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    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the ‘Vintage
    model
    Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new
    model
    with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The
    model
    is a ‘Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular
    model
    kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately £2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of £48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more ‘hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as ‘strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone ‘off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the
    model
    in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    Visiting European
    model
    Boat Shows
    Hi Ian, The Nürnberg Toy Fair is vast and is for everything from baby toys through games to sophisticated
    model
    building, robotics you name it! There are days for the pros, manufacturers and distributors, and days for the prols like us to go and empty their pockets and wallets. 😁 So check the programme carefully before you book your tickets! For me it's about a two hour trundle up the A9 Autobahn😊 For more pure
    model
    building you might like to look at Düsseldorf and Friedrichshafen where large
    model
    exhibitions like Inter
    model
    lbau are held. With demonstrations of all sorts of
    model
    s, slow-fly hangars, field for the big stuff and hellis and drones, very large pools for boat demos. These venues are attended by all sorts of manufacturers from complete kits to all the little bits n pieces makers. I'll try and dig up the dates and links - my new
    model
    l Werft magazine arrived today, there is usually a listing in there of all upcoming exhibitions as well as Show Meetings of several major
    model
    Boat Clubs. Many of which attract international exhibitors and competitors. Especially the Dutch and Belgian participants who turn up with huge harbour layouts and dioramas! More soon. BTW the Nürnberg show has been and gorn☹️ it's in March I think. Cheers, Doug 😎
    5 days ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Re: My current fleet 14 July 2019
    Yeah, that would work. But I do feel I may have to cheat with that one as a Ship in a Bottle may just be pushing my size envelope a little. I have however been reminded of a christmas gift from a nephew. A Haynes V8 Petrol Engine. One of these clear plastic working
    model
    s. That would be a good fit for me as in a past world I did my Mechanical Engineering training with a diesel and gas turbine engine making company.
    5 days ago by ikseno99
    Directory
    My current fleet 14 July 2019
    At long last the new Dry Dock is completed, we now need a new centre piece for the dining room table. It needs to be something interesting to provoke conversation, which the
    model
    s have done quite regularly. All I have to do now is finish the rest of the stuff that is not in camera shot!!!
    6 days ago by ikseno99
    Forum
    Motor reversing
    Hi Pete, "If the water compresses the air within the chamber, would the cylinder swell and the seals be compromised." Not if everything is properly dimensioned; pressure hull and bulkhead thickness, sometimes even a separate chamber to take up the air expelled from the tank or bladder (😮) The pressures involved at the depths our subs will (hopefully!) operate are not that great. For every 10m you go down the pressure increases by about 14.6psi, i.e. 1 x normal atmospheric pressure at sea level, 1 bar or atm. So at 2m maximum, more is not recommended or indeed particularly useful for
    model
    s, the pressure is about 17.6psi. Not a too dramatic increase (ca 20%) which pressure hull walls and bulkheads of ca 5mm perspex or similar should cope with with ease. Of course the bulkheads need to be secured with more than just friction on the O rings!! I'll dig out my dive-tank and check the wall thickness. Cheers, Doug😎 PS As I wrote below, somehow I have acquired two copies of Brüggen's book on
    model
    sub technology. I think an Aunt sent me a copy for my birthday, about a month after I already bought it 🤔 If you want my spare copy PM or e-mail me!
    6 days ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Re: 36'' Maiami Crash boat used for camera boat.
    Agree completely Doug, but I didn't want to muck about trying to make strut bearings etc. This way if the bearings clap out there are only 2 to replace and if all else fails, a pair of vice grips on the end of the tube gets the whole thing out real easy, chuck a new one in and you're away. Trying to replace a bush/bearing in a fragile strut (unless removable) without damaging something, would be a tricky operation I would imagine. Most nitro boats in the past were made like this until cable drives came along (before cables, the only thing close to an open shaft on a fast
    model
    was a 'zip strut' which involved an underwater universal (see Seafury). The reason was mainly a torque issue, as if you just had a 'T' strut and open shaft, the torque from something like a hot .60 powered boat jumping out of the water was enough to bend the strut on landing, so you needed quite a substantial 'T' or better, a 'V' strut, (I even had heavy struts as well as the tube, -see pic,early 70s - strut was about 4mm thick on a .40 boat). Check out the cable drive strut size on a big
    model
    hydro or mono for eg. A lot of kit manufacturers like Dumas,(see pic) used full length stern tubes for a number of their
    model
    s, - probably more for ease of building rather than going for the full 'scale' bit. The term I've always known the 'outer tube by is a stern tube but there are probably a number of variations.
    6 days ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: On the water!
    Yes sadly
    model
    shops are a rare thing these days! According to my dad he took the boat to the pond when he was a boy. Before the days of electrics.. just had his newest
    model
    on a long length of string. He pushed it out and as he did water went up the tube and started to fill the hull! Before he could pull it back in he watched it sink from the stern forward!!
    6 days ago by GrahamP74
    Response
    Re: 36'' Maiami Crash boat used for camera boat.
    I must admit I have never had any problems with any shafts, having said that the chances of my boats hitting the water now are over for me. However when I make my
    model
    s I always grease them up just in case I end up selling them. Once I have used up all my bits and pieces, odds and ends I will still make
    model
    s for RC and test all the movements to make sure they do what they are supposed to do. Martin.
    6 days ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Motor reversing
    Thanks Admiral bro, My style/form of
    model
    making has changed over the years and due to lack of finances now I use what ever I can to achieve the final outcome, it seems to work out ok as you can see on some of my
    model
    s but I would love to be able to purchase some of these fantastic
    model
    kits that are now available. I now tend to look at something then think to myself how could I make that, luckily I normally come up with some sort of answer. Then if that didn't work I try something else. Martin.
    6 days ago by Martin555
    Response
    Re: 36'' Maiami Crash boat used for camera boat.
    Hi John, "nothing looks worse than huge shaft tubes hanging out of a boat (in saying that, the shafts in my ST are too big, but who could turn down $7 for a 10mm D (outer) x 250mm stainless shaft with ball bearings". The shaft tubes should never hang outside the boat surely!?🤔 The 'stuffing' tube should end at the hull breakthrough (that's what they are for). Only the drive shaft itself continues on through the support bracket (with bearing) to the prop. Attached pics of my
    model
    HMS Belfast and one of a real RAF Range Safety Launch both showing this. This is as true today for frigates and aircraft carriers etc as it was then for all these coastal craft. Simple really - why add all that dead-weight and cost to extend the stuffing tube outboard? The very term 'stuffing tube' (better 'stuffing box') gives a hint! It's only there to seal the gland to prevent water ingress where the drive shaft exits the hull. Even within the ship / boat the drive shaft is not enclosed in a 'tube'. Would have made servicing or replacing a shaft bearing an absolute nightmare ☹️ Inside our
    model
    s it don't matter ("Frankly my dear .. I don't give a damn!!"😁) but outside the hull on a scale
    model
    I think it should. But wadda I know😁 I admit that when I scratch-built my first ship HMS Hotspur I made the same mistake. I was 15 and higorant!😔 That will be corrected during the current refit / SLEP. I often notice in posts a 'blurring' between the terms shaft and tube which can also cause confusion. Cheers, Doug 😎
    7 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Motor reversing
    Hi Pete, "My problem is simple. Where does the air come from to take the place of the water." I assume you meant 'dive' system and not 'drive' system, a subtle difference😉 Let's go back one step! Where do you suppose the air in the tank goes when you pump the water in? Right ... It gets compressed.😮 Air compresses easily, water is practically impossible to compress. When you 'blow' the tank the compressed air expands again and helps the pump to eject the water. The small amount of air you have compressed will not alone be enough to 'blow' the tank without the pump. That's why real subs have compressed air tanks and separate compressor systems. It's preferable in
    model
    s to separate the air / water components. (Just like 'in real'!) That's why Martin is using a balloon, aka bladder. (Oh😮 that reminds me ... I need a P! Back in a mo!! ...... Aah! Dat's bedda😊 As the bladder fills with water and expands on diving (😭) the air in the tank section is compressed. You mentioned before in a PM venting the air to the other compartments in the boat and then relying on the air so partially compressed to drive the water out again. Sorry but it ain't quite that simple. Firstly: that would be fraught with danger as you then need breakthroughs into the other compartments from the dive tank chamber. These have to be not only securely sealed but also capable of being opened to accept and then vent back the air evacuated from the dive chamber. (If you did this in a real sub you'd probably pop the eardrums of the crew🙊😭) So you would need either some very well engineered and precisely machined mechanical valves to control the air flow and prevent leaks and/or a complicated control system, solenoid valves perhaps? Very dodgy! (With apologies to Mr Geezer😁) The chances of flooding the whole boat are much higher than with a contained system. Secondly; the pressure of the air expelled from your dive tank would be reduced by dissipation within the compartments outside the dive tank. Martin's system is contained within one compartment using the bladder (that word again🤔 er, Could you excuse me a moment please Cpt Mainwaring!) The system for my Akula 2 (Typhoon) is also contained, but will use a piston tank. To dive the piston is driven to the far end of the cylindrical tank, compressing the air behind it as it draws in water in front of it. Exactly the reverse procedure to surface. Only disadvantage of this system is that you have to arrange space down the centre of the WTC to accommodate the drive spindle for the piston when submerged. Big advantage is that you have full control of the piston and thus dive depth. Given a suitable programmable TX Periscope depth and max depth could be preset. A max depth Fail-safe controller is also highly recommendable! Have a look on this site, the German
    model
    dive system specialist > 30000 systems sold. This is where I got my Akula 2 kit. https://engel-
    model
    lbau.eu/shop/en/home/ Also Hall Effect sensors for the dive tank ! Such as you mentioned Pete. They determine the position of the piston in the dive tank and feed it back to the dive / fail-safe controller. https://engel-
    model
    lbau.eu/shop/en/Submarine-Kits/AKULA-II/Hall-Sensor-for-Compact-Tank-Switch-CTS2-2-upgrade-set.html Cheers, Doug 😎 BTW: If you want to understand more about the principles of how submarines work, whether 1:1 or scale
    model
    s, I can heartily recommend this book- Submarines
    model
    s and Their Originals, by Carsten Heintze. Originally published by Verlag Für Technik und Handwerk (VTH) English edition 2005 by Traplet Publications Ltd. ISBN 1 900371 86 3 Or specifically for
    model
    submarines-
    model
    Submarine Technology by Norbert Brüggen (the German
    model
    sub guru!) ISBN 1 900371 32 4 Also by VTH in original German and Traplet in English. Should be able to find both on Amazon/Ebay. I've just realised that somehow I have acquired two copies of the latter🤔, English edition! If you want one PM me. BTW 2: you can use the electronics of a servo as a mini ESC or even to drive an electronic switch, BUT you will need to beef up the output transistors to handle the current your pump motor will draw, or add a change over relay to the output! If you want to go that way I can help as I did something similar years ago to use as a winch driver. Standard and mini / micro servo drivers are rarely designed to handle more than about half an Amp, esp the mini / micro versions.
    7 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Help identifying this
    model
    boat
    Good morning. I just acquired a large pond boat in Connecticut, but have reason to believe it's from New York, and would like to know more about it. I have attached a few pictures. It is a large
    model
    with a heavy lead keel. It is plank on frame construction and might be from the 1950's. It measures 55" overall, with 45.5" hull length, and is 15" across the beam. Any thoughts you may have regarding this
    model
    would be appreciated. Thank you very much for your time. Best regards, Norm
    11 days ago by ginkgo
    Forum
    PS Waverley info...
    I went to Cornwall
    model
    s on the web and in the search box I typed in C55. Martin.
    9 days ago by Martin555
    Response
    Re: 40'' Seaplane Tender, new build N
    would it not be worth using a system called the closed loop system? this gives you a better / more precise control over your rudders. I take it that the rubber tube between the two rudders is just a temporary thing - just to get the size etc., ? but, here's a photograph (if you don't mind) of a system I use on the majority of my twin ruddered
    model
    s - especially on MTBs and high speed
    model
    s. John
    9 days ago by JOHN
    Response
    Re: 40'' Seaplane Tender, new build
    hi there looking at the photographs of your rudders. I was just wondering, would it not be worth using a system called the closed loop system? this gives you a better / more precise control over your rudders. I take it that the rubber tube between the two rudders is just a temporary thing - just to get the size etc., ? but, here's a photograph (if you don't mind) of a system I use on the majority of my twin ruddered
    model
    s - especially on MTBs and high speed
    model
    s. John
    9 days ago by JOHN
    Forum
    Martin Westquay's Piper Cub ;-)
    The world's getting smaller and smaller every day John😉 Was wondering about the German registration, until I noticed that it was a Graupner
    model
    ! Cheers, Doug
    11 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Skipper and mate.
    "...Very good Ken. I like them a lot. I think a few crewmen help to make a
    model
    come alive...." Quite right - and it's so hard to find cheap figures. I use Ebay railway figures at a couple of quid for 10 and modify them a bit. I don't do as good a job as Ken, but they look OK from a distance. Here are some being made into PT boat figures at 1:48...
    11 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Skipper and mate.
    Very good Ken. I like them a lot. I think a few crewmen help to make a
    model
    come alive. Well done. Martin.
    11 days ago by Martin555
    Response
    Re: Wee Nip, Ruf Red
    Hi Phil, Certainly fun to sail, especially in a stiff breeze. Are there any steam
    model
    s in your videos? Cheers, Stephen.
    12 days ago by stevedownunder
    Blog
    The Vosper 46” RAF Crash Tender Kit By Vintage
    model
    Works
    Just a small introduction, I am a retired engineer, trained as a toolmaker and practiced this in various forms for 20 plus years before going into Lecturing in engineering for 13 years then finally working on development of NVQs and VRQs for an Engineering Awarding Body. As far as My
    model
    making experience I did a little as a youngster helping my dad to build the 36 inch Crash tender and then doing some
    model
    aircraft but that was 50 years ago. I then became hooked on building a kit car which has occupied me for many years changing things and maintaining it as a recreational vehicle. This brings me up to date and instead of restoring a classic car I decided to get back to
    model
    making and this is the start of the 46 Crash Tender. So here we go Out of the box and the contents checked off, a minor anomaly on the parts numbering but soon sorted by VMW. I have spent some time in kitting out a new work station in what used to be my office until I retired. I now have two workshops one upstairs and one in the basement. How good is that? One of the of the first things was to construct a substantial building board that would give a perfectly flat base and a grid that could ensure bulkheads are square to the keel an parallel with each other also the same aspects in the vertical axis. I lined out the base board with parallel lines spaced at 25 mm and then from the centre-line at 90 degrees I marked the bulkhead positions.
    2 years ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Re: HMS EXETER.
    Hi JB, Yes I must admit I only make and test my
    model
    s now. Occasionally I sell one if I can to pay for materials to do my next one. You may have noticed that I make my
    model
    s from whatever I can, I would love to have the funds to get the good stuff but unfortunately I have to budget very carefully. I made the Steampunk Pike just for something different. I now have something in mind that could be a bit challenging, but I need to experiment a bit before I can start it. I will not say what it is just in case it does not work. Martin.
    14 days ago by Martin555
    Response
    Re: HMS EXETER.
    Sounds a bit like me Martin except I'm fortunate to be able to drive mine around. Great shame you can't get your fine creations out to a lake to see them in action. I seem to spend months or years making a
    model
    (planes and boats) and once I've perfected the performance, taken photos and videos, they just hang or sit there for sometimes years, full of expensive radio gear doing nothing, (think it's the general lack of clubs) Mainly I think some of us get more pleasure from the actual building of the
    model
    s and having them operate successfully, rather than having one and using it to death and ending up being bored with it. In my case I'm just a hoarder of my own creations, (unfortunately) although now I have no more room, so it acts a bit like a brake until I can get off my butt and actually make an effort to sell some. John B
    14 days ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Batteries in a DX5e
    Hi Doug, I was meaning more here in NZ, as I know you have some nice shops in the UK and Germany etc ( I have bought quite a bit from Cornwall
    model
    Boats who give really good service) and a few years ago was buying IC engines and parts from Just Engines in Shaftsbury who were a great bunch with spot on service and advice. A list of good shops would be great Doug as if you are not in the country you quite often don't get to know good local shops. When I was working on Norfolk Island (SP) in the 70s there was a shop called the 'Mini Golf shop' owned by a lady named Agnes who was incredibly knowledgeable on all aspects of
    model
    ing ( it's where I bought all my
    model
    s, motors and radios at the time as they were tax and duty free, - bought an OS FS 60 motor when they first came out for around $160 Aust for eg, in NZ a year later they were about 6-$700 NZ). The shop was tiny (about the size of a double garage and was packed to the roof with
    model
    stuff from all around the world,- a real
    model
    ers paradise and it was known worldwide . Sadly it has been gone for many years as the tax system changed due to Australian interference, (they have now taken over completely) and is now just Lego and other crap (although at one time they sold more Lego than any shop in the world from the new -1980s shop) . I doubt whether there would be many shops in the world as exciting to enter as that old one these days.
    14 days ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Batteries in a DX5e
    Hi JB, There are some really nice
    model
    s on that site and I like the place that they use. I just make
    model
    s now and test and ballast them in Big Blue so I don't have to worry about all that now. Although I did love spending the day floating my boats and having a cup of tea and a sandwich and a good old chat in the nice sunshin. Martin.
    15 days ago by Martin555
    Response
    Re: Mermaid sport fisherman
    Thank you for interest,. I mostly like the building. I build scale
    model
    s which always go too fast. I have an brushed motor admirals barge that at full throttle lifts about the first third of the boat out of the water. I also bought this thing as a wreck and totally restored it. Looks nice, runs great, never had it in the water.
    15 days ago by Commodore-H
    Forum
    Batteries in a DX5e
    Doug, the Pietenpol , Cub and over 40 other
    model
    s are designed and produced by the young guys at Flite test, but they started doing "Power packs for the various
    model
    s, which used to be e-max, etc. parts, but with my kit for the Pietenpol was a Graupner flyer. It turns out they've been "together" for some time. Flite Test is very American based and their extre,mmely popular videos on youtube often mention Horizon Hobbies, rather than Graupner. Getting their kits in Britain has never been easy. Now Sussex
    model
    Centre has the Cub and Pietenpol listed although the Cub was out of stock. I believe there is one other dealer in UK who claims to have them, but the Flite Test efforts to furnish Brits with kits are not exactly impressive. It could well be that the vids are so popular they were caught on the hop when a UK dealer came on line. The Pietenpol is merely one of FT's many kits and ideal as a trainer being parasol wing. Ideal for me as it's not too big. I would be interested in the Cub you mentioned. Especially as I once flew a Cub. All very ilegal of course, but I went up in one, except the somewaht Maverick owner/pilot said, "come on then, you flying this or what", while it was ticking over on the end of the runway. So, with his verbal help I flew it! Took off, circled around, lost the airfield (he had to help there) and landed it. Unfortunately it was lost in a massive fire at the club where another 6 vintage aircraft were destroyed. Fortunately they were insured to the hilt and replaced what they could. My friend couldn't find another Fairchild Argus though. He now has a share in a Tiger Moth. What price were you looking for on the Cub? Cheers, Martin
    15 days ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Batteries in a DX5e
    And charge twice as much! Whilst the airframe kit is complete and very inexpensive, the ready packed power packs are NOT cheap. I can get all the bits in there for half the Graupnerised price. If Graupner want to reach a wider public they need to ensure that the kits are available, which they most certainly are not. I was after the Cub, but out of stock, hence the parasol winged Pietenpol. It was a home build aircraft, Doug with, amazingly, a Ford
    model
    A engine and a stand up radiator that must have made forward vision a nightmare! But, I'm sure this is enough about airyplanes on a
    model
    boat forum. Martin
    16 days ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Repairs finished.
    Hi Colin, Great finish on the deck. Respect👍 And a super 'Distribution Board', wish I had space in my
    model
    s for something like that. Heartily agree on the use of quality artist brushes. Bought a selection at the local art shop last year. Mostly used on my smaller 'Plastic Magic ' ships though, where spraying is impractical / wasteful. Looking forward to your launching system with great anticipation! I'm not getting any younger either 🤔 Cheers, Doug 😎
    16 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Batteries in a DX5e
    Hi Martin, 37% residual charge for a LiPo is fine 👍 I use 30% as a bottom limit. "I didn't know about the charge rate so left it at 0.2A. It's a 2200 3S" 200mA is always a good safe starting point.👍 Yep, you're dead right 👍 11 hours charge is correct, assuming that the battery was dead flat at the start. Which it obviously wasn't (37% charge left). But the charger should recognise that and adjust the time accordingly. 500mA is also safe, but NEVER more than 1A. You may see 'Fast charge' LiPos advertised as 10C, 20C or even more. Meaning charging at 10 or 20 times the capacity in AH as Amps. So for your battery that would mean a charge current of 22 or 44A 😮💥 At the very least the battery would get very hot, may 'puff out', which drastically shortens it's useful life, or at worst cause it to explode💥🔥 Similarly advertised discharge rates I've seen of up to 50C are nonsense. Consider a 5000mAH battery = 5Ah. I.e. it can provide 5A for one hour (theoretically 'in this the most perfect of all possible worlds'😁) A discharge rate of 50C would mean 50*5 = 250A😮 The theoretical discharge time (before the battery departs for Valhalla) would be 5/250 hours. = 72 seconds. After that buy a new battery☹️, and
    model
    if it burst into flames.☹️ So where does that getcha? Thus it becomes obvious that such figures are nothing more than marketing gimmicks. Buyer beware! The NiMHs are a bit more critical as far as maintenance is concerned. As I'm sure I mentioned before, they have a self-discharge rate of around 1% per day. So if you leave an NiMH battery alone for 3 months it has very likely joined the Dodos. At the very least it will never be able to take a full charge again, due to irreversible chemical changes. So called 'Deep discharge'. Here endeth the epistle to the Wisbech Luddites for tonight 😁 BTW: thought you were going to print all this out the last time we discussed it, as reminder for the winter maintenance? Considering the prices of batteries it's worth a little effort to keep 'em happy. Cheers, Doug 😎 Thinks! This is all stuff I was considering adding to the 'How Tos' on batteries, when I can get A Round Tuit! BTW: apropos capacity! Look for batteries which are marked with an IEC standard against which the quoted capacity has been measured. Otherwise it's a bit of a Pig in Poke business. Don't just buy the cheapest on offer, you'll most likely be disappointed. Go for the lowest offer available for a well known manufacturer who also provides specs and the standards adhered to. I know almost all batteries seem to be made in China these days. But many are also made there for well known western brand names to strict specifications. Cheapo 'No Names'? Who knows?
    16 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Batteries in a DX5e
    That was a good read Dodgy might just have to move away from static
    model
    s so my brain 🧠 can boil along with the rest of you.
    16 days ago by marky
    Forum
    3D Printing.
    Hi Guys, How do you guys feel about this 3D Printing ? I know it is the future, but do you think that making part for your
    model
    s or even complete
    model
    s will slowly take the skill out of
    model
    making. I would be interested in what you guys think. I have probably opened up a can of worms with this subject. Martin.
    19 days ago by Martin555
    Blog
    The Waterline/Boot Topping.
    I don’t know what it is about successfully applying a white waterline to a hull that gives me so much grief. I had problems with getting a good result with my Crash Tender and similarly with this
    model
    too. The common denominators are; 1. Me. 2. The hull. 3. Trimline Tape. On both occasions I’ve used this tape it has refused to adhere properly where it crosses the spray rails and on this occasion it also lifted in lots of places along the hull sides so that when the finishing lacquer was sprayed on it got behind the tape, lifted it more, and looked awful 😞 and this was despite meticulous cleaning and keying of the surface before application. Without meaning to do an injustice to the product I suspect that it’s just the way I was applying it and perhaps I had greater expectations of the product. Consequently I had to remove all of the tape and flat down the step in the lacquer coat 😠 and consider another approach, perhaps masking tape and white paint or an alternative tape. I decided to persist with the ‘tape’ method so I found a seller on eBay that could supply very thin PVC car body ‘coachlining’ tape in any colour or width to order, so I bought 10 metres of 4mm in white for just a couple of quid. What a difference!😊 This stuff went on beautifully straight, sticks like the proverbial and has stayed firmly in place over all of the contortions of the spray rails and hull. Furthermore when the hull was re-lacquered with a clear satin finish it behaved impeccably….success at last.😀👍
    18 days ago by robbob
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Anyone into CNC, or perhaps looking to get into it? I am wondering about putting my plans out as G Code, and it would be useful to have a discussion about the practicalities. For instance, what bed size do people use?
    model
    boat plans are a bit specialist for most CNC boards. They worry about cutting hard materials - we mainly use balsa and ply. Their machines are usually square - ours would need to be long and thin. They use big commercial routers and spindles - we could get away with smaller motors and dental burrs. I picked up one of these over Christmas, and am currently going through the learning curve. But it doesn't seem to be all that difficult.... https://amberspyglass.co.uk/store/index.php?seo_path=eshapeoko-cnc-milling-machine-mechanical-kit
    6 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    40'' Seaplane Tender, new build L
    Bit more progress, bit slow as I had to have a change and 3/4 finish some 1/2 finished jobs on the house). I've fitted the toe rails, glued on the cabin roofs, made the floors, (both 2pc so as to be easy to remove to get at the bilges,) made the shaft support blocks, milled out the shaft slots and slotted the hull to match, ( still have to epoxy blocks in when happy with shaft angles ), made the motor mount plate and trimmed the inside edge excess off the deck. Still have to make the rear cockpit floor and rear cabin /door panel but I'll wait till I've fitted the motors, as I have to see where the engine boxes end up, (they will probably end up being in the correct place with the motors partly inside the cabin but if I'm clever enough it won't be noticed. The odd pic out is of some of the tools we use to make our
    model
    s and don't even think about. I know most of us have our special home made 'tools' for different little jobs (ie sandpaper glued to flat or shaped blocks etc) but I thought for anyone just starting, it might give them an idea of what they could need to make it easier to build a
    model
    . Obviously there are fillers, paints, brushes, planes, drills etc (couldn't fit my mill on the table, weighs about 400lbs) and a number of other items for doing the larger bits. Mostly it's some of the simple smaller tools which are the handiest (assortment of
    model
    ling knives, small hacksaw, cutting board, pencils and sanding blocks/paper. If you are fortunate enough to have a lathe you will obviously save a lot of money on scale fittings, shafts etc, but most people don't have one and have to come up with other methods or $$.
    18 days ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    "....I am sure that you will end up with a lot of customers when see these...." While it is, of course, quite reasonable to charge for materials and time, I am looking forward to a future where the base patterns for a
    model
    boat kit will be available for free off the Web. You can download a lot of free patterns already, but I haven't seen anything I would call a 'real boat kit'. CNC cutters and 3-D printers are already available at most schools, and local councils now operate 'MakerSpace' workshops where this kit is made available to the public. Hobbyist designers could turn out the cutting files - all a
    model
    ler would need to do would be to buy the sheets of wood and feed them into the machine to have a kit coming out the other side. Not too sure how to do fibreglass hulls, though...
    18 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    3D Printing.
    I must admit I have been looking on utube quite a bit and have seen a lot of tutorials. I have also seen the results that some friends have done, and I am extremely tempted but me and computers are not the best of friends. I could spend hours and hours making a small thing for my
    model
    s then I have tried to draw something simple on a CAD program and made a right pigs ear of it. I know that practice is the key but patience with a computer is a different thing. Martin.
    18 days ago by Martin555
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Hi Red, Just found this on the net. There are two approaches you can try for fixing warps in plastic. The first is to simply clamp the parts and adhere them with adhesive. I prefer the liquid styrene cement, which actually fuses or welds the parts as opposed to adding an adhesive to create the bond. Once so fused, they're nearly impossible to separate. Most of your alignment issues can be addressed this way. Most warping issues for these
    model
    s come when you cut it to allow access for your RC components. These are usually long cuts along the mid-line of the boat. It is common for the cut parts to see warping along the length, creating gaps in the seam that are unsightly and hard to address via the first method. For these, the solution is to mechanically force the part straight, then heat the plastic up to its Glass Transition temperature for a short time, then cool it off. Polystyrene begins GT between 175-195° F (79-91 C) depending on its molecular weight, plasticizers, pigments and fillers. In order to straighten warped polystyrene parts, you need to get the plastic up to that temperature, allow it to settle in the proper shape, and then cool it back down again. There are a number of ways to accomplish this. The safest one for small parts is to use hot water. Simply heat up a bowl of water in the microwave to something around 200F, allow it to cool slightly and then dunk your part. Once the plastic has heated up, it should become more malleable and retain whatever shape it's put into. Dunk the part in cool water to lock in the new form and you're done! You can also use your oven, which allows for precise control of temperature in a larger format. Most sub hulls are going to be much larger than your bowls or oven, so you're going to need to use something like a hair blow dryer or, ideally, a heat gun. This takes some practice, as it's easy to overheat the parts and get warping and distortion, or even burning if you're not careful. Never focus the heat gun on one section for too long. Keep it moving at all times and use broad strokes so that you're heating up a large area. You'll see the part relax into the proper shape. Once it does, let it cool thoroughly before releasing your clamps and checking alignment. Repeat as often as necessary for a great fit. Martin.
    20 days ago by Martin555
    Response
    Re: My favourite job
    Hi Graham, Weathering. Well there are lots of different ways to achieve all sorts of different effects, and to me there is not a wrong way or a right way of doing it. There is a skill in weathering
    model
    s, the hardest part is remembering scale. You seemed to of mastered it extremely well. Good work. Keep it up. Martin.
    20 days ago by Martin555
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    "...Out of interest, there is currently such an RAF crash on eBay listed as Victory Industries vintage 1960's
    model
    toy boat Vosper RAF Rescue Launch..." Indeed there is - at nearly £50. You can see plastic distortion of the hull in one photo, and there are no fittings with it. There is one that looks to be in better condition, with most fittings and box, here https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/VOSPER-RAF-CRASH-TENDER-by-VICTORY-INDUSTRIES-LTD-SURREY-WORKING-ORDER/202715426684?hash=item2f32c7ef7c:g:ihIAAOSwHk9dDgNU That's got 5 hours to run, and has £16 on it so far...
    20 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    "...I am assuming that she is made using wood...." Er, no. The boat referred to is the well-known ready-to-run toy marketed by Victory Industries in 1954. It was very successful, would be seen on many boating ponds in the 50s and 60s, and is still quite common on Ebay. See Phil Smith's excellent site tracking plastic
    model
    s from this company - I have linked to the page with the Crash Tender. These toys were probably where the black-white-grey colour scheme first originated... VIP (Victory Industries Products) also did a matching
    model
    of the 'Mercury' - a Vosper high speed yacht built for Stavros Niarchos in about 1960, and based on the Brave patrol boat class. Three gas turbines - 60kt plus. Still in existence, though now renamed 'Brave Challenger'... see https://www.philsmith.co.uk/VIP/1960.htm These early plastic toys all suffered to a varying extent from warping over time. https://www.philsmith.co.uk/VIP/1954.htm
    20 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Back for Summer
    That would be up to the client, Doug. I think he is suing for costs and so he should. Incompetent bastards! I think I'd sooner play The Doors. Didn't he sing about getting his mojo working? Just finished a stretched Ferrari 312 (Parkes) body pattern, a Jebro Mk1 H Mod and an HO (small slot cars are actually 1/64th, but they annoyingly call it HO) McLaren M1B. Matra MS 80 next! Car brake light keeps flickering on the dashboard, so more expense. That's what these things pay for! We had to get something Chris could more easily get in and out of so we chopped in the Peugeot 206CC for a Suzuki Swift VVT. 4 doors, 4 seats and space for my
    model
    s, be they yachts or aircraft. I really must try to get some stuff done on the Chris Craft (Sea Hornet), Darby One Design and Spitfire Outboard racer. I treated myself to an inrunner brushless for the lovely HobbyKing CNC machined o/b, which I've turned into a Godiva 40, instead of a Mercury. Well, I am an old tub thumper and a complete Coventry Climax obsessive and the Godiva 40 had a CC engine on its end. The one which became the Hillman Imp engine, the FWMA, Feather Weight Marine Automobile. NOT a damned fire pump, whatever drivvle you may read about them. So, as odds and sods progress, I will post pics and chat about them. BTW, the aforementioned Mike Parkes was the engineer responsible for helping Hillman make the FWMA into the Hillman Imp engine as well as being a very decent racing driver! Cheers, Martin
    22 days ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Motor identification.
    Oh dear - they look like some Johnson can motors. Johnson is a company which specialises in industrial DC motors for power tools, car windows, etc. It does a bewildering variety of them - as do many other companies, but I tend to think of them as generically 'Johnson'. See https://www.johnsonelectric.com/en/product-technology/motion/dc-motors/automotive-dc-motors/low-voltage-dc-motors They are often hard to identify, and will be good for the thing they are designed for, which may be nothing like a
    model
    boat engine. In particular they may be designed for intermittent use, low or high torque, high drain...or anything else. They may be good for a boat - they may be useless. And it depends on the boat - if they are ex-drill motors they may rev quite fast... Check the number of poles - more than three and the motor may be a better quality one. Do the revs on your battery match what you want (between 5000 and 10,000, usually)? Is the no-load drain below 1A? Then the motor might be useful. Otherwise, see the video below: https://youtu.be/pNw0IWrn0hU I recall that Mayhem were very scathing of unknown can motors a little while ago - spool down to the bottom of this page https://www.
    model
    boatmayhem.co.uk/Common/Electrics/How%20Fast.htm P.S - does the one on the left look like a turntable motor?
    25 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Response
    Re: Steampunk Pike.
    Hi Red, I am not sure what the plastic is but I think it is ABS. The thing is I use whatever plastic I can lay my hands on, mostly food containers. The majority of my
    model
    s are made from waste materials as I do not have much of a budget to be able to get the good stuff. Martin.
    25 days ago by Martin555
    Blog
    H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER
    Thinking of a future project and decided upon another launch type vessel. My earlier Daman 4207 project gave an interesting
    model
    with good performance. The Brave class of FPBs (Fast Patrol Boats) caught my attention. Can remember the incredible performance they offered when entering service. Only two of the class were used by the RN, although variants were used by other navies. Have decided to use proprietary Glass fibre hulls in future as they probably cost little more than building from scratch using wood and resin. They give a robust and watertight hull, but one which still requires thought to complete properly. There are several companies that offer a “Perkasa” hull, a Brave class derivative with an almost identical hull. From previous experience have decided to limit my
    model
    s to 40” long, larger vessels become difficult to transport and handle. After much research considered the hull offered by MTB Hulls in Gibraltar met my requirements best. The inquiry to MTBHulls was well handled; the quotation acceptable, so placed an order. Was pleasantly surprised at the shipping costs. From the UK these often approach the cost of the hull, but from Gibraltar they are much more reasonable. Delivery only took 7 days.
    1 year ago by RHBaker
    Response
    Re: Steampunk Pike.
    "But I want to make something really wacky." Oh no! Another Morse Code 'paper chase'!😮 How about binary or hex code this time Martin? 😂🤣 0011 1001 0001 1111 - 0100 1111 10101 0111 😎 (Binary equivalents of the number of the letters in the alphabet😁) BTW: You don't HAVE to be wacky to build
    model
    s, but it helps!😉 (You'll probably end up wacky anyway!)
    29 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Hi Brianaro ~ That's interesting and I am worrying about the fittings in the kit that are not as comprehensive as other
    model
    s I have built ~ sadly I have no
    model
    Shops locally ~ regards Ray
    27 days ago by MaggieM
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Hi Rob ( is it Rob ) I think we had a good chat by this boat ~ I am used to
    model
    Slipway , Billings etc. who give you full CAD drawings good instructions and all necessary fittings ( mainly white metal ) ~ unfortunately missing with this
    model
    ~ I have just got some netting for the scramble nets ( had to buy 1 m x 4.5 m ( have enough for 50 plus
    model
    s ) ~ I am not used to Boat Mayhem but I think I have all your blog ~ e.g. the boat hooks see 2 different lengths but is the dowel 3mm or 4mm . So as far as superstructure common opinion seems to be grey sides and white roofs ~ yes I purchased planking to do rear , middle and boat hook areas ~ appreciate your advice regards Ray
    27 days ago by MaggieM
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Martin - I wholeheartedly agree - there was an elderly member of our club who despite ill health and a few other problems like arthritis kept on producing new
    model
    s which whilst not being of Gold Medal standard were a lot better than many I have seen. And all scratch built too. A friend collected full size boats and had at one stage two Miami Crash Boats and two Ford Class seaward defence boats. The Crash Boats originally had a material covered planked deck. He removed the material except where a non slip surface was required and the boats looked great when he used them as excursion boats from Hout Bay.
    27 days ago by redpmg
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    I am reminded of the 1/72nd Revell Flower class corvette
    model
    . That had a steel plate deck, with non-slip walkways and some small planked areas at the bow and amidships. But the
    model
    has the deck completely covered in moulded-in raised planking lines, and if you want a more accurate
    model
    you have to sand or scape these away... My own EeZeBilt PT Boat had a stained and drawn planked deck, because I thought that looked pretty. But in reality the originals had plywood sheet decks which were painted. I think a few of the ELCO 80ft prototypes may have had planks - but they were all initially delivered painted grey, so you would never have seen them. They just look better with wood planking, don't they...? "....I have been told that when the boat was commissioned into service all the superstructure was painted white ~ I see the majority of other
    model
    s grey with white roof......." I think that all service craft have a delivery specification paint job, which would act as an 'undercoat' and then they have other paint jobs specified for different theatres, and maybe even different tasks. These paint jobs may change rapidly - particularly where camouflage or FoF recognition is involved. So if you want to be accurate, you need to look up a date and a location and find the official specification for that craft at that time. Luckily, I think that that Crash Tender had a short career on the South Coast, and probably only ever sported one official pattern.
    27 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Hi Robbob ~ thanks very much for advice ~ yes I know that sometimes it's the builders choice , but I try to make my
    model
    s as close to the real craft I was at Warwick last year and saw a really nice
    model
    planked ~ did seem a bit odd ~ I have planked my Huntsman and looks really cool ~ I will take your advice and paint the deck grey ~ on another point I have been told that when the boat was commissioned into service all the superstructure was painted white ~ I see the majority of other
    model
    s grey with white roof ~ appreciate your view many thanks
    27 days ago by MaggieM


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