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    Blog
    Revell Gato Class Submarine Conversion.
    I am about to start the most ambitious project to date. This one will be running alongside the three others currently on the go, The Police Boat which is nearly completed, The Dusseldorf Fire Boat which is well underway and the PTB upgrade. My intention is to change this Revell model into a static dive radio controlled Submarine. I am lucky that Martin555 has agreed to help whenever I get stuck which will be invaluable since he has already almost completed the same. I started by purchasing the model from Amazon for less than Β£50. I have also purchased the water tight tube for the electronics. I will make the end caps and sealed internal plugs from some 80mm diameter nylon I had at work. It will now come in handy that I am a toolmaker and have a considerable array of
    machines
    at my disposal. I will turn the plugs next week and find suitable o rings. I have started to prepare the hull. There is an enormous amount of work required to adjust the standard kit. A lot of cutting and drilling. I have prepared the split lines and glued in the alignment pegs. I have ordered suitable shafts and propellers from the USA. They should be here in a couple of weeks. Next job is to stick the two halves together and start the cutting.
    10 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Response
    Re: Exhaust Smoker
    Re- following several weeks experimenting, I was going to ask what pump you had Graham but you have answered it here. Seems to work quite well, not sure how mine will go (if they ever arrive) but there are a number of air pumps on line to try. Need something with a bit of grunt to it. I think this little project has been a great example of Kiwi/Anglo cooperation as we have both swapped ideas back and forth to get this result. Graham has refined the electronics and done a great job and I'm pleased that he has taken an interest in my original simple idea, and with his electronics knowledge made it pretty flash. With the greater model boat interest in the UK, I'm sure it will be seen on more models yet and is a device which can be easily adapted to any model - tugs, PT boats, barges etc, - with or without water. The best thing is it can be made very cheaply as against the price of current marine smoke
    machines
    . JB
    5 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Re-purposing an old Hull.
    Thank you guys and gals for all your praise. I'm only doing it because I want to share what bit of modelling knowledge I have amassed over my 65 years of modelling, I started with my grandad when I was 5 years old. It seems that the first model that you make should be out of your own head, that way you can change things as you go. That way you enjoy what you make, and are more likely to carry on making. It's fortunate that my grandson is at a forward thinking school who already have a lego club, also a meccanno club. Both of them are well attended and enjoyed. Much better than those stupid electronic games
    machines
    . Tomorrow I will find out how well they are getting on with their designs. Cheers Colin.
    5 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Are there fairies.
    Hi DG. It looks a similar size, but definitely not the one I have. Plus that one has diametrically opposite brushes, whereas mine has three equally spaced brush positions. And I haven't seen the adjustable field windings on any sewing
    machines
    vintage or new. Cheers Colin.
    7 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Are there fairies.
    Definitely not sewing machine, my other hobby is restoring vintage sewing
    machines
    . Local retired electrical engineer thinks it may have been a generator /dynamo. Cheers Colin.
    7 months ago by Colin H
    Response
    Re: Lighting and other tweaks ;-)
    Hi Steve, Actually Martin told me what the lamp is signallingπŸ˜‰ I know Morse but can't read it very wellπŸ€” In the COMMS systems I designed for naval vessels we had
    machines
    to do that for us😁 BTW: all Likes added to my post above should actually be credited to Martin - it's his work not mine! Me? I'm just Adm. SO CCaBW (Senior Officer Chief Cook & Bottle Washer) 😎
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Workshop
    I have finally finished the new Shipyard. I had help to do the final build as it came as planks of wood. I painted the floor today which only leaves the outside walls to cover with a second coat. I will try to get a workbench installed before I have to go back home and work. This will be my retirement office when her in doors who must be obeyed says I can have the day off. I am lucky as my testing `lake` is at the bottom of the garden. The Danube.πŸ˜€ I will buy a few small
    machines
    over the next year or so and then, hopefully, have a bit of uninterrupted building time. I have seen the lovely pictures of Colin`s new workshop but I would love to see where others do their work as well and the equipment used.
    8 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Workshop
    Just checked Hobby city, (main hobby shop in Auckland) AAAAARGH, some prices- mill drill $450, 24108 miller $2103, 24350 miller, $5398, 27110 micro miller $720, CNC ready miller $7802 ! and these are bare
    machines
    which need the 'accessories to be able to do anything with them. A bit beyond my meager finances methinks, could almost buy a Triumph 2000 lathe for that much second hand . (had a quick look and found a Bridgeport power feed mill for $7200. Try- Hobby city.NZ -should get you there. Bet they don't have them in stock and you have to wait 3 months (if you are lucky) Pics of Hobby city owners plane before and after. Decided he'd had enough and turned it into a submarine at high speed. SA guy, previously represented NZ in world precision flying comps (second) shame, very clever guy and nice with it. You never know!
    8 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Workshop
    Perfect hobby
    machines
    , I'm in the wrong country!. We used to have a lot of small new lathes for sale here in machinery outfits for around $1200 NZ but I haven't seen any for a while. I could do with a small lathe especially for boat stuff. We had a Triumph 2000 (lathe not car) and a Bridgeport mill and all the gear when I was in the site services dept in the big woodworking co I worked for. I made good use of those, plus in my workshop I had 2 German RS2000 tool grinding
    machines
    which were great for touching up all your router bits and saw/ planer blades etc and a Chinese mill which I reco'd when the other guys didn't want to use it. Made my sons cars' frame and running gear (all 10 speed bike gears modified etc', -everything adjustable for growth) while I was there . Sure great if you have the gear!
    8 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Workshop
    I was lucky that when my work was up grading
    machines
    if I could carry the old one I would have it and stashed it away for later use ,I got a pillar drill from the jewellery department because it wasn't drilling at 90Β° got it home and all that was wrong was the table hadn't been squared properly,still keep in contact with my old squad so if anything comes up they let me know they also keep loads of handy off cuts .will post some photos of the workshop interior when I get the gear moved in πŸ‘keeping my fingers crossed a 3D printer might need upgradedπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚or perchance a laser 🀞
    8 months ago by marky
    Forum
    Workshop
    I am doing exactly the same as you Doug. I am buying all of the items, including kits and
    machines
    , over the next two or three years ready for my retirement move to Hungary. I wish I could bring my factory
    machines
    with me. I have a 1 metre CNC machining centre along with a 16 electrode changer CNC spark eroder, Bridgeport mills, J&S grinders and others. I think my shed is a little small and possibly not enough power as the maximum single phase power supply here is only 32A. Small bench
    machines
    it is then.😊
    8 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Workshop
    Looks good Doug. The
    machines
    are exactly what I had in mind. We need the
    machines
    Martin. You do not.
    8 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    "...I'd rather cough up a bit more and know that I could do something with it!.." Quite right! When buying, people need to understand the important features of a product, and with new technology it is easy for the advertisers to conceal these. For a CNC cutter, stiffness is very important, particularly if you are going to cut metal. The machine must not deform appreciably when it puts a strong force on the workpiece. It also needs adequately powerful stepper motors to put that force on. and, of course, it needs to move the cutting head to all parts of the workpiece. I was interested to see that the spec states 'max travel distance' - I would have expected it to say 'max cutting dimensions', and wonder if these are less than the figures quoted. At least we can specify a cutting area ambiguously, so that modellers can understand what they are getting. I would guess that 1ftx1ft cutting area would be fine for most aeromodellers, while 1ftx1yd is more what boat modellers want. But it is easy for an individual to chose. Motor power requirement is harder to define - it depends so much on the leverage designed into the mechanics. Screws have more advantage than belts, for instance. And if you are only count to cut softwoods you can get away with much less power than cutting steel! Usually I would like to see the steppers having between 5000 and 10,000 gfΒ·cm of torque - though that is a 'piece of string'. Rigidity is even harder to estimate. You can get some feel when the seller says that this machine will not cut metals, or 'is an engraving machine'. The other indicator is weight - rigid
    machines
    are going to be much more massive. If the frame is light it will bend under stress. Though if you are using a laser...
    8 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    Yep, that's what I thought. OK for formers or bulkheads on airyplanes, but useless for a boat without a considerable extension. Anyway we should be encouraging people to make stuff conventionally and just use
    machines
    to save time perhaps when they get to be our age! But come the glorious powercuts, brothers and sisters, they'll all be f***ed and we'll all be knifing away happy as Larry. Martin
    8 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    "....I am looking forward to the next stage....." There will now be a short intermission while I sort out other things, and I suspect that a build will start sometime in September. Or later! In the meantime, this thread has introduced a number of issues apart from describing the egg-box structure that Ernie Webster used in the KK EeZeBilt series. It suggests that if CAD packages are used for model boat design then the plans created can readily be shared with other modellers over the Web, and shows that personal CNC
    machines
    costing a few hundred pounds are a useful supporting workshop tool for this process. Any comments on the above points would be read with interest!
    8 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Water Jets
    "...DG if you have a 3d printer you must have the design software for it too - otherwise its useless ..." I said I 'can get one printed'. Dodgy Geezers can call in favours from all sorts of places! And not only plastic deposition
    machines
    either - stereo lithography or selective laser sintering (if you want to 3-D print in tungsten) would be available through university contacts. As would design modification...Though, given how long it took me to get a pair of rather specialist gears lapped the last time I wanted a set, I would match RN's comment in saying that I wouldn't hold my breath!
    8 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Response
    Re: 40'' Seaplane Tender, new build P
    Not sure if I can put much more up front Rob, it balances just in front of the motors now so will probably need a bit of rear ballast. I'll see how it floats before getting too carried away, although still working on the smoke out the exhaust idea (have 3 smoke
    machines
    to experiment with.)
    9 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Magnetic motors
    Much like what they have done with washing
    machines
    . I'm amazed at how quiet a direct-drive machine is on full spin....
    9 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Boat retrieval
    There are a number of commercial 'missing signal' units available. Fly boys use them to set controls to default safety, or sound a beeper for finding a lost aircraft. I believe that there are some specific ones for subs. Washing
    machines
    and boilers both have pressure detection units inside. This is what a typical one looks like. They are mechanical microswitches operated by a diaphragm. The blue screw sets the pressure at which it operates. They could form the basis for an independent safety system - emergency blow with a Sparklets cylinder, for instance, or releasing a 'sub down' tethered buoy.....
    9 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    "...To prevent parts falling out, There is a low tack film sheet that airbrush painters users that you could stick to the under side of the wood...." There may well be. But it turns out to be easy to just specify a cutting depth which has exactly the same effect. I was surprised at how precise these
    machines
    can be. And I'm running off such archaic software that I would have to do tabs all manually - a lot of work....
    9 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    A strong magnet would work - but in fact I have found that: - cutting 1/16" and 1/8" balsa sheet - using a 0.5mm cutting tool and a 12v boat motor the sideways cutting forces are sufficiently small for a simple raised lip around the cutting table to hold the sheet in place. One difficulty with passing round files of 'cutting instructions' to people so that they can create their own kits is that the cutting
    machines
    are all different. They will all accept 'G-Code' of some kind, but that code effectively says things like 'Go to position 25"x2" and cut a circle radius 2 inches'. Now, if you have a machine that only has a 10" cutting bed, you can't do that. You have to reposition the part so that it fits onto your cutter. So I've passed a DXF file to Nick - this is a CNC file with the shapes drawn on it. He will have to take each shape and position it on his machine where he want to cut. I have designed my machine to be able to take a standard sheet of 4"x36" balsa, because I expect to do most of my cutting that way. If other people have cutting beds which can do this, i can pass them cutting files directly. Another difficulty with cutting everything out of a single sheet is that one part may fall out of the sheet while cutting is going on in another part of the sheet. The best way I have found to avoid this is to not cut completely through the balsa sheet - leave a small gap of about 5 thou. Then you can easily push the shapes out later...
    9 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    3D Printing.
    Go for it! If you get one in kit form it will keep the costs down, with the added advantage of learning how the machine works as you build it. Prusa probably do the best kits on the market, pricey but decent European quality. Tronxy or Creality are good Chinese
    machines
    starting at around 150 for something decent enough to get you going. Chinese quality has come on in leaps and bounds over the last few years and they have listened to the community and made improvements accordingly. And then comes the endless hours of fun 'upgrading'. There are plenty of on line forums and social media groups for advice and assistance, so for the price of a boat kit you can add a whole new dimension to your modelling skills. Not just modelling either, there is a thousand and one things you can do. For example, I replaced a Β£15 button on the washing machine in half an hour with 20 pence worth of plastic.
    9 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    ".......I am on a bitof a learning curve at the moment........" A few lessons I learned: 1 - Get a good, solid base-board which isn't warped. The local timber yard may have off-cuts of 3/4" ply. You will want to assemble the mechanics on a proper base, and it helps to have it available first. You will want to paint it anyway, so it will need time to dry. 2 - Get a dial indicator. An easy way to check for precision in assembly is to attach a dial indicator to the end of the Z axis and run it over the base board. It's good for other fault-finding and calibration as well. There are cheap ones on Ebay. 3 - Plan out all the wiring. I put my limit switches in as an afterthought, and found that I had wires which couldn't go in the places I wanted them to go. 4 - Wiring loom control. Consider Drag Chains, Heat-shrink tubing and Braiding. All items are very cheap from Ebay. If you don't put the wiring in at assembly you won't be able to put it in later once everything is connected up... 5 - If you use a drag chain for the USB connection, you will either have to make sure that it's wide enough to take a USB plug passing through it, or cut the plug off, pass it through and re-solder it afterwards. If you do the latter, note that the shielding in a USB cable is aluminium, and won't solder. So you will need to use a connector plug which has a physical connection to the shielding, because interference can ba a problem on these
    machines
    ....
    12 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    While it helps to be accurate, the final trimming of the work holder is done by the machine itself. Here I am cutting the edges of the holder so that a sheet of 4" balsa will be neatly held. That's about 1.6mm wider than a 100mm sheet, so I will need a packing strip if I use the metric sizes. It's surprising how precise these
    machines
    are - I'm moving the cutter in by 0.1mm each pass, but it can move in much smaller steps - one microstep is 6.25 microns, which is about 2.5 ten thousandths of an inch. The balsa will be held between some raised sides made of hard balsa, so that they can be cut easily by the machine if I get a command wrong and move the cutter out of the work area. I expect to put a 2mm felt layer below so that the cutter will have something soft if it goes completely through the workpiece.
    1 year ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Gina 2 Billing Boats Fish Cutter - Restoration & Conversion
    As promised (or threatened?😁) stage two of the hull work and thoughts on motorisation. The hull was sprayed with two coats of grey primer/filler. Pic1. As usual this showed up the remaining imperfections (pics 2 & 3), but I'm not going to worry about them until I've got prop shaft tube and rudder stock sorted out and permanently fitted πŸ˜‰ After my attempts to make and thread a 3mm prop shaft went awry Martin (Westway the Mechanicals MasterπŸ‘) stepped in and made me a decent one complete with a bushed stuffing tube πŸ‘ Vielen Dank Meister😊 I did however manage to make a 4mm to 3mm reducer so that I could fit a Rabeosch 35mm prop as seen in pics 2 & 3. The tube and shaft from Martin, arrived Saturday an' he only made it on Monday😊, have been dry fitted so that I can start setting up the gears, necessary to bring the drive down to the prop shaft fitted very low down in the hull, and motor mount. Pic 4. Motorisation: (Remember folks - this kit was designed and built as a static model!) I want to use the old 1950s Taycol Target motor which my Dad originally fitted in the Sea Scout which I have renovated and upgraded to work forward and reverse with a standard ESC. See Build blog 'Sea Scout - Jessica' Many of you will know that the Taycol motors were field coil motors, meaning that they have no permanent magnet around the rotor coil, and thus reversing the battery connections to the brushes had no effect on the direction of rotation, as this simply reversed the magnetic fields of both stator and rotor coilsπŸ€” To counteract this so that the motor could be used in both forward and reverse with a conventional brushed ESC I modified the motor slightly (separated the two coils) and built a simple converter board to connect it to the ESC. Again see the Sea Scout blog for the details of the conversion. Basically; once the field coil and brush-gear (rotor coil) have been separated a simple diode bridge can be used to apply the output of the ESC to the motor. This enables the reversal of EITHER field OR rotor coil polarity, depending on how you connect the converter to the motor. Thus reversing the direction of rotation of the motor. Beneficial side effect is that the diodes also suppress the commutator sparking😊 In my case, with the Taycol Target, I also cleaned, flattened and polished the commutator. Thus significantly reducing the potential for spark generation in the first place! A peculiarity of the Taycol motors is that they all use metal brushes, pressed phosphor bronze strip, so they need oiling! DO NOT oil conventional brushed motors with carbon brushes unless the brushes are exchangeable or you want to have to buy a new motor!!!!! Pics 5 & 6 show the proposed position of the Taycol in Gina 2 and pic 7 the prototype converter board I knocked up to test the motor, together with a Graupner Navy V30R Marine Brushed ESC. Details and results in the Sea Scout blog, including video of the sparks and oscilloscope pics of the drive waveforms before and after conversion! The latter showing the spark suppression effect of the converter😊 Some samples attached - last 3 pics. Pic 8 pic shows a more compact version of the converter, one of a few types I'm doing for Martin's various Taycols as a trade for the prop shaft he made for me and some useful material he sent. Thanks mateπŸ‘ Next steps will be 1) mounting the gears correctly on the shafts, requiring the manufacture of a 3/32" to 4mm adaptor and a 1/8" to 4mm adaptor, and keying them to the shafts - Hooray for mini milling
    machines
    πŸ˜‰ 2) manufacturing bushed end plates to hold the gears in place, 3) fitting the motor mounting platform. I'll probably borrow from my experiences of real shipbuilding and do this as a suspended 'false floor', i.e. mounted on stiff springs to enable adjustments to optimise the gearing mesh! On real naval ships this is done to improve shock resistance and to minimise engine noise / vibration conduction to the hull, thus significantly reducing the acoustic signature of the ship. Not that I'm tooo worried about being torpedoed 😁 Worth a tryπŸ˜‰ Pic 9 shows the cleaned up and renovated Taycol Target motor. Pic 10 shows the drive waveform complete with sparks before modification.πŸ€” Pic 11 the cleaned 'forward' waveform with the converter board. Pic 12 the cleaned 'reverse' waveform, no suppression capacitors needed πŸ˜‰ More soon folks, Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Along the way a new keel was fitted as can be seen in pics 1 to 3. The original builder had 'buried' the keel in the hull planking! 😲
    2 years ago by RNinMunich


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