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    Response
    Hull finishing touches
    Stuart - as you can see from the article in Model Boats, Colin has fitted a contrasting timber to the perimeter of the hull and up the centre of the bow and then infilled with planking. Another method is to veneer the deck and just varnish it or drawn lines on it with Biro or pencil before varnishing. SLEC do laser etched ply but the
    planks
    are straight. Really it depends on how accurate you want the result to be and how much time you want to spend on it. With my Huntsman 28 build I'm just using birch ply and varnishing it whilst with my larger Swordsman 33 (but same scale) I'm going the whole hog and planking it. Chris
    6 months ago by ChrisF
    Response
    Enclosing the controls.
    Hello Rob, Can I be cheeky, and enquire as to where you got the large ball head pins, they are perfect for holding the
    planks
    of obeche in place, also the long stainless 'T' headed pins you have used in past builds. cheers, Peter😊
    6 months ago by Rookysailor
    Blog
    The deck planking.
    The kit I’m constructing is a pre-production prototype and consequently it does not have the β€˜laser etched planking’ feature that has been subsequently introduced in the final production kits on the β€˜upper’ deck and the β€˜well’ deck. This is of no concern to me because I think I prefer to do my own planking anyway but I do have to do a bit of preparatory β€˜laying out’ of the deck pattern to ensure that it’s symmetrical and laid in a pleasing fashion. I have chosen to use 1.6 mm x 9.5 mm obeche hardwood strip-wood (from SLEC) for this with a thin black plasticard caulking between the
    planks
    . This is what I did when I constructed the VMW Fire Tender and the result was very effective and visually pleasing. Obeche has a pleasing grain, takes stain very easily and is also considerably cheaper than mahogany which I feel would be far too β€˜dark red’ when finally lacquered. Because I wanted an outer curved plank around the hull edge I had to cut this from 1.6mm obeche sheet to the correct shape and width as it would be impossible to bend a strip to this extreme curve. These also needed a section trimmed out to allow the bow gunwales to be positioned correctly. Once both sides were cut and shaped I could then form the ply gunwales to the correct curve by my heating and bending process and glued them down to the deck. I understand that on the production kits these gunwales are now incorporated into the side skins which will make the construction a bit easier. The remaining outer
    planks
    on the hull edges were made from straight lengths of obeche but required some easing cuts so that they could be bent to the curve of the hull. Hopefully these cuts will not be too noticeable in the finished deck. When all the edge
    planks
    were glued in place I temporarily laid out the obeche planking strips with a thin strip of black plasticard as caulking and all held in place with masking tape. The centre plank was arranged to lie over the centre line from bow to stern. The setting out of the
    planks
    in this manner confirmed that the layout worked as intended and so I began fixing down the planking from the centre plank of the hull outwards with a fast bonding superglue and the process proved to be quite quick to complete. The side deck
    planks
    were equally straightforward but did require some to be carefully shaped in a tapered fashion at each end to fill the remaining gaps. The rear deck was also planked by working out from the centre plank and thankfully the planking layout matched and followed the bow deck planking perfectly. The surplus plasticard β€˜caulking’ was then trimmed flush to the
    planks
    with a very sharp chisel and the entire deck rubbed down with my sanding plate until it was all perfectly smooth. For those building this model that don’t feel confident enough to do β€˜real planking’ will probably want to make use of the laser etched planking on the ply deck panels to achieve a similar result with very minimal effort, but I quite like the challenge of doing it the hard way and the benefit of a slightly better finish.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    riva
    Given that the inner core of the riva is some sort of plastic (onto which the
    planks
    are laid and glued), and given that the one shown has some 15 coats of clear epoxy and varnish, it is quite well sealed. And stable in our experience. I should have mentioned that you may be carving out space for the electronics and motors as well. (I say "may" because it has been a few years, and my memory is not photographic...)
    9 months ago by bustedknuckles
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Hi I use popular ply for construction and decking it is much lighter than birch but is much stronger than light ply . The decking is a light straw colour and of very close uniform grain one coat of danish oil 'can be applied with a soft brush if you are worried about rags washed out with turps use dividers to measure plank widths use biro for curved
    planks
    use a wheeled block device as per the yacht books to follow deck edge apply several coats of oil burnish with fine Scotchbrite Cheers Ian
    9 months ago by TOWN3810
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    The bend was done using a "jig" and two strips of a thin plywood as a protection of the
    planks
    (nor to distort them by clamps as it happened for the first time). First, I cooked them a little, of course. When dried, they kept the shape nicely. For caulking, the epoxy (or aliphatic wood glue) could be "injected" into the gaps left between the
    planks
    . I have tried all three methods (black paper, epoxy and aliphatic glue) and went for paper, at the end.
    9 months ago by Zdenek
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    As far as the bending of the
    planks
    is concerned: the thinner and wider the
    planks
    are, the more difficult the bending is if you don't want them twisted. As a "caulking", I usually use the black card (thickness of some 0,3 mm or so) and the result is not a tragedy, I would say (the
    planks
    on the picture are 4 x 2 mm, lime wood. You have to make a choice of planking method because everyone has his own "best" one πŸ˜‰. Good Luck! Zdenek
    9 months ago by Zdenek
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    McDonald's have changed the shape of their stirrers all wavy sides I have seen a deck with the
    planks
    held down with drawing pins to make the gap between them. This was into a wooden sub structure then the gaps between the
    planks
    filed with black bumper body filler Scout
    9 months ago by scout13
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Found some info that said 16foot was the most common length. 22' is available but the price goes up considerably. 16' will be fine by me as that is half the length of the actual boat so 16"
    planks
    on the model. Having trouble finding
    planks
    and sheet in the same wood and thickness. I need some sheet for the king
    planks
    etc. Have found Maple and Lime so now need to know which comes closest to Teak? Steve
    9 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    I don't want to build the deck up too much so have been looking at 0.5mm thick
    planks
    . Scale wise they need to be 5mm wide. And as Doug said 10:1 plank/gap so I'm planning to use 0.5mm black plasticard as the caulking. On a full size cabin cruiser what would be the normal length of a plank? I've been on Google to see if I can find any info but the best I found was an advert for
    planks
    that were 1220 long which seems rather short to my mind. Steve
    9 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    I found the pencil did not give enough definition to the plank join. A fine fibre tip pen produced a good line but the ink still tried to chase the grain of the wood. I managed to smudge a couple of lines before they had dried. But finally, the grain of the plywood looked 'wrong' on the
    planks
    which would not be too bad down the side of the cabin but the foredeck
    planks
    will have a quite significant curve and a large surface area to see how 'wrong' the grain is. I have a wallpaper steamer somewhere in the garage so modifying that will be the next job. Steve
    9 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    A good supply of free
    planks
    is available at most McDonald's eateries and coffee shops, my family and friends always grab me a handful when visiting such places. I now have a good supply. I usually pop them in my wife's old pressure cooker for about 20 minutes which normally allows me to bend round the forming jig and pin down till dry. As for colours, coffee, tea, food colour or commercial wood dies, it's your model so you have to decide. And I usually try a few spare
    planks
    to test the colours. I hope this helps, cheers Colin.
    9 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Hi Steve, What went wrong? 😲 1. Drawing on deck planking, i.e. on a veneer or thin ply- Why/how did it go wrong? Surely since the
    planks
    are all 'parallel curves' all you need to do is make a curve template in plasticard from the plan. Then at a few strategic points along the plank length mark the widths of the
    planks
    . Set the template along these points and 'Bob's yer Uncle - Fanny's yer Aunt' πŸ˜‰ Mind you; doing it that way the 'curious grain of the
    planks
    ' would betray the fiddleπŸ€” 2. 'what type of strip wood - Any very close grained type. Possible source- http://www.slecuk.com/index.html 3. How to glue it!? Any thin, spreadable waterproof wood glue! 4. Gap? Max 0.5mm perhaps. Ca 10 to 1 ratio. 5. 'How do you secure the bent
    planks
    whilst the glue dries? Modelling pins at strategic points along the plank. Assumes
    planks
    are pre-shaped by steaming!! See 6. πŸ˜‰ 6. 'Do I need to steam the
    planks
    ? - YES! As mentioned above; make a template defining the curve required. From this make a jig of ca 5mm x 10mm in which you can set the steamed
    planks
    to cool and set to the shape required. To allow for the so called 'spring back' make the jig with a slightly sharper curve than the actual deck curve. When fitting the
    planks
    to the deck it's easier to 'push them out' than to try to increase the curvature. Finally; mark on the deck base the plank widths at strategic points along the plank length as alignment points. Glue
    planks
    alternately left/right (OK port/starboardπŸ˜‰) using modelling pins to hold in place until the glue is fully cured. For the 'gaps' There are various solutions in Build Blogs on this site. One that I like is the use of thin black card. When the whole deck is planked and properly cured sand lightly (ca 240 grit). 7. 'weathered teak' there are various suppliers of teak stain and also deck weathering stains; e.g. Jotika stain, Lifecolor Washes for Hulls and Wooden Decks, set part no. LP04, which includes Wooden deck darkener and Shadower, amongst other useful weathering pigments. http://www.astromodel.it Google Lifecolor and you'll surely find some UK distributors. Enough answers for enough questions!? 😁 Hope this provides some inspiration, Cheers, Doug 😎
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Right ho. Change of plans. Tried some experiments with drawing on my deck planking and screwed it up after only 8
    planks
    worth. I also tried just using pencil but the curved
    planks
    are just impossible to draw. So...what type of strip wood is best to replicate a weathered teak look? Where to buy it? How do I glue it to birch ply? What gap should I use for 5mm wide
    planks
    ? How do you secure the bent
    planks
    whilst the glue dries? Do I need to steam the
    planks
    ? Should be enough questions for now, Steve
    9 months ago by steve-d
    Blog
    Elizabeth Cabin/superstructure
    The cabin has now been finished off with a well deck, the well deck is made of balsa mostly, and the floor is oly, the well deck floor is lined as
    planks
    ( urghh ), firstly scored with a blunt Stanley type knife blade the the plank lines infilled with pencil, the floorboard nail marks are just scored with a sharp pin with a little cyno rubbed in the hole to colour the pin prick, decided to make this as an all in one removal unit, it still has to be glazed and fittings plus furniture, as in windscreen , door's consul etc: .. The deck and all other woodwork has been varnished and the cabin roof painted white, awaiting suitable weather to paint the hull, as this is done outdoors.. Muddy....
    10 months ago by muddy
    Response
    Elizabeth
    Sorry chaps but canna remember how far into this build we progressed.. But hoping not to bore you, the decks were added, in Walnut
    planks
    5mm x 3mm, edges lined with beech, ( this I named Bendy Beech ) it has been treated and one can tie this in a knot, no need for steaming or water soaking just apply glue and tack it down or clamp it until glue dries. BUT-it aint cheap.. Made a start on the cabin upperworks, this is veneered 3mm ply. Basic innards construction with formers trying to make it as light as possible. More to follow.. Muddy..
    10 months ago by muddy
    Forum
    Metal sanding plates
    They sound similar, but sure mine are by Sandvik. I never thought to clean them with paint stripper. Thanks for that, I'll give it a try. The new laser etched one's from Japan are highly flexible though, perfect for sanding a round bilged hull. At Β£6.99 including P&P I'm going to order a course and medium to make up the set. My main interest is static sailing ships and my new NT Sander has already made itself indispensable, levelling veneer
    planks
    . Their durability remains to be seen. Mike
    10 months ago by Nonsuch
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Don't know if it is still available, but I downloaded the construction manual for the Graupner Valvdiva, which has a joggled king plank and curved planking which is started on the outer edge of the deck. I haven't tried it yet, but it appears to be a good "how to." Greatest concern for me is bending the
    planks
    to the curve of the deck, as they are wider than their thickness.
    11 months ago by Peejay
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Nice work but in my case the
    planks
    are all curved and herringbone jointed so far more complicated than I am prepared to put into this model. it is going to be hard enough just trying to draw it. Steve
    11 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    May be too late, but have you thought about real planking? This was my first attempt following advice on various youtube videos and studying pictures of the full sized boat.
    planks
    supplied by Jotika. They have various sizes and woods and worked out to quantity when I gave them the deck measurements. I used cyano to glue to a plastic deck and sealed with a proprietory outdoor satin varnish. I found it very satisfying and was pleased with the end result. Ps. Please excuse the black dots of fly sht. on the deck in the first picture. Steve
    11 months ago by cormorant
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Hello from Australia, First start off with a scrap piece of plywood the same as you intend to use for the deck. Work out the width of the
    planks
    and score lightly with a scriber (not to deep). Using a ruler or suitable guide ,mark the lines with a no 3 fine tipped marker pen. wait till dry(usually 24hours to stop bleeding) then either spray or paint on satin laquer. (3coats). Always works for me. Good luck. Sid
    11 months ago by sidley70
    Forum
    Painting
    I have a Huntsman 31 model I am refurbishing. The paint is peeling off from age, the muppet who painted it only applied one coat (Me), the Humbrol enamel was probably too thick for the fine grain of the birch ply and spruce. I am planning to start with cellulose sanding sealer as it is nice and thin so should get a good key into the grain. So.. What paint should I use over the sealer? Some parts of the ply I want to look like teak deck planking so first I think I need a stain. Then line in the
    planks
    with fibre tip pen followed by what type of varnish? Some of the spruce needs to look like mahogany so do I stain it or use some sort of paint? Thanks Steve
    11 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Painting
    Ah, there are motor boats, Doug and then there are woodies! Woodies have varnish...everywhere, motor boats are a little more utilitarian I think. Perhaps the Fairey tendency to be on the sea rather than freshwater lakes meant they had scrubbed teak decks. If you made the deck
    planks
    from, say 2mm stuff, they would curve no problems, but veneers would have to be cut to shape. Nice sharp knife and gently does it is the trick. Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Painting
    Except on Rivas and the like MartinπŸ˜‰ (and restored Sea Scouts of course😁) Both my pics were taken from Huntsman 31 For Sale ads. Rather like the curved planking, but would be a devil to do!
    planks
    would have to be pretty thick to stop 'em warping while trying to curve 'em 😲 Way to go Steve πŸ‘ Joggle jiggle, what's it matter so long your mojo works 😁😁
    11 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Painting
    I notice your first picture shows properly joggled
    planks
    into the King plank, but Doug's picture shows no joggling on, I assume, a similar boat. Joggling will look so much nicer. Not keen on the varnished deck of the boat seen from the rear. Scrubbed teak is the "proper" finish for a deck. Cheers, Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Painting
    Yes coming to the same conclusion on a template rather than calipers because the
    planks
    follow the hull curve along the side of the cabin but do not follow around the bow. I'll make a template of the side and see if I can move that forwards and achieve the required result. I think I may also cheat a little and have slightly wider
    planks
    than scale and hope there arn't too many 'rivet counters' (Land Rover expression) out there.
    11 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Painting
    Ah! I thought Fairey might prove the exception to the planking rule. Well, it'll look nice, that's for sure. Paint. I always use enamel and my local auto paint shop will make me 1/4 litre tins up, of HMG, which lasts a long time from a small spray gun. Failing that, Rustoleum do some lovely rattle cans in a range of colours that spray very well and are only just over a fiver a tin. One tin would do you if you're careful. I've just given my Darby One Design its second coat of blue after a rub down and I'm happy with that. Dries very quickly, but is a nice gloss. it is a bit thin, so be very careful how you spray. Better to do two coats than one thick one. But really, if you can get it, HMG is the best bar none. Worth hunting for. Paint, alas, just ain't cheap anymore. Would that we could get tins of Valspar or Japlac, eh? The proper original stuff. Plastikote was a good paint when it was an enamel, now it's acrylic water based muck. No coverage and reacts with itself, let alone owt else. I would be inclined, btw, to do that curved deck in veneer, so all your mistakes will be made before it goes on the boat. in which case, once the
    planks
    are made and fit bang on, go up the edges with a black marker pen. it will look like caulking when all is done. Good luck, Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Painting
    Thanks Martin you came to my rescue...I had already sanding sealed the deck. I like the idea of scoring the ply and rubbing the stain in but the
    planks
    curve following the line of the hull and I don't fancy my chances of controlling a scalpel along the curve. They try to take your fingers off in normal use without giving them an unfair advantage. I've still not decided how to mark the lines even with the fibre tip pen. Think I will have to make a form of 'Odd Leg Caliper' to do most of it.
    11 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Painting
    Oh and back of a scalpel's fine or I found a slightly blunt scriber, which is less likely to follow the grain. Of course
    planks
    made from suitable veneer would give you the laid deck look as well, but take longer. Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Thanks for the reply. Had already sussed the curved
    planks
    but think I will stick to a simple join to the king plank. Just bought some fibre tip pens 0.3mm which should do the job. So, seal and sand the ply first?...the ink would track into the grain otherwise. Doing it before fitting means you can bin it if not happy or turn it over and start again.
    11 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Steve, something like a 2B pencil is a good density, but keep it sharp. if you like a nice contrast then a fine fibre point marker pen would do it. Bear in mind that most sailing boats had
    planks
    that followed the edge of the boat whereas motor boats had straight
    planks
    that follow the king plank down the middle. On a sail boat the curved
    planks
    joggle into the king plank in a variety of patterns, all tedious to draw! I lived on a Victorian racing yacht for a few years and its deck
    planks
    were, oddly, straight, so it ain't a golden rule. They leaked so bad I had a Gamalan orchestra of pots and pans catching the drips until the deck "took up" and stopped leaking, then the sunshine would shrink em all again for the next rain shower. I would draw the
    planks
    on before you glue that ply deck down. So much easier. Cheers, Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Response
    deck
    planks
    All work on T. C. stopped for a wile. I have 7 boats after the summer sailing none are seaworthy. Repairs WILL TAKE SOME TIME.
    11 months ago by hammer
    Response
    W1
    Thanks for the kind comments. Planking did take a couple of days but was not done all that neatly (just clamp and cyno) as I was glassing it later - it was all thin resin coated inside to seal it). Planking was just a hint at the original so you could just make out the
    planks
    through the glass. Have included a few more pics of the motors and interior which is not that flash but is unseen, (more for the fact that I had seen the original and was sort of putting down what I remembered from when I was 15) There is a small picture at the top left of the stairs which on the original, was a Photo from an HSL looking off the Stbd rear 1/4, to 2 64ft HSLs side by side climbing over its wake at speed The stair set is the original from the wheelhouse to wardroom, which has been kept and used again by the present owner (down to utility room in front of engine room) and still has the original 'POWER BOAT' rubber treads (not bad nick for 79yrs old!)
    12 months ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 11
    In the words of Delboy, 'What a Planker, Rodney!' Added more sheets ply in diminishing sizes. now down to 1cm
    planks
    for the bow. Found I'm allergic to superglue fumes.
    12 months ago by CB90
    Forum
    St Canute Planking Help?
    Hello everyone, l am looking for some tips / advice with the planking on the St Canute currently under construction. I have completed 5
    planks
    on each side, but now it’s getting a bit complicated at the stern end. I have sat and thought about it over a few days, do l plank the majority of the hull and leave the stern to plank in small strips of left over
    planks
    ? I acknowledge that to get the ideal shape there will be some considerable filling and shaping. If anyone out there has some pointers that would be great. Have attached a couple of photos, not very good but will try better photos in the morning. Thanks guys for your time and help, Richard
    12 months ago by Richard7
    Forum
    St Canute Planking Help?
    Hey guys, I cannot thank you all enough for all these suggestions and advice, what a great website this is!!! I am swaying to purchase some blacks of balsa and give this a try, I did the same with my first model of the Billing Boat Norden (much smaller model) but on that occasion the stern block came with the kit. Does anyone have a website that I can purchase these blacks of balsa? I will try my local Hobbycraft store but they are sadly winding down on a lot of items. it is my intention to paint the St Canute the same colours as Billing Boats suggest, so none of the
    planks
    will be varnished but I will have a lot of sanding and shaping to do. Many thanks again to you all,πŸ‘ Kindest regards Richard
    12 months ago by Richard7
    Blog
    Mid Deck
    Now I am in the swing of planking I may as well do all the remaining decks that need planking. Therefore, very much the same procedure as before with a mahogany border, followed by caulking the inside edges of the mahogany border, then cutting the
    planks
    roughly to length, and then finally trimming on the disc sander for an exact fit. When all he
    planks
    have been dry fitted, they can are removed and glued with aliphatic glue. A couple of days to completely dry then it’s on with the sanding before finishing with sanding sealer I marked all the nail holes using the marking tool I made. This is all on this deck until final finishing which will be done with all the other decks.
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Response
    deck
    planks
    Great work Hammer! I really like the craftsmanship!
    1 year ago by figtree7nts
    Response
    deck
    planks
    All the rails made, deck held up as the ends not cut off yet.
    1 year ago by hammer
    Response
    deck
    planks
    Rails fitted just to see how they look. Remove and paint when the aft section is at this stage. Etching primer for copper & brass. I will cut off the excess below after final fitting. The speaking tube also fixed.
    1 year ago by hammer
    Response
    deck
    planks
    On to the railings. I am using striped electrical wire. Free & easy to solder, and different sizes. The only drawback it is a little soft. The hardest job is getting it straight. This is done in vice & between fingers.( fingers not in vice) I also flatten the stanchions where rails cross. The long silver is the flagstaff at the bow, half way along the section being made. Held in a jig to solder, saw cut hold stanchions & nails stretch rails. The tape was to hold rails against stanchions. This was not needed as I pushed them down with a screwdriver as I removed the soldering iron.
    1 year ago by hammer
    Response
    deck
    planks
    the state of play. I must wipe off those finger marks.😁
    1 year ago by hammer
    Response
    deck
    planks
    "Take him down Bailiff"! 😁
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    deck
    planks
    Finished companion ways. Open & shut case
    1 year ago by hammer
    Blog
    Aft cockpit deck
    I first cut the base material to size allowing a card thickness all round for final clearances. The lower deck has a number of features in it that need to be measured. I took dimensions from the plans and marked out the base. Again following the upper deck which has a mahogany boarder I cut and planed a further amount of 6mm x 1.5 strips of material. I started by outlining the mahogany boarders, Some years ago I made a mitring device for picture framing which has come in very handy for doing the corners. Having all the pieces cut they are then glued and temporally pinned in position until set. The next job is to prepare all the edges with black card and then measuring each plank across the width starting from the centre line. I must take into account how the
    planks
    sit against main access hatch and the battery hatch opening however, all seems to look good but until each plank is positioned and glued with its caulk divider it’s difficult to tell. When preparing each plank I first cut each piece oversize with wire cutters then using the disc sander I trim square one end, then place in position and mark for final length and finish again on the disc sander giving each plank a nice push fit Because lime planking varies in colour across a batch I numbered each plank across the deck varying the pattern of colours as I cut each to length. Next I cut a number of card pieces to length and start to glue (using Aliphatic glue), plank, followed by card filler across the half width, then repeat the other side. Finally the battery hatch and main access hatch are treated in the same manner. Next comes the finishing , I use a very fine grade on my belt sander (I attach a block on the underside of the main access deck to control the sanding process) to remove the majority of excess irregularities followed by an orbital sander for a fine finish. if there is any staining by the black card residue I simply remove it with a pencil rubber. Next I put the nail holes in again using the jig I made to ensure uniform spacing and then gave a coat of sanding sealer. Final finishing will be done as a complete assembly. Preparation of the side panels is the next process before final assembly
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Response
    deck
    planks
    Paddle boxes well on the way. Just the face to do now. Note they are bolted to hull & fit behind plates holding bearings. So they are removable.
    1 year ago by hammer
    Blog
    Deck
    planks
    Deck
    planks
    , 5 x 3mm Walnut, not a good choice perhaps up a size would have been better Every fixing pin ( .7 x 10 mm Brass Flat head ) had to be pilot drilled. it does sand to a mirror glass type finish but very hard wood, so again a time swallowe'r. Regards muddy
    1 year ago by muddy
    Blog
    Hull + Deck
    Once the hull was finished, with planking on the base and ply skins on the sides, made a start on the deck.. Decided to go for Walnut 5 x 3mm with pear .5mm as caulking. Quickly found out it was bad choice, as each pin/nail hole had to be pilot drilled. Using a bradawl just split the Walnut
    planks
    . it may have been better using 6 x 3mm for
    planks
    .. And what with this weather, not at all helpful in the quickness of construction. The spray strips were added next to the chine and at deck level, plus a couple of reinforcement strips along the sides, i refer to em' as bumper bars. The next thing was the hatch combing, this is .8mm ply with a 3mm square top edging, hoping to improve water ingress improvement. Regards Muddy
    1 year ago by muddy
    Response
    The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh!
    Did you mean me John? Or Mike? I had considered planking but my mahogany
    planks
    are very very thin about 0.5mm x 5mm wide, and I would still have had the problem of 'warping on' a plywood base skin. So I persevered with the mahogany veneer and I'm happy now with the result of making it in two pieces. matching the edges for the centre line joint took the most time πŸ€” More power to your plank cutters GentsπŸ‘
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Inspiration for beautiful boat builders ;-)
    Yes Martin I agree we are a dying breed in this Virtual Reality Throw Away Rush rush world. But also please don't forget that you are a professional model builder with decades of experience. BTW: my 1/72 HMS Hotspur was absolutely scratch built. My first ever ship model, I was about 13/14 when I started it, with extremely basic hand tools. Kits out of the question and there weren't nuffink like her around anyway. Built to plans drawn up by me on foolscap paper from measurements taken from an Airfix 1/600 kit with a plastic micrometer and scaled up with a slide rule!! Remember them!? Had just started technical drawing at school, very handy. My Type IA submarine, built 30 odd years ago, was a Krick 'kit'! Ha Ha! 4 20mm
    planks
    of wood for the hull, a big lump of steel bar for the keel, crude half shell vac-formed tower, and a bag of assorted brass rod and tubing for various fittings. Some brass sheet for the dive planes. 'Thanks for the cash the rest is up to you' sort of deal! A visit to the Deutsches Museum showed up many 'simplifications' in the Krick plan so all the corrections were 'scratch' as well. Notably- Correct hull shape, correct rudder assemblies with skegs, railings, net cutters, flooding slots, wintergarden etc etc. Looks like Gina 2 is going to be a scratch rebuild from the gunn'l up as well. Actually I just thought my post might create a little wonderment and some Oohs and Aaahs, not loose off such a debate. I'll know better next time. Now back to Pete's lighting. Ciao, Doug
    1 year ago by RNinMunich


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