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    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the โ€˜Vintage Model Worksโ€™ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a โ€˜Thames River Police Launchโ€™ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50โ€™s and 60โ€™s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately ยฃ2.15 in todayโ€™s money but an equivalent cost of ยฃ48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36โ€ in length where the original was 24โ€ which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more โ€˜hiding roomโ€™ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as โ€˜strakesโ€™ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and
    servo
    . During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder &
    servo
    at the stern but largely I have not gone โ€˜off planโ€™ to any extent. The pictures show the model in itโ€™s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.
    6 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Re: Z-39 German WW2 Destroyer
    Well I'm damned! That's exactly how my HMS Hotspur started out when I was 15! 52 years ago, Tempus Fugit ๐Ÿค” Based on the old 1/600 Airfix kit! Back then no digital micros, PCs, Internet or 3D techโ˜น๏ธ I used calipers, a crude plastic micrometer, Dad's steel rule (half mm and 1/64th scales) and a slide rule. Drew the plans at 1/72 on an 'endless' printer roll Dad brought from the RAF Cosford Tech Training School, where he was chief syllabus writer for the Radar Tech courses. Much much later (32 years ago) I made my own decoder board with relays to switch the lighting, smoke and horn circuits. All operated from one channel at the TX.
    servo
    mounted micro switches provide for two further functions. Looking forward to your sketches / photos very much๐Ÿ‘ For my turrets I used one
    servo
    reduction gear and a pulley system to increase the 'firing arc' to ~270ยฐ. The whole shebang is mounted underneath the aft deck section so all comes out together for servicing. Think I'd better continue this in 'Retro Build Blog'!๐Ÿ˜ฎ Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    1 month ago by RNinMunich
    Directory
    (Yacht) Koh-i-Noor
    I bought this yacht via a well known auction website. it was owned by an old gent who had passed away and was covered in dust and the ABS white hull had yellowed with age. I cleaned the yacht up, rubbed the timber decks down and varnished them, re-painted the superstructure, rubbed down the hull and spayed the hull a grey/brown colour. it came complete with auxiliary motor, batteries, sail winch
    servo
    , ESC and navigation light switching unit. The yacht sails perfectly and looks great on the water. A real bargain buy. (Motor: Robbe) (ESC: Hitec Gold) (9/10)
    2 years ago by ads90
    Directory
    (Life Boat) Taymar
    Model Slipway Taymar Lifeboat and just completed the glassfibre hull, deck and installing motors, bow thruster and rudder
    servo
    (Motor: Graupner 600 x2) (10/10). The deck was a bad fit into the hull and a battle to fix but with hour long epoxy and lots of sellotape pulling the hull against the deck I got there in the end
    11 months ago by Brianaro
    Forum
    Model Slipway Tug AZIZ
    Further to the previously mentioned craft, the Model Slipway Tug/supply vessel 'Aziz' is also for sale. 1:50 scale, and measuring just over 110 cms. Again, constructed to the highest of standards, and with excellent detail, the craft has been used only sparingly. As with the other boats, the radio/electrical gear needs attention, as it is only presently fitted with the two motors and the rudder
    servo
    . This is a very impressive looking vessel, and I will give serious consideration to any offers that may be forthcoming. Many thanks, Dave
    3 months ago by Davecounty
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    Accidently deleted posts - Response by JOHN on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify โœ“ Like This Post ( 3 ) hi there With regard the
    servo
    rudder linkages - I was advised that it is always best to use the 'push/pull method' of linkage - as this has two strong points in its favour. The first problem it alleviates is - sometimes if on a single connection between rudder and
    servo
    and it is not set up quite right - a
    servo
    movement can force the rudder tiller arm to come back on itself under certain circumstances - i.e. when the distance from the centre of the
    servo
    to the outer hole on the
    servo
    arm isn't equal to the centre of the rudder post - to the centre of the linkage arm on the rudder. The second problem - you can get an odd strain on the gearing in the
    servo
    , because on some models there is a fair bit of force on the rudder blade - whilst the model is in motion & turning to port or starboard. The way to think of this, you are riding a pushbike and holding the handlebars with one hand and you are trying to turn a sharp corner - think of how much strain and effort you have to put in. Now, if you have a double linkage to either side of the tiller arm from your
    servo
    - that strain now is balanced and is evening out the strain in the
    servo
    . Admittedly, this problem where you wear the
    servo
    out only happens on very rare occasions - but - as the old saying goes 'belts and braces/better be safe than sorry'. John Response by RNinMunich on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify โœ“ Like This Post ( 1 ) In the wrong post but sensible stuff John.๐Ÿ‘ Hadn't considered it before but it certainly makes sense to me that a dual linkage will help cancel the backlash from the rudder. And hence stop the
    servo
    motor having to fight it. That would reduce potential 'hunting' of the
    servo
    and also take the strain off the gearing. Probably not a noticeable problem for short term rudder commands or in small, light models. But could be in the heavyweights with big rudders I suppose. like Mike said (sort of); makes yer think!! More power to yer
    servo
    s Gents. Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž PS Dual linkage not possible in some situations, see pic of cramped space in my Sea Scout. Had to lay the
    servo
    on it's side.๐Ÿ˜ฒ
    2 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    Two reasons for a double linkage, firstly with a single linkage the pressure exerted on the
    servo
    from the rudder during a L/H turn will put the linkage in tension, and when doing a R/H turn then the linkage will be in compression. is it possible this could have an effect on the electronic mechanism in the
    servo
    , not that I have any expertise in this area, however with two linkages this is equalled out. Secondly, and the main reason, is that it may not be necessary, it may be overkill, but I like symmetry, and the
    servo
    arm has two arms maybe for a reason? At the end of the day its personal preference and itโ€™s good to foster debate and you may find a lot of the parts I make may not be necessary to most people but I enjoy engineering, wait while you see the mast!
    2 months ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    Cooling the motor โ€“ update.
    Iโ€™m grateful to mturpin013 for commenting that he considered using the propeller adaptor supplied with the Turnigy motor as it prompted me to retrieve mine from the box and adapt it to secure the fan on the end of the motor. I cut off the threaded shaft from the prop adaptor and the end was ground flat and then I placed it on the end of the motor stub and used a scriber through the bolt holes to mark the positions on the flange of the fan. The fan was then removed and the holes drilled through and opened up to 3mm and then it was a simple matter to put the fan back on the motor and attach the new piece to the motor using the three 2.5mm cap head screws which are supplied with the prop adaptor. I think this is a far better โ€˜engineeringโ€™ solution to securing the fan to the rotor than a spot of CA. Because the addition of the fan was so straightforward and effective I have decided to implement it on the model anyway so I cut an opening through the end panel of the motor cover and put some stainless steel mesh over that to finish it. The motor is now connected to the ESC and I have done some tests with the motor running and Iโ€™m delighted to report that thereโ€™s a very healthy airflow through the motor cover ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ‘. It turns out that my modification is not unique at all and credit is due to reilly4 who did something similar to the twin motors on one of his boats long before I came up with the idea. He posted a โ€˜photo of his boat when replying to mturpin013 on the subject of
    servo
    mounts. Take a look at the motors in his picture!
    2 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Enclosing the controls.
    Hi Boaty. Thank you for you compliments, I'm pleased you're enjoying my build blog ๐Ÿ˜. The VMW kit has been developed really well and does credit to the original designer so definitely put one on your 'to-do' list. The kit is now available from VMW: http://www.vintagemodelworks.co.uk/?page_id=18 The
    servo
    in mine is actually in a rear compartment that I formed and involves a bit of 'keyhole surgery' to work within but it means that the
    servo
    and all the operational running gear is very neatly hidden away, another benefit of the re-scaled version of this boat ๐Ÿ‘. PS. Note the relocated antenna ! Robbob.
    2 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Enclosing the controls.
    From Boaty I am following your post with interest as I had been thinking about building a Police Launch in the near future. Models with aft cockpits can present issues when installing RC gear and I have experienced this when building an Aerokits Sea Scout and five years ago when restoring the Crash Tender. Simplest method is to install the
    servo
    horizontally and raise the cockpit floor but this can create problems in itself unless the floor is sealed around the edges to prevent water entering the compartment. The seat idea is a realistic method as it could be eliminate the problems that I mentioned above as well as providing easier access to the RC gear. Keep up the good work Boaty๐Ÿ˜
    2 months ago by boaty
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    Just moved these two posts that were posted further down my blog by mistake as they are significant to the discussion and bring back the subject as I think its important as I would like to know if any others have a view. the photo is Johns Response by JOHN on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify โœ“ Like This Post ( 2 ) hi there With regard the
    servo
    rudder linkages - I was advised that it is always best to use the 'push/pull method' of linkage - as this has two strong points in its favour. The first problem it alleviates is - sometimes if on a single connection between rudder and
    servo
    and it is not set up quite right - a
    servo
    movement can force the rudder tiller arm to come back on itself under certain circumstances - i.e. when the distance from the centre of the
    servo
    to the outer hole on the
    servo
    arm isn't equal to the centre of the rudder post - to the centre of the linkage arm on the rudder. The second problem - you can get an odd strain on the gearing in the
    servo
    , because on some models there is a fair bit of force on the rudder blade - whilst the model is in motion & turning to port or starboard. The way to think of this, you are riding a pushbike and holding the handlebars with one hand and you are trying to turn a sharp corner - think of how much strain and effort you have to put in. Now, if you have a double linkage to either side of the tiller arm from your
    servo
    - that strain now is balanced and is evening out the strain in the
    servo
    . Admittedly, this problem where you wear the
    servo
    out only happens on very rare occasions - but - as the old saying goes 'belts and braces/better be safe than sorry'. John Response by RNinMunich on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify โœ“ Like This Post ( 1 ) In the wrong post but sensible stuff John.๐Ÿ‘ Hadn't considered it before but it certainly makes sense to me that a dual linkage will help cancel the backlash from the rudder. And hence stop the
    servo
    motor having to fight it. That would reduce potential 'hunting' of the
    servo
    and also take the strain off the gearing. Probably not a noticeable problem for short term rudder commands or in small, light models. But could be in the heavyweights with big rudders I suppose. like Mike said (sort of); makes yer think!! More power to yer
    servo
    s Gents. Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž PS Dual linkage not possible in some situations, see pic of cramped space in my Sea Scout. Had to lay the
    servo
    on it's side.๐Ÿ˜ฒ
    2 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    Hi reilly4. Thanks for your response. I didn't think it was a standard feature, it does seem to work though and I did note your water cooled motor mounts too. Hi Mike. Sorry to hi-jack your thread ๐Ÿ˜‰.
    2 months ago by robbob
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    Robbob, This was my first venture into using brushless motors so I was a bit uncertain on cooling. I made the fans from aluminium and bolted them on at the existing 2mm bolt locations. Someone told me they wouldn't rev fast enough but I think every bit helps. I also have water cooling at the front plate of the motors. The end result is that the motors never get warm, even after an hour of sailing around the lake at good speed.
    2 months ago by reilly4
    Blog
    Brave Borderer
    During our protracted wait for Spring, have had chance to reflect on the earlier tribulations with the brushless motor installation. My enthusiasm was sparked by an article on getting the best from your Tx in a magazine and the advantages of using the Elevon or V Tail facilities if available. My Flysky Rx/Tx has this facility, so after some experiments, set the boat up to use the Elevon function. This puts both motor ESCs on the same control lever, so advancing the control accelerates both screws equally and moving to either side accelerates, or slows the appropriate motor. Think this will reduce the coordination previously required to sail in a straight line. Fresh from that success decided to experiment further. The Tx allows reducing
    servo
    throw, so tried that too so could reduce the max. ESC output, it also seems to work. One problem with the original layout was that if the forward speed was reduced quickly it was very easy to move the lever through the neutral point, overshooting into reverse. This immediately reversed that motor causing erratic operation. The Tx also has a โ€œDual Rateโ€ facility to adjust the lever response from linear to various alternate rates. This allows the neutral point zone to be increased, so the tendency to overshoot into reverse is reduced. Bench tests of these adjustments suggest the model will be easier to operate. Hope they will make controlling the models performance better in our closest pool, which is quite small. A further precaution to prevent inadvertent operation of the brushless motors when using the centre, brushed one, was to add two small relays; one into each of the white ESC signal wires. This allows a another channel on the Tx to be used to select, or deselect the brushless motors. Anticipate that by turning this channel and thus the brushless ESCs off, manoeuvring can be accomplished without the operation being overwhelmed by a brushed motor inadvertently being operated. My patience for Spring is getting thinner!
    2 months ago by RHBaker
    Response
    Search light
    In the wrong post but sensible stuff John.๐Ÿ‘ Hadn't considered it before but it certainly makes sense to me that a dual linkage will help cancel the backlash from the rudder. And hence stop the
    servo
    motor having to fight it. That would reduce potential 'hunting' of the
    servo
    and also take the strain off the gearing. Probably not a noticeable problem for short term rudder commands or in small, light models. But could be in the heavyweights with big rudders I suppose. like Mike said (sort of); makes yer think!! More power to yer
    servo
    s Gents. Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž PS Dual linkage not possible in some situations, see pic of cramped space in my Sea Scout. Had to lay the
    servo
    on it's side.๐Ÿ˜ฒ
    2 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Turnigy Standard 9x transmitter
    Peter,here i put photos of simple
    servo
    switch., constructed by Petr Hajek (ufon 13).I use the same switch for switching sound modules (siren + foghorn) Channel 2 in my model ps Lulonga. I do not know why you are not using channel 3 (throttle) to control the engine via ESC.... Regards Tom ๐Ÿ˜Š
    2 months ago by tomarack
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    Two reasons for a double linkage, firstly with a single linkage the pressure exerted on the
    servo
    from the rudder during a L/H turn will put the linkage in tension, and when doing a R/H turn then the linkage will be in compression. is it possible this could have an effect on the electronic mechanism in the
    servo
    ?, not that I have any expertise in this area, however with two linkages this is equalled out. Secondly, and the main reason, is that it may not be necessary, it may be overkill, but I like symmetry, and the
    servo
    arm has two arms maybe for a reason? At the end of the day it's personal preference and itโ€™s good to foster debate and you may find a lot of the parts I make may not be necessary to most people but I enjoy engineering, wait while you see the mast!
    2 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Search light
    hi there With regard the
    servo
    rudder linkages - I was advised that it is always best to use the 'push/pull method' of linkage - as this has two strong points in its favour. The first problem it alleviates is - sometimes if on a single connection between rudder and
    servo
    and it is not set up quite right - a
    servo
    movement can force the rudder tiller arm to come back on itself under certain circumstances - i.e. when the distance from the centre of the
    servo
    to the outer hole on the
    servo
    arm isn't equal to the centre of the rudder post - to the centre of the linkage arm on the rudder. The second problem - you can get an odd strain on the gearing in the
    servo
    , because on some models there is a fair bit of force on the rudder blade - whilst the model is in motion & turning to port or starboard. The way to think of this, you are riding a pushbike and holding the handlebars with one hand and you are trying to turn a sharp corner - think of how much strain and effort you have to put in. Now, if you have a double linkage to either side of the tiller arm from your
    servo
    - that strain now is balanced and is evening out the strain in the
    servo
    . Admittedly, this problem where you wear the
    servo
    out only happens on very rare occasions - but - as the old saying goes 'belts and braces/better be safe than sorry'. John
    2 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    Turnigy Standard 9x transmitter
    Hi, As I see, there is a problem. The basic question is - what you need to control, and the other - whether this type of RC kit will allow this. Especially .. this type is mainly designed for aircraft control. You need to choose compromises to control the ship model. This type does not allow simple switching of functions - only by means of another switching module, or by means of end switches on the modified
    servo
    . in the base allows only proportional control of
    servo
    s or ESC. There are RC sets, that have switching functions, such as Graupner - e.g. Graupner mc-20 12-Channel HoTT but these are far more expensive... The basic wiring is the 3rd throttle for engine control (ESC), channel 4 for control of the rudder. there is a possibility to use channels 1 and 2 for switching the added end switches but it is not possible to switch them permanently (perhaps with the help of the added relay)-. channel 5 can be used - setting> AUX> GYR> PIT TRIM - (rotary potentiometer control.) similarly channel # 7. AUX settings> HOV THRO Channel No 8 - AUX Settings> HOV PIT Operate again using rotary potentiometers - see function descriptions. These channels again allow only proportional control. Switching can be done (maybe) using channel # 6 settings >AUX>FLP> Gear ON/OFF (I did not try this) It is good to get familiar with the setting of the individual elements and check this on the display for the test (without the connection of the receiver !!) before you all plug in the model. I hope it helped you a little bit.. Tom
    2 months ago by tomarack
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    The
    servo
    mount on my Crash Tender came from China, unfortunately I don't have the machinery or skills that Mike has. I found the single linkage to be more than adequate. reilly4. I note that your motors have fans attached (first 'photo), are they standard on those motors ?
    3 months ago by robbob
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    The aluminium
    servo
    mount is similar to what I have used, but the quality here is a step above excellent. ๐Ÿ‘ I use aluminium angle sections as well, so they can be made into a Z section depending on the application. I use 2mm to 3mm diameter bolts and drill and tap into the sections to secure the
    servo
    s. This method can be used on any size of
    servo
    as they come in various sizes. I have also noticed that some modellers put two linkages on rudder
    servo
    s. if both linkages worked in tension only (ie both pulling), then this is necessary, but if the linkage is a rod that works in both tension (pulling) and compression (pushing) then there should be no need for duplication. None of my models have this arrangement.
    3 months ago by reilly4
    Response
    servo
    Mount
    I'm curious to know why you opted for the 'push - pull' arrangement for the linkages?. Nice piece of metalwork, and polished to a mirror finish too...dazzling ๐Ÿ˜Ž Rob.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    Aziz, Westerriff, Assurance Envoy for sale
    Thank you for your kind comments, and yes, all of the ships have been built to a very fine standard. With the Aziz already fitted with two motors and rudder
    servo
    , there is little to do in order to set sail. They have all sailed previously, and I think that some of the RC components may have been transferred from one to the other, dependant upon the flavour of the month at the time. I can't sing the praises of these craft enough, they are impressive in every respect. They aren't in the way yet, but I am fearful that constant working around them could result in damage, so they sooner they sail off into the distance, the better. :-) Don't be afraid to make an offer, I do need to sell them all. Many thanks, Dave ( the site will also benefit from a sale, as a suitable donation will be made ).
    3 months ago by Davecounty
    Blog
    servo
    Mount
    servo
    mount I have looked and better looked for a decent
    servo
    mount but could not find one that suited the position I wanted to put the
    servo
    , so I decide to make my own. I bought some aluminium channel, which would act as a platform and base for the standard
    servo
    . Space in terms of height is at a premium and so some material had to be removed from the keel area to make sure the
    servo
    arms did not catch on the underside floor of the rear deck. As the space tapers in height from stern>forward then the best position for the
    servo
    would be next to the forward bulkhead
    3 months ago by mturpin013
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Mowe 2
    I hadn't build a RC model for over 45 years, so as a 60th Birthday present my wife bought me this Aeronaut Mowe 2 kit, complete with all the RC equipment; motor,
    servo
    , transmitter and receiver, ESC unit etc. It was a great kit to build and took me about 3 months from start to finish. The hull was a bit tricky, but a tube of P38 and lots of sanding, re-filling with light balsa filler, re-sanding, finishing and painting and patience won through! Not a brilliant finish, but an ideal boat to get my hand back-in to modelling. When sailing, the boat needed a bit of ballast in the form of 2 old AA batteries in the bow to keep it stable and level in the water at speed! (ESC: Aeronaut) (8/10)
    3 months ago by StuartE
    Blog
    Auxiliary motor, rudder
    servo
    , bowsprit bitts
    Back to posting again....I decided to added an auxiliary motor since I had several laying around and it will come in handy when I am tweaking the sailing setup in case I get stuck in the middle of the pond. Made a stuffing tube just like I did on my rescue tug build. Made a shaft from some 3/16" steel rod, threaded it and polished it up, works great. Photo of the aft section shows continued hull framing and upside down mount of the rudder
    servo
    . I will enclose the
    servo
    with the small pilot house as is typical on the barge. This will make maintenance and adjustment access easy. Yes, the build is wandering away from the true "Pearl" which I used the hull plans from. it will maintain the same sail plan, but I will modify some items for ease of RC use. Bowsprit will be retractable, bitts are shown in progress. The bowsprit will be made from a carbon fiber "arrow shaft". Mast will be wood and I am shaping out of maple that I have. Staring to plank the hull as well. More to come shortly, Joe
    3 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    RC circuit
    Since your going to replace your Tx and Rx consider a computer radio like the taranis. Each of your rudder
    servo
    s can be on its own dedicated channel as can the ESC for each motor. Using the built in mixing functions you can "tune" the setup so as to get the effects your looking for plus you can do things like both rudders moving in opposite directions to give a brake effect. Setting up the mixing looks difficult but once your into it, it follows a logic. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yq_H9vzCz8g&t=21s
    3 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    Robbe Westerriff lotse pilot vessel
    This boat is understood to be a Robbe 1:25 kit, constructed to a very high standard, and is the pilot vessel Westerriff. The craft is finished to the most exacting of standards and, whilst fitted with a motor, bow thruster and lots of wiring, will need additions and finishing to perform, with, battery, radio gear etc required. ( I also note there is no
    servo
    for the rudder ). It has sailed previously, and is provided with many attractive features, including operating water cannon, rotating radar, operating mast lights ( numerous ). The length is 106 cms, or a tad under 42 inches in old money.( The craft is supplied without the stand that is shown in the images. I am presently looking for a suitable stand, so if there is one out there to be had, please do let me ( or the new purchaser ) know. If further info or images is/are required, please do let me know. Again, I am looking for a reasonable and realistic offer for the boat, and all offers will be considered. The craft is presently moored alongside the previously mentioned Assurance class armed tug in South Manchester. ( also, the least I can do is to ensure that a suitable donation is made to the site following the sale of any of the craft that I am offering for sale ).
    3 months ago by Davecounty
    Forum
    RC circuit
    looking at flanking rudders you will need another
    servo
    working these and this can be either with a another channel or a Y connector working all
    servo
    s have a look at "Google" how flanking rudders work hope this helps
    3 months ago by jacko
    Forum
    Slightly confused newbie
    Q.E.D. ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ‘ That's the main thing - whatever you do or how you do it - Enjoy it!! Apropos Normal or Reverse at the TX:- Terry is quite right. ๐Ÿ‘ If I remember my history correctly the Reversing function was originally added many years ago mainly to accommodate the 'fly boys'. It made reversing
    servo
    s very simple when the confined installation space made mechanical reversing very difficult or downright impossible. For ailerons in thin wings for example. Have fun with your boat JB, and don't forget to put her in your harbour with some pics / video. All the best, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    3 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    I have two steam boats, an Alexandra and a Tug which was destined for the bin, until my friend suggested that he may know someone who wanted it. I refurbished the boat and the steam plant went to Clevedon Steam who stripped it, reset the burner etc and added a few new bits, glass water gauge etc. The rudder is controlled by an electric motor, NOT a
    servo
    , so you have to return the motor to central after a manouevre, so you have to think well ahead of where you are, and where you want to be!!
    3 months ago by CaptainFlack
    Forum
    Time to let go !
    For some time now, I've been addicted to purchasing beautiful things, particularly well made things, without much thought for my family, my job, or where the heck I'm going to put them ! On one such escapade I helped out with disposing of a small flotilla of very well made boats, with the intention of keeping one, and having made my decision on which one to keep, the rest must now sail away ! I must admit that I'm a sucker for 'plug N play' the easy way out possibly, but I really don't yet have the time to build a kit myself, which is my aim for the future . Ho Hum. Anyway, enough about me, what about the boats ? I hear. Well, the first is a very well constructed Model Slipway 1:43 scale Assurance Class WW2 armed tug. The model has sailed previously, but is presently only fitted with a motor, rudder
    servo
    and various wiring. It will of course need finishing in this respect. The build quality is excellent, and is as it should be, except for a little attention required to the rigging, as visible in the images. Also, the white I.D. decals are slightly flaking, on the port side ( now I am being picky, but that's about the extent of 'things to do'). I guess the initiated will know the spec. but if any further info is required, please do ask. I am open to very sensible offers for this, and the other boats that I will be releasing. I purchased a collection, to save them from a commercial brokerage, and to retain one for my own use, which is now the case. Please do ask any questions, or let me know if you need further images of any aspect of the craft. Of course, I will not post, and it will be advisable for a prospective buyer to view first. The boat is presently moored in South Manchester, with easy access from the motorway network. Best regards.
    3 months ago by Davecounty
    Response
    HMS Bustler
    hi ya Marky, judging by your building skills - it wont take you much to move right over to radio controlling a model - if you have the skill to master building, you have the skills to master radio control. Go for it :-) heres an idea, look on some of the websites who sell radio gear and buy yourself a reasonably priced 2.4 handset with the receiver then you can purchase a couple of
    servo
    s to plug into the receiver along with a battery to power it all and then have a play around and find exactly what it does, and then programme if needs be. Golden rule, 27MHz 40 MHz &2.4 can be used on the land and on water only. 2.4 along with 35 MHz and be used for aircraft only. So 2.4 is the only one interchangeable between land and air. Basic rules for buying a transmitter in the UK anyway. amendment ,27MHz can also be used for aircraft๐Ÿ‘ john
    3 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    Slightly confused newbie
    Hi John, regarding the rudder, the 'Normal' and 'Reversed' designations are purely arbitrary. If you put a
    servo
    arm in one position on the
    servo
    , then remove it and place it at 180 degrees to the original position, the
    servo
    is reversed with respect to the original position. Try it with a spare
    servo
    and
    servo
    arm. The Normal/Reverse options on the transmitter are only there to allow for variations in
    servo
    to
    servo
    arm location variations. The 'Normal' designation is somewhat misleading. As far as the ESC goes, that is sorted by programming the ESC. That's my 2.7p worth. (5 cents Australian) Cheers, Terry
    3 months ago by terrymiff
    Response
    Tug Brooklyn!
    Except the smoker Ed? Looking forward to Nick's answer ๐Ÿ˜‰ Like the whistle๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘ How about a little steam release to go with it?
    servo
    operated valve to let a little 'steam' out from the smoker perhaps? (When you get the new one set up๐Ÿ˜‰) Very nice build Ed Hat off ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    3 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Slightly confused newbie
    Sorry JB but, Total waste of time and postage.๐Ÿ˜ฒ 1. The Mtroniks ESC and your TX appear to be working as advertised. If you arbitrarily reverse the
    servo
    output at the TX then you must tell the ESC that, i.e. go through the Mtroniks setup process again. 2. if the whole thing works just fine with the
    servo
    reverse switch on the TX set to reverse - so what? Why mess about and waste money? There seems to be no particular standard for what is 'Normal' or 'Reverse' between manufacturers. I have noticed this phenomenon with several manufacturers. In particular between older 40MHz sets and 2.4Gig sets of recent Eastern manufacture. I just set the TX switches so that everything works the way I want and 'Bob's yer Uncle, Fanny's yer Aunt'. I really don't care if it's 'Normal' or 'Reversed' - "If it works - DON'T FIX IT!!" Whatever, I would be MOST interested in Mtroniks response. I don't believe there is anything wrong with the ESC.๐Ÿ˜‰ Please post their answer ๐Ÿ‘ And yes, I have several Viper Marines in operation with no problems. Just follow the instructions as John posted above, and IF you change anything at the TX - TELL THE ESC!! Good luck, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    3 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Mtronics W-tail marine mixer connections.
    hi there Colin - to stop confusion and people suggesting things that are totally 'confusing' ๐Ÿ˜Š 1. What type of 2.4 transmitter do you have, what make and how many channels. 2. Can you put a photograph of your rudder
    servo
    in the model and the actual plug that fits into the receiver. This
    servo
    may not be compatible with what you are trying to do.
    3 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    Mtronics W-tail marine mixer connections.
    My boat was already built with twin motor drive. So I will stick with what I have, may even keep the original rc gear and esc,
    servo
    if I locate a transmitter that will operate it successfully. But I thank you for your input, cheers Colin.
    3 months ago by Colin H
    Directory
    (Yacht) Sea-Lite
    Acquired this Sea-Lite sailing yacht as a project. Everything works after a fashion but based on mixed reviews the intention is to replace the radio gear, winch and rudder
    servo
    s and increase the keel weight (5/10)
    3 months ago by Mids-Phil
    Forum
    Help with vintage rc.
    hi there I am in agreement with DodgyGeezer about the reliability of vintage radio gear. I believe the Digi4
    servo
    s were Linear movement, rather than rotary as in modern day
    servo
    s and yes some of the old versions were 4 wire; with male plugs at the end. One of the main downfalls of these old sets was thing called 'black wire' its where the negative side wire in the electrical wiring system actually turns black and corrodes. The only way to repair it is to actually renew the wiring and once you have it in one part of your radio system, it inevitably works its way through the whole of your radio system. The transmitters do turn up on that popular auction site. I have often fancied purchasing one just to play around with it - but I wouldn't trust one operating a precious model on the lake, because I can remember the 27 mghz radio gear being very prone to interference from the slightest thing.๐Ÿ‘ john
    3 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    Help with vintage rc.
    I think the Digimax had interchangeable crystals - but didn't it also have 4-wire
    servo
    s? if so, you will need a full Digimax set.... In general, it is not a good idea to use Vintage equipment unless you know what you are doing. The kit will be old, could need maintenance or repair (which may not be easy to source) and will have less range, reliability and interference rejection capability than modern sets. it will be 27Mhz. You may have to repair the electronics yourself. If you source a transmitter which SHOULD work with it, but doesn't, you will need expert attention to determine what is wrong - again, this will be hard to find. I assume that you do not know if that receiver works at the moment.... Running vintage radios is rather like running vintage cars. They look great when they are operating properly, but need a lot of work to maintain, and do not perform as well as modern kit. One source of help might be the Single Channel and Vintage RC group here - http://www.singlechannel.co.uk . They have specialists in old equipment...
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Emma C. Berry
    I need some help. I've successfully refurbished my static display Emma C. Berry model and added remote control. I have the sails on a winch loop, I have the rudder on a
    servo
    , I even managed to add a motor, and an extended keel with weight. The one issue that I have not been able to resolve is maneuvering under sail. Primarily, I cannot get it to move through the irons when coming about. She responds and the sails will luft, she might even catch some wind but she never makes enough of a turn to change direction. I've already changed out the rudder for the larger size on the plans. I've also tried extending the depth of the rudder. Bottom line, she is mainly being driven by the current. In this situation, by current I mean whichever way the wind is blowing the small lake. It is a local park lake and doesn't really have any inherent current. My one suspicion is the keel I added. It is doing its job to keep her upright and providing some resistance but in the end, the underwater current is overpowering her response to the rudder and/or trimming the sails. See Photo. I had originally wanted to incorporate a more rounded profile on the ends of the weight and the shafts but I remember reading somewhere that it isn't that critical Sails are per the plans and made from the material that came with the kit (25+ years ago). I even added a couple of sailor figures but we still can't establish control. ๐Ÿ˜ญ
    3 months ago by carpemoment
    Blog
    PS Iona - Steering
    Fairly standard stuff, the steering. Rudder is made from brass and held to the stainless shaft with glue / pins. There's a chain drive from the
    servo
    to the tiller arm, both sides.
    servo
    is accessed from the stern hatch lifting off, and the rear grid (3D printed) also lifts off. Despite having individual drive to each paddle, the rudder is quite useful for steering, although with paddles driven in opposite directions, Iona will turn on the spot. Nice๐Ÿค“
    3 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Forum
    1950s sea commander refurb.
    Thanks for all your comments and input. What i really need now is a copy of the templates sheet so that i can cut some new parts to replace some of the missing ones . I have ordered a new rudder, and new plexi glass for the windows. Already in hand is an Mtronics Viper marine 25 amp ESC. 12 volt 7ah battery, Futaba 27 or 40 Mhz RX. Futaba
    servo
    . Just awaiting the motor from Doug (RN in Munich). We are going to repaint the Hull in White, Cabin sides in Dark Blue, Cabin roofs in White. The decks will be left as my dad made them, just cleaned and a fresh coat of varnish. the inside of the hull is well sealed already with bitumen (original) which is still allright. Next stage start rubbing down the hull ready for the glass cloth and Ezekote resin. at least i can do this indoors in the warm, workshop too d*** cold. Thats all for today shipmates, more to come, Cheers Colin.
    4 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    RC steam lever
    Hi Rick, I have just posted a bit of video on here which I found very interesting, mainly due to the fine detail of the two figures in the boat, and the fact they are animated via
    servo
    s. The stuff in the boat has to be seen to be believed, from a Bulldog to a shotgun and tools and stuff everywhere. Very very realistic, and steam beats electric motors every time, welcome to the club. Regards, Gary.
    4 months ago by GaryLC
    Forum
    Aeronaut Pilot Boat
    Hi Ron. I have just fitted the rudders and controls last weekend. I have built almost the complete model but held off from fitting the deck until I had time to consider this problem. The best I could come up with was to reverse the control arms so that their screws fixing them to the rudders were accessible from the front after the deck had been fitted. Doing the linkages this way means that you have to bend the control arms to miss the strength rib in front of the rear skin and also you might have to reverse the
    servo
    travel direction on the Tx. I had to do this.๐Ÿ˜‰ I have included a picture to show what I have done. it does not solve all of the problems but makes adjustment possible. I have also included a picture of the dual speed controller. I know you have solved this problem but I have tested this unit and it works very well. I hope this helps in some way. Peter.๐Ÿ˜Š
    4 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Aeronaut Pilot Boat
    Hi Peter. I have competed the hull and tested motors which are running OK. Whilst setting up the
    servo
    etc for the Rudder Control, I found the fittings very fiddly to connect (and that is without the Deck fitted). Moving on, I am considering what can/should be done to enable slight adjustments to the Rudders etc. when the Deck is fixed. All very tight to get into that area. Has anyone had this problem and found an answer? Thanks. Ron
    4 months ago by RonW
    Forum
    RC steam lever
    Rick, it's myself yet again, and having been involved with steam for at least the last FORTY YEARS, I can answer most of your problems and help. Google CLEVEDON STEAM here in the U/K and this guy can help you with all the steam fittings you may require. Look for lever operated valves via
    servo
    , you could use this valve for a throttle valve, (steam control) or a gas cutoff valve. if you have any problems get in touch I am here to help. Regards , Gary.
    4 months ago by GaryLC
    Blog
    PS Enterprise
    The boiler is coming along nicely and the deck is glued down. The chain rudder
    servo
    is in place.
    4 months ago by rcmodelboats
    Forum
    Yacht Suppliers
    Bowsies are easy to make. I've had DF65 ones break so I 3d print my own. I've also made them out of
    servo
    horns for other boats and one guy at our club uses buttons. Not sure how race legal they are, but since I don't race it doesn't matter to me.
    4 months ago by unknowndna


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