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    Response
    Re: What colors to use?
    Hi E, There are three distributors in USA http://www.billingboats.com/articles/distributors-america.html Nearest ones to you are in NJ or NY. There's also one in CA. Only place in this list I know (knew🙄) is Las Condes, Santiago de Chile. Was often there in the nineties for meetings with MoD /Navy and our agent there.😉 The Billing
    paint
    s are small bottles and quite expensive, and you'll need an air-brush for the big bits!! I'd look for the nearest R-O or Tamiya spray can equivalent if I were you. The excellent conversion chart that Martin found can help you there 😊 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS the
    paint
    numbers are on page 16 of the Building Instructions. Seems they've stopped putting them up with BB numbers, now just in triangles!! See pic.
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Re: More done
    Thanks Doug, I hope I can do her justice. Like you, I really like the Tamiya rattle cans, I was going to use my airbrush but the Tamiya
    paint
    s are working well right now. Have you ever tried the Tamiya acrylic for airbrushing? I’m thinking about giving that a go sometime. Cash
    2 months ago by Cashrc
    Response
    Re: Chine strakes and hull
    paint
    ing
    Hi Graham. I'm pleased to see that you have started a 'refit' blog, and from what you've posted so far shows a remarkable improvement. The addition of the chine strakes have clearly been a worthwhile addition too. I also had a similar issue with the Halfords gloss lacquer coat being very 'soft' for a long time and easily marked, the hardening process does seems to take some time and so I did have to flat down the gloss lacquer on my boat and re-finish it too. Body repairers use an infra red lamp to dry and cure base coat and clear coat finishes before they polish it to a high gloss finish as I found out when I had a small repair done on my car by a mobile 'Chips Away' type repair company. They advised me that the drying/curing process does take time if the finish isn't 'baked' in a
    paint
    shop spray booth/oven. Curiously the red anti fouling on mine was finished with a satin lacquer and didn't suffer from any such problems and the hull sits on some neoprene pads on the stand with no ill effects. Keep up the great work👍. Robbob.
    2 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    More done
    Real quick update. I built up the stuffing tube and rudder post. Both are made from 6mm brass tube in which you install flanged 6x3 mm bushings. They’re a tight fit, but I soldered themin just in case. I installed the rudder post tube into the hull, followed by the ply bushings that are glued in place over the tube and against the hull, then slathered epoxy over the joint. I also started test fitting some of the motor mount parts to get an idea how this will all fit. Hopefully I’ll get more done this weekend, once the power system is in, I can concentrate on finishing up the upper superstructure, then, it’s time to
    paint
    and detail. Thinking about either airbrushing her or Tamiya rattle can. The Tamiya
    paint
    s aren’t cheap, but they cover well and dry fast.
    2 months ago by Cashrc
    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the ‘Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a ‘Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately £2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of £48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more ‘hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as ‘strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone ‘off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for
    paint
    ing and finishing.
    1 year ago by robbob
    Forum
    GLUE FOR ABS
    I used acetone for internal reinforcing strips (ABS to ABS) or sticking an ABS bracket to the hull etc. You just use a small
    paint
    brush and run some acetone along the edge while clamping the part. You have to be careful on the outside as it will mark the ABS finish if you get a run. I'm assuming it's still the same material Graupner used to make hulls out of (I had a Commodore and still have an Optimist from the 70s). Try a drop on some scrap to see if it will melt the ABS. If it does, you can also make an ABS 'putty' from scrap material softened with acetone for smoothing a seam etc (sets fast though).
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    Most of the good stuff has gone now, most solvent based sanding sealers etc are waterbased now, (even car
    paint
    s are going waterbased). Waterbased stuff just doesn't get the same results as the old
    paint
    s etc (fade like mad down here in NZ sun) and are not much good if you don't want to wet your project, or later
    paint
    with acrylic enamel (solvent based) or enamel. On the other hand, I use
    paint
    ers (art) acrylic
    paint
    s for some finishing work and interiors on the models. It's totally waterproof and you can mix any colour you like. I've used the metallics on the rudders and props on my HSL (even the boot topping stripe) and it's stuck really well, despite the props spinning at 15000 rpm max revs. I guess it can have a place on certain modelling jobs. John B
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    Well, if we have finished discussing ladies' underwear, I would like to go on with the discussion on plan creation... Actually,
    paint
    finishes on EeZeBilts is a bit of a problem. It's true that balsa is not a good surface to
    paint
    on, and a common trick has been to cover it - with tissue, brown paper, nylons or fibreglass - and then work on that. I have always found this to be a bit fiddly and time-consuming, and prefer to get a reasonable surface with sanding sealer, then use car spray
    paint
    s and finish off with spray lacquer. Remember to seal the inside as well - balsa can swell like anything if it absorbs water. I'm currently trying sprayed acrylic
    paint
    s in an effort to lower the cost - they seem to work if well sealed.. Anyway, back to the design... It turns out that this hull is not a simple one to convert to an EeZeBilt. The angles on it make the shape critical to get right, and we have no measurements or any precise pictures at right angles. Still, we will do our best... Now we have got a basic hull shape, we look at it, compare with pictures and see if it looks right... When I did this, I thought that the stern should be fatter and the hull should taper towards the bow. Martin555 pointed out that the funnel should be lower and wider, and the mast should be wider... so I tweaked the hull and superstructure until it looked a bit closer... compare fig 10 with fig 11. As we develop a reasonable plan and elevation, we can start to consider cross-sections. In this case I am thinking about powering the hull with water-jets, so I think about where they will fit. Most of the hull can be a simple box structure which the egg-box design is great for - it will only need a different approach at the bow. In fig 12 you can see various stern cross-sections being tried out for jet fitting and similarity to the rear photo. A CAD package is really handy here - you can just nudge lines and angles until they look OK. When the hull shape looks like it's settled down, we can add the cross bulkheads. You can see these in fig 13. From this drawing we will be able to generate the bulkhead shapes, the deck and sub-deck and the keel, just by measurement. But only for the main part of the hull. We will leave the ways you can do EeZebilt bows for the next session...
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    paint
    ing etc. On Andrea Gail
    Went out to my hobby store & bought some
    paint
    & man hobby
    paint
    sure is expensive these day's . Because the model was never made to be a R/C boat a lot of thinking has to go into how to get into the hull to change batteries & if anything go'es wrong with the electronics you need to find a way to remove decks to get into her for repairs . Still a lot of fine details to complete but I'm almost there . I would like to post a video of her maiden voyage but not to sure how to do that .
    4 months ago by GARTH
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    "...I suppose depending on the cutting head you will be able to cut thin sheet plastic?...." The basic machine is just a precise 3-D positioning device. You then tie anything you want onto the end, depending on the job you want to do. A router or a laser will cut wood, a milling bit will cut metal, a knife will cut vinyl or paper. A plastic extrusion head will let you build up plastic shapes, a pen would let you write letters, and I suppose a
    paint
    brush would let you create watercolours... For every material there is a workholding requirement, and a set-up and run optimisation process to undertake, but the principle is simple.
    4 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    "..I should not jump to conclusions, due to the lack of information maybe I should have researched before submitting my last post...." Hi Martin - I agree with DG - we all do it from time to time . No need for apologies - you were asking the right question anyway. Can remember reading an article on getting the warps out - for the life of me cant remember where - going through a lot of back issues at the moment - very confusing as the brain fades...........Was hoping someone else may have read it - Don't think using better half's hairdryer would go down too well - and the
    paint
    stripper heat gun would simply melt the plastic !
    5 months ago by redpmg
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Hi Elsrickle, Those are the same drawings that I posted 6 days ago. if I remember correctly Martin (Westquay) sent them to me a year or so ago to ask me to enhance them a little so we could decipher the text describing the
    paint
    s used. Thanks for blowing up the text 👍 It confirms as I had posted; decks, cabin sides and tops were all the same shade of grey. https://www.e-
    paint
    .co.uk/Lab_values.asp?cRange=BS%20381C&cRef=BS381C%20631&cDescription=Light%20grey Decks non-slip, cabins smooth. No white anywhere. But if you like white - Why not?😉 Cheers, Doug
    5 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Hints and Tips.
    paint
    TUB WORK STAND Hi Guys, I use old
    paint
    tub's as work/display stands. Remove the handle. Cut out the desired shape for your boat at the top of the tub. Line the cutout with rubber hose. It is ideal for holding your models when you are working on them. With some modifications you could use it to but your boats in the water and retrieve them as it is made from plastic. Martin.
    5 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Hints and Tips.
    Love it,,sod's law,, I’ve just renewed mine .I used my last one to make a
    paint
    stirer, ideal for the tinlets.
    5 months ago by KenThompson
    Forum
    Hints and Tips.
    So simple, yet brilliant, I too can relate to knocking over pots of glue and
    paint
    jars. Thank you.
    6 months ago by KenThompson
    Forum
    Hints and Tips.
    CLEAN FINISH ON PLASTIC Hi Guys Another little tip this is mainly for the beginner to plastic kit model making. After sanding holes or small parts it tends to leave small wispy bits I have found that if you use a small
    paint
    brush and liquid plastic glue and brush over the area it cleans it up and leaves a nice Finnish. As you may of gathered I also tinkering with plastic kits. I also use this when working with plastic card. The photos are just for demonstration,But you can see the results on the railings on my Gato. Martin.
    6 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Glue
    Hi, For the plastic card I use humbrol liquid poly (see photo)and applied with a small
    paint
    brush. And I also use super glue and if I apply it to small areas after it has been
    paint
    ed I use a thin piece if electrical wire, (sometimes just one strand)and for a larger area I use a cocktail stick. For two part epoxy I use different sizes of plastic card depending on how much I use. I hope this helps.
    6 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Motor Anti-Submarine Boat MA/SB
    My latest project, a 1/24 scale MA/SB is currently taking shape. The vessel is based upon the 63ft BPBCo launch and I understand some had planked decks. There is nothing I like better than planking a deck but I can find no reference to MA/SBs having anything other than metal decks. My recommended reference book is Caostal Craft History Vol.2 which only tells me that planked decks were usually varnished whilst metal decks were usually
    paint
    ed grey. Can anyone assist please? Steve
    10 months ago by cormorant
    Forum
    Hints & Tips
    Would it be possible to start a topic on hints & tips in building? For instance I struggled for years with filler application , and when going through my old artist type oil
    paint
    s etc to pass on to my kids , came across some old W&N palette knives. They work a treat from the very small to very large applications. Had bought a cheap set before leaving UK from one of those outlets that pop up from around Christmas, dug that one out and the broad and angled blades work well for the large applications. The flexible heads push the filler in very well and practically no wastage.
    7 months ago by redpmg
    Blog
    Fairmount Alpine - TUG!
    I have to admit I'm a bit of a novice and tend to work on my own a lot, although I have looked at build videos on YouTube. I often wonder about the best time to
    paint
    the various bits as it seems some will be difficult to do later. So I
    paint
    ed the guard rail uprights and glued them in... then clamped the
    paint
    ed guard rails (proper names?) then started adding the hull sides, glued, clamped, and pinned where necessary. Size comparison picture with tug Annabelle (Billings Banckert) Fairmount is 1:75 scale, Banckert is 1:48
    2 years ago by Harvey Kitten
    Forum
    New forum rankings.
    LifeColor accurate naval
    paint
    s and original
    paint
    scheme prints do? Snag; sending
    paint
    s through the post or courier services! RATS!!😭
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Directory
    (Naval Ship) Sir Kay (T241)
    This is my Sir Kay (T241) - Round Table Class Minesweeper. it is from the Caldercraft range and I was fortunate to recently acquire it - I would have much preferred to have built it but couldn't miss the opportunity of it being given to me by an old retiring modeller. it just needed new RC throughout, a good clean, a tidy up and some fresh
    paint
    here and there plus a bit of rigging renewal. Not tried it in the water yet but will do tomorrow at our Club meet. (Motor: MFA Geared 2.5:1) (ESC: Mtroniks) (5/10)
    1 year ago by ads90
    Response
    Anteno 2 tug
    I feel I have to comment on your Anteo Tug, that has to be one of the neatest planked hulls I have seen in a while, and the
    paint
    job on the hull is quite incredible, wow. I built this kit back in the 1970s and it definitely is and was really good value for money, none of your white metal rubbish, near enough everything was brass and good quality. I opted for the authentic look and fitted a steam plant into the hull, not an easy job to cut down and strengthen all those ribs, but worth it in the end. Enjoy your hobby.Regards.Gary.
    8 months ago by GaryLC
    Blog
    Mast assembly
    The supplied mast is of white metal and although OK it has a number of minus points for me. 1- The mast does not lend its self to being hinged. 2- It really needs navigation light on top and the supplied casting is not suitable for this. 3- wiring needs to be hidden, not easy with the casting 4- it’s quite heavy Having said all that it’s ok if you don’t want my wish list. So on with the manufacture of a replica, I chose brass as the preferred material because it’s easy to silver and soft solder. The main legs are made from 6mm round tube, which I squeezed in my machine vice to an oval shape to look like the castings, each of the ends were then squeezed again at 90 degrees to allow then to join to the cross mid-section. I made some brass inserts for the hinged end from 2mm brass sheet, which are bent by 25 degrees to allow the hinge mechanism to sit at 90 degrees to the cabin roof, these are drilled and tapped 8BA. These pieces actually block the end of the oval tube and need to have a 2mm slot milled in them to allow the wires to exit the tube; these are soft soldered in place later. Two feet were made from two pieces of 2mm brass plate the base plate being slotted to accept the upright and finally silver soldered together. (A point here for silver soldering is to use as little solder as possible and allow it to flow with the heat around the joint this means that no filing is needed. I find it’s also good practice to quench the part when nearly cool to break the glass like residue of the flux then just steel wool is required to clean the parts). The feet upstands were then drilled 8BA clearance and the base fixing holes drilled the same size. The cross mid-section is made from 1mm brass sheet and is bent through 360 degrees whilst placing a 6mm round bar in the centre to create a hole for the top mast. A small wooden former was used as the piece was pressed together in the machine vice, this was then silver soldered to give stability and then filed to shape. This piece has to accommodate the wires passing through, so again a 2mm slot is milled from each leg location to the centre to create passage up to the top mast. The top mast is just stock tubing which then has a turned top with four 5mm holes machined at 90 degrees to accommodate the LED. This is a 5mm Flat top wide angle LED this will direct the light out of the four holes. Finally the cross piece, again stock tube with small ball finials at each end soft soldered in place and tapped 10 BA for the pulley blocks. All pieces now made, it’s time to assemble the parts using a combination of soft soldering and epoxy resin. The wire that I used was silicon sheaved, and when I soldered the legs to the mid-section and lower hinge piece I made sure there was enough wire to pull through to check if the process had damaged the wire, but it hadn’t. So having soldered the LED, the top was epoxied to the upper tube and the tube epoxied to the mid-section. Finally the mid-section was filled using Milliput but first putting some Vaseline on the wires to avoid them being stuck should I ever have to rewire the unit. Next the cross beam was added and epoxied in place. The bottom of the legs looked plain compared with the cast version so I have made some thin gauge brass covers with mock bolts as per the original. The whole assembly was cleaned up ready for a first coat of etch primer, and white primer, followed later with a final coat of appliance white
    8 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    paint
    ing over epoxy
    On fibreglass you could use an etching primer which is a modified alkyd primer that produces a sound base coat on wood, steel, fiberglass, aluminum surfaces. but you should use an ordinary primer before the top coat. Halfords do a spray etch primer.
    8 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    funnel mounts and deck hatches
    Nice work, can I offer a very simple but effective improvement to the Cowl Vents, just cut small circle of black card and stick it in the red area and it looks as if there is a hole to the interior, then just
    paint
    with a matt varnish. I did mine and I think they look good
    8 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    paint
    ing over epoxy
    I have used several Halfords Aerosol spray cans on boats over the recent years. In each case I have sanded the hull down to bare wood as the boats were vintage ones and did have coats of
    paint
    on them that could not be identified. Best to use thin applications of both primer then
    paint
    then build up on that after leaving 24 hours between each coat. Another good point is that Halfords also stock plastic primer in their
    paint
    s range which is ideal if your boat has a polystyrene hull or you have plastic fittings. Boaty😎
    8 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    paint
    ing over epoxy
    Halfods spray cans will work brilliantly of if you know of someone who works in a body shop get them to spray it with 2 pak
    paint
    for you Dave
    8 months ago by Dave J
    Response
    paint
    ing the hull – Part 1 primer & anti fouling.
    Panel wipes...one of the best thing going, used to wipe over before final coat with ispropanol alcohol, but panel wipes are much easier, and of no cost really.
    8 months ago by Rookysailor
    Blog
    funnel mounts and deck hatches
    Fitted the "legs" to the wheel house so now at correct height when on the deck. Funnel mounts done (just need to finish the funnels, workout what holes to drill and then mount the funnels to the mounts) so we added 2 hatches to each mount,
    paint
    ed white with brass hinges. the one placed between the Cowl vents is open, the one at the back is closed. as we only had "closed" hatches put a triangle shaped bit of plastic under the "open" hatch to prop open. When dry mounting the Cowl Vents found an issue with the rear vents as they are suppose to be higher than the wheelhouse and the ones i got where not, so found 2 wooden cotton reels the right height and turned then down to the correct width using the pillar drill as a lathe,
    paint
    ed them up and then placed the Cowl vents on those. also
    paint
    ed the "flat" vents chrome and stuck those to the mounts as well. to finish off these all we have to do is fit the breather pipes and ladder to funnels and fix the funnels to the mounts (allowing for the front funnel to have the hole for the smoke generator. Started work on the 2 deck hatches using 1mm plastic sheet. Made the 2 housings up and the planked and varnished them ready for the hatches. found out i had only enough hatches to do 1 housing, so drilled a 7mm hole in the hatch for a 10mm brass porthole,
    paint
    ed white with brass hinges. once dry stuck them on the housing ready to go. (ordered some more hatches to i can complete the other housing lol) one last thing was to start on the wheel box. Found in "The Works" in town a heart shaped box which was almost perfect for a mold for the thin wood that was steamed to shape and then held on the heart to fix the curve in place. next to do is to make up the front and back of the wheel boxes and stick the "curved" wood to that
    8 months ago by barryskeates
    Response
    paint
    ing the hull – Part 1 primer & anti fouling.
    I always use panel wipes as a result of my experience with spaying kit cars, the same methodology applies even though the item is somewhat smaller and in a way its more important as the finished item often gets closer scrutiny.
    8 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    paint
    ing the hull – Part 1 primer & anti fouling.
    Doesn't everybody use panel wipe ??..... .....Actually.....I didn't until I got some grease or silicone on a surface to be
    paint
    ed and it was the devil's 👿 job to get it off so that the
    paint
    didn't react....lesson learned 😁. I use it all the time now 👍 Robbob
    8 months ago by robbob
    Response
    paint
    ing the hull – Part 1 primer & anti fouling.
    Haleluia someone who actually does the
    paint
    ing stage right for a change using Panel Wipe top marks there. Dave
    8 months ago by Dave J
    Blog
    paint
    ing the hull – Part 1 primer & anti fouling.
    There’s no putting it off any longer, I need to start
    paint
    ing the hull before I do any more on the boat so the hull was given a final rub down with a fine abrasive and then the deck and gunwales carefully masked off. I used some panel wipe to thoroughly de-grease all the surfaces and then put the hull in the ‘spray booth’ on my turntable and applied two coats of Halfords grey primer. I left this for a couple of days to dry and harden off before setting it on my bench. The next stage involves levelling the hull fore and aft and side to side so that the waterline can be established. Fortunately the well deck floor is meant to be perfectly level when the boat is afloat and at rest and this is the datum I used to level to using a couple of spirit levels. The rough waterline points were measured off the plan and transferred to the hull to be used as approximate starting points for the waterline. For my previous build I bought a self-levelling laser to indicate the waterline so this was brought out for the same purpose. The laser level was placed on another workbench a couple of metres away and gradually raised with packing pieces until the projected line agreed with the rough position marks I’d made on the hull and then finely adjusted until the line was correct and pencil marks made at intervals along the projected line. The process was repeated for the other side of the hull and then also marked across the stern, fortunately the stern line and bow markings joined up accurately confirming that the levelling was spot on. Good quality low tack masking tape was then applied all around the hull and the area above the line masked off with a couple of layers of newspaper. The exposed hull was then keyed with a fine Scotchbrite type pad and cleaned off with panel wipe before two coats of Halfords red oxide primer applied as the anti-fouling.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    end of week report LOL
    good week this week, i should of said that there are 2 of us working on this Tug, myself and my father. this means that we are splitting the work up and as he is retired he can spend some more time on the boat than i can. so, (and i forgot to take the "before" photos) we have the wheelhouse and the platform it sits on (as the platform is held above the deck on a number of legs. plasticard and wood veneer outer cladding with a (removable) roof. going to put lighting in the table, telegraph, binnacle, map table and ships wheel.
    paint
    ed the 4 Cowl vents then we dry fitted (placed no glue) the various parts( wheel house, funnels, mounts) into place on the deck to see how it looks. finally
    paint
    ed the funnels yellow to match the Cowl vents still to do on the Funnel mounts is to
    paint
    and place the vents (flat vents), fit the Cowl vents,
    paint
    and fit the hatch covers (white hatches with bronze hinges) fit the pipework to the exterior of the funnels drill holes in the front mount for the steam generator funnel and finally mount the funnels to the mounts (so not too much just for those 2 bits)
    8 months ago by barryskeates
    Response
    Basic hull construction completed
    I guess you will only be able to tell properly is when it's primered. I suppose you could always fill it and resand - that will be my fallback position! Is the motor size in the instructions? Had a look at a build article and it's not in there. if you haven't got it it's well worth getting because as well as the build of that very kit Dave Milbourn has written an article on finishing nd
    paint
    ing which I'm reffering to. it's the Model Boats Winter Special Edition 2018. Chris
    8 months ago by ChrisF
    Forum
    Planking
    What type of boat/ship if its purely a sport boat you can cover the planking with tissue and dope then high build primer. Sand it down and
    paint
    with whatever takes your fancy. On the other hand if your wanting the planking to show ( scale type model) you need to seal the wood on the outside and inside with a decent varnish that should provide all sealing you need.
    8 months ago by Haverlock
    Blog
    Deck Parts
    good weekend Made up,
    paint
    ed and planked up the engine cover and the 2 funnel stands. Funnel stands need to have the Cowl vents, funnels, hatches and tow mounts fitted to them. Need top make up, create,
    paint
    all of those first of course😁 also looking at a steam generator to go into the front Funnel so a hole will be drilled into the mount for that as well
    8 months ago by barryskeates
    Response
    Mowe 2
    Good looking boat.Nice clean
    paint
    job.Looks good on the water.
    8 months ago by Donnieboy
    Blog
    vintage yacht (Victoria)
    restoring a vintage free sail yacht have named this as there is no name on the yacht after removing 4 colour layers of
    paint
    from the hull and 2 days sanding I re
    paint
    ed with 5 layers of
    paint
    rubbing down with 2000 grade between each coat
    1 year ago by jacko
    Response
    paint
    ing
    Thanks Doug. Do you have any idea as to why white spray
    paint
    is much more difficult to get good coverage with than most other colours.🤓
    9 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Blog
    PS Enterprise
    The Top deck is now complete. The hull is partially
    paint
    ed and the construction of the superstructure has begun and the rudder is now attached
    9 months ago by rcmodelboats
    Forum
    paint
    ing white metal
    Good evening Can someone advise me on the correct method to
    paint
    white metal fittings, the fittings I have, had been
    paint
    ed several times,so I have scrapped the layers off down to bare metal,do I have to prime or can I brush
    paint
    straight on. Which is best enamel or acrylic. Thanks Roger
    9 months ago by Rogal118
    Forum
    paint
    ing white metal
    Thanks to you all that's cleared that up for me,your explanations are clear and now I know what to do. I will post photos as I proceed. Thanks once again for your time.Roger
    9 months ago by Rogal118
    Forum
    paint
    ing white metal
    I found the enamel over acrylic comment interesting I have never had a reaction between acrylic and enamel
    paint
    s. The only reaction I have seen ( to my chagrin) was cellulose over enamel ( do not do it EVER) enamel over cellulose is fine. Acrylic not using powerful solvents tends to be safe over anything and once "set" pretty resistant to the solvents in enamel
    paint
    . However when it comes to a
    paint
    ing sequence I have actually used cellulose ( clear shrinking dope) followed by enamel for base colour then acrylic for details.
    9 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    Richardson/Southampton Smoke Generator
    Hi, Ed: I did more web searching & struck gold. I found some excellent photos & great information about the Southampton’s smoke system (the Southampton is identical to the Richardson except
    paint
    & markings). Smoke fluid goes in the little tube on component “B”, not “A”. When the deckhouse floor is installed that little tube fits snugly into a raised ring on the inside surface of the deckhouse floor. The rubber plug goes through a hole in the deckhouse floor (see photos) to seal it up the filler tube. I’m going to rework the filler tube arrangement by enlarging the hole in the floor so it’ll fit around an extension tube that I’ll add onto the existing filler tube. I’ll seal the extended filler tube with a snug-fitting vinyl cap (I have dozens of vinyl caps on hand). Doing this modification will make it a lot easier for my clumsy fumble-fingers when smoke fluid needs to be added. I emailed Hobby Engine today via their website’s “contact us” page & asked them for information about the smoke system. I’m also going to contact Nick at Harbor Models tomorrow & ask him for advice as you suggested. I’ll be sure to “tell him Ed sent me”! By the way, have you had any contact with Doug (RNinMunich) lately? I half expected him to offer up some advice about this topic. A couple of weeks ago I replied to something he posted on the “LED Mast Lights” topic, but he didn’t respond. I also sent him a PM to ask how he’s doing, but he didn’t respond. He used to reply pretty much right away whenever I asked him a question or for advice. I hope he’s all right & I also hope I didn’t say something that insulted him in some way. He did a lot of design work for my tug’s lighting upgrade project. That upgrade is definitely going to get done; it’s been held up all along by a string of eye infections, then my fall, surgery & recovery. if you hear from him please say “hello” for me. I’ll post back later on & share whatever information I receive about the smoke system or fluid from either Hobby Engine or Nick at Harbor Models. Thanks for your input & advice, Ed. I appreciate it! Thanks, Pete
    9 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Forum
    paint
    ing white metal
    Hi Roger, Metal fittings of any kind and white metal figures can be
    paint
    ed with either Humbrol type
    paint
    (enamel) or Acrylic
    paint
    ,both will need their own primer, but remember😱. you can
    paint
    enamel over acrylic, but not the other way (acrylic over enamel). Most of the fittings I get in my Deans Marine warships are white metal and resin, I use Halfords plastic primer (grey or white) then use acrylic
    paint
    from various company's to finish off. Hope this is of some help to you.😊 cheers Peter👍
    9 months ago by Rookysailor
    Forum
    paint
    ing white metal
    Hi Rogal, Whatever it is (wood, fibre glass, plastic, white or any other colour metal) PRIME IT! Primers are designed to give the top coat
    paint
    s something to stick to. Otherwise they will scratch easily and flake off especially from smooth plastic or metallic surfaces etc. Enamel or acrylic? Your choice, just make sure both are the same basis otherwise you may get a nasty reaction when you apply the top coat😲 Acrylics are usually easier to use, don't pong, and the brushes can be cleaned in warm water😊 Happy
    paint
    ing, cheers, Doug 😎
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Shroud for Model Air Boat
    Hello, CPO: I agree with Joe727. I’d use a high quality two-part epoxy for sure & maybe some sort of small fasteners, too, if there’s room for them. When I was about eight years old my father had a real air boat named “Banshee”. She was
    paint
    ed bright red & was an absolute blast to ride in, although I remember being more than slightly terrified on a few occasions. Dad modified her four-cylinder airplane engine to the point that she’d easily get close to 60 knots. Dad only opened her up that much in summer in late afternoon or early evening when there wasn’t much wind. Believe me, calm air or not, at 55 to 60 knots when the boat virtually goes airborne it’s white-knuckle terrifying, especially when sitting in a “bar stool” high above the water!
    9 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Forum
    Shroud for Model Air Boat
    Hello, Airboats are not something I have real experience with, but your one comment got my attention: SuperGlue, or CA, an abbreviation, as it is commonly referred to. It does not withstand constant exposure to water. it is not waterproof. Now there is likely to be a storm of comments against this, but this is based upon experience over 20 years. CA is great and I do use it for some applications on my boats. However if it's below the waterline make certain to adequately sealed or properly
    paint
    ed over it. This is a good rule for most glues that sit below the water, with the exception of truely waterproof glues like epoxy. Good luck with your projects. Cheers Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727


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