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    Forum
    Motor Anti-Submarine Boat MA/SB
    My latest project, a 1/24 scale MA/SB is currently taking shape. The vessel is based upon the 63ft BPBCo launch and I understand some had planked decks. There is nothing I like better than
    planking
    a deck but I can find no reference to MA/SBs having anything other than metal decks. My recommended reference book is Caostal Craft History Vol.2 which only tells me that planked decks were usually varnished whilst metal decks were usually painted grey. Can anyone assist please? Steve
    11 months ago by cormorant
    Response
    Hull finishing touches
    Stuart - as you can see from the article in Model Boats, Colin has fitted a contrasting timber to the perimeter of the hull and up the centre of the bow and then infilled with
    planking
    . Another method is to veneer the deck and just varnish it or drawn lines on it with Biro or pencil before varnishing. SLEC do laser etched ply but the planks are straight. Really it depends on how accurate you want the result to be and how much time you want to spend on it. With my Huntsman 28 build I'm just using birch ply and varnishing it whilst with my larger Swordsman 33 (but same scale) I'm going the whole hog and
    planking
    it. Chris
    9 months ago by ChrisF
    Blog
    The well deck floor & sides.
    The โ€˜boxโ€™ of the prototype Iโ€™m building is made of balsa wood, later production models are produced in ply and have the
    planking
    lines laser etched on the floor panels, and as balsa doesnโ€™t take stain particularly well I have used separate obeche panels to line the box internally that can be finished with the Teak stain that Iโ€™m using. This does, however, mean that I can apply the deck lines using a black indelible marker pen and incorporate some detail lines around the motor housing. I started by cutting and shaping two obeche panels that join along the centre line of the deck and fit neatly around the motor mount and prop-shaft, then I used some tracing paper over the panels to make a test pattern for the
    planking
    lines. When I was happy with the layout of the lines I first applied two coat of Teak stain to the panels, and when that was dry I used a .8mm pen to mark the deck lines, the ink takes a while to dry fully and I found it all too easy to smudge some lines ๐Ÿ˜ก which had to be very quickly taken off with a dampened cotton bud and re-applied. After 24 hours the ink had fully dried and was impervious to smudging and resistant to removal by any means (except a solvent). The floor panels were then glued down to the balsa floor with an even spread of aliphatic glue and weighted down over all of the area as there was a tendency for the panels to curl and lift. Each side panel was made in one piece and then separated into two parts to make the fitting easier, the join will be covered with a vertical detail strip, and they were also stained before being glued and clamped in place. No lining detail was applied to the side panels as Iโ€™ll do this with other surface applied pieces later but only in the area outside of the cabin. All the panels were given a couple of coats of satin lacquer to enhance and protect the finish.
    9 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    planking
    To make the hull water tight I use a product called z-poxy it's a 2 part product mixed in hardener and resin of the same amounts and I use a layer of fibber cloth and them the z-poxy smooth as best you can about 30 min. time to use and then let harden over night at least 24 hours and them you can sand and finish with filler if needed or some more coats of z-poxy sanding after each coat. Rick
    9 months ago by Newby7
    Forum
    planking
    I'm looking into building a planked hull and need some advice on how to make the hull water tight. Regards Dave Van Daley
    9 months ago by Davevand
    Forum
    planking
    SH-One-T happens!๐Ÿ˜ฒ
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    planking
    reduce-reuse-recycle :)
    9 months ago by billmcl61
    Forum
    planking
    No sh*t๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚
    9 months ago by marky
    Response
    Commission 44347
    I also have the same model, i struggled a bit with the balsa
    planking
    but eventually managed it. I was never happy with my UK version of the upperworks so ive since stripped it all down & am basically starting all over again but with the hull intact
    9 months ago by ibobide
    Forum
    planking
    because I am tight fisted and wanted to get my monies worth! ๐Ÿ˜œ
    9 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    planking
    Haverlock, If the smell is an issue, why not try new nappy liners?
    9 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    planking
    if you can stand the smell get some nappy liners and lay them on the hull then saturate with polyester resin ( + hardener). Once it set hard ( give it a week) you can sand it down with 600 used wet. Gives a smooth finish that is almost invisible. Sealed and hard wearing.
    9 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    planking
    Hi Dave, I was faced with the same question last year when renovating and restoring the hull of an ancient Billing Boats Fish Cutter 'Gina 2' that I had inherited. The Blog gives blow by blow account of how I stabilised and waterproofed the hull. https://model-boats.com/builds/view/43305?goto=43306 Otherwise Haverlock is quite right too๐Ÿ‘ I would have liked to have had a varnished wood finish but the original hull construction was so bad I had to fill it (after applying glass-fibre tissue to the inside) and the green filler gave it a tortoise shell effect!!๐Ÿ˜ฒ have fun. Cheers, Doug๐Ÿ˜Ž
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    planking
    What type of boat/ship if its purely a sport boat you can cover the
    planking
    with tissue and dope then high build primer. Sand it down and paint with whatever takes your fancy. On the other hand if your wanting the
    planking
    to show ( scale type model) you need to seal the wood on the outside and inside with a decent varnish that should provide all sealing you need.
    9 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    Bending balsa
    Hello, I am having a problem with the final stages of
    planking
    on my Billing Boats St Canute!! I am very interested with your method, could you please let me know what you are using in your 50-50 mix? I normally have a huge amount of patience as I have built a couple of plany on frame boats but some some reason I am really having a problem with this build... Thank you very much Regards Richard
    10 months ago by Richard7
    Directory
    (Other) RTTL 2751
    model was originally built by myself using a mixture of Vic Smeed plans and photographs/plans from a gent called Christian - my model is double-planked. Outer
    planking
    is scale sized; props both drive the same way as in the original boats. (ESC: ACTion) (8/10)
    10 months ago by JOHN
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona - the hull
    So... here is a compressed build blog of my paddle tug Iona... and I'm playing catch-up as the vessel is 95% complete and has been sailed already, but there may be some interest in what I've done. Iona was scratch-built off plan and has turned out to be the cheapest build so far out of 3 I've made, mainly because I was able to source materials from the leftovers box! it's a 'mixed-media' boat ๐Ÿ˜œusing traditional methods of plank on frame hull, with paddles made on my 3D printer, and other parts turned on the lathe. So starting with the hull, frames were drawn out, transferred to some scrap 9mm ply and cut out on my bandsaw, along with the keel. These were assembled on a build board with some right angle brackets / measuring tools and test fitted before being stuck in place with epoxy. This was quite difficult as the shape of the hull is critical and comes right at the start of the build. I did remake 1 frame to correct alignment. The deck stringers need to bend in 2 directions, so some steaming with a carpet steam cleaner attached to some tubes worked and the wood clamped in place to dry. Outboard sponsons (?) were fitted to make a frame for the paddle boxes to fit on. Then a large sheet of ply forms the bottom of the hull, and the only job left to complete was the (tedious)
    planking
    . This was my 1st plank on frame ship... and it took ages. I think it came out reasonably OK but I'm not a perfectionist and I know if I'd spent more time it could be better... but I didn't! Next blog will feature building the paddle boxes and superstructure.๐Ÿค“
    10 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona- paddle boxes & superstructure
    Building the paddle boxes was remarkably easy, once the 1mm ply had been steamed for bending. I decided to build the boxes first and make sure the paddles fitted inside later, the idea being that all this would come apart for maintenance should it be necessary. (it usually is!). There are few models to be found on the internet to use as reference and hardly any images of the original tug. And to confuse matters, PS Iona also existed as a passenger ship, as well as tug, and looked a bit different. The superstructure is really simple and quick to build, with some more
    planking
    ! Am liking
    planking
    small areas now. The funnels came from some scrap plastic tubing in the garage... just the right diameter too, a lucky find. These will screwed in place from below once I have the other funnel parts made. I plan to run the tug on batteries rather than steam, as I am a relative novice to model boat building. The whole deck will be fitted with 1mm ply as a base before... more
    planking
    ! Before all this is glued in place, I thought it best to water test the ship first and see how much ballast I am likely to need.
    10 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Response
    Clamp Chaos
    Steve, You are quite right, I intend to flip it over, build some jigs, when it's time to do the hull "
    planking
    ". My methods are to experiment along the way on a Build, try different ideas along the way. Decided that I first wanted to build a very straight, rigid keel with stern and bow ribs first. That's why the build board is just a lightweight flat straight surface, I figure out how to clamp it best as I go. Your interest and comments are appreciated, it made me think more about the
    planking
    , thanks! Joe
    10 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Determine Scale / Ribs / HELP with building board ideas?
    To clarify this build, it will be a RC Sailing Boat with full functioning rudder and sails. I say this as I am using the PEARL for its design overall, but as to detailed historical details it will have some, but be simplified. Boat's Dimnsions were shown in Imperial, 21' width x 85'-6" length. The bowsprit adds about another 25% in length. To determine what scale I wanted to build in I thought most about storage, weight to lift and how to transport to the pond. I like to keep things simple, I prefer to rig it and transport while assembled, with the topsail mast dropping and the bowsprit retracted. Have done this before and it has worked well for me. Looking at potential scales and finished sizes. * 3/4" or 1/18 scale would be 16" x 64" * 1/2" or 1/24 scale equals 10.5" x 42.75" * 3/8" equals 8" x 32" I prefer a larger bout in length as it is easier to get to sail correctly, at least in my experience. Anything under 32" get tricky. I like the 64" size, but with bowsprit will be about 88" LOA. This will be a little too large for my vehicle. I decided to go with 1/2" scale as it will still be a good length hull. Ribs - I took the hull line drawings from the book, which were very small, just about an inch wide. I scanned the image and using the app "paint" on my laptop. I cropped it close around the hull rib drawing, I then enlarged it to 1/2" scale. Then I printed on standard letter sized paper, then mirrored the image cut them in two, pasted up as seen in the photos to show the completed rib sections. Next I will put together a building board / hull jig. I want to build bottom up for
    planking
    . DO any of you have any good ideas for the best one to build? I have never done this except for tiny boats. Ideas, Help would be appreciated. Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Sports cruiser ''ALI''
    Started this sports cruiser 2 days ago. Here we dont have balsa so im using whats available. I hsed ply for my keel and bulkheads. Ply doesnt work great with ca glue, but its okay. I will use pvc for the
    planking
    . I hope i will get some ideas and you will fix me whereverim wrong.
    11 months ago by Sakibian
    Blog
    Rubbing fenders, more epoxy & hatch coamings.
    With all of the deck
    planking
    fitted I can now fix the rubbing fenders to the hull where the deck meets the hull sides. These are made from 6.5mm x 5mm obeche strip steamed and bent to shape and fixed with 30 minute epoxy, unfortunately the strips are not quite long enough to do this in one piece even with the rear rubbing fender in place at the stern so a join has to be made which I hope wonโ€™t be too conspicuous. The fender tapers in height from bow to stern and the piece that runs across the stern was made from 5mm x 5mm obeche. All the fenders were โ€˜pilot drilledโ€™ for the pins that held them in place while the glue set. The complete hull was then given a further two coats of epoxy resin with a rub down between coats and a final โ€˜polishโ€™ with 240 grit paper used wet. The resulting finish is perfectly smooth and ready for paint. The front and rear hatches were fitted with the coamings that will hold the hatches in place. The rotary disk sander that I bought from Lidl is certainly proving to be very useful in shaping small parts at this stage of the construction. I note that itโ€™s back on sale now (Feb 2019) so if you have the opportunity and ยฃ30 โ€ฆ.go buy yourself one! The next stage will be to assemble the cabin.
    11 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Sports cruiser ''ALI''
    planking
    by 2mm pvc. its not smooth. I normally use the paint putty,with cement powder. its good and waterproof.
    11 months ago by Sakibian
    Response
    Sports cruiser ''ALI''
    Did some
    planking
    by 2mm pvc. Port side done. Doesnt look very bad eh? ๐Ÿ˜„
    11 months ago by Sakibian
    Response
    The deck
    planking
    .
    Thanks Rob I will try to seek out a 0.1mm pen!
    11 months ago by Joburg-sailor
    Response
    The deck
    planking
    .
    Rob likewise it was good to meet up, and the boat/s lived up to expectations.
    11 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    The deck
    planking
    .
    At that scale it could work if you have a small enough tip on the pen. I have one that is .1mm ๐Ÿค“
    11 months ago by robbob
    Response
    The deck
    planking
    .
    Beautiful! I would like to see the "poor man's" version soon ("fake
    planking
    ") technique. Would it work on a 1:72 scale i.e. about 2.2mm width plank?
    11 months ago by Joburg-sailor
    Response
    The deck
    planking
    .
    You can also fake it with an indelible marker pen and a straight edge as you'll see later in the blog ๐Ÿ˜œ. Robbob.
    11 months ago by robbob
    Response
    The deck
    planking
    .
    I would love to be able to do planning and black caulking at this level. Each time I have tried, it just about ended in tears๐Ÿ˜ญ As it was many years ago, laser etched
    planking
    wasn't available then, so maybe that might make a difference these days. I really hope I get to see this boat one day. Many thanks for sharing the build Ribbon ๐Ÿ˜Š
    11 months ago by rolfman2000
    Response
    The deck
    planking
    .
    Hi Mike. I chose to use .8mm black plasticard after doing a test pieces with it and comparing it with another using card and I found the plasticard far easier to cut and fix, and it trims very neatly with a sharp chisel. No special primer required at all, the obeche strip is stained with several coats of teak water based stain and finished with a couple of coats of satin acrylic lacquer. It was great to meet you at Ally Pally on Saturday and compare notes on Crash Tenders, I hope you enjoyed your day out to London. Very Best. Rob.
    11 months ago by robbob
    Response
    The deck
    planking
    .
    Once again a piece of precision
    planking
    , the end product is always dependant on good planning and preparation, I used black card as my caulking (its available in a variety of thicknesses) and my thought was that it would not require any special pre- treatment other than sanding sealer and lacquer. Does the plasticard need a plastic primer?
    11 months ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    The deck
    planking
    .
    The kit Iโ€™m constructing is a pre-production prototype and consequently it does not have the โ€˜laser etched
    planking
    โ€™ feature that has been subsequently introduced in the final production kits on the โ€˜upperโ€™ deck and the โ€˜wellโ€™ deck. This is of no concern to me because I think I prefer to do my own
    planking
    anyway but I do have to do a bit of preparatory โ€˜laying outโ€™ of the deck pattern to ensure that itโ€™s symmetrical and laid in a pleasing fashion. I have chosen to use 1.6 mm x 9.5 mm obeche hardwood strip-wood (from SLEC) for this with a thin black plasticard caulking between the planks. This is what I did when I constructed the VMW Fire Tender and the result was very effective and visually pleasing. Obeche has a pleasing grain, takes stain very easily and is also considerably cheaper than mahogany which I feel would be far too โ€˜dark redโ€™ when finally lacquered. Because I wanted an outer curved plank around the hull edge I had to cut this from 1.6mm obeche sheet to the correct shape and width as it would be impossible to bend a strip to this extreme curve. These also needed a section trimmed out to allow the bow gunwales to be positioned correctly. Once both sides were cut and shaped I could then form the ply gunwales to the correct curve by my heating and bending process and glued them down to the deck. I understand that on the production kits these gunwales are now incorporated into the side skins which will make the construction a bit easier. The remaining outer planks on the hull edges were made from straight lengths of obeche but required some easing cuts so that they could be bent to the curve of the hull. Hopefully these cuts will not be too noticeable in the finished deck. When all the edge planks were glued in place I temporarily laid out the obeche
    planking
    strips with a thin strip of black plasticard as caulking and all held in place with masking tape. The centre plank was arranged to lie over the centre line from bow to stern. The setting out of the planks in this manner confirmed that the layout worked as intended and so I began fixing down the
    planking
    from the centre plank of the hull outwards with a fast bonding superglue and the process proved to be quite quick to complete. The side deck planks were equally straightforward but did require some to be carefully shaped in a tapered fashion at each end to fill the remaining gaps. The rear deck was also planked by working out from the centre plank and thankfully the
    planking
    layout matched and followed the bow deck
    planking
    perfectly. The surplus plasticard โ€˜caulkingโ€™ was then trimmed flush to the planks with a very sharp chisel and the entire deck rubbed down with my sanding plate until it was all perfectly smooth. For those building this model that donโ€™t feel confident enough to do โ€˜real
    planking
    โ€™ will probably want to make use of the laser etched
    planking
    on the ply deck panels to achieve a similar result with very minimal effort, but I quite like the challenge of doing it the hard way and the benefit of a slightly better finish.
    11 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build
    Sakibian, My friend Graham built his E-boat with a fibreglass hull but scratch-built everything else. He does magnificent detail work. For you to build this hull you first need to get the plans to the scale you want to build. 1/24 is good for these models. The cross sections are essential. You need to determine how many bulkhead frames you will require. You won't require as many as shown on their plan and photos - maybe less than half - as many as will enable you to support the stringers to give you a shape of the hull on to which you can fix the
    planking
    or skin. The frames you choose need to be at or very close to cross sections, so you can use them to mark and cut your frames. I use 5mm plywood. There is a photo of my Fairmile D frame earlier in this series of posts. One of my earliest posts on this website was a Youtube video with the E-boat and my Fairmile D in action with sound effects.
    11 months ago by reilly4
    Response
    Fitting the rubbing strakes.
    When
    planking
    a static galleon model I boiled the strakes for 5 mins but think that this expanded the wood that resulted in slight shrinkage on drying out. Never thought about just wetting strakes and using the heat gun. Great idea that obviously works well. I am enjoying this read hugely.
    11 months ago by Joburg-sailor
    Forum
    Older Billings Models
    Hi Garth & Brianaro, l too have been building Billings kits, although l do find some of there instructions a bit hit and miss, but l think any kit has its challenge. My first Billing kit was the Norden fishing boat, my second kit was the Boulogne-Etaples, now l am currently building the St Canute tug, but l took a rest during the run up and over Xmas, to be honest l am struggling with the hull
    planking
    , so l will knuckle down very soon. I have also built the Aero-naut Diva which was a fine kit to make. Your chat reminded me of my early school days (late 50โ€™s) when l used to spend my paper round money of the โ€œKeilcraft boat kitsโ€ (May have got the kit name wrong), the boat l recall was called the Mermaid, does anyone out there remember these early kits? Anyway chaps lโ€™ve attached photos of my current finished kits, l always like to see other completed kits! Happy new year and good modelling for 2019 Richard
    11 months ago by Richard7
    Forum
    Wood
    planking
    onto a fiberglass hull
    Hi chaps, a very happy new year to you all. I have been given a fiberglass hulled boat it has a nice wood deck and cabin. My question is. Is it or can the hull be planked to suit the deck
    planking
    . Jim Dogged.
    12 months ago by jimdogge
    Forum
    Wood
    planking
    onto a fiberglass hull
    anything is possible however the level of difficulty and skill required will be dependant on the shape of the hull, pictures would be helpful (if not essential to give any comment as to the practicality of such a venture)
    12 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Fitting the side skins.
    Robbob, Looking back again on some of your earlier posts, I see the plywood skinning that you did. I will be doing this on a future build as I am not the best at
    planking
    a hull. Your reference to HEATING THE PLYWOOD is a great tip, I have never tried that. Thanks, Joe
    12 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    Mamoli Puritan yacht plans
    What-ho chaps, hope you all had a merry one. I appear to have become the 'proud' owner of a Mamoli kit for the Americas Cup cup boat 'Puritan'. Everything is in the box with the exception of the plans, instructions and the keel and formers to build the hull. There is evidence the the owner had started to build the boat, some of the detail parts have been assembled, companion ways and the like, but all the hull
    planking
    appears to still be in its pack. I suspect he took the missing parts out to start the hull but got distracted. Sadly he died earlier this year but the kit is a few years old. Now this is where you come in, hopefully. Has anyone out there built this now out of production kit and still has the plans that came with it? If so can you send me a copy, I'll pay the copying and postage costs, or can you send scans of the plans?. The interweb has yielded a set of lines and I think I can get them into scale, having found the basic dimensions of the boat, but the actual plans might yield information to ease the build. Either way I hope to produce a build blog along the way - but I've set out to do that before and failed on a Type 21 frigate HMS Active built from scratch, got carried away building the boat. Thanks in advance Graham 'smiggy'
    12 months ago by smiggy
    Forum
    Sea Queen Frames
    "I wish I had never said anything or about Biro pretend deck
    planking
    Cheers Ian T" You weren't to know he was selling such crap! Are you sure it's the same guy you got yours from? I can't believe he was supplying first class drawings years ago and is now supplying rubbish. Why bother drawing (well trying to) around the frames etc. when you already have good drawings?
    12 months ago by ChrisF
    Forum
    Sea Queen Frames
    Town3810 wrote I wish I had never said anything or about Biro pretend deck
    planking
    Cheers Ian T I'm lucky in as much as I have a laser cutter so by turning the power down I can burn the lines into the deck then turn it up to cut the deck outline
    12 months ago by donrecardo
    Forum
    Sea Queen Frames
    I wish I had never said anything or about Biro pretend deck
    planking
    Cheers Ian T
    12 months ago by TOWN3810
    Forum
    Sea Queen Frames
    Hi my plans for sea queen and sea commander purchased from the same guy 5 years ago were perfect in every way Ps i also use Biro for pretend deck
    planking
    Cheers Ian t
    12 months ago by TOWN3810
    Response
    Excelsior
    Hi Joe, In answer to your queries, Hull was built in the bread and butter system using deal sealed inside and out with coats of yacht varnish and painted using acrylic. Subsequent models of Wherries and Chinese Junks were plank on frame using 1/8โ€ balsa strips sealed with resin,varnish inside and out, with again acrylic paint. Balsa easier to work with to gain experience - reasonable effectiveness both in carvel and clinker
    planking
    . All the best and good sailing. Gascoigne
    12 months ago by Gascoigne
    Response
    Excelsior
    Hello, Just spotted your boat, I love the gaff-rigged working craft. Built one, a Falmouth fishing boat, and I plan to do more. Your boat is very impressive, nice quality workmanship and attention to detail. If you don't mind I am curious about a couple of things. is it plank on plank? Did you fiberglass over the hull or just paint. What kind of wood do you use for
    planking
    . I to, work from old drawings plans with lines and offsets. Great work! Regards, Joe
    12 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    Pretend deck
    planking
    Hi again the thinnest popular ply is 2mm I use this for decks the raw edge i finish with half round 5x3 mm ramin beading or 3x2mm walnut half round from The Model Dockyard uk Sorry to keep on about the Biro and I know it probably wouldn't suit scale fans or the purist but it really does give a good effect especially on popular ply Cheers Ian
    12 months ago by TOWN3810
    Forum
    Pretend deck
    planking
    My sailboat will have a birch ply deck which I would like to mark making it look like it is planked. What is the best method? Thanks
    1 year ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Pretend deck
    planking
    Hi I use popular ply for construction and decking it is much lighter than birch but is much stronger than light ply . The decking is a light straw colour and of very close uniform grain one coat of danish oil 'can be applied with a soft brush if you are worried about rags washed out with turps use dividers to measure plank widths use biro for curved planks use a wheeled block device as per the yacht books to follow deck edge apply several coats of oil burnish with fine Scotchbrite Cheers Ian
    12 months ago by TOWN3810
    Forum
    Pretend deck
    planking
    as for mc d coffee sticks i buy mine from Ebay 1000 at a time look for Wooden Coffee Tea Stirrers ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘
    12 months ago by jacko


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