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    Event
    Modellers Exhibition Midhurst
    The 37th Annual Modellers Exhibition will be held at The Grange Centre, Bepton Road, Midhurst, Sussex GU29 9HD on Sunday 10th February 2019. This is a great exhibition in the South where many Model Boat Clubs attend displaying a great array of their boats. For the train enthusiasts there is a large hall with fantastic displays and trade
    outlet
    s.
    6 months ago by ads90
    Blog
    Fairly Hunsman renovation part 1
    Pictures Rubbing down hull, Close ups of hull repairs Drill holes in transom for the exhaust pipes (water cooling
    outlet
    s). Added spray rail to side of hull. Have found that I am having bad reactions to the fumes from Gorilla Glue.
    10 months ago by CB90
    Forum
    Smoke generator
    Have just made a prototype of a fan forced smoker which seems to be working well (despite breaking the heater coil by moving it while hot, - had it apart, broke wire, screw and washer repair, not quite as hot) I bought a couple of Heng Long smokers (for R/C tanks or cars) to play with, for $10 NZ each(or 5.3 Euros to you Northerners give or take a yen) from Bangood and just bought another from Ebay. There seem to be 2 different models, as one has a long coil with a lamp wick draped over it, which is sitting in the oil reservoir, the other has a small coil inside a piece of heat resistant woven tubing (as you might find insulating toaster/heater wiring etc) which acts as a wick and that also sits in cotton wool in the reservoir, (this seems to be the better of the two) Tip - don't fill the tank right up, only enough to soak the cotton, element should be just out of the oil. The wick loads the element. The better model seems to have a black top to the tank (also maybe either brown or black tank) and the other has a brown top and dirty brown tank. As with most of this stuff you won't know till you get it what it's going to be. What I did was remove the tank and cut off the pump tube just in front of the screw lugs (see black line in photo) then fitted the tank, and a 40x40x10 5v ESC fan (voltage controlled by a UBEC set to 5v on the jumpers) into a plastic electronics utility box from Jaycar (our local electronics and hobby store). I made up a double JST lead for the 2s 1800Mah Lipo and fired it up (using baby oil). it's pretty much silent and smokes well once it gets warmed up, ( starts smoking in about 5 seconds) You could control it (on/off volume) by either a remote on/off switch or perhaps a small cheap 10A brushed ESC. I would leave the fan running and control the element to avoid burning the element. The original pump tank inlet hole seems ok as is (approx 1.5mm) but you could enlarge it very slightly to get a better flow if you could find a better oil. At the electronics store they have proper smoke machine oil for $20 NZ per litre so I may have a look at that. The reason I went for the fan idea was that I found in std pump form, if I immersed a tube from the tank in water, it sucked water back into the tank. I was hoping it would pump smoke out of my HSL exhausts at water level alongside the cooling water but it would need a very light non return valve to do this. The fan seems to pump the smoke through 2mm ID silicone tube ok, so tubing of similar ID to the OD of the tank
    outlet
    s should work well. These pumps in original form work pretty well for the price, and are cheap enough to keep a few for spare elements, the only thing is they are a bit noisy but in an 'engine sounding' way, (might add to the effect on a tug or work-boat though) What you have left after this mod is a very handy little geared motor with an eccentric output wheel which could be used for winches, radar and whirly bits of any description (see pic of motor leftover and original) To avoid burnout, these should be run on no more than a 2s (around 7.5v-(suggest 8v max with fan running) The other tank is going to work a lot better than this one but I'm not making a tug, just want a bit of exhaust smoke on start-up etc to go with the 2 sound units. Very cheap to make (around $25 NZ with pump, box, fan and UBEC all through Ebay, Aliexpress and Bangood (and local electronics store) if you wanted to run an ESC to control the smoke and you have no channels left to control it proportionally, you can always try using a second receiver bound to your TX, (if your TX will allow it,) power it and a brushed ESC (wired to the element) as normal and use the throttle channel to plug in your smoke control. This should work if you want more smoke as you accelerate or if you are using only 1 stick on a 2 stick TX you could use your 'elevator' stick pushed up (or a toggle switch if available) to start/stop the smoke (through the brushed ESC setup) . This setup weighs 100g (10g more than std) The quest for lots of smoke continues Will try to upload vid later and update progress.
    5 months ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    Plumbing the water-cooling for the ESC
    The HobbyKing ESC Iโ€™m using has the facility for water cooling and as it will be in an enclosed location without any free ventilation it seems sensible to utilise this feature. To keep the water circuit as short as possible I will put the pickup just behind the propeller and the exhaust on the stern but as the boat has a bulkhead just in front of the stern skin I need to make an access hole through it to allow me to secure the nut on the stern skin. I made a hole through the bulkhead large enough to get a socket on the nut and reinforced the hole with a ply plate, similarly I reinforced the inside of the stern skin where the
    outlet
    passes through it. When I was happy that the arrangement worked and I could attach the hoses and securing clips easily I glued and pinned the stern skin to the hull. The water pickup is a standard one that is readily available but itโ€™s supplied with overly large and ugly fixing nuts, the inside one is of no consequence but I thought that the outer one needed smartening up so I put it on a threaded rod and locked it in place with another nut and put that into the chuck of a drill and used a file to re-shape the nut to a pleasing taperโ€ฆ.who needs a lathe......๐Ÿ˜œ I had to reduce the height of the inner keel former as the pickup tube is not long enough to get a good fixing with the internal nut, as the inner keel is balsa I fitted a ply reinforcing plate to spread the load. The last โ€˜photo shows the location of the ESC, main battery fuse and receiver. The hoses will be secured to the ESC with spring clips throughout. I found that the silicone tube I use tends to kink rather easily if the radius of a bend is too small and I found it necessary to form a tight spring coil around the piece that loops the water back through the ESC to prevent this happening.
    6 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Internal wiring & bottom skins
    Because I am keen to conceal as much of the wiring as possible I have decided to place the battery at the bow and the operational equipment at the stern, the engine on the original boat was central and covered with a soundproof box and this is convenient as the motor can be positioned and concealed in the same way. This means that some of the wires will have to run the full length of the boat and the easiest way to conceal them is to run them beneath the โ€˜boxโ€™ around which the hull is formed, and this needs to be done before the bottom skins are fitted. Holes were bored through the bulkhead formers under the port side of the hull and battery cables were run to the stern where the ESC will be and three motor wires from the ESC run to the centre, emerging near the motor position. For good measure I put in a servo cable and a separate draw wire just in case I needed to put more cabling in for any additional features, perhaps working navigation lights? Satisfied that I had all the cabling in place I was able to fit the bottom skins starting with the starboard side first. Before doing so I put a very slight 'hollow' in former F1 which should help blend the shape of the the hull where the ply skins meet the balsa blocks that will to be carved and shaped to form the bow. This can be seen in the last picture. The process of forming and fixing the skins is the same as for the side skins but in addition to the pins holding the skins in place I used some brown polythene โ€˜packing tapeโ€™ to pull the skins tightly against the bulkhead formers and strakes. The packing tape has a very high tensile strength and is ideal for this, and of course cheap and easy to remove. Once the aliphatic glue had set thoroughly overnight I removed the excess from the skins with a small block plane and finished them with my sanding plate. Before I fit the skin at the stern I will have to arrange the water cooling for the ESC, with the pickup just behind the prop and the
    outlet
    on the stern. Iโ€™ll cover that aspect in the next update.
    6 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Proboat Sonicwake
    Three weeks ago I got a Proboat Sonicwake deep V fast electric. This appears to be a replacement for their previous model Vorocity. Very interesting self righting method with a water tank on the port side, slots in the deck and a large exit point at the stern. Idea is that if it capsizes, water will enter through the slots and as it draws the boat under, the air trapped in the hull will self right it. If the boat is stationary in the water, it will list to port due to water entering through the stern
    outlet
    and when power is applied it will empty out. Bit scary to watch at first as I thought the boat was on its way to Davy Jones. I use waterproof marine clear tape to seal around the hatch ever time I use it. The quality of the hull raises a few concerns. This relates to its ABS construction as the vast majority of similar boats at that price are made of fibreglass which is much more rigid and would be more suitable for the high speeds. Makers claim it does 50 MPH plus on 6S lipos. The electrics however are excellent with the exception of the external quality of the Horizon Hobby STX2 TX which looks a bit "toyish". For myself, this is not relevant as I replace all my wheel TXs with the "stick type" and I found that the Futaba T2HR fulfils all requirements and worked well when I sailed the boat. I have not yet changed the stock prop for an Octura one, the latter works great on my Blackjack 29 with a noticeable increase in performance. The motor is a Dynamite Marine W.C brushless 1900 KV with a 120 amp W.C ESC . ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‹ Boaty.
    7 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    S.H.G Black tornado
    hi got this off internet not eBay!!!! going to over the winter add meteor 40 engine propshaft n' tube were already fitted as was water scoop n'
    outlet
    ,rudder , trim tabs,a 2channel Acoms r/c receiver and and 2 servos no trans. but it did all work ( all in a gooy margerine tub possibly the best part of 40 yrs worth of GOO!!!! Hull /deck look to be in good condition! will keep u informed on "resto" over the winter months regards
    9 months ago by thatsinkinfeelin18
    Blog
    Fairey Hunsman renovation part 2
    The boat was free but I gave a small donation to the club,(Darlington & District Model Boat Club). Started by removing all hardware, motor mounts, prop shaft, rudder, water-scoops and
    outlet
    s. Next fill the holes I have made, remove some excess wood. roughly sand down hull. Foam bow area, and glue crack in deck. Find a lot of damage to the fibreglass hull, large chips out of the gel coat and associated stress fractures, and other spider web cracks. Drimmel all crack lines and open up chips and dents, then fill with a filler. an experimental mix of P38 and Araldite, hope it works. Start planning drive options I have a number of items that I have brought and not used that will be put in this boat, otherwise they may never find a home. last picture shows drive option to use up components.
    10 months ago by CB90
    Forum
    Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings...
    If you want it to look like metal, use metal. That alclad is OK, but still looks like paint to me and having to do it in black first (and that coat has to be perfect apparently) is too much of a faff for me. Hammer, as you can see from the response (or lack of it) taking more pictures (never easy for my shit camera) would hardly be warranted and the description says it all really. I have a few more to take, or rather the wife can take em with her Klevafone for me. Filler and cap, exhaust
    outlet
    and windscreen supports have been added. Just the bear paw vent to go when I get a bit of 1/8th" through the post. I have 1/8th", but it's that horrible yellow gooey stuff, so I've splashed out on a small bit of CZ120, hard brass. Also called leaded, silicon or engravers' brass. MUCH better to cut and shape. The equivalent for rod, strip and section is CZ 121, extruded. These will all be available to buy once my chum has cast them in white metal and then you just have to burnish with a crewel needle (darning) and you have chrome (lacquer to taste). Martin
    10 months ago by Westquay
    Response
    Emerald - ''Round the Word'' ocean racing yacht.
    Auto Bailout Modification. 1. I drilled small holes in the lower corners of the cockpit wells, opposite each other. These were then connected together with some small brass tube. This was to allow the water to flow from the front cockpit to the rear cockpit. (See pictures 1 and 2). 2. Two more holes were drilled in the rear cockpit, in the outer corners further aft. these were fitted with brass tube stubs. These were to take the plastic tube, which runs to the nozzles fitted into the hull (see picture 3 and 4). 3. To ensure the water would not flow into the boat, while stationary, the tubes were run through small eyelets on the under side of the deck(see picture 5). 4. Small holes were drilled in the hull and brass tubes were cut and bent, so that they would pass down through the hole in the hull, and lay flush against the hull, with the opening facing aft(see picture 6 and 9). 5. On the outer hull, the tube is built up, and covered in a cone shape, so the tube opening is the widest part of the cone and flush( see picture 7 & 8). 6. When the tubes are fitted to the stubs on the aft cockpit, and the cockpit secured in the yacht, the bale out is complete. Principle: While the boat is still and on an even keel, the cockpit floor is above the waterline, the tubes raise up to the deck level which prevents the water from flowing up and into the yacht. When the yacht starts to move under sail, the water flowing over the
    outlet
    nozzle is forced out by the cone, and creates a small vacuum at the nozzle opening, which draws any water in the cockpit through the tube and out through the nozzle. During a gust or strong winds, the yacht will heel over more. This will bring all the cockpit water to the lower side bailout tube, and be drawn out by the vacuum. When the yacht slows, and becomes even keeled, the cockpit will have been emptied. During heavy gusts, I found that the yacht will heel excessively, and if the waves are high enough, the cockpit will take some water over the deck. This is why I fitted the bailout device. So after a long sail in heavy weather, a long cruise back to shore on a broad reach and more even keel, will ensure the cockpit is dry. Happy Cruising
    11 months ago by East-RN
    Forum
    Warped wood
    Hi Martin, Yes I'm very happy with it. ๐Ÿ˜Š Not the cheapest but very good. I use the whole range from Base coat Pore Filler (Sanding sealer) through matt, satin and full gloss varnishes. in both brushing tins, for small part brushing, and spray cans for the bigger stuff like hulls and decks. The cans don't reveal what the base is but the thinners is white spirit or any of the usual 'universal' substitutes. It's made in Holland, supposedly specially formulated specifically for model builders! But it's available all over the shop, I get mine here from Krick. Just Google Lord Nelson varnish and you'll find loads of
    outlet
    s, and Hotels ๐Ÿค”! For Sea Scout I used all spray; 2 base coat, 2 coats of satin varnish, as undercoat! Then 2 coats of Gloss varnish. Needless to say thin coats! And left to harden under a 300W halogen lamp๐Ÿ˜‰ Lots of 'flatting' back in between culminating with 3000 wet & dry, wet with a little liquid soap. Final polish using two stage paint cutting / polishing paste from the Petrol Head world. See pics. Full details (including the bloopers๐Ÿ˜ก) in my Sea Scout Build Blog. Have fun with it, cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž PS Shame about the Lupins๐Ÿ˜ก, that hybrid sounds fantabulous! ๐Ÿ˜‰ BTW: if you use the brushing stuff thin with 10 to 20% white spirit, otherwise you'll find, as I just did with base coat sealer on the deck of my PTB, that it takes yonks to get the brush marks out ๐Ÿ˜†
    12 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    NAXOS - Fishing Boat
    Depending on what voltage you intend using governs what gearing you should use commensurate with size and weight of model and prop size , IE small boat and prop ,low voltage direct drive would do. As you go bigger then consider gearing.Bear in mind the torque produced by the drill. You could build a large boat with a fine turn of speed using that motor. The thing is there are so many possible variables you could experiment till the cows come home. The thing is how big a boat can you handle without putting your back out. LOL. if you remove the existing gear and replace it with one secured by grub screws and a "GearBox" with easily changed cogs you can achieve something suitable. You shouldn't need cooling .Remember the drill had none and your motor will have free space round it in the hull. if you decide you do want cooling annealed copper tubing can be wound round the can and one of the plastic tubes used to couple this to the scoop and the
    outlet
    . One way of making a scoop is a length of tubing with a slot cut in it and a cap soldered (or glued depending on material) on the end when in place under the hull the cutout will face forward. Preferably in the prop wash.Or buy a ready made scoop from a model shop. Much simpler as the mounting method will be incorporated in it already. Here is a page of suitable shops.--https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=model+boat+shops&npsic=0&rflfq=1&rlha=0&rllag=53384469,-3048343,31236&tbm=lcl&ved=0ahUKEwiJyL2-i5_bAhWpKsAKHZsiD8YQjGoIaQ&tbs=lrf:!2m4!1e17!4m2!17m1!1e2!2m1!1e2!2m1!1e3!3sIAE,lf:1,lf_ui:10&rldoc=1#rlfi=hd:;si:;mv:!1m3!1d2318841.41797519!2d-3.0710914999999996!3d52.741938250000004!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i83!2i180!4f13.1;tbs:lrf:!2m1!1e2!2m1!1e3!2m4!1e17!4m2!17m1!1e2!3sIAE,lf:1,lf_ui:10 Good luck. P.S. Join a club. Youll get loads of help from the other members.๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘
    1 year ago by onetenor
    Response
    NAXOS - Fishing Boat
    Water scoop is normally sited just behind the prop and offset to enable the prop to push water up the scoop, the
    outlet
    is usually in the transom,although i have seen them mounted in the side.
    1 year ago by Wingcoax
    Response
    Sanding down.
    Thanks Doug. I bought some primer but can use on another project. I will find the filler primer recommended. I bought sanding sealer also for when I am happy with the preperation. I have a 24litre tank compressor and special regulator and moisture bottle in the line. I also bought a second airbrush with a slightly larger jet. I know that you are in Germany, but would I find the acrylic paint in large quantities in a decorating shop? Professional paint
    outlet
    ? Seen tiny pots in the modelling shop but I would need loads of those. ๐Ÿ˜Š
    1 year ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Aerokits Patrol Torpedo Boat
    Hi MB, can only say what I have which works and I ain't set the house on fire yet ๐Ÿ˜‰ Not surprisingly for someone living in Munich both mine are from German companies! Robbe Power peak Uni 7 and Graupner Unimat 14. There are later versions of both around nowadays but you can still find these on Amazon / Ebay etc. Both of them have automated programmes for various Lithium types, NiMH / NiCad (not recommended these days!) and SLAs. Robbe is now defunct and their Marine stuff taken over by Graupner and marketed as RoMarin! Pics also show the Balancer Adaptor Boards, necessary to connect the balancer cable of the battery. This ensures that each cell is equally charged ๐Ÿ˜Š I also included in the pics the little battery Capacity Testers I use. They cost around a tenner and are very useful for checking the capacity before a run or charging, as well as the voltage and capacity of each cell, which gives an indication of the battery condition. I found some duff cells with the tester in a few batteries I'd only just bought ๐Ÿ˜ก When looking for / buying a charger look also for a LiPo Safe bag to charge them in. E.g. LiPo Guard. Charger may cost 50 quid upwards depending on how many charging
    outlet
    s you want and how many Bells & Whistles. But I get on well with these two ๐Ÿ˜‰ I like the Robbe version cos I can charge two LiPos at the same time. Also in the pics are a few of the charging cables I made up with gold 4mm bullet plugs for the charger end and Tamiya and BEC (for my Plastic magic stuff!) at the batt end. Such adaptor cables are also available 'ready made' but I just like fiddlin' ๐Ÿ˜Š Hope this helps, Cheers Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž Nearly forgot! Can't say for sure what current your motor will draw cos I don't know all the other details, but a 40" boat will need some shove! So I wouldn't go below the 5000mAH if you want a half decent run time. A 40" boat can carry a bit of weight! And batt power is more useful than pure ballast ๐Ÿ˜‰ Recommend a little Wattmeter to check the max current draw - see last pic. Basic theory! A fully charged 5000mAh (or 5AH) batt can theoretically deliver 5A for one hour, or 10A for half an hour and so on! Say your set up draws 20A with the 'pedal to the metal' then a 5000mAH batt will 'theoretically' last 15 minutes. Theoretically cos other factors are in play; initial charge state, temperature, internal resistance of the cells, cable losses etc. The latter is why I only use gold connectors! The higher the batt capacity the higher the price and weight. So suggest you start with the 5000 and see how (long) it goes. Then check the weights of higher capacity batts (and the bank account / management approval๐Ÿ˜‰) Bon chance mon ami!
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Command Boat 90
    I tried one of these but couldn't get it to reverse the boat. Possibly not got the correct set up for the jet nozzle. it pushed a 30 inch fiber glass fast patrol boat very well, might try to sort
    outlet
    to give better control. You've raised my interest again thanks, Colin.
    1 year ago by Colin H
    Forum
    displaying at vintage and steam rallies.
    Illegal to have trailer on car tyres, something about ply rating for trailers over 250kg unladen and carrying capacity. if you check with tyre
    outlet
    s they will explain. My trailer weighs in at 293kgs unladen and has carrying capacity of 1750kgs. Cheers Colin.
    1 year ago by Colin H
    Forum
    cooler
    A correctly positioned scoop just aft of the propeller and a side exit pipe will work fine. Makes sure the exit is above the waterline but about level with the motor
    outlet
    pipe to avoid air locks.
    1 year ago by Dave M
    Forum
    Steam sound unit (variable speed)
    Just to update on the Technobots sound units. Alan Bond the original designer was selling under his Forge Electronics
    outlet
    . He has now, just passed on the future sales to www.scalewarship.com run by John Wills. John is in the process of adding the units to his on line shop and hopes to be able to supply in the near future. The units are very good and reliable and can produce very realistic sounds in line with motor speed. A separate 20 watt amp and 8" speaker on a baffle board works well for me in my Tugs.
    1 year ago by Dave M
    Forum
    replacing propshaft
    Brilliant, I have been using them for years, you can sign up for their news letter with their daily deals and stuff. A quick question to any sage, as I am doing a repaint of the hull, I thought I would fit a water pick up, which I have done, but where is the best place to fit the water
    outlet
    on a Sea Commander? To all a Happy Christmas and a prosperous New Year
    2 years ago by RichardSReade
    Blog
    Planking complete!
    Finished โ€œCostaโ€ planking today and have put in most of the edge strip (need more strip, model shop Friday!). Jobs to do before I start the superstructure, finish laying out the RC components, fit rudder parts, make battery tray etc. Put in a 1/4 square strip around deck opening to prevent water ingress. Couple of coats of resin inside radio bay, 1 more outside, sand and prime. Sand, stain and yacht varnish deck. One question on a water pick-up as using a water cooled ESC!
    outlet
    will be in the transom, does it matter where the pick-up is located?
    2 years ago by Skydive130
    Forum
    Motor problem
    the scoop should be fitted behind the prop so prop wash is driving water through it whenever the motor is running and the cooling coil fits around the motor join the two up with fuel tube etc. then the other end of the coil connect to an
    outlet
    ( unless you want a self filling boat) http://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/acatalog/cooling-coils.html http://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/cgi-bin/sh000029.pl?REFPAGE=http%3a%2f%2fwww%2ecornwallmodelboats%2eco%2euk%2facatalog%2fcooling%2dcoils%2ehtml&WD=scoop%20water&PN=water_cooling%2ehtml%23aG1427#aG1427 As to sitting on your boat you could put it in the water and get some one to hold it while you run the motor up and watch the current used. closing off the cooling vents to an electric motor not used in a speed model shouldn't be any problem if you have the correct prop an electric motor should only get hand warm. The temps you indicate would have burned out your motor even if there had been no covering over the motor at all. With an electric ( brushed) motor the more you load it the higher the current flow and the hotter it gets. Stall current tend towards infinity you have what I think is a 60mm prop and that's a BIG prop being 3 bladed makes the situation worse since there is increased blade area against a 2 bladed prop. if you intend to use that prop then get a motor man enough to swing it.
    2 years ago by Haverlock
    Blog
    small detail items
    The hobby doesn't have to cost the earth I made some ladders from welding brass filler wire, and an exhaust
    outlet
    from a draw knob I found whilst walking to the shops. Also done some additional planking using stirrer sticks from costa fortune coffee shop. (My son grabbed me a hand full enough for a life time's modelling).
    2 years ago by Novagsi0
    Forum
    Hobby Engine Richardson Upgrade
    Re Technobots Sound Units- "As part of our review into the product ranges we stock, this engine sound unit is no longer available from Technobots. We have been the retail
    outlet
    for the excellent engine sound module designs of Alan Bond of Forge Electronics for many years and have proudly supplied over 1,000 of these units to modellers around the world. The good news is that Alan is going to continue production of the programmable sound unit so please visit the Forge-Electronics website for pricing and availability. Our rather popular and well respected range of single voice and combo engine sound units have had a makeover! They still have the same great sounds but are even more user friendly." https://www.technobotsonline.com/combo-engine-sound-unit-mk2.html Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    What paint type
    Hi Dave, I'm sure that Bondaglass is excellent. Unfortunately they don't have a distributor in Australia๐Ÿค” Shipping cost quoted to Germany is 11.95 which doubles the price of a can. To Austria, just down the road from me, they quote 33 pounds!! For Australia the info is 'Contact us'! I checked that Deluxe materials have
    outlet
    s in Australia and found two ๐Ÿ˜‰ Cheers Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž PS lovely woodwork, would be shame to hide it ๐Ÿ˜†
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Jaydee
    Hi Ian It's a racing prop and will use lots of power hence the heat. As you have a cabin cruiser it does not need such a coarse pitch prop and changing to a prop with a lesser pitch will improve your running time and produce less heat. Performance will depend on the chosen prop but should not be much different from what you already experience. As you already have a water cooler inlet and
    outlet
    you could just wrap some copper tube round the motor and connect with silicon tubing to keep the heat down Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Response
    Jaydee
    Hi Dave I've attached a photo of the prop as you asked. You can just see where I've shaved it down. This seems to have eased the overheating considerably. You can also see the water inlet for the cooling system that was used with the original diesel engine. This is now piped directly to the
    outlet
    on the port side (you can see it working in some of the action photos). The other photo is a fore/aft view of the central bay which contains the motor, ESC and battery. Ian
    2 years ago by IanD
    Forum
    PT109 Refit
    Hi Dave, glad you found the pics useful, that's what we are all here for n'est ce pas? ๐Ÿ˜‰ may have a few more detail pics in the archive, will have a rummage later. The two 'black boxes' are 'ready ammunition' drums for the Browning 50 cal MGs. You can see them again in pic 14. They sit on an equipment box in front of the cabin, cos on this version there is an extra single 50 cal mounted on the port corner of the cabin. See pic 23!! The one after the starboard prop pic. The penultimate pic shows the MG in detail from the rear - Operator's PoV. The silencers (mufflers in American) have a simple butterfly flap valve to deflect the exhaust into the silencer box with an underwater
    outlet
    . BTW: the actuators are missing๐Ÿค” They were a simple rod mechanism actuated from the stern deck. Still looking for detail pics! Maybe we could figure out a way of coupling them to a motor sound module for 'Whisper Mode'?? Bit small to see when out on the pond though! Cleaning the glasses helped the eyesight a bit๐Ÿ˜‰ straightening out the crossed eyes and retraining the brain took a little longer ๐Ÿค” happy building and exciting but safe sailing, cheers Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Adhesive
    Yep I've used it to fix water pick ups and
    outlet
    s also rudder tubes and not had any problems with it sealing brass to wood and plastic to wood. Seems to take modeling enamel paint okay as well once fully cured. But my personal favourite glue is epoxy from pound land, you get a clamp and spatula free with it as well. Happy sticking Colin.
    2 years ago by Colin H
    Response
    Secure the hatches and raise the flags !
    Hi Colin. Welcome to the forum and congratulations on your good choice of model ๐Ÿ‘. I bought all of the brass pins I used from a UK based eBay seller http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SOLID-BRASS-PANEL-PINS-15mm-20mm-25mm-30mm-40mm-CHOOSE-QTY-FREE-P-P-/161327078311?var=&hash=item258fd7dba7 I can't imagine that something similar would not be available in Oz, try a good joinery or cabinet makers supply
    outlet
    . I mostly used the 15mm size and used, quite surprisingly, a total of around 500 ๐Ÿ˜ฑ. These pins have a tapered head rather than a flat one so that they can be punched flush, or just below the surface of the wood very easily. This is important when pinning the side and bottom skins so that the pin hole can be filled and sanded to give a very smooth surface for finishing. Also, when pinning the thin wood strips always pre-drill the wood to stop the wood from splitting. I'm not sure if CMB supply this type but Javro, who replied earlier, may be able to confirm this. Good luck with the build and please do think about posting a build blog on this site and ask as many questions as you need to. As I discovered, the help and advice you will get will be invaluable. Rob.
    2 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    The electrics, drive & radio
    The switch panel and wiring loom was made, tested and dry fitted a while ago and so it only needs securing to the bulkhead with four fixing screws, the two NiMh batteries were strapped down to the bearers with cable ties as close to the chines as possible and the XT60 connectors mated. I have read that placing the heavy batteries as far away from the keel as possible improves the handling, all other heavy items are centered along the keel for symmetry and should help the boat to sit evenly in the water. Iโ€™m not sure if I will need to do any ballasting, hopefully the maiden voyages should give me an indication. The prop shaft was greased and fitted, and with the prop, thrust washers and lock nuts in place, the clearance was adjusted and locked with some Loctite so the motor could then be installed. The initial motor alignment was made with a solid coupler which was then replaced with the universal joint, I took the precaution to grind a flat on the motor shaft so that the locking grub screw has better grip on the shaft. The grease tube was then fitted to the shaft clamp and secured to the side of the switch panel. The ESC was fixed to the back of the bulkhead with another couple of cable ties and the input cables, again XT60 types, and the three pole XT60 motor connectors mated. I have also fitted a Turnigy in-line volt, amp and watt meter in the circuit before the ESC so that I can log readings in case of spurious fuse blowing issues or unexpected battery life problems. The water cooling tubes were then run from the water pickup, through the ESC and then back to the transom โ€˜exhaustโ€™
    outlet
    , all water connections are fitted with spring clips to ensure water tight connections. I have used quite a large bore silicone tubing to ensure maximum water flow and made sure that all bends are kink and compression free. The R/C receiver is fixed to the rear cabin wall with some Velcro pads for easy removal, the two aerials were fitted in some plastic tubing at 90 degrees to each other as recommended for 2.4 gig systems and as high above the waterline as possible. The receiver is connected to a separate 4.8 volt NiMh battery via a changeover switch that also has a charging connection and LED power indicator, and I have also fitted a battery voltage indicator, just because they are cheap and convenient although the R/C system that I have has telemetry that reports RX voltage as standard. The battery charger I have chosen can handle the 16 cell series configuration of the drive batteries and so they can be charged in-situ when the main power switch is toggled over to the charge position. The RX and lighting batteries are charged separately. All of the servo and lighting switch cables are routed through the hull to the receiver through pre drilled holes in the bulkheads at high level for neatness and to retain the integrity of each compartment just in case ๐Ÿ˜ฒ!!. The servo and cables and the water cooling tubes are strapped to a supporting bar between the bulkheads for neatness and security. With the TX switched on first, the RX is then powered up and the main power switch toggled to the โ€˜operateโ€™ position, the ESC then gives a reassuring series of bleeps that confirm that all is well. The ESC was set up using a Turnigy programming card specifically for that model of controller and if required I can tweak the settings once the boat has had a few sailings. The last things to do now are to fit some strong magnets to hold the hatches and roofs down securely and then finally raise the RAF ensigns ๐Ÿ˜
    2 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Possible Motors for Large Scale Tug
    Hi raginghalfasian I see you are in the USA. The motor you mention looks pretty good but the real question is will it have the Tork to dive your props. Given their usage I suspect they will. if you buy one you can test and if OK buy another. As Mark says in the UK we can source car heater blower motors from local scrap yards and they do work very well in Tugs and can turn big props. If you have such an
    outlet
    near it may be worth a visit (take some tools) to see what is available. Sonar uses similar motors from a German supplier but I am sure there will be similar in the USA. When Figtree wakes up he may have some useful input as he is States based. Good luck with your search and please keep us posted with your eventual choice Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Blog
    Cockpit deck brass features.
    The aft cockpit deck has two drain holes on the real boat that discharge through a pair of
    outlet
    s on the transom if the boat takes on any water in the cockpit well. On my model the drains are not connected to the
    outlet
    s, thatโ€™s taking the scale accuracy a bit too far ๐Ÿ˜œ, nevertheless I donโ€™t want a couple of holes in my deck letting in water so I need to fill them in with some drain gratings. I made these from some 10mm thick wall brass tubing and some 2mm brass rod. First I filed three narrow slots into the end of the brass tube about half the thickness of the brass rod and soft soldered them into the slots. The rod was then filed flush to the top of the tube to flatten the profile and form the grating slots, and the overhang filed flush with the tube sides. I used a pipe cutter to separate the finished piece from the brass tube and then repeated the process for the second fitting. The grating needs to be blocked so that it doesnโ€™t let water through and I did this by forming a disc out of black plasticard the same diameter as the tube bore as a stopper and filling the base with epoxy to form the seal, the finished drains were then glued into the deck panel flush with the planking. I used some 1.5mm brass rod bent and fashioned to form the handles for the hatches and these were fixed with epoxy through holes in the panel. Another brass feature on the deck are the rivets around the battery hatch, these are actually some domed rivets with a 2mm head and 1mm shaft that I bought online from RB Models (Poland) along with some other excellent items from their range of ships fittings. www.rbmodel.com Finally the deck panel and main hatch cover were sprayed with several coats of satin lacquer. The panel will need some further work to incorporate the towing hook stays and Iโ€™ll cover that in another posting.
    2 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Big Blue
    quite a few years ago I was asked if I could make a model boat hull for a friends son. As then a laminator it was an easy job after making the plug to the approx specs asked for. I made the plug and mould then cast a test moulding asked if i could keep the test mould and was told by all means have one. The mould was handed over when completed and payment ect was made. The test moulding i just stuck in the loft Not knowing I would ever start modeling boats so much later in life. So Now I am into the model boats hobby. Here is the hull with twin
    outlet
    s for the propshaft. And progress so far with the superstructure. Approx 51 inches long 17 inches wide and a depth of 11 inches. As I was paid to do the job nothing in the end belonged to me except the hull I was told I could have. In writing I may add.. Made a flat sheet of laminate and enclosed the whole hull on the top. Cut out an area for the superstructure and as you can see I have started a rough looking superstructure. I have no plans or drawings for this so it will go where ever it ends up I guess.. Apart from the hull I plan on using ALL recycled materials from our local tip. Paint .Plastic and everything else... The big idea apart from saving material from the tip is to make the model at the lowest possible cost. Motors and some other electrical parts will be removed and put into this model from the Ayton cross So all the parts will be transferable from model to model. Well thats the plan anyway. Guess I will have to wait and see how that goes later. Prop shafts props and rudders will be new so NOT replaceable. The timber so far a lump of 4x2 from the tip Free all cut down and sanded. The superstructure I have used a large fliptop plastic white bin from the tip again ยฃ1.00 Superglue bought from the local ยฃ1. shop. Filler and sanding paper I already have. So I have started it. I will update as I go along..
    2 years ago by none
    Forum
    2 motors 1 esc
    Hi Sonar I suggest you try maplins http://www.maplin.co.uk/. Look under components/capacitors and you want the second page ceramic capacitors 0.1uf. If you have a local
    outlet
    it will be quicker. You do not need a dual ESC two identical ESC's is the way to go. If you are considering Mtronik look at http://www.mtroniks.net/cat/ex-demo I have used several of their ESC's and they work well. The ex-demo refers to ESC's that have been tested to spec, so you do know that they will work. Dave
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    Big Blue
    A little bit more of the superstructure done now. Nothing fixed as yet just thinking will it need another top deck ? Something to put all the fittings onto.. As for the two funnels there the same as the Ayton Cross.. except for the top
    outlet
    they are tops off of some lung inhalers.
    2 years ago by none
    Blog
    The Hull Markings
    The paint on the hull has sufficiently hardened and needs a couple of coats of clear lacquer to protect it but before that happens I need to apply the hull markings. The waterslide decal set that was supplied with my kit was probably at least 5 years old when I bought the kit on eBay and they had deteriorated so badly that when I put the large โ€˜FIREโ€™ lettering panel in some warm water it fragmented and clearly was not usable. I called Mike Cummings at vintage Model works and explained my dilemma and he very generously agreed to supply me with a replacement set, and in addition a set of the recently available printed vinyl letters and markings that they now produce. I decided to use the vinyl set as a quick test piece with the waterslide set revealed that the white ink is not solid and therefore not completely opaque. Furthermore I could not eliminate the โ€˜silveringโ€™ effect that happens on waterslide decals despite using various lotions and potions such as Humbrol Decalfix and Microsol/Microset solutions. A test piece with the vinyl lettering sheet was far more successful and when over-lacquered on the test piece the results were very acceptable. Starting with the large FIRE lettering I cut a paper template the same size as the complete word and fixed this with low tack masking tape on the hull, this paper was then outlined in more masking tape to form a window and the vertical spacing of the letters transferred to this to keep the correct spacing. Vertical strips of tape were then used as positioning guides for the letters which were individually cut and placed so that I could eliminate all but the solid white letters and give them a hard edge. Feeling very pleased with myself I removed the masking tape guides and realised to my horror that I had set the baseline of the letters far too close to the waterline and the vertical proportions were completely wrong โ€ฆ.disaster ๐Ÿ˜ฑ Feeling ashamed that I could make such a basic error I abandoned the lettering and called Mike at VMW and described my foolish error, no problem he said, Iโ€™ll send you another vinyl sheet and also some additional drawing that were missing from my kit that would help with detail finishing. My second attempt with the new vinyl sheet employed the same process but I was careful to measure, mark and check the positions (several times!) before starting. The roundel and numerals positions at the bow and the stern were carefully measured and marked using the supplied drawings and masking tape โ€˜guidesโ€™ used to fix their positions before application. Lastly the roman numerals that span the waterline at the bow and stern were marked, cut and individually applied. I also took the opportunity to fix in place a couple of modified 6mm portholes to replicate the aft cockpit drain
    outlet
    s, in the photo is the โ€˜94โ€™ waterslide decal which I later removed and replaced with vinyl when I could not eliminate the โ€˜silveringโ€™ problem. A big Thank You to Mike Cummings at Vintage Model works for replacing the lettering sheets TWICE! and for the extra drawings, I call that exceptional after sales service !. Cheers Mike ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘ .
    2 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    White metal deck fittings.
    In between coats of black paint thereโ€™s time to prepare more of the white metal deck fittings. They all require a bit of a clean up to remove casting lines and flash, and this is easy to do with an assortment of small files, blades and a small suede shoe brush with brass wire โ€˜bristlesโ€™. After a quick clean up with panel wipe I fixed them all to a piece of card with small strips of double sided foam tape to stop them getting blown around by the pressure of the spay can and gave them a couple of light coats of etch primer. To assemble the anchor I used some 2mm brass rod with some brass ends made from some larger diameter brass rod, drilled and filed to a pleasing profile, a bit of plasticard was added to neaten the pivot point and the assembly was also given a coat of etch primer. The cooling water
    outlet
    tube and flange and the dummy exhaust ports (adapted portholes) were primed also. Theyโ€™ll get a coat of black gloss before they are fixed to the stern. Iโ€™ll tackle the fire monitors nextโ€ฆ
    2 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    King-Fisher changes made
    Grandpa, I started with a direct drive Speed 500 on 6 cells (7.2V) and it didn't have the performance I was looking for. I later changed to the Speed 600 and 8 cells (9.6V) and it made a huge difference. I'm not convinced how effective the cooling coil is as the flow from the
    outlet
    is not as much as I anticipated however this could be a function of the poor design of inlet that I'm using. Bottom line is I don't think the cooling coil is necessary. I make up my own battery packs and for this one I use two x four cells, one on each side of the centerline. As I previously stated I was a school boy when I built my original and the hard chines nearly made me throw in the towel. As an impatient youth it appeared to take for ever to plane them to match the bulkheads hence my switch over to laminations of 1/4 x 1/8 on my remake. Have fun and keep up with the posts. Robert
    2 years ago by Robert
    Blog
    Detailing the transom.
    The real boat had some detail on the transom which I would like to incorporate on my model, these are the two main engine exhausts and the pump engine exhaust and there are also two small drain
    outlet
    s from the rear cockpit. As my ESC is water-cooled I want to use the pump engine exhaust detail as my cooling water
    outlet
    . I have used brass portholes as the basis for the exhaust details as they look very similar to the real thing with the rivet holes around the circumferences, the two main engine exhausts are 8mm internal diameter and the pump exhaust is a 6mm internal diameter type. I first removed the rear flanges of the larger portholes by rubbing them flat over some wet & dry paper so that they will sit flush on the transom. I left the flange on the 6mm porthole as it will help locate the assembly in the transom. I used a 6mm external brass tube set into the smaller porthole with a very short protrusion on the external side and about 25mm to pass through the hull to leave 20mm inside the boat to connect the flexible silicone water tube to. Once I was happy with the positioning of the details I drilled the single hole for the water
    outlet
    and slightly countersunk the outside of the hole to allow for the small flange on the rear of the port hole The tube was fixed into the porthole with a light smear of epoxy and when set the assembly was given a coat of etch primer and a couple of light light coats of black gloss and then set aside as I won't fix it in place until the hull has received it final coats of black gloss. I also etch primed and painted the two larger exhaust pipe flanges ready for glueing to the transom. If I can find a couple of even smaller brass portholes, perhaps 3mm, I may also fit them as the cockpit drain ports in the finishing stages. The hull will get a couple of overall coats of clear lacquer to seal this transom detailing and the lettering decals as well.
    3 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    Spraying the deck and superstructure.
    As the spray booth seems to be working as planned I next decided to put some primer on the deck and superstructure. Not much to say about this really, it's not a particularly creative or rewarding process but as this is the foundation of the paint process it's as important as the final coat and thus worth getting right from the outset. After masking off the various openings and the hull I put down the first coat of Halfords grey primer. I pre-warmed the can in a bucket of warm water for a short while and gave it a thorough shake for the prescribed two minutes and it seemed to go on very easily with an even coating. The booth is quite roomy and very easy to move the can around to get into the difficult areas without removing the boat from the booth to turn it around. A second was applied after about 15 minutes and the whole thing left to dry in the booth. I'll tackle the hull next but first I need to mark out the transom for some detailing and drill a hole into my precious hull for the water cooling
    outlet
    . Last picture is yours truly, first and last time you'll see me, much better looking with the mask on I've been told ๐Ÿ‘‹
    3 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    1:12 scale Arun lifeboat (Hand rail stanchions) Part one.
    Hi everyone, this is my first venture into the realms of writing an article so please be patient. I have swapped from gas boats to scale boats about 3 years ago and am enjoying the new challenge. I joined a club and there is a wealth of knowledge to be had and gracefully shared by my new friends, however one of my biggest problems is I like big boats! I have just finished a 1.12 scale Waveney and have already purchased a 1.12 scale Arun to build over the next year or so. I have searched the Internet and all model
    outlet
    s known to man to find good quality hand rail stations at 1:12 scale (not white metal!!) and can't find any! SO.....I decided to make my own and this is how I've made them! Using a white metal 1:12 stanchion as a guide for spacing etc; I purchased a couple of metres of 3mm brass tube, and 100 brass beads 5mm dia (from a great shop called tackle bits 2010 on ebay) I made a jig to cut the tube to size (pic 1) and then made several assembly jigs until I settled on this one (pic 2) It's simple to make using 1mm rod and a block of aluminium. Start by putting a bead on each rod and then putting the cut length of tube in between (pic 3) you can slide all the pieces to make sure they are in line, then apply flux to the joints that are to be soldered and heat with a flame and solder, that's it! As simple as that. Allow to cool and slide off the jig , Polish with wire wool and you're done (pic4) The principle can obviously be applied to different scales making life easier for those of you wanting something better than is available through the shops. Will hopefully post more as the project progresses. Thanks .
    3 years ago by namron
    Blog
    Water pickup scoop
    I'm not very happy with the quality of the plastic water scoop that I have purchased, the threaded portion is only just sufficient to pass through the keel and frankly it looks a bit naff. Equally, the water
    outlet
    I have as similarly poor and I can't seem to find a brass equivalent anywhere, so I decided to make my own. The tube is 6mm brass and needs to be bent and flared as a scoop so to do the bending I made a jig with a fixed circular former that I filed a round groove in around it's circumference and a square block to retain the tube. The tube was then annealed to soften it and bent around the former, I also put a curtain wire inside the tube to prevent the tube crushing and although it helped the tube did distort slightly. Perhaps I should have tried the 'dry salt' or 'fine sand' method but overall I am pleased with end result. Once in place in the hole I drilled through the keel it looks like it will do the job but it definitely needs a flange of sorts to make it look better. Maybe a bit of turned brass ?...... ๐Ÿ’ญ
    3 years ago by robbob
    Blog
    Gunwhale stringers.
    The cabin sides are now glued to the assembly and checked for square and left to dry while I dig out the wallpaper steamer in preparation for steaming the gunwhale stringers. I have a length of aluminium tubing that is ideal for a steaming tube, one end can be sealed using some duct tape and the length of the tube is sufficient to take the strakes over distance that they need to be formed. The
    outlet
    tube of the steamer is long enough to reach outside to prevent condensation inside the workshop and stop my glasses from steaming up too ! About 15 minutes is sufficient to soften the wood and make it very pliable and when ready they are placed in the bench vice and bent to a curvature greater than required so that when they are cold they relax to approximately the right amount. The stringers are actually laminated from two pieces and the inner pieces are fitted first on each side so that the assembly doesn't twist, these are epoxied and pinned into position and lots of clamps used to hold it all together. At all stages the assembly is checked for squareness. The process is repeated for the outer lamination of the gunwhale stringers, and so far I haven't managed to snap anything or scald myself !
    3 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Westbourne Model Centre
    Thanks for adding the link I had been trying without success to find it for hours, listened to it now and not impressed with the excuses , economic climate/ resection if that was the case why do other online shops not have any problem, not wanting to advertise Other
    outlet
    s but I use two of the popular ones mentioned regularly and NEVER had to wait more than three days......enough said.
    3 years ago by Peter501
    Forum
    PCF (Patrol Craft Fast) SWIFT Boat Vietnam Era
    UPaul, That's a nice boat - and a nice build.... Don't be shy of asking a decent figure for it, it may be a model but even these can reach high build cost figures. In 2012 I completed my 46" fire boat after some 14 months work and expenditure of near GBP 2,000! Built using a glass hull the rest is scratch built using copies of Vosper drawings, the vessel is complete with wheelhouse instrumentation & furniture, First-Aid room with bunks, blankets & pillows - & F/Aid Cabinet, steps leading up to deck, on-deck equipment includes working rescue ladder, hoist Derek, boat hook, working fire monitors, stowed life rings, working Nav lights, folding mast, scale Hard Suction Hoses and threaded inlet, Tow hook, Rescue Nets, etc. & Many more small parts, Twin electric propulsion with brass scale exhaust
    outlet
    s..... and on...... Jim Trying to upload photos but 'drop-down' box covers Submit Changes button!
    3 years ago by Aeronut1
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    I have not tried yet BUT I think it may also work if you use a laser printer. So you can design on your computer then generate full sized templates. As to materials lite ply is available from many model
    outlet
    s and can be cut with a scalpel. Balsa is easy to work light and once sealed takes a good finish. Tools well ~laughs~ your not human if you don't have way to many and want even more
    4 years ago by Haverlock
    Response
    Mona's Isle
    Roy thanks for the info I usually buy my Iom sail material & fittings from peter wiles @pj sails it is all good to find new
    outlet
    s as a lot of hobby shops are closing down Happy sailing Bob ๐Ÿ‘‹
    4 years ago by Northumbrian
    Response
    Vosper 1/16th scale crash tender
    Some water under the rear well but most is in the compartment where the prop shaft enters the hull. I have tried to seal the gaps between the formers and the skins of the hull but this may not be totally effective. I should have done this before installing the electrics. Water may still be moving around between compartments. The pump intake pipe and
    outlet
    s look to be OK. Jeremy
    4 years ago by JeremyBB
    Response
    Vosper 1/16th scale crash tender
    Which compartment is the water in?. Have you checked the intake pipe that that feeds the pump? and the
    outlet
    s. Some water can come up the prop tube, but usually very little unless the bearings are very slack. Alan
    4 years ago by AlanP


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