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    Forum
    Ship rudders
    Mornin' Toby, I'm back😁 Pardon the delay, just finished tidying up the wiring and final running tests on Colin's Taycol Supermarine motor and converter board - to make it run off a standard brushed ESC! The rivets look great👍 and the last pic was much better as well😊 Soooo many rivets 😲 guess you have to do them in batches, and then go pull up a tree or something, or you'd go doolally 😡 And I thought I was patient doing all the portholes and stanchions on my 4' 6" 1936 destroyer - that was ONLY hundreds! Rivets? Didn't even contemplate that!! I think you should continue this in a proper Build Blog - there's lotsa good stuff you're doing here👍 And at the end you can make a pdf file of the whole story with just a few clicks😉 Be a nice memento👍 Look forward to the Launch Report. During my career I attended the launches of several naval ships I had worked on,designing the COMMS systems. The funniest one was a glass fibre minehunter at the intermarine yard in italy near La Spezia. The ship was still in dry dock, like a huge bath. They turned on the 'taps' and slowly up came the ship! Keep up the good work, cheers, Doug 😎 BTW; were you sitting on the saw to help keep awake? 😁😁
    11 months ago by RNinMunich
    Directory
    (Tug Boat) Loch Ranza
    I bought an unfinished Graupner paddle steamer kit which was in a bit of a state and spent many happy hours making her look loved. The hull and paddle wheels were in an acceptable condition but the deck and superstructure left lots to be desired. The previous owner had purchased the motor which was 50.1 geared and pushes the boat along well all other bits including 'smoke' brass portholes and new superstructure added by myself. She was a delight to finish and looks an absolute dream on the water. (Motor: MFA 919D series) (8/10)
    11 months ago by ChrisG
    Response
    Cabin roof hatches
    Hi Boatshed, I have used cascamite on some of the older boat restorations, but they are mainly for display boats, but it's rather expensive for most modelling jobs, so now tend to stick to using epoxy and the best one in my humble opinion is from the poundland shop, it dries quite quickly and crystal clear, I've even replaced
    port holes
    glazing with it. (it features Tommy Walsh on the package.) Comes in a syringe, so really easy to use. Cheers Colin.
    12 months ago by Colin H
    Blog
    Search light
    A working search light seems to be expected on this craft so here goes. Based on Robs build I purchased the lens and the LED from Maplin’s which seemed to fit the bill. The only piece that will be used is the main body that is supplied as a white metal fitting, the rest will be replaced by a brass construction, as the rest of the parts are not substantial enough to support a working unit. First, I need some 3/16 half round brass bar, the easiest way is to machine my own cutting just less than half the diameter away. The half-round bar was annealed before bending round a suitable mandrel to a half circle. I then soldered an 8BA nut on each leg to act as the swivel bearing. Next, I machined the body’s internal bore to suit the lens body and skimmed the outer rim and face, finally bore out a small recess that locates the lens in place. The two pivot holes need to be drilled and tapped 8BA, and then a drilled hole in the rear wall for the wires to exit. As the light is to be both working and rotating the base has is to be made with a centre spindle that connects to a micro servo under the roof. The connecting devise was a bit of a headache trying to make it fit in a relatively small space; I used the supplied servo arm with four legs (shortened) and then machined a mating part with pins that located in the arm that is attached to the body above deck. The LED was modified to fit in the white metal body as it has a heat sink which was too big; as others have found cutting it down didn’t affect the heat dissipation when fixed in the white metal body, this was fixed using a small amount of Milliput. Having already machined the outer flange on the body I turned up a brass-flanged ring to push fit on the body this has to have the TRI form guard added. I made this from a central pinion with three holes drilled to accept the bent brass nails; these were soft soldered in position. The TRI form was then located on top of the brass flange and again soft soldered in position At this point all the components will have to be dismantled for final finishing before being painting.
    12 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    real gentleman who started selling timbers for modelmakers, but had to stop that as he got a sensitivity to the dust of woods, but he also had a range of amazingly good stuff for amazingly low prices, including various stanchions. I bought all the remaining portholes from him because I hate glazing portholes! I have tiny working compasses, rigging scissors, tiny woodscrews, rigging cord, bottle screws, all sorts from him and all cost me very little. Alas, health issues have caused him to cease trading and he has been flogging of his stock on ebay. A great loss. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Hi Martin, My stanchions were pre-drilled, from Graupner ca 30 Years ago. Never 'eard of Modelling Timbers. Timber stanchions!!!😲 I "only" had to drill the holes in the decks (thought that was what you meant), there were enough of them. Much worse though was fitting all the two part portholes 😡 Since fibre glassing the the hull I have to do that all over again😭 Frankly I think anyone who gets so many stanchions made as castings without pre-drilled rail holes need his bumps feeling. I thoroughly agree ref mini drills, too easy to snap fine drill bits. 👍 For precision / repetitive drilling I use my Proxxon mini milling machine as a drill press. if I need more than one of something I knock up a simple jig (usually from hardwood taken from demolished old furniture) to hold the work piece in the machine vice attached to the milling machine cross bed. I took the irritating collet fixing off the mill and fitted a real 3 jaw chuck 😉 Happy 'Vincenting', All the best, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Kit Quality ETC.
    Hi Ian. A Mahogany deck with light strips between would look better and another colour for the cabin, but, yes to the brass portholes. Canabus
    1 year ago by canabus
    Blog
    Kit Quality ETC.
    To give you some idea of the quality of this kit. Here are some photos. The quality is excellent and if you have a bit of experience this can easily be built. I don't fancy the all white look as the original had mahogany cabin sides and brass portholes this is what I will do with it,👍👍
    1 year ago by Ianh
    Blog
    Steam Whistle!
    Captain's Log: I finally got the Steam Whistle for the Brooklyn! It's made by RAM! it's a RAM80 to be exact! It's not a bad device at all. It sounds quite loud! But I haven't tested it outside yet! I left all the Portholes opened on the Brooklyn. So, that helps a lot with the Steam Whistle sound!
    1 year ago by figtree7nts
    Blog
    Boat lifting eyes
    Boat lifting eyes As has been said by others the boat lifting eyes are a small detail but an important one, somehow when detailing gets in your head its difficult not to seek it out. Anyway, there are six eyes three on each side, which I presume, are for lifting the boat out of the water, unfortunately there isn’t any detail on size so it’s down to “builders eye”. I made the six in a batch, that’s to say I first made six identical pieces 10.5mm x 20.5mm x 2mm thick and drilled the hole in each then the six pieces fastened together with an M4 screw and then machined together to ensure uniformity and ease of production. I then skimmed them to final size 10 x 20 followed by milling the concave and convex radii on the top. I intend to sink the eye into the deck and secure using a brass pin sideways into the gunwhale stringers and epoxied into position. To ease fitting I made a small jig, which will allow a 2mm slot to be cut in the exact position on the deck along with a drilled hole at 90 degrees. Two small grub screws fasten the jig to the gunwale stringers while the slot and holes are machined. After all the slots had been prepared I then made all the foot rails that run along the edge of the deck from bow to stern, the first set I used the obeche supplied in the kit, however as they are in a place that could get knocked I decided to rework then in walnut. Finally I pre drilled all the foot rails ready for temporary pinning. Having all the components ready it is time to assemble with epoxy resin, using sparingly and making sure not to get any on the visible part of the brass lifting eyes and using pins to hold in position while curing. PS sorry about some of the picture quality but I didn't check them until after assembly
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Robbe Smaragd
    On the original kit, there were no portholes or windows. it was all done by transfers. Grey pieces of paper, slid onto the cabin sides. I cut the holes to the shape of the transfers. Then I planked the sides around the window frames, from deck to roof. Then I used some old cd cases, to cut and shape the window glass. it worked quit well. 👍
    1 year ago by East-RN
    Forum
    port holes
    Wow! She's BIG! 😲 Comin' on very nicely Mark 👍
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    port holes
    At risk of appearing to teach monkeys to suck eggs or grandmas to climb trees... Upon pondering the subject of potholes; plans always show them as
    port holes
    and after-build photographs show them as painted black circles. I know what I prefer. On line purchases of brass
    port holes
    can be not cheap. I've found that normal brass eyelets with a blob of Deluxe Materials Glue 'n' Glaze in the hole dries to a passable imitation of the real thing. I appreciate that you are just swapping the painstaking painting of rows of black circles with painstakingly drilling a row of holes and gluing them in but if you question the sanity of building a miniature boat then it all seems quite normal. And if you have any issues, take them up with my mate Popeye.
    1 year ago by Delboy
    Forum
    port holes
    For some reason can only send 1 picture on the mobile app superstructure only placed in position
    1 year ago by marky
    Forum
    port holes
    Hi Doug some pictures of the puffer still a lot of work to do but getting there .Cheers Mark
    1 year ago by marky
    Forum
    port holes
    In orbit perhaps 😲 Maybe he's on his way to the moon😁 I'll try another mail to him. Glad to hear you can work on the puffer, look forward to seeing that👍 All the best Mark Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    port holes
    Hi Doug, things have been fine last bout of Chemo was a bit rough , puffer hull is coming along fine will post some pictures tomorrow . your right Wayne was the 3D guru wonder how the rocket he was working on ended up . Cheers Marky
    1 year ago by marky
    Forum
    port holes
    Oh Noooooooooooo!! Ed's gettin' ideas 😲 Head for the hills chaps, lock up your wives an' daughters 😁
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    port holes
    That was Wayne Mark. 'Midlife'. He was threatening to buy a third (!) 3D printer so I expect his missus shot him 😲 We all warned him to print some Kevlar armour first! Last I heard of him was several months ago when he asked me for some Tiger tank (printed for for his LC!!) sound-files. I emailed him a batch but never got a reply 🤔 How's it goin' Matey? All the best, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    port holes
    i had some portholes printed at the work and the perspex infills laser cut ,if you can access the technology why not use it .whatever happened to Phil ?who was the 3D printing guru ? And was printing a landing craft 1/16 th scale maybe printed himself into a corner. May have the name wrong ,chemical soup still mucking about with the old brain .
    1 year ago by marky
    Forum
    port holes
    Humm, Give's me idea's!
    1 year ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    port holes
    Well, he's 3D printed so I can scale him as needed. Scaled at 80 percent he turns out around 1/24. Scale it to around 55 percent and that should give you 1/32.
    1 year ago by Delboy
    Forum
    port holes
    -
    1 year ago by Delboy
    Forum
    Spektrum, new, useless...
    Re Portholes, Martin, I don't know how many dozen I did on my 1/72 53" destroyer, two rows in the hull plus superstructure, but that's why I AM NUTS! 😁 Since fibre-glassing the hull I now have to do those AGAIN! 😡 Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Spektrum, new, useless...
    Yep, he done good, did the Naval man in Munchen. I'm in his debt and if I use the TX to fly I promise I'll insure myself, but I ain't joinin' a club unless the local one is as cheap as someone recently suggested. And the only decal on my wings will be the SMAE, if I have to hand paint it! Now...back to boats. Tis my birthday and my dear bride bought me a set of the old Yeoman white metal fittings for my Crash Tender, so now the kids have departed I will have a wee clean up of them. Then, a Chicken Achar from the new indian restaurant. A bonus is that she also bought me a pack of 20 beautifully made turned brass portholes, glazed, that I've just realised will fit the Crash Tender wheelhouse. Result...I HATE glazing portholes. I did 9 on a scratchbuilt canal boat and it drove me nuts. 4 down, 16 to put back in storage, the last of Modelling Timbers' stock of them and the manufacturer no longer does em. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Cabin roofs
    Theoretically this should be a very straight forward process and a change from rubbing down the hull so let’s look at the instructions – what instructions! First of all fit some thin card to the sides of the cabin walls to allow for a clearance fit (cornflakes packet) then some minor trimming of the spars to give an exact ,(not tight) fit across the side supports, I decided to pin each of the parts together as well as epoxy in the joints. I always find the best approach is to use a jig to drill pilot holes for the pins ensuring that the pins do not split the wood and the construction is accurate. The frame is then glued up and placed back in the boat and left to dry next job is to fit the corner strengthening pieces, the easiest way I found was to put a card support for the corners to rest on whilst they set still in the cabin structure. Looking forward I had decided to retain the cabin lids with Neodymium magnets so I machined a slot in the corner pieces underside to house the magnets, to be fitted at a later date. Next job is to fit the roof skins which again will be pinned using the 0.7mm brass pins. The roof skins are now epoxied in place so I need to mark out the position of the secondary panels. Looking at the pieces and the instructions the spacer frames seem to be the same size but I was sure I’d read somewhere that these overhung by 2-3mm, reading Robs blog conformed this to be the case. So some trimming required before fitting and marking out the appropriate position then being glued into position. The mid cabin was assembled in exactly the same way
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Response
    engine
    A little more done on the engine. Steam ports & pivot holes drilled in cylinders. Oil light bronze bearing ready to fixed. Piston rods ready I will be silver soldering piston blanks in place. Then with the rod in chuck turn the blanks to fit. Chrome crank shaft, pin & web in the picture ready for cutting. The strip of ali with four holes will mark the steam ports in the frame. when the crank is fitted. The small gears fit between the bearing & crank web. As I said before this will give the chance to change ratios if the low is to low.
    1 year ago by hammer
    Response
    54 year old Crash Tender
    Great job being done there Martin. My memories were of my Veron Viceroy in the 1960s with Taycol Asteroid sailing on New Brighton model boating lake rapidly going through 4.5 volt cycle lamp batteries wired up in series. I am made up to see a very original Crash Tender as the one I have now is a 1962 version I restored in 2014 from a wreck that was about to be binned which I bought for next to nothing from another person. in Ellesmere Port . On examination there was no evidence of the boat having an I.C engine but I did manage to find some mounting holes which appeared to match those of a Taycol Standard. This was a coincidence as Taycol did use photos of a 34 inch Crash Tender powered by the Standard in some of their advertisments including the leaflet that was supplied in the box with their range of motors. Boaty😊😊
    1 year ago by boaty
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Hi, Doug: I’ve got a question about the resistors that’ll be needed for each of the six mast-mounted LED navigation lights. This may seem like a dumb question to an expert like you but please don’t laugh too hard. Anyway, do these resistors need to be installed as close as close as possible to the anode or can they be located some distance away, maybe as much as a foot or so? I don’t know yet what the value or physical size of the resistors will be but I’m pretty sure that the space inside the Richardson’s mast isn’t large enough to house the wiring for the LEDs & the resistors, too. if they can be installed farther away, I was thinking I could put the six resistors on a small board & install it inside the large cabin under the pilot house. When resistors are used in LED circuits do they get warm or even hot? if so, I can open up the dummy rectangular portholes & install black fine-mesh nylon screens in the openings. if heat isn’t a concern then I won’t sweat it (bad pun there, sorry). The hardest part of my project will probably be finding a good online source for the various electronic parts I’ll need. There used to be a great electronics supply store about two miles from my home. Coincidentally, that store was less than a block up the street from a hobby shop where I did business for almost fifty years. Now both stores are long gone. Sniff.
    1 year ago by PittsfieldPete
    Forum
    Fittings & Detail Parts
    Greetings, everyone: I’m looking for an online sources that offer fittings & detail parts, especially for modern tugboats. I have Hobby Engine’s 1:36 scale Richardson tugboat which is already pretty well detailed, but I’d like to replace its two deckhouse life rings with better looking ones & add a few others in appropriate locations. I’m also looking for a life raft drum & a few other detail parts here & there. Most of all I’d like to find navigation lights for the mast. The housings can be most any material but the lenses must be clear. I’m going to remove all of the “dummy” navigation lights on the mast & replace them with LED-lighted ones. The boat came with working port & starboard sidelights so they won’t need to be replaced. I’ve got a dredging barge designed (in my head) to use as a companion for tug. I’ve got all of the basic materials stockpiled for the barge itself plus a nice lattice boom crane for the dredge. I found a beautiful metal clamshell bucket that’s a work of art to use with the crane, too. Although I could scratchbuild things bitts & bollards I’d consider buying some as a time saver. I’ll need portholes for the deckhouse, ventilators, etc. as well. I live in western Massachusetts which is a beautiful area but there aren’t any hobby shops nearby that stock ship fittings of any sort. I used to buy fittings from A.J. Fischer & Bliss Marine but they both went out of business a long time ago. I’ve found several online shops that sell ship kits & fittings but they’re mostly for small scale sailing vessels. I’d appreciate any suggestions. Thanks, Pete
    1 year ago by PittsfieldPete
    Blog
    Chine rubbing strakes
    As the hull glass matting is really dry and has had some minor filling done it’s time to fit the chine rubbing strakes. which have been in the jig now for some days and consisted of a two dimensional curvature jig. in order to make sure the strakes were equally balanced on each side I made a cardboard template that followed the Chine stringers line and rested on the Gunwhale rubbing strakes, having drawn a line on the port side I flipped the template over and drew a line on the starboard side giving a perfectly equal curve on each side So now to prepare them for fitting. The jig had made a curve that was a really good fit without much spring. I decided to use some very small brass pins (0.5dia x 10mm long) to hold them whilst the epoxy sets. I pre drilled the whole length of the strake and lightly inserted pins along its length, then applied the epoxy and started to fix from the bow and followed the pencil line back to the stern. This was repeated on the other side, when set there was some minor filling to be done/filling pin holes.
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Wheels
    May be someone may want to make paddles using this method. if you do & you have a lathe should be no problems. First turn wooden blanks & mark centre & number of spokes required. Rap strip brass around the former cut & join to a tight fit. it is important as this will keep them the same size. Align the drill accurately to the spokes. Drill one & pin it with a short piece of spoke material, so the strip doesn't move wile drilling rest. The centre hub was divided in the lathe. On assemble three spokes in my case immediately aligned the rings, that is if the holes are right. if not fettling is the order of the day. I soft soldered mine as the structure is inherently strong. Note soldered away from the marks on blanks, to preserve them. The dishing can be seen on the finished upright wheel. This was achieved by a thick washer under the hub, & clamping the outer ring down on to the former. I did try bending the spokes before fitting. But had trouble as the rings didn't align automatically. Clean up by hand. Only Three more to make.
    1 year ago by hammer
    Forum
    Gypsy
    Those are what I used for the first set of portholes on my H class destroyer when I was 15 😁😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Gypsy
    Long time since I saw shoe eyelets as portholes! No reason why it shouldn't sail. Let's face it some of the best sailing any of us have had is with a Star yacht from the seafront kiosk when Dad was feeling generous. Let the sails out a bit on the bowsies and off it went to the other side of the pond. I had one for years! Eventually, Mum had to make new sails as the originals rotted, so an old bedsheet or one of Dad's shirts would be run through the old Singer, ready for the next years holidays. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Hair pulling not that I have any
    As the title say's it's hair pulling time again, I tried to fix the W/M rudder horn's but with no luck, and my local model shop do not have any collets that small. moved onto fixing the motor's and yes they were out of line so set to and make a new motor bed. I came across a site called Scale Warship (www.scalewarship.com) so I only went a got myself some Photo Etch R.N Generic
    port holes
    and R.N Generic style Ladders, and yes the person that built her in the first place has made the port hole's way to big so out with the p40 filler. Will I ever get a run of good luck with this Ship.😁
    1 year ago by Fred
    Forum
    Sloop Gypsy
    Improvements: Added weight to keel Removed all silicone from deck and
    port holes
    Cut off former cabin and replaced with fully tape sealing cabin Changes to sheet line exit Plus more
    1 year ago by Ron
    Blog
    Floating Light house
    Continued with floating light house & decided to just build a R/C model. So finished up the running gear added a couple of ladders & 10
    port holes
    plus a couple of railings .Still need windows yet & still waiting for water in Spencers pool in Burlington Ontario to do the shake down try out . So happy model boat sailing this summer.
    1 year ago by GARTH
    Blog
    Final fitting of cabin roof skins
    Now that the internal detail of the cabin has been finalised and fixing points made for each of the panels and floor pieces (all parts of the cabin detail are to be removable) I can now finally fit the cabin roof skins. Since the leading edge has an overhang which because of the lifting design hasn’t the same framework support I have decided to reinforce the joint with stainless steel pins.to ensure a perfect fit, I made a tiny jig out of brass angle that ensured all the holes in each piece lined up. I then placed pieces of silicon sheet on the parts I really didn’t want the skins to stick to the cabin framework. Fist all the pieces were position and pinned to ensure a good fit, they were then removed adhesive applied and the skins finally placed and pinned, most of the pins will be removed when it’s dry. The centre panel has an opening for the hatch so this was put in prior to fixing. After a day’s drying it’s time to see if the whole thing works as envisaged, thankfully it does. The roof will now have to be dismantled so further work can be carried out it, will also get a covering of glass matting to add overall strength.
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    Winches
    Doug, Have you any info on Dreadnought's anchor winches? She now has all,I think!, of her portholes, well over a hundred. Anchors next, then guard rails around the focsle.
    1 year ago by Gdaynorm
    Response
    Update on the Tug Brooklyn!
    Great Build; Tug Brooklyn has always been my favourite. For the brass Portholes/Port Lights that You used on the Deck Cabin; where they the ones supplied by Dumas, or bought elsewhere? (They look good.)
    2 years ago by Tug_Hercules
    Blog
    Doors
    Here is a photo of the doors for the main superstructure, made out of a thin piece of Oak with a surround made from plasticard, brass portholes and dolls house knobs. The watertight doors made from plasticard and the hinges also made from plasticrd with the aid of a magnifying glass 😁 I bought the two sets of portholes from MMModels as it wasn't worth the trouble of making them all, lazy I know 😜
    2 years ago by AlanP
    Response
    Cabin Aft!
    What I use to cut out the portholes is a step drill.I don't put it in a drill.I just use my fingers to rotate it.Works good on balsa and styrene.It makes a clean cut.
    2 years ago by Donnieboy
    Response
    Fascis Board and Molding!
    ... and no finger prints on fingers!? Now is the time to rob a bank!? 😲 Seriously though folks 😉 looking good, the portholes are brill👍 BTW: I think you earned a new User Name 'Quick Draw McGraw' 😁
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Media
    Michael
    Dumas kit Carol Moran, renamed Michael for my first grandson.My first build, learning how to make those brass railings each post being soldered following a paper pattern. Some customizing at the request of my grandson with added
    port holes
    , and deck features. He helped to paint it.
    2 years ago by Ron
    Directory
    (Yacht) Enterprise
    I love this 8 meter yacht,sail number K91 it has a great keel shape allowing weed to be ignored most of the time. Built by the southwater dabblers a while back and has been through a few owners before I brought her. Moves in the lightest of winds and copes with large gusts too. Am improvement on the basic model is the larger rudder allowing superb control (unless I get distracted!) Deck is lined in wood with a cabin top allowing access to the inner workings. I am running it on a acoms 27Mhz set as it has never let me down I can see little point in changing it to 2.4 Ghz The only thing I have done is added some portholes and a wheel to make it more realistic. As can be seen in last photo not all weed can be ignored!!! (Motor: Mother nature) (ESC: Acoms) (10/10)
    2 years ago by Bryan-the-pirate
    Response
    Plating
    I said on post until the plating finished. Well finished one side, just three more on the other. Drilling the portholes with a cone drill. Holding with grips don't want to cut my fingers. Sized to fit brass tube, (chromed will skim off) That will be the surrounds, fitted after finished painting the hull.
    2 years ago by hammer
    Blog
    M. V. TEAKWOOD
    Finished the major parts of the hull and am satisfied with the results. Now turned to the superstructure, which has turned into a challenge in its own right. Decided to break the structure down into decks and concentrate on each deck individually; before “rolling them up” into the complete structure. Also decided to make the central “core” first and complete, before adding the curved frontispiece containing the forward bulwarks. This would allow all the detail between the two such as windows, doors and portholes to be accurately made and positioned. The structure from the first deck upwards was made removable to gain access to the internal systems of this working model. The lovely flowing curves, which attracted me to the vessel initially, proved a pain to reproduce. The bends around the front corners required making each deck front separately and then gently bending heated styrene around a former to reproduce. There is much opportunity for hurling! Added a L shaped strip around the front of each deck, so there is something firm to glue the front bulwarks to. Was concerned that without something like that the individual deck shields would never line up properly. Similarly added styrene U channel along the deck edges to give a surface to which the shield side rails could be fitted. This also replicates the vertical deck edge panels that are evident in pictures. Felt this would also make the structure more robust, enabling it to be removed and refitted without damage.
    2 years ago by RHBaker
    Blog
    M.V. TEAKWOOD
    Started to add the finishing touches to the hull; portholes, a bulwark capping strip and bilge keels. The portholes were drilled to the outside diameter on the drawing and small sections of styrene tube epoxied in. These were then drilled out and smoothed to the hull contour. Once the hull is painted lenses will be added usimg clear epoxy. The bulwark capping strip is a small styrene “U” section CA glued along the top of the bulwarks. This tidies up the edge and gives a smooth, consistent appearance. Have never been satisfied with previous attempts at bilge keels. Tried making them from both styrene and wood, pinned and epoxied into place. Not very robust, although they looked fine. Plenty of scope for repairs! Decided to try another approach on this model. Purchased strips of 1/4” L shaped styrene and CA glued them into position on the underside of the hull, with the leg facing in towards the keel. Filled the gaps on both sides of the styrene with fibre-glass resin and then rubbed them down, feathering the edges of the bilge keel into the hull. These bilge keels are nice and strong and, from the outside, the bodge is not visible. it can been just seen from the underside if the model ever gets inverted. Hope that is unlikely though! From here on the construction will follow well established principles, so will only write bog updates as significant milestones are achieved.
    2 years ago by RHBaker
    Response
    Chris Craft Sport Fisherman
    That is actually the 30 footer. This is the 40 footer. Note the raise deck line going forward and the additional
    port holes
    2 years ago by Brightwork
    Blog
    MV TEAKWOOD
    As the under deck access was now as good as it would ever be, it seem be an opportune time to add the major pieces of operating equipment. One item overlooked in my previous blog was the stern bulwarks. The attached picture reminded me that I had recessed the bulwarks to epoxy a piece of alloy strip onto them. This was another attempt to make sure the bulwark joints were strong enough so they would never pull apart. The alloy strip had been bent to follow the correct profile, which was thus imparted to the bulwarks. The rudder post had been fitted earlier and the rudder horn now installed. The servo location was chosen to fit it close to the rudder. Appreciate the rudder/servo sense is reversed, but this reflects all my models and retains Tx control consistency. Linking them was easy through the generous holes previously cut in the bulkheads. An auxiliary bulkhead was cut and installed to hold the motor. Once the correct spacing and location was achieved, this bulkhead was also epoxied into place. Readers might question my choice of “O” ring and pulley drive. Have used this arrangement on several models and have never had a problem. The “O” rings easily last a couple of seasons, but usually replaced as part of the winter PM program. The arrangement has advantages in that the motor orientation can be reversed to minimize space and alignment requirements are reduced. it is also quiet, easy to work on and a modicum of speed adjustment can be made with the pulley sizes. The black tube in the foreground, looped out of the way, is the shaft oiler feed. Seems to have become is increasingly difficult to buy new shafts with this feature. Not sure just how well they work as always pack the shafts with oil and grease annually, but they do appeal to my Engineering sensibilities. The ESC and will be added Rx later, they will easily fit easily into the remaining space.
    2 years ago by RHBaker


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