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    Forum
    Hints and Tips.
    Most of the paint on the Acapulco and Neptun are airbrushed acrylic. Easy clean up, and completely waterproof when cured. I still use Tamiya
    spray
    Lacquer from time to time too.
    14 days ago by Cashrc
    Forum
    Hints and Tips.
    Mate, too many years in salt water . Tips? the secret? I really paint all my wood models so thoroughly and make internal wood coamings inside of the superstructures and actually hose down first thing at home with a soft hose stream to wash off salt. Most of my hulls and decks when the model is finished have been "painted" local hardware paint or
    spray
    ed with fibreglass resin thinned down about 50% or so on paint varnished wood ( even polyurethane 50% thinned ) of which BOTH are so clear and some models over 30/35 ( i/c and steam ) years are still impervious to attack and a bit bullet proof and every so often I do a clean down with say a household (any brand will do) kitchen bench type of cleaner, supermarket
    spray
    mist cleaner , you know the ones that smell so fresh and clean that they kill ONLY 99% of all germs and baddies ( what a crock ) and I then take the model/ bits onto the grass still smelling so fresh (UGH) and gently wash away the germs and baddies and just sun dry for a bit and put back in the shed for another day. I am so petty, I also save up the dry cleaning flimsy plastic sheets and cut the sides so I have a long sheet to drape over each model till the next run the sawdust of other shed jobs does NOT get on the model. I fold the sheets off with the dust side to the inner fold , hoping I do not forget which side is which ( I think I am getting OLDER )before I check out the model (radio test, fuel ok , just lightly SINGER oil carburettor shaft , rudder post prop shaft bits , check the glow plug works, inline fuel filter is clean , AND AND leave my engine settings alone year after year AND try to exactly mix the same fuel blend over and over by careful measure but you can slop a tad more oil in as *Oil is CHEAPER than steel , if a bit rich then one click on the needle yet my mates rib me as I leave it *ALONE ). I always check, ALWAYS on the day BEFORE next days run and avoid things that go wrong at the pond side , ( you know the guy who glitches and bleats it was going so well last time ) as I am in OPEN waters I do not chance fails. Regards and good boating Lyle from Oz.
    23 days ago by Lyle
    Blog
    Paint prep
    It’s time to start looking at some paint preparation as this is something that can be done alongside some of the remaining jobs. I have spent hours glassing the hull and deck and the cabin roofs and then finishing to a standard for the first coats of primer, this was achieved by progressing through various grades of wet and dry from 400 to 800. This gives a good adhesion surface for the first primer coat. As I have said in previous posts I made as many parts detachable as was practical, so on the forward cabin roof (which is in itself detachable) all parts are removed leaving a relatively flat surface to prepare, the underside was masked and then put in the queue for painting. Mid cabin and rear cabin roofs - again all parts were removed and placed in the queue/turntable,
    spray
    ing is a hazardous process whatever type of paint you use, so it’s essential that some sort of extraction is used and an appropriate face mask ( I use a P100 rated mask because it gives the highest level of protection in the widest variety of situations and will filter out 100% of both oil-based and non-oil-based particles.). This can also be used for most of my wood working activities, however; if this isn’t an option for you then I suggest you
    spray
    outdoors. My
    spray
    booth is made from an old cooker hood mounted in my workshop with a table below. On this I used plain sheets of hardboard which I made temporary fixings to hold a box together. The extraction element was a piece of old clothes dryer flexible 4” pipe which when I’m
    spray
    ing hangs out of the window. Back to
    spray
    ing, I use a compressor and small
    spray
    gun for this size of work so I purchased a litre of grey primer and 5 litres of thinners. I am no professional
    spray
    er but have
    spray
    ed a number of cars in the past and I have learnt that once again ”Less is more” so a number of light coats is better than one thick coat that runs, meaning lots of sanding and a repeat performance of painting. First three coats of grey primer applied and I’m pleased with how it’s going. I took the opportunity to
    spray
    some of the other parts that were finished while the gun was full of primer.
    spray
    ing is one of those jobs which is over before it’s begun yet the preparation seems to take weeks but it always pays off in the end. Next will be a top coat of Appliance White.
    24 days ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    Planking the hull.
    After shaping the frames to the hull profile and glueing shaped lime wood block to the bow and the stern, planking started at deck level. I happen to have a length of lime plank. So using a bandsaw cut lengths approx 2mmx10mmx a bit longer than the boat. I planked each side two planks at a time, glueing and pinning to each frame. Where required I soaked the ends of the planks to assist in the bending. Planks were shaped as required. Ones close to the keel needed a lot of trial and error. This all took a bit of time (4 planks a night). Once the planking was complete, the hull was sanded to smooth out the plank transitions and any bumps. The hull was then coated with car body filled, sanded, etc until happy with finish. A couple of coats of grey primer was applied using
    spray
    cans.
    3 months ago by Hillro
    Forum
    Painting over epoxy
    On fibreglass you could use an etching primer which is a modified alkyd primer that produces a sound base coat on wood, steel, fiberglass, aluminum surfaces. but you should use an ordinary primer before the top coat. Halfords do a
    spray
    etch primer.
    3 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Painting over epoxy
    I have used several Halfords Aerosol
    spray
    cans on boats over the recent years. In each case I have sanded the hull down to bare wood as the boats were vintage ones and did have coats of paint on them that could not be identified. Best to use thin applications of both primer then paint then build up on that after leaving 24 hours between each coat. Another good point is that Halfords also stock plastic primer in their paints range which is ideal if your boat has a polystyrene hull or you have plastic fittings. Boaty😎
    3 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    Painting over epoxy
    Halfods
    spray
    cans will work brilliantly of if you know of someone who works in a body shop get them to
    spray
    it with 2 pak paint for you Dave
    3 months ago by Dave J
    Blog
    Painting the hull – Part 1 primer & anti fouling.
    There’s no putting it off any longer, I need to start painting the hull before I do any more on the boat so the hull was given a final rub down with a fine abrasive and then the deck and gunwales carefully masked off. I used some panel wipe to thoroughly de-grease all the surfaces and then put the hull in the β€˜
    spray
    booth’ on my turntable and applied two coats of Halfords grey primer. I left this for a couple of days to dry and harden off before setting it on my bench. The next stage involves levelling the hull fore and aft and side to side so that the waterline can be established. Fortunately the well deck floor is meant to be perfectly level when the boat is afloat and at rest and this is the datum I used to level to using a couple of spirit levels. The rough waterline points were measured off the plan and transferred to the hull to be used as approximate starting points for the waterline. For my previous build I bought a self-levelling laser to indicate the waterline so this was brought out for the same purpose. The laser level was placed on another workbench a couple of metres away and gradually raised with packing pieces until the projected line agreed with the rough position marks I’d made on the hull and then finely adjusted until the line was correct and pencil marks made at intervals along the projected line. The process was repeated for the other side of the hull and then also marked across the stern, fortunately the stern line and bow markings joined up accurately confirming that the levelling was spot on. Good quality low tack masking tape was then applied all around the hull and the area above the line masked off with a couple of layers of newspaper. The exposed hull was then keyed with a fine Scotchbrite type pad and cleaned off with panel wipe before two coats of Halfords red oxide primer applied as the anti-fouling.
    3 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    soldering
    Sound advice from Haverlock and Dodgy geezer! I have found La-co flux (from plumbers merchants) a fabulous "active " flux. La-co
    spray
    -on heat mat ( a gel) prevents heat travel away from heated area. An unsupported butt joint is inherently weak. I would suggest some sort of supporting insert into the tube to maintain the flush appearance,but with added strength.Eg: a smaller close fitting tube of smaller diameter/section.
    4 months ago by drspock
    Response
    Painting
    Thanks Doug. Do you have any idea as to why white
    spray
    paint is much more difficult to get good coverage with than most other colours.πŸ€“
    4 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Sea Queen - strakes
    Have you got any pictures of these triangular
    spray
    rails?
    4 months ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    Sea Queen - strakes
    I found when fitting
    spray
    rails to use triangular stock like trailing edge section for aircraft wings. it looks neat and bends more easily than square stock.Fitted thin edge up the right angled face forming the deflecting face. Filled and sanded it blends well into the hull. Maybe not true scale but looks nice. it comes in many sizes and suppliers.SLEC is one for starters and Hobbies is another. Balsa Cabin another. Just loads if you use uncle Google.πŸ‘
    4 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Sea Queen - strakes
    The principle is simple. Fluid flowing over a surface tends to stick to it (Google Coanda Effect). it's worse at the low Reynolds numbers that models work at. The result is that water displaced by the boat at speed tends to flow up the sides of the hull, sticking to them, and can even pour onto the deck. This slows the boat down and can swamp it. If you have a sharp chine, you can force the water to move away from the hull at the discontinuity, because it can't easily flow around a sharp angle. ideally, you can deflect it downwards and get some lift, helping the boat onto the plane. So a lot of models have small rails along the chine, shaped to deflect the water downwards a bit. This is what many of the Aerokits models have. Deep Vee design relies on these a lot - the bottom of the hull has a series of parallel
    spray
    rails so that as the boat rises in the water the
    spray
    is deflected downwards by each rail in turn and an ever-smaller part of the hull bottom is wetted - reducing drag a lot. But the Sea Queen is not a Deep Vee, and doesn't need more that the one set of rails along the chine. Deep Vee
    spray
    rails can also help to cushion the shock when a boat drops back into the water after leaving it - but that's more useful in full-size practice rather than models....
    4 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Sea Queen - strakes
    I am about to start a Seaqueen build, as a complete novice, can anyone expand on the
    spray
    rail concept please?
    4 months ago by vk6tnc
    Blog
    Keel
    Printed out the frames /ribs drawings and outlined each in orange so I could easily see the correct lines. Cut those out and pasted to some plywood. The plywood is Baltic Birch 1/4" -5 ply, very nice quality that I get from a local woodworking supply store. it's a bit nicer than from the local warehouse hardware lumber yard, but that would work also. Used some
    spray
    rubber cement,
    spray
    ed only the paper back and stuck on the plywood.
    spray
    ing just one surface allows quick removal of the paper once cut. I don't have a bandsaw of scroll saw, so I use a sabresaw/hand jigsaw mounted upside down on a surface that secures to my drill press. Works pretty good. My shop is so tiny that I just don't have a space for larger tools. Maybe someday. Keel board was glued up, will show more tomorrow on that. Joe
    4 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Fairly Hunsman renovation part 1
    Pictures Rubbing down hull, Close ups of hull repairs Drill holes in transom for the exhaust pipes (water cooling outlets). Added
    spray
    rail to side of hull. Have found that I am having bad reactions to the fumes from Gorilla Glue.
    10 months ago by CB90
    Directory
    (Yacht) DMI 'Pirat''
    Classic modell, in the 70's sold under the name DMI pirat. a full wooden sailboat without RC controls. the keel was extended to improve stability. In the 90's the wooden strips from the hull were so dried out, that I had to fill it complete with epoxy and
    spray
    ed the uniform 'baby blue'color. After a long period in the attic , it saw daylight again and the sails needed to be replaced. Now it is a static model with sailing capacities. (7/10)
    5 months ago by Smaragd
    Response
    Fitting the rubbing strakes.
    Nice one 'Cyril' πŸ‘ Used much the same technique for the
    spray
    rail repairs and replacements on my PTB 109 restoration. Works a treat don' it. Pics show the before an' after. Following the build with great interest, as I also did the Fire Boat Rob. Great stuff. Keep it up. Cheers Doug 😎
    5 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Propshaft Lubrication
    You can still get greases that are applied in liquid form but they now tend to be in
    spray
    form. I personally do not use silicon oil or grease, it is fine until you need to repaint your boat, it forms a film that is almost impossible to remove, even cellulose thinners has no effect and any paint applied fish eyes and separates, there are dedicated removers but we tried one on a contaminated bike frame which had been blasted, with poor results we had to treat it several times and had to reblast it, we discovered silicone grease had been used in the bottom bracket. Keep silicone away from any surface you may need to paint.
    5 months ago by TheBlacksmith
    Blog
    Crack in seam Repaired!
    Captain's Log: Cracked seam Update! She has been sitting in the Domesticated Test Tank. For 20.0 hours and she is dry as a bone!😁😁😁 Eureka, Tug Brooklyn is now repaired! Now all I have to do. is
    spray
    her bottom! And just a few electrical repairs. And she'll be ready for her spring Maiden Voyage! Long awaited but, patients is a virtue!πŸ‘
    6 months ago by figtree7nts
    Blog
    Hull
    spray
    ed
    My son has finished filling sanding priming then
    spray
    ing in 2 pack. See photo smashing job, over the moon.l
    6 months ago by Dick
    Blog
    Anteno 2 tug
    Decided not to double plank as per kit instructions but skin the first planking with thin cloth 0.60 oz. Lot of rubbing down,now awaiting top coat Quick tip when using aerosol can or airbrush,use a large plastic storage container on its side as a
    spray
    booth.
    6 months ago by Dick
    Response
    Anteno 2 tug
    I used an old cooker hood as the basis for my
    spray
    booth with the filters taken out and vented outside, and has built in lights. I also use it as my silver solder/brazing and small welding jobs using the back wall as one side with simple hardboard sides and a rotary table (old party susan) if you can remember them, it works really well and allows
    spray
    ing in my workshop in the winter months.
    6 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Anteno 2 tug
    Point take Doug,I will get around to venting it. in the meantime my son has a full size
    spray
    booth,car size, and is now
    spray
    ing my hull in 2pack Merry Christmas Dick
    6 months ago by Dick
    Response
    Anteno 2 tug
    Hi Dick, To 2nd plank or not to plank - your choice but regarding the improvised
    spray
    -booth - Your storage container, neat idea, may prevent you from colouring the immediate surroundings, but it won't stop the vapours, explosive fumes and over
    spray
    dust from rebounding back into the room. 😑 Ask me how I know πŸ€” To prevent that your storage container needs an extractor fan coupled to a vent pipe leading to the great outside world! DIY nuts can construct such using the guts of an old vacuum cleaner. I was about to try that when I stumbled across a booth with extractor and vent pipe at a reasonable price on the German Conrad site. https://www.conrad.de/ Have used it to good effect on my Sea Scout restoration. 😊 In the attached pic one can see it behind the freshly
    spray
    ed hull of my Sea Scout. To the left is an additional filter/fan to absorb any over
    spray
    that flies out of the little booth. I also use that when soldering with my ancient lead based multi-core solder. Happy modelling - but stay safe Guys πŸ˜‰ Cheers, Doug 😎
    6 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Net bins
    The boat is nearly complete now, the final part is to fill the deck with fill nets! I have found that the Heinz snap pots for baked beans are the perfect size! Top removed,
    spray
    ed and weathered and then a body buff has been cut up and stuck inside along with some twine. I’ve then painted the net to make it look dirty and some varnish to give it a wet look.. 2 down 1 more full one required and then a stack of 3 empties... but first dinner, and yes, it’s beans on toast for me!!!
    6 months ago by GrahamP74
    Blog
    Painting
    Well it is nearly Christmas again and time to go to my testing river in Hungary. This boat will not be ready but I hope to complete the Police Launch this trip. I have started the painting process on the Pilot Boat. Very early on I had a dilemma. When is the correct time to paint. As I generally use rattle cans and an airbrush, I think it best to paint prior to major assembly. I am still not sure if this is the correct approach but I am concerned with masking an assembled unit. I hope that the glue does not ruin the paint finish when I put it together. It is a bit difficult
    spray
    painting this time of the year due to the fumes. I
    spray
    in the garage with the door open but I am always concerned about air temperature. The finish looks good so perhaps this is not of great concern yet.πŸ€“ I will now leave the hull to dry prior to applying the lacquer. I have completed the insides of the bridge and rear room and will start to assemble this part next prior to masking and painting the outside walls. I have bought a roll of special low tack clear film to protect the windows and frames. I hope this works. I have used the same film to cover the instrument panel which so far seems to be staying on well. I think that these models by AeroNaut are really well designed. it still amazes me that the model looks so natural even though it is made generally from flat thin sheets.πŸ˜‰ I will attach the deck next and then start on the main structures. Happy Christmas to all.
    6 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    You are correct in your thinking. The component is called a
    spray
    rail and is mounted at the chine line from bow to stern. The
    spray
    rail provides additional lift so planning can be achieved at a slightly lower speed, and at the same time deflects the
    spray
    down and out from the side of the boat at speed.
    6 months ago by bubbletop409
    Response
    aeronaut classic
    Evening Sifi, Nice job, lovely woodwork πŸ‘ Tip / Suggestion; to give your decks that 'final touch' how about
    spray
    ing with a clear lacquer? I use one from the auto branch, e.g. used with touch up
    spray
    cans (esp. metallics) to melt/blend in to the original finish. Gives the varnish a finish like glass - sea attached pics of my Sea Scout. Cheers, Doug 😎
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    spray
    paints
    If they are enamels like Plastikote used to be, yes, but as far as I know, Plastikote changed formulae to acrylic, which, if their brush pots were anything to go by are complete crap. I had one that reacted with itself! I complained bitterly to them and they sent me every pot of enamel they had left in the office! Martin
    7 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    spray
    paints
    This looks handy folks.---https://www.metals4u.co.uk/tools/c190/decorating-wood-care/c2518/paints-
    spray
    -paints/c2846/decorative-
    spray
    s/c3834?source=mailer&utm_campaign=m4u+nov+2018&utm_source=emailCampaign&utm_content=&utm_medium=email πŸ‘
    7 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    HMS M.33
    Manxman was about when I was in the RN in the sixties. She was involved in an exercise with the Yanks. The yanks were controlling things and designated Manxman as a hospital ship . She was restricted to ten knots or so. At the end of the exercise about the middle of the Atlantic. The whole fleet were heading for Pompy for some shoreleave. Cin C USN told Manxman to make 15 Kts. Then later make twenty if she could! Now Manxman was one of the last RN ships that actually LOOKED like a warship. Captain of Manxman had by now worked out what was transpiring.He sent a signal to Whitehall explaining what was what. Signal to Manxman.... Flash boilers three, four, five and six and proceed independently to Portsmouth. Shortly after this she circled the whole fleet twice at forty knots and disappeared over the horizon in a cloud of
    spray
    and steam! Her crew where home on leave for at least two days before America's finest turned up in Pompy! Regards Nick Viner.
    7 months ago by nick
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Hello from Australia, First start off with a scrap piece of plywood the same as you intend to use for the deck. Work out the width of the planks and score lightly with a scriber (not to deep). Using a ruler or suitable guide ,mark the lines with a no 3 fine tipped marker pen. wait till dry(usually 24hours to stop bleeding) then either
    spray
    or paint on satin laquer. (3coats). Always works for me. Good luck. Sid
    8 months ago by sidley70
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Just to feel comfortable I am going to go with a matt sealer of some sought............ NPJ
    8 months ago by NPJ
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Agreed Boaty πŸ‘ With a plastic or glass fibre hull it's a slightly different kettle of fish. However I'm still wary of the primer absorbing moisture.πŸ€” Sealing with a matt or silk lacquer seems to give an extra knot or so as wellπŸ˜‰ But here we were discussing wooden hulls. Cheers, Doug 😎
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Hi Doug Red primer certainly is porus and does need some protection when used on a wooden hull. The only exception to this is when the hull is plastic then plastic primer can be used. It adheres better than the standard primer and is readily available from the likes of Halfords etc. I have used this on my italeri P.T 109 and is still good seven years on. Boaty😁
    8 months ago by boaty
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Bon chance mon amiπŸ‘
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Thanks Doug. I start today.😊
    8 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Mornin' Peter, Red primer can be a good match for some anti-fouling paints. If you are happy with the colour - fine. BUT!! Seal the primer paint with several thin coats of matt or silk clear varnish for the reasons mentioned to Neville above! Primer is porous!! Flatten the primer with 1000 / 1500 wet n dry until your fingertips tell you the surface is good. Apply the varnish in several thin coats, flattening lightly with 2000 / 3000 w&d between coats, until you have a good sealed surface. The varnish (or lacquer) will also give some extra protection against knocks and bangs 😊 Cheers, Doug 😎
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Mornin' Neville, ."How wet is wet"? Hold the paper under a running tap, warm water, until it goes dark all over. Remove excess water with kitchen roll. You don't have to flood the hull but keep the paper well wetted. For convenience I use the Tamiya sanding sponges. They mould themselves to any shape they are used on which is great for compound curves. Keep a bowl of warm water handy to re-wet the paper or sponge from time to time and to clean of the residue that builds up on the paper. Also regularly wipe off the slurry that builds up on the object you are sanding with kitchen roll or a damp flat dense kitchen sponge. When you are finished wash off the hull (or whatever) with the the flat sponge and clean water. Dry off carefully with kitchen roll or non-linting cloth. DON'T do a bath test with just primer on the hull as the primer is porous! it consists mostly of finely ground chalk dust or similar in a solvent suspension. Wait until you have at least the first top coat on to seal it. You only have to look at a car with a primed wing, that has then been driven around in typical British weather for a few weeks, to see why!! Don't forget the 'secret ingredient' πŸ˜‰ All the best, Doug 😎 PS Nearly forgot 😲 Start using a few drops of liquid soap on the w&d from the final preparation of the primer coat through til the end.
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Really useful information here. I will take it all on board. I would like to know though if the primer red is the ideal colour for your top coat for antifouling, can it remain as primer only or is it necessary to go to a proper top coat paint. Thanks.πŸ€“πŸ˜Š
    8 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Thanks both.Really helps. Question is as I have not used it before............"How wet is wet"? I have no idea and have not seen reference anywhere here. I thought I had and image of the 'mouths' but cannot find it. Only two small instances and at the overlap areas. Very pleased with how the damaged areas are looking and how solid the who;e thing now feels. If I am going to really wet it with rubbing down, I will bring forward the bath test as that will be quite a moment for me! All the best both. NPJ
    8 months ago by NPJ
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Hi Neville, Check out my Sea Scout 'Jessica' renovation blog for how to achieve good paint finish! 'Wet n dry' is the ONLY way to go. Right from the priming stage. it stops the 'riding' you describe and the generation of flying dust which is anathema to any paint or varnish finish, but you do have to clean and re-wet the paper and the object you are sanding from time to time!!! Any mistakes at that stage will carry through to the top coats and still be visible 😑 Don't quite understand how you created 'mouths'. I'm wondering if you
    spray
    ed too close and/or too heavy!? Your apparently exorbitant paint consumption seems to hint at thisπŸ€” For the record; I started with 240 on the primer/filler for my Sea Scout and worked up through 400, 600, 1000, and 2000 and 3000 for the final top coats and deck varnish. All 'Wet', with a few drops of liquid soap added at the top coat stages, i.e. from the 1000 stage. At the end I polish with a mild cutting polish 'Anti hologram' they call it here, from the auto industry. Tedious I agree and a generous dollop of patience is required (the 'Secret ingredient' I have often mentioned here πŸ˜‰ But when you see the result it warms the cockles and makes it all worthwhile.😊 Happy
    spray
    ing, cheers, Doug 😎 BTW; for the blue on my Sea Scout hull I used a 400ml rattle can for several coats (more than three in the end) and there's still some left ! BTW2; For masking I use Tamiya tape for nice crisp edges. Fill in behind that with 'normal' fine masking tape and newspaper.
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Hi there, the filler primer used on a car would normally cover a front wing with 3coats, so going by your Hull size it was about the right amount, 300ml primer would normally have given 2 coats so again about right. Although I usually try doing very light mist coats with 20 minutes between not allowing the paint to harden between coats allows the paint to bond better. When rubbing down between top coats I prefer to use 1200 wet and dry, wet in frequently, and the final rub down with 2500 wet and dry before finally polishing. This is my preferred method, but other methods will still work. Cheers Colin.
    8 months ago by Colin H
    Blog
    spray
    ing Again.......
    Well had a break of a few weeks, now back on the job. So now have a Red Oxide boat rather than Yellow one……………… Although these next stages are a bit β€˜ samey’, I have learnt a few things as it happens. For example, I had put three coats of the Halfords filler/primer on a couple of days before I had a break. Now when I left it all looked dry, well covered and β€˜solid’. When I came back to it some weeks later the longer drying period had shown up some gaps. Well not gaps actually but β€˜mouths’ where tissue I had overlapped had pulled apart slightly. interesting, easily fixed with some 240 grit sanding, showing that the drying period is longer than it would appear. At least for filler/primer which is a much thicker substance than just
    spray
    paint. With the sanding, I had not appreciated the difference between the grades say from 240 upwards (or is it downwards) as my experience was with doorframes and floorboards. For the stage I am at, 240 and 400 seem very effective and leave a good surface. What I did find was how important dust becomes……………… The sandpaper rides on it (the powdery dust) and so becomes much less effective and I found brushing with a thin 2 inch brush worked well, using the vacuum cleaner to clear up later. I did try blowing it off with the heat gun but that put the dust up in the air too much. it is my intention to try β€˜wet and dry’ approach for later coats and looking for a better answer when it comes to finishing coats. Another interesting discovery was coverage per rattle can. It may be my β€˜beginner’ technique, but it seems to take a lot of paint. On this size of boat hull, 44inches (112cm) by 14 inches (36 cm), it took a 500ml rattle can of yellow filler/primer for three coats. For two coats of the red primer it took the whole of a 300ml can. Also discovered, using these β€˜rattle cans’ for the first time, that the primer on its own comes out differently to the filler primer. This unsettled me for a minute or so but appreciate may be due to the different density so will be aware next time. Another issue that became obvious was…………..I must improve my β€˜masking off’ ! So that is it so far. Next stage is - going to buy a couple more cans for the finishing coats, do a bath test, mark the white line point, more sanding down and then start applying the finishing coats. Any helpful comments will be much appreciated. NPJ
    8 months ago by NPJ
    Forum
    Painting
    Ah! I thought Fairey might prove the exception to the planking rule. Well, it'll look nice, that's for sure. Paint. I always use enamel and my local auto paint shop will make me 1/4 litre tins up, of HMG, which lasts a long time from a small
    spray
    gun. Failing that, Rustoleum do some lovely rattle cans in a range of colours that
    spray
    very well and are only just over a fiver a tin. One tin would do you if you're careful. I've just given my Darby One Design its second coat of blue after a rub down and I'm happy with that. Dries very quickly, but is a nice gloss. it is a bit thin, so be very careful how you
    spray
    . Better to do two coats than one thick one. But really, if you can get it, HMG is the best bar none. Worth hunting for. Paint, alas, just ain't cheap anymore. Would that we could get tins of Valspar or Japlac, eh? The proper original stuff. Plastikote was a good paint when it was an enamel, now it's acrylic water based muck. No coverage and reacts with itself, let alone owt else. I would be inclined, btw, to do that curved deck in veneer, so all your mistakes will be made before it goes on the boat. in which case, once the planks are made and fit bang on, go up the edges with a black marker pen. it will look like caulking when all is done. Good luck, Martin
    8 months ago by Westquay
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    The weather has quickly turned colder, giving an excuse to get back to this model. Stripped out much of the interior and the prop. shafts to replace the nylon propellers with brass. These items all needed removing for painting, so decided to paint the hull before reassembly and then moving onto the superstructure. Fortunately, examining similar naval vessels and several U Tube videos, confirmed the hull as light grey, the deck a darker one of the 50 shades of grey and the lower hull below the waterline black. Used thin Tamiya masking tape to define clean colour separations, followed by regular tape, masked the hull into colour sections and
    spray
    ed using β€œrattle” cans. After the colours applied a light overall Matt coat to subdue any shine. The results are satisfactory. Will now reassemble and move onto building the superstructure and the other fittings. Prior to the season closing decided to experiment with my new Flysky Tx/Rx package, shortly to be fitted to this model. This Tx has a servo limiting function, which was hoping could also be used to restrict ESC output. Would like to make the full speed motor response correspond to full Tx control position. Currently can over power the model; which lifts the stern, causing it to come off the plane and then dig the bow in. Was thinking that if full throttle could be set at around 90% forward control movement and 40% sternwards the model would retain adequate performance, but without being overpowered or very sensitive to control lever movement. As the Brave was not available, tried the idea on my Daman Stan 4207 model. This is brushed motor powered and a good performer. Obviously the settings for the Brave will be different, but at least could try to see if the idea would work – it did! This Tx function is easy to use and adjustments can be made whilst the model is on the water. Once the ideal settings are achieved they can be programmed and then retained in the Tx. Will try this on the Brave when back on the water next Spring.
    8 months ago by RHBaker
    Blog
    Must get the skins on before I pull all of my hair out!!
    This build is proving to be much more difficult than I had expected. 😀 I think I started this project thinking that all of the parts were ready to fit and glue. As I went on, it became clear that this is not the case. Due to this, and as detailed in the earlier post, I have had to break down the glue joints of the hull frame, and reposition after deepening some of the assembly slots. I have re-assembled the bulkheads, stringers etc. and then started to fit the side skins. This has proven to be the most difficult task so far. You need six arms. After several failures, removal of all of the fixing tape and then starting again, they finally started to look reasonable. I watched a time lapse video on you tube and he seems to do it fairly easily. Oh well. πŸ€” Now that I was happy with the fit of the sides, it was time to start on the bottom skins. I started by trying to form chamfers along the keel centre joints so that they look reasonable. Then I once again applied tape to hold them in position whilst glueing with my other three hands, I wish. This only took two attempts. I must be getting better. I still have most of my hair also. Next, I tried to mount the motors onto the angled bulkhead. The front location was very loose so I made a couple of thin silver steel rings to improve the fit. They work very well. 😊 Next job was to fit and align the prop shafts. I decided to make these solid joints and avoid the use of universal joints. The first motor went straight on with perfect shaft alignment. The second was not so good. After two hours of fiddling with a packer, I finally achieved perfect alignment. Next job was to give good joint strength and make the hull water tight. Rightly or wrongly I use a lot of glue to give that perfect seal. I used epoxy for all of the skin inner joints and Stabilit for the outer seams and joints. I used the Stabilit around the shafts as well which looks a little messy at the moment, but I will tidy all of this up next. I will paint the inner Stabilit with white paint to hide a little. This weekend I will do a water test to ensure it is water tight.😱 I think after that I will fit all of the electrics, servo and speed controller. Then I will
    spray
    the hull and the main deck prior to fixing together. I would be interested to know what others think about when to paint, before or after assembly, especialy regarding the hull. Enough for now.🀐 I will try to speed up the build a bit now as I am expecting the new 46" Crash Tender to arrive soon. Wood!!! Love it.😊
    8 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc....
    Here's the yacht after the first coat of red enamel and the keel
    spray
    ed with self etch primer ready for the green later, but it's raining, dammit! Martin
    8 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Styrene Allergy?
    Where gloves are concerned, use blue nitrile as there are probably more people allergic to latex than styrene! Don't know about you though, but I can't breathe in any mask worth it salt. I just do it all outside in the almost permanent breeze that blows round my bungalow. I stand in the doorway of the shed and
    spray
    out into the great blue yonder. Styrene, fortunately doesn't affect me. When Slater's first popularised Plastikard, old man Slater used to demonstrate the making of things like model house window frames with Micro strip and Slater's own solvent called Mek-Pak. The smell was glorious and just oozed quality modelmaking to me. I always made a bee-line to Slater's stand at any suitable exhibition. These days I use Plastic Weld as it does more plastics than just styrene and it doesn't have that lovely "esterish" smell. Martin
    8 months ago by Westquay


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