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    Forum
    Workshop
    I was lucky that when my work was up grading machines if I could carry the old one I would have it and stashed it away for later use ,I got a pillar drill from the jewellery department because it wasn't drilling at 90Β° got it home and all that was wrong was the table hadn't been squared properly,still keep in contact with my old squad so if anything comes up they let me know they also keep loads of handy off cuts .will post some photos of the workshop interior when I get the gear moved in πŸ‘keeping my fingers crossed a 3D
    printer
    might need upgradedπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚or perchance a laser 🀞
    4 days ago by marky
    Response
    Re: clyde puffer
    Yes I should give details just wanted to get back to the build, scratch built plank on frame with wood I have to see how cheap I can build it. No plans as such just side elevation and photos off the net so not true scale 31 inc long 8.5 inch beam some detail from my 3d
    printer
    , planks ripped from softwood and pickled until I could form the bends and left to dry before fitting, electric power and will fit brass prop after sea trials. This is the first boat I have built since I was 16 years old now 73!!!!!! been into model aircraft but this is more relaxing at least they come home in one piece.πŸ˜€πŸ˜€
    5 days ago by billhook301
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    My thoughts exactly DG. I'd rather cough up a bit more and know that I could do something with it! (Still got a few bob left in my savings fund😊) Think I'd better get the hang of my 3D
    printer
    before lashing out on another machine though! 😎
    8 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Water Jets
    Anyone out there with a 3d
    printer
    ? - a website called cults3d.com is giving away a free design for a water jet. looks pretty good https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/various/water-jet-propulsion-system-janikabalin
    10 days ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Water Jets
    DG - sorry - not picking on you - assumed you had a
    printer
    . Trouble is with favours is the time taken - only when favours are owed can you put pressure on..........
    8 days ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Water Jets
    "...DG if you have a 3d
    printer
    you must have the design software for it too - otherwise its useless ..." I said I 'can get one printed'. Dodgy Geezers can call in favours from all sorts of places! And not only plastic deposition machines either - stereo lithography or selective laser sintering (if you want to 3-D print in tungsten) would be available through university contacts. As would design modification...Though, given how long it took me to get a pair of rather specialist gears lapped the last time I wanted a set, I would match RN's comment in saying that I wouldn't hold my breath!
    9 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Water Jets
    DG if you have a 3d
    printer
    you must have the design software for it too - otherwise its useless - unless you are only ever going to make other peoples designs - very easy to add stuff & modify designs if you know how - friend has one - manipulates its faster than I do Corel - but its purely commercial for him - so no freebies . unfortunately ...........
    9 days ago by redpmg
    Blog
    40'' Seaplane Tender, new build U
    Cabin partly painted, (tops to paint), mast painted with LED riding light fitted. Second sound unit turned up and both now fitted and working, (with as near as I can find to Detroit 4-53s as fitted to this boat, in the programmed choices). Inner hull in cockpit and some interior painted and steering servo fitted. Props painted bronze (art acrylic metallic). Still waiting for shaft collars for the motor end of the shafts and some nice little shaft oiler cans (far easier than trying to make them). They have arrived in the country so shouldn't be too long. Off to get some paint tomorrow for the cabin tops and deck, also I have to fit the cockpit side battens which I've already stained and cut. Once the cabin's painted I can fit the windows and grab rails as the stanchions have arrived from CMB. Going to make a quick vid later, showing the sound units operating etc. Still have bow roller and a number of smaller details to go, such as tidying the waterline with a black boot topping and making the name decals (if my
    printer
    stops mucking about, - almost time for a new one)! Also have to do the nav, cabin and stern lights, ( have ordered a small adjustable voltage reg to adjust lights. Remote switch for lights is already fitted.
    9 days ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Water Jets
    Thanks for the tip Red, Have downloaded the files, will be a half way sensible πŸ˜‰ test project for my
    printer
    πŸ‘ Doug 😎
    10 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    This was my first
    printer
    LOL! Martin555.
    10 days ago by Martin555
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    My first
    printer
    was an ICL line
    printer
    , in 1979 http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/gallery/ral/orig/r18088l.jpg Rather like this one, but orange, since I was working on an ICL 2900 system https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICL_2900_Series
    10 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    I am looking forward to it tremendously. I have just been looking at the EeZeBuilt web site and I particularly like Neptune. Will have to see if I can slot her in to my building list, the only snag is I don't have a
    printer
    so I will have to figure something out. Martin.
    19 days ago by Martin555
    Blog
    The Instrument Panel.
    I decided that an instrument panel would enhance the appearance of the β€˜Steering Wheel’ power switch so I made up a panel to go around the switch onto which I could put some dials and a throttle control. In my previous blog update I discounted using the very nice but pricey BECC transfers and looked for an alternative, Doug (RNinMunich) kindly sent me a .pdf of some instruments but the resolution was very poor when printed out. So after a bit of Googling I found a picture of some real commercially made instruments that was quite high resolution, and importantly, printed very nicely even when scaled down to the sizes I needed. I used a premium glossy photo paper in my Canon Pixma
    printer
    for this. The panel was made from some 2.0mm ply from the scrap box with the edges bevelled for neatness and after two coats of Teak stain they were ready to have the dials applied. The dials were cut out from the printed sheet as best as possible with a new scalpel blade, not easy I might add, as they are so small that you can’t really make a continuous circular cut so it was a case of nibbling round the edges until it was an acceptable shape. That was a test for my old eyes πŸ€“ I can tell you. The edges of the dials were blackened with a black β€˜Sharpie’ pen before sticking down onto the panel with a light smear of canopy glue. The throttle control is just an offcut of Obeche carved and shaped and with a short piece of styrene tube and a pin head for the lever, painted in gunmetal grey it doesn’t look too bad. I used a small white ball headed pin in the final assembly. The instrument panel was given two coats of satin lacquer to protect the dials before the throttle control was stuck down and then the whole piece glued down onto the battery cover, and I also painted the aluminium switch panel black so it was less conspicuous through the slot. I had arranged the height of the wheel so that the battery cover can only be removed with the switch on the off position as a safety consideration. Also there’s room inside the battery box for a low voltage alarm attached to the battery balance connector too. Viewed through the cabin window the instrument panel looks quite acceptable and it all helps to disguise the purpose of the steering wheel and the switch can be accessed easily through the sliding cabin window without removing the cabin. Quite pleased with that 😁
    26 days ago by robbob
    Forum
    Where are they?
    ... and colour laser
    printer
    s on Friday evening when you have a 120 page system description to print in 3 originals and the courier is already stomping up and down outside! 😠 Been there - had that!πŸ€” 😎
    26 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Re: Workshop
    It's alive, we have power all machinery now wired in, only the lighting to do now .managed to get an old bobbin sander(allegedly obsolete) that was being replaced by a newer version and a box of assorted bobbins free gratis from my old work ,don't know if it will make my boats any better but better of in the shed than in a skip. Waiting for a laser or 3D
    printer
    to become obsolete soonπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
    29 days ago by marky
    Forum
    3D Printing.
    HI Martin - think a lot of modellers buy cowl vents, guns . bollards , lifebelts , anchors etc , and for instance when building liners or similar large ships you find you have to make several hundred of the same item , easiest is to cast them from an original - so the 3d
    printer
    is just another tool - the same way the Laser is. What has made a real difference is the computer assisted drawing programs like Corel and Autocad . Without them the 3d
    printer
    s & Lasers would be useless. In Corel and most others for instance you can zoom in to a drawing up to 45,000%. Gives you spurious accuracy as you could never actually cut that closely. Our laser for instance the cutline is about .3mm so when cutting small items you actually have to increase the size of the cutfile at narrow sections to allow for the width of the cut .
    2 months ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Re: 3D Printing.
    Me too NickπŸ‘ I have a 3D
    printer
    , wrapped up in a bin bag to keep it clean for the last two years! Haven't had the time (or guts?πŸ€”) to even calibrate it yet πŸ˜” A 'step by step' Blog in the 'How To' section of the site would be great. I'm certain it would have many highly interested followers. Looking forward to it enormouslyπŸ˜€ All the best, Doug 😎 Maybe you can teach an Old (Sea) Dog new tricks!
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    "....I am sure that you will end up with a lot of customers when see these...." While it is, of course, quite reasonable to charge for materials and time, I am looking forward to a future where the base patterns for a model boat kit will be available for free off the Web. You can download a lot of free patterns already, but I haven't seen anything I would call a 'real boat kit'. CNC cutters and 3-D
    printer
    s are already available at most schools, and local councils now operate 'MakerSpace' workshops where this kit is made available to the public. Hobbyist designers could turn out the cutting files - all a modeller would need to do would be to buy the sheets of wood and feed them into the machine to have a kit coming out the other side. Not too sure how to do fibreglass hulls, though...
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    3D Printing.
    There is still a range of skills involved, drawing up parts for printing, I use Designspark Mechanical , preparing the cad files for printing with a slicing program, setting up the
    printer
    and fettling the printed parts. I re made all the resin fittings and printed the superstructure parts for my MMS. I have also used wood for capping rails, doors etc and the results are well worth the effort. So, in answer to the question, I don't think it will remove the traditional modelling skill set, but it will add extra skills to out modelling arsenal. It will enable folk to make their own fittings at low cost, and at the end of the day if we end up with a creation we are proud of we can't really knock it. Photos show some MMS fittings and a Footy yacht hull being made...
    2 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    It is easier than you would think. I only got into 3D printing 2 years ago, once you see how it works the rest is easy. Main difference between a CNC router and a 3D
    printer
    is that a 3D
    printer
    adds material to make an object and a CNC router removes material.
    2 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    Re: 3D Printing.
    Now that is an interesting question indeed, Martin! In the "One to One" scale world, I have in my lifetime watched the steady march of machines taking over what i would describe as "Hand Skills" I have memories of being a trainee mechanical engineer and spending some time in a heavy machine shop and watching this guy "Knock on a cut" with a hide mallet. Just ease the lock nut and a tap with the mallet and he could put on a couple of thou! Today it is all CNC and robotics. The skill being in the machine maker, the software designer and the guys & gals that programme them. Now I am not going to dare to say who is more skilled the guy with his mallet or the guy who uses the software. They are both skilful in their own right. So if we turn that on its head and apply that to 3D printing. Software driven accurate 3D modelling against hand and eye skills. That is for you hardened purists to argue over. However I do just wonder if it may be a way forward for us to attract the next generation of modeller away from their X Box or similar to a laptop and
    printer
    to make a modern model with a 3D
    printer
    . Was it such a heinous crime against modelling when Vac Formed parts arrived or heaven forbid Glass Fibre Hulls. I have a friend who uses a CNC milling rig to make the plugs for his gun turret silicon rubber moulds he uses to cast resin ones from. Is this not verbally the same? For me the choice will be what is the best way to make the part I need. When a logical engineering decision is reached, just get on with it and make a great model to be proud of. Great question Martin 555 am sure this will create loads of responses and run for ever
    2 months ago by ikseno99
    Forum
    Hintsand tips - Decals made easy
    If anyone is looking for a cheap easy way to make any decals of photos name plates, designs etc, here is an idea you might find useful. I use a waterslide decal paper on which you can print anything you design, draw etc on your inkjet
    printer
    . I buy this paper from a company in Australia for around $30 NZ for 10 A4 sheets. You can buy clear or white. What you do is just print your design, photo, text etc onto the paper (plastic waterslide coated), let the ink dry, spray with either a clear lacquer or Helmar clear (the best), allow to dry, trim,soak in warm water as usual and apply. This material is quite tough and will not tear easily and you can spray lacquer over it to seal it on the model. It is a similar stuff as sold by Testors in a kit but is a lot more cost effective. I've included some examples of decals I've made for my boats and planes . For small decals you can cut a small piece a bit bigger than your design, print your picture on A4 to see where it will come on the page, sellotape the piece of decal paper over the print, (tape horizontally top and bottom) put the page back in the
    printer
    with the same orientation as is was, and print onto your decal. This saves wasting a whole sheet of decal paper which cannot be re used. If you find a nice clear sharp design it will come out nicely on the decal
    2 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Re: Model Boat crew....
    It is amazing what these 3D
    printer
    s can do "modern technology " Martin.
    2 months ago by Martin555
    Response
    Re: WTC/Sub Driver.
    Hi Mouldbuilder, Unfortunately I didn't make a log of this build but if required I could explain most of the build. The kit that I put together is :- Revell 1/72 scale US Navy Gato Submarine (05047) length 132.0cm My model looks a little different as I decided to add the extra limber holes along the sides. The prop shafts are 2mm inner shafts with a 4mm outer the length that I have fitted is 8" but I would definitely go more for 7" as it is very tight when fitting the universal joints, I purchased them from eBay. As I have said if you do decide to make one I can explain more on how I fitted the drive shafts. The photos show the flood holes that I cut in the underside of the hull, The other photos a just to show the other holes. As I do no have a
    printer
    I had to think of a way to transfer the holes.(again explain later if required) I hope this helps you decide. Martin.
    3 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Motor, speed controller
    Thought of building a simple Springer type tug as a rescue boat as there is no club locally - so sail on my own. Tried using my old Lindbergh tug quite often, can handle bad weather and has a surprising amount of power from a 7 pole (old
    printer
    ) motor, but the pointy bow makes it difficult for rescues although it has worked from time to time. Any ideas on how to control the motors on a springer from a single speed controller as ESC,s are not only difficult to obtain they are also b..... expensive here. Perhaps I should try servo switching as I have a large stockpile of those. Have two ideal 380 motors , shafts props etc from a RTR toy type but of course the Radio/ ESC is not very much use beside being the multi channel 27 mhz type which even my cellphone (mobile) interferes with
    4 months ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Look for a simple balsa build
    Having owned a laser cutter for nearly 10 years , I have found that most old hand drawn plans are inaccurate and a lot of the old die cut kit parts are not only inaccurate but in most cases the bulkheads for instance are asymmetrical. When making a model you have to first correct the bulkheads etc (not difficult using Corel) and then cut a prototype to determine what further errors there are. Back to the drawing board to correct those, and then a further test cut etc. In the early days it would take about 6 versions to correct all the errors , but with experience have now whittled it down to about 3 as areas likely to have errors can be anticipated. There is also the difficulty of for instance "3mm" thick material that can vary from about 2.7mm to 3.4mm and that can mean parts don't fit. Having said that I have cut most of the EezEbilt models from the site and the errors are minor besides being balsa they are easy to correct especially using water-resistant quick drying PVA glue. With enlarged versions you have to correct the slots etc so its easy enough to check on Corel for any inaccuracies. (That is one of the beauties of digital plans - you can produce a model at any size you choose). Most Lasers use dxf CAD files which Corel converts for you either way importing or exporting. One of the drawbacks my partner and I see is that in CAD drawings a curve is represented by a large number of straight lines which makes for a very large file. In Corel a curve is simply a curve and hence a much smaller file. PDF files are very problematic for most modellers as for instance two files imported from the same source can vary in size dramatically and you then have parts that don't match. The same applies to printing pdf plans in parts on an A4
    printer
    - the pages very often don't line up. JPG files are much less of a problem as sizes go. My personal feeling is that the mismatch of parts is probably due to the use of pdf files with their associated problems. Some
    printer
    s unfortunately do not allow you to adjust sizes other than in a rudimentary fashion.
    4 months ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Look for a simple balsa build
    "....Curlew, the top was short...." That's very surprising. It's an original KK, and I would have measured directly from an image of the die-cut parts. Are you sure that you printed the plans out correctly, with no 'scale' or 'fit to page' on your
    printer
    ? That can alter the scale at which things are printed, which is why there is an inch scale on each page. Perhaps you could provide me with some measurements so that I can trace any error? That boat is a very small one - too small for standard R/C unless you want to perform some complicated modelling. It is a good starter boat to teach the rudiments of making a hull, and perhaps sailing on a pond. At only 10 3/4 inches it's not really suitable for a big lake. The Curlew has a push-in two-roof cabin superstructure. By 'top' do you mean the forward cabin roof, the rear cabin roof, or the complete superstructure? Or do you mean the two deck parts? I would like to correct any problems.
    4 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    I guess I could make mounts for small spindle motors on the 3D
    printer
    . How is the cutting tool held in place? Do you use just a rigid coupler with grubscrews or a minature collet system?
    4 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    My plan is to trace PDF files into DSM and output as DXF, or work up my own drawings. I have DXF to G code so I guess I could deal with your files. When finished, my OX will be used for all sorts, cutting aluminium is a must, Daughter has demanded name plaques for her horses stable, she reckons her horsey pals will pay for nice carved name plaques so who am I to argue! ply and balsa cutting will be essential and possibly light brass sheet, hence my first choice of the 900 Watt DeWalt router. I may well end up with an arsenal of spindles/routers and eventually a laser head. I am using the CNC shield for now but the intention is to use a Rumba board, a versatile Arduino mega 2560 based board with loads of output options more commonly used on 3D
    printer
    s, I have upgraded 2 of my
    printer
    s with them already. Like 3D
    printer
    s, the options for modifying/tweaking are endless. I will be fitting endstops, but I may use TMC 2130 drivers, which do not need endstops, as soon as they detect a substancial increase in current they switch off. My Mk3 Prusa has them, certainly reduces the ammount of wiring! I have a notion to draw up some plans for a series of warship boats at rc able size, ie, 47ft Whaler, Skimming Dish FML Cheverton Launch etc, interesting boats but rarely seen actually on the water as working models. I have a milling machine so a plentiful supply of milling cutters is available for a range of jobs.
    4 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Hi, I am in the process of building an Openbuilds Ox machine. So far I have built the gantry and Z axis. The drivers for the Nema 23 motors should arrive on Saturday so I can spend the bank holiday weekend fiddling about with the electrics. I will use a Dewalt 900Watt router for the spindle so there will be enough power to cut aluminium sheet. I have been using 3D
    printer
    s tobuild a minesweeper with great success so a CNC router will add to mt arsenal...
    4 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    Model Boat crew....
    I may have not made it clear but when I say you can make figures in Make Human they only exist in the computer (not physical items). All the programs make things on screen only but between them you can end up making a file that you can load onto a 3d
    printer
    and make the physical item. I had a go at it and then left it . I would now have to start the learning curve again. (Edit) I just thought you probably mean physically do the sculpting. I guess with the right skills that would work. My mistake. Les
    4 months ago by lesfac
    Forum
    Model Boat crew....
    If you have access to a 3d
    printer
    ,maybe at your local library,you can down load free from thingyverse,a couple I have had done Popeye 4"high and Captain Haddock 4" including base .these were both printed at my local library,with Popeye costing 50p and Captain H costing 75p.
    4 months ago by marky
    Blog
    Rear deck test
    So while 2nd layer of gunwhale stringers glue is setting on 46” boat I thought I’d do some renovations on the recently acquired 36” boat, starting with the rear deck. This will be a useful practice for when the 46” boat needs doing. The original deck was painted white and was screwed down. I’m replacing it with a planked deck, some removable foam tanks, hose & deck hatch with brass handles. The foam tanks need to be removable to get at the screws to lift the deck (access to rudders &servo) here’s where we are up to. Deck is planked with recess for hatch. The cross hatch grid for the foam tanks was made on my 3D
    printer
    and once painted will be OK. I’ll make the brass connectors for the hose on my lathe, and the hatch needs a recess milled out for the handles. The hose I have is a bit of corrugated plastic probably from Lego. We’ll see how all this comes out and adjust for the 46” boat in due course. πŸ‘
    4 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona - the hull
    So... here is a compressed build blog of my paddle tug Iona... and I'm playing catch-up as the vessel is 95% complete and has been sailed already, but there may be some interest in what I've done. Iona was scratch-built off plan and has turned out to be the cheapest build so far out of 3 I've made, mainly because I was able to source materials from the leftovers box! it's a 'mixed-media' boat 😜using traditional methods of plank on frame hull, with paddles made on my 3D
    printer
    , and other parts turned on the lathe. So starting with the hull, frames were drawn out, transferred to some scrap 9mm ply and cut out on my bandsaw, along with the keel. These were assembled on a build board with some right angle brackets / measuring tools and test fitted before being stuck in place with epoxy. This was quite difficult as the shape of the hull is critical and comes right at the start of the build. I did remake 1 frame to correct alignment. The deck stringers need to bend in 2 directions, so some steaming with a carpet steam cleaner attached to some tubes worked and the wood clamped in place to dry. Outboard sponsons (?) were fitted to make a frame for the paddle boxes to fit on. Then a large sheet of ply forms the bottom of the hull, and the only job left to complete was the (tedious) planking. This was my 1st plank on frame ship... and it took ages. I think it came out reasonably OK but I'm not a perfectionist and I know if I'd spent more time it could be better... but I didn't! Next blog will feature building the paddle boxes and superstructure.πŸ€“
    6 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    PS Iona - paddles
    I decided to build the paddles on my 3D
    printer
    , working off the plan rather than building in brass as this should be much quicker... should be! Feeling confident I designed ver 1 & printed it out... and scratched my head a lot to see how this was going to fit together. So ver 2 was much better and almost looked like it would work. Ver 3... same etc. Ver 4 πŸ‘ This would assemble looking like paddles. I decided against feathering paddles having talked to a few paddle steamer builders - it seemed more complicated, used slightly more battery power and in 1:36 scale would make little difference to performance. Having built one now I would probably make a few changes but it looks and performs ok. The assembled paddle is attached to a 4mm stainless steel drive shaft with brass bushes. I have recently added some pins to ensure they don't come loose on the lake.πŸ€“
    6 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Which is where laser cutting leaps to the fore with a tool diameter around 0.1 mm. The Cyclone is a pcb cutter which uses a taper-point tool so there is no offset. The goal is to mount a laser rather than a Dremel. Point taken on the smaller parts . My initial thought was that, with a larger platform, you could cut multiple parts from a larger piece of material in one pass. Unfortunately, you can't walk away from a laser cutter to let it get on with things as you can with a 3D
    printer
    . You are looking at a potential bonfire and the bigger the job, the longer you have to stand and watch it.
    7 months ago by Delboy
    Forum
    Smoke generator
    I made them myself (and engine mounts, battery mounts etc...) on my 3D
    printer
    . I printed a solid version to line up the motors then replaced those with the flexible ones afterwards.
    9 months ago by landie
    Response
    105ft Motor Minesweeper
    Great job.Looks like with the 3D
    printer
    you will have the boat finished a lot quicker than I can.Nice to be able to use modern technology for your build.The details so far look good.Will look forward to more details being added.
    11 months ago by Donnieboy
    Blog
    105ft Motor Minesweeper
    I am currently fiddling about with 3D
    printer
    s and as it is high time I built another boat I am going to combine the two hobbies and make the decks superstructure and some fittings on my 3D
    printer
    s, a Prusa i3 Mk2S and a Tronxy X5S. So far the results are encouraging. The model is based on a 105ft Motor Minesweeper, a wooden harbour/coastal sweeper. About 300 were built and saw service throughout WW2. My example carries the LL magnetic influence sweep but proved under powered for the task and many were converted to carry an acoustic 'kango' hammer for dealing with acoustic mines.
    11 months ago by Nickthesteam
    Forum
    Port holes
    That was Wayne Mark. 'Midlife'. He was threatening to buy a third (!) 3D
    printer
    so I expect his missus shot him 😲 We all warned him to print some Kevlar armour first! Last I heard of him was several months ago when he asked me for some Tiger tank (printed for for his LC!!) sound-files. I emailed him a batch but never got a reply πŸ€” How's it goin' Matey? All the best, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Inspiration for beautiful boat builders ;-)
    '87/'88? I was here then as well, since Oct. '85. Where were you working? I don't ppo poo 3D printing. I have to admit that I've had a 3D
    printer
    for 2 years now and haven't even calibrated it yet πŸ€” Haven't had a real need that drove me to it yet, will come eventually I hope. Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Agree Pete, But then telephone wires come as twisted pairs (to minimise induced interference) which gives them additional strength (and bulkπŸ€”). Your wiring looks to me to be about 24 gauge. I also agree with space in the mast, had also pondered that while looking at my Southampton. Came to the conclusion that I would use the tiny wrapping wire (as U lot call itπŸ˜‰) down the mast and into a socket permanently glued under the cabin. Then use flexible stranded wire from then on down to the electronickery! Then there's no strain on the fragile wiring when you remove the cabin for maintenance etc. That light 'wrapping' wire is fine for the LED circuits as they only take a few tens of milliamps. I'm also looking at the possibility to use a common return (negative) lead to minimise the wires needed on the mast itself. I buy my wire Online as well, almost no shops left where you can go an look at stuffπŸ€” Was surprised and disappointed at the limited choice at Radio Shack, pretty miserable compared with the range I can get here from Conrad, and many others, even Krick Modellbau. I'm multiplexing my projects with yours, and others who have approached me by PM. Trouble is I can never resist a challenge! What I'm doing for your Richardson will also be the basis for some mods to my SouthamptonπŸ˜‰ Anyone know a good 'Cloning Shop'? 😁😁 Big 3D
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    and an isaac Asimov Positronic brain perhaps? Cheers All, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Crew
    I can only speak for myself but I hate to see model boats tooling about with nobody on the bridge, like the Marie Celeste or a Philippine super tanker. So, i was very pleased to find this able bodied seaman that I can reproduce on my 3D
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    . https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2757066
    1 year ago by Delboy
    Forum
    Wherry hull in GRP
    Boatshed, you have to speak as you find with these things. Clearly, the model has been improved but not enough yet. It's only fair that we are honest with suppliers. I haven't looked at his deck fittings, but if they are straight off a 3D
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    they too will need a lot of work to correct and improve the surfaces. it's not offensive to say so, it's just the truth. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Wherry hull in GRP
    Hi mastman, I saw your comment that you wrote, I have copied and pasted it below. ******************************************** Your right about the madhouse cant see how people can run things down on here without seeing the actual goods any way thats another matter. ********************************************* I did write about the shape of the wherry hull was wrong. I am not into sailing boats, am more into MTB's and I power boat hulls. I know I hadn't seen the actual hull in the flesh so to speak. All I saw was the picture that had been posted for the Wherry hull that was for sale. I had just come home from Norfolk and just seen a Wherry moored in Potter Heigham. I commented that the shape was wrong because of the way the bow of the hull swept up so high. I have posted the picture I saw from which I commented on. I am sorry if I did offend you but it was just that I din't see the shape as being correct. Once again I am sorry to have offended you. I also said about other parts being made on a 3D
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    . Onc e again I did think that resin ones I have seen on ebay were of a better finish quality than the 3D printed ones. it seems that I have put a cat amongst the pigeons with my remarks. I am sorry to have offended you. Regards BOATSHED.
    1 year ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    Wherry hull in GRP
    Arron, the first thing to do is make the pattern a clinker construction. Your website showed that you were using CAD to develop plank shapes. I have no idea if that's possible, but if you can do CAD and it is possible why is the model carvel? Secondly the sides show a great deal of wobbliness to the shape. What car designers would describe as "flabbiness". There is no strength to the form. it goes in and out. Maybe the layup is not thick enough in that area. The side view isn't bad, if a little indistinct. Maybe in the trimming, but then a well laid up hull will trim much better. There should be a sheer line moulded in to which the deck level can be trimmed. I'm sure anyone wanting a model of Albion will be delighted to find a GRP hull at last, but for a wider audience you would have been better off taking a little longer and making a clinker version. Wherries were so varied in length/tonnage that a clinker model could cover as many as 3 popular scales at the extremes. BTW, I didn't say 3D was all you did, only that as a young guy it was very likely 3d printed since you will have learned the necessary CAD. I wish my son could do the same as he has 3
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    s already, but can only use free files. If I could do CAD, I would be dangerous Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Wherry hull in GRP
    Many of those parts look like they have been made on a 3D
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    and not very professional. Not like parts that are made from resin and nicely finished. Some pictures are very badly focused and blurred.
    1 year ago by BOATSHED
    Response
    Ship's Boats
    I think digitalizing the drawings would be the time consuming bit ,if you had a 3D scan of the hull it could be scaled to the desired scale then depending on the
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    build dimensions broken down into printable size parts a.Cheers Marky
    1 year ago by marky
    Blog
    TRIUMPH (CG-52301) USCG Type F MLB
    Laser cut kit from Barracuda RC Boats, N Carolina, USA. Baltic birch plywood false keel, ribs/frames, hull sheathing, deck and cabins. No formal plans; I was able to source a handful of B&W archival photos from the USCG website. Fortunately I was able to procure a motherload of archival photos and a few hard to read layout drawings from Mr. Timothy Dring, LCDR, USN (Ret.). He is co-author of "American Coastal Rescue Craft", which is the "bible" if you will, of such. I do sometimes thank the internet. I am certain that without his assistance, my efforts on this wouldn't have been as enjoyable. The kit was also void of fittings, which I was aware of prior to purchase, so I invested in a 3D
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    . That I've used to a limited degree, due to searching for parts in the correct file format is mind-numbing! I have globally sourced fittings; USA, UK, ASIA. As a matter of fact, the searchlights I got from this Model Boat Shop were 3D printed, and I was able to fit 5mm LEDs into them. I'd like to get a couple more and put some superbright 12v LED drone lamps in them for use on my 35" towboat. Many deck fittings are handmade when possible, the cleats and fairleads are from Cornwall Boats, UK. (Very reasonable & diverse source, if you didn't already know.) I try to keep wood natural when detail allows it, as I never have enjoyed painting over natural grain. Her decks are covered with 1/16" scribed basswood sheathing from earthandtree.com, which is normally used for wainscoting dollhouse walls. All my boats that have wood decks are covered with scribed sheathing; I feel it makes 'em look "sexy". Believe it or not, the idea for wainscoting came from finding 3/16" at Hobby Lobby's dollhouse department. A couple of feet x 3.5" was about $16, so I found a less expensive source that also had more selections (earthandtree.com) The rail stanchions are 3/16" square dowels with 2 corners rounded over on the Dremel router table. Leaving their base square, I fit a square peg into a round hole with no glue to facilitate removal, and also for ease of replacing broken ones, which is inevitable. The rail is 1/16" brass rod that also is readily removable. The stern rail is stationary on the lower half, and the chain & wire stanchions are removable for towing ops. The deck coamings and knuckle are African mahogany strips, other mahogany accents came from leftovers of a prior build. I also try on all my boats, to incorporate vintage leftover scribed sheathing salvaged from my late Father's builds, so I know he's got a part in my builds. Note-the raised deck section between the aft ladder trunk and towing bit is actually a laminated deckhouse he made for the Frigate Essex. Unfortunately, he was unable to build that kit due to Alzheimer's disease in his latter years. (I blame that mostly on the hazardous fumes from the airplane "dope" & glue he used when building RC planes in the 60s & 70s.) I use polyurethane instead of resin due to COPD, 37 yrs of smoking, I quit 2.5 yrs ago. The driveline consists of: 775 Johnson DC main (3500 RPM@12V), Harbor Models 4mm x 14" shaft w/brass stuffing box, Raboesch 75mm 5-blade brass wheel (not OEM), 5mm U-joint couplers, Dimart 320A fan-cooled ESC. Handmade wooden teardrop rudder on a 3/8" sternpost, 1/4" tiller arm steered by a Halcion sail winch servo and cable system. Flysky 6 channel. The nav lights and other illumination are Lighthouse 9v LEDs, also a GoolRC Receiver controlled flashing blue Law Enforcement light. Obviously, I put the cart before the horse and completed the topsides and below deck before finishing the outer hull, but the Wx and season change dictated such. Can't wait for Spring!
    2 years ago by circle43nautical
    Directory
    (Other) CG-40564
    DUMAS 1:14 USCG 40' UTB. REPRESENTING US COAST GUARD UTILITY BOAT CG-40564, WHICH CAPSIZED DURING A RESCUE ATTEMPT ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER BAR ON 17 JAN 1961. HER CREW WAS FORTUNATELY RESCUED. SHE WAS ASSISTING CG-52301, A 52' TYPE F WOODEN MLB, WHICH FOUNDERED WITH THE LOSS OF ALL HANDS. IT REMAINS THE WORST SMALL BOAT RESCUE DISASTER IN COAST GUARD HiSTORY. THIS IS AN UNUSUAL SCALE BALSA PLANK-ON, COVERED BY 2 OZ FIBERGLASS. I USED MINWAX POLYURETHANE FOR AN ALTERNATE TO RESIN, WHICH TURNED OUT WELL, AND CAN BE DONE WITH MINIMAL VENTILATION. WITH BIRCH PLY DECK & CABINS, 1/8" SCRIBED SHEATHING COVERS THE DECK BOW TO STERN AND MAHOGANY TRIM LEFTOVER FROM ANOTHER DUMAS KIT IN MY SCALE SHIPYARD. STOCK D/C FITTINGS WITH SOME SUPPLEMENTAL PREMADE AND HANDMADE ITEMS. SHE FEATURES TWIN RABOESCH 4-BLADE WIDE FLUKE WHEELS AND MATCHING RUDDERS; WORKING HATCHES WITH STOWAGE AREA FOR ANCHOR & TOWLINE, LIGHTHOUSE 9V LED NAV LIGHTS AND FLASHING LED LAW ENFORCEMENT BLUE LIGHT (RC CONTROLLED). I'M ADDING A MOUNT FOR A SCALE BROWNING M2 50 CAL THAT I WAS ABLE TO PRODUCE ON MY 3D
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    . THAT'S AN ADVENTURE IN ITSELF. THIS WAS MY FIRST REAL PLANK ON BULKHEAD, AND BALSAWOOD CAN BE A LIL TRICKY, BUT WILL ALWAYS BE THE STANDARD OF WHICH I COMPARE ALL MY SUBSEQUENT BUILDS. MY FATHER BUILT RC AIRCRAFT, AND ALWAYS PREACHED THAT YOU SHOULD OVERBUILD IN ORDER TO SURVIVE A CRACK-UP AND FLY ANOTHER DAY! THAT'S MY CREED WITH BOATS. OVERBUILD!!! THANK YOU DAD! BTW-FYI-MR. ARNOLD PALMER WAS A US COAST GUARDSMAN (YM3) 1950-53 (Motor: 775 JOHNSON-TYPE 6-12V) (ESC: HOBBYWING) (9/10)
    2 years ago by circle43nautical


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