, with the piece in a vice use a dental burr in a minidrill and hand mill it out, but PLEASE make sure it can't slip or you could be the owner of a grooved thumb or worse. Finish with files and papers of various grades. More anon when I do the next bits, although you're already further on than I am! Cheers, Martin
    8 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    54'' long Cervia tug.
    I have the same hull I made it as Ten Cents the cartoon character from the children's programme Tugs a friend gave me a hand to make the prop on his
    lathe
    was going to power it with a car radiator motor but lent it to a friend to try in his boat and never saw it again and use a car battery for power as well as ballast I now have spine problems so can't see it getting on the water any time soon
    8 months ago by scout13
    Response
    helm
    Holes drilled spokes cut & fitted, stuck with super glue. Don't want silver from solder showing. I made a mistake, should have drilled the holes before removing the waste. The drill kept skidding side ways off the centre boss. Should have just cut a grove around the boss, to see how things where going. Any way got over that. Skimming off the boss so the spokes lay level. Then made a cap to fit over them. Note the cocktail stick keeping holes aligned. Drill this out when complete. Marked the handles for length in the
    lathe
    . cut & file them before patting off.
    8 months ago by hammer
    Forum
    1914 Wianno Senior
    Time to show the progress of this building project. Thanks to the kind folks at Doyle Sailmakers Inc who sent me main sail data, I was able to make a 1”=1’ sail pattern. I showed in an earlier post the rudder servo instalment, now here is the main servo installation that will control the Jib and Main. (A work in progress) I have the lengths for the mast, boom, gaff but I am not sure if I will try turning them on the
    lathe
    or use a cut down mast from a Soling.
    9 months ago by Ron
    Forum
    gannet 30cc 2 cylinder 4 stroke
    It is, but people come on these things sometimes to just get an idea what a thing is worth. He wouldn't get that from me! I just wanted a 30cc Gannett ever since I first saw one in a cruiser like that at Victoria Park, along with a Westbury Seal sidevalve four (made by Olive Cockman)and a Channel island Special. it was always a great club. Alas, my
    lathe
    isn't big enough to make an engine. Martin
    9 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Spektrum, new, useless...
    Well done mate.Not detracting from your efforts but as you say easy when it bites your hand so to speak. Getting back to Threading dies. What about having a go at splitting some as I posted a bit back. Good quality discs from Bang Good will do the job. it might take a couple for one cut but as long as you can keep them firm,say in a
    lathe
    tool holder and the cutting tool in the chuck you can make straight clean cuts. The edges of the cut form the cutting edges. Also note which is the feed side. ie the bigger opening. This is the side you present to the rod to make the cut. Grannies, eggs and sucking come to mind. if they fit many apols.πŸ˜œπŸ‘ John
    9 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Windows, stoopid question.
    I wouldn't swap my lovely little Peatol (Taig)
    lathe
    for anything. I've had it over 30 years and it's never ever given me a moment's trouble. I had a new drive belt about 20 years ago and bought a spare but of course that's gone somewhere. it uses a British Thompson Houston 1/4 horse motor, whose fan blades are almost all broken off, but which still runs perfectly. My son recently got a Peatol with all available extras, even a book on making goodies for it, for Β£200 off ebay and was a lucky man to find it. And yes, Minicraft (also known as Maxicraft) were a great make. I never paid more than Β£25 for any one attachment. Martin
    10 months ago by Westquay


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