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    Response
    Servo Mount
    Accidently deleted posts - Response by JOHN on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify ✓ Like This Post ( 3 ) hi there With regard the servo rudder linkages - I was advised that it is always best to use the 'push/pull method' of linkage - as this has two strong points in its favour. The first problem it alleviates is - sometimes if on a single connection between rudder and servo and it is not set up quite right - a servo movement can force the rudder tiller arm to come back on itself under certain circumstances - i.e. when the distance from the centre of the servo to the outer hole on the servo arm isn't equal to the centre of the rudder post - to the centre of the linkage arm on the rudder. The second problem - you can get an odd strain on the gearing in the servo, because on some models there is a fair bit of force on the rudder blade - whilst the model is in motion & turning to port or
    starboard
    . The way to think of this, you are riding a pushbike and holding the handlebars with one hand and you are trying to turn a sharp corner - think of how much strain and effort you have to put in. Now, if you have a double linkage to either side of the tiller arm from your servo - that strain now is balanced and is evening out the strain in the servo. Admittedly, this problem where you wear the servo out only happens on very rare occasions - but - as the old saying goes 'belts and braces/better be safe than sorry'. John Response by RNinMunich on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify ✓ Like This Post ( 1 ) In the wrong post but sensible stuff John.👍 Hadn't considered it before but it certainly makes sense to me that a dual linkage will help cancel the backlash from the rudder. And hence stop the servo motor having to fight it. That would reduce potential 'hunting' of the servo and also take the strain off the gearing. Probably not a noticeable problem for short term rudder commands or in small, light models. But could be in the heavyweights with big rudders I suppose. like Mike said (sort of); makes yer think!! More power to yer servos Gents. Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Dual linkage not possible in some situations, see pic of cramped space in my Sea Scout. Had to lay the servo on it's side.😲
    2 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Brave Borderer
    Canabus, Hope this helps, Rowen Using the FS-I6X instruction Manual, dated 8/10/2018. This Tx allows infinite experimenting with the various control functions and ultimately reverting to factory settings if dissatisfied with results. After several attempts at setting the ELEVON function (V-TAIL could be similar, but the Tx channels would be different), decided this works best for me. it puts both brushless ESCs on the RH control lever. Moving it up operates both screws in the forward direction and down into reverse. Going from side to side speeds up or slows down the motors, so the boat goes in the direction the lever dictates. This was accomplished by: 1) Page 14/57 Establish the Tx Stick mode, mine was # 2. 2) Considering ELEVON, need to determine which layout allows the Aileron and Elevator controls to be operated by same lever. 3) Use Elevator for throttle (fwd & astern) and Aileron to “turn”. The Aileron will accelerate the motor on the outside of a turn. 4) Plug Port &
    starboard
    motor ESCs into channels 1 & 2 respectively. 5) Refer to Para 5.10 and set Elevon mode on Tx. 6) Use channel 4 (LH lever side to side) for rudder and Channel 3 (LH lever up / down) for any other function needing proportional control. I am using it for the centre brushed motor. This means that my control levers, which had previously had throttle on the LH lever and rudder on the right are now totally changed. There is also an article in the March edition of Model Boats that explains the concept.
    3 months ago by RHBaker
    Response
    Servo Mount
    Just moved these two posts that were posted further down my blog by mistake as they are significant to the discussion and bring back the subject as I think its important as I would like to know if any others have a view. the photo is Johns Response by JOHN on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify ✓ Like This Post ( 2 ) hi there With regard the servo rudder linkages - I was advised that it is always best to use the 'push/pull method' of linkage - as this has two strong points in its favour. The first problem it alleviates is - sometimes if on a single connection between rudder and servo and it is not set up quite right - a servo movement can force the rudder tiller arm to come back on itself under certain circumstances - i.e. when the distance from the centre of the servo to the outer hole on the servo arm isn't equal to the centre of the rudder post - to the centre of the linkage arm on the rudder. The second problem - you can get an odd strain on the gearing in the servo, because on some models there is a fair bit of force on the rudder blade - whilst the model is in motion & turning to port or
    starboard
    . The way to think of this, you are riding a pushbike and holding the handlebars with one hand and you are trying to turn a sharp corner - think of how much strain and effort you have to put in. Now, if you have a double linkage to either side of the tiller arm from your servo - that strain now is balanced and is evening out the strain in the servo. Admittedly, this problem where you wear the servo out only happens on very rare occasions - but - as the old saying goes 'belts and braces/better be safe than sorry'. John Response by RNinMunich on the 6th Mar 2019 Modify ✓ Like This Post ( 1 ) In the wrong post but sensible stuff John.👍 Hadn't considered it before but it certainly makes sense to me that a dual linkage will help cancel the backlash from the rudder. And hence stop the servo motor having to fight it. That would reduce potential 'hunting' of the servo and also take the strain off the gearing. Probably not a noticeable problem for short term rudder commands or in small, light models. But could be in the heavyweights with big rudders I suppose. like Mike said (sort of); makes yer think!! More power to yer servos Gents. Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Dual linkage not possible in some situations, see pic of cramped space in my Sea Scout. Had to lay the servo on it's side.😲
    3 months ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Search light
    hi there With regard the servo rudder linkages - I was advised that it is always best to use the 'push/pull method' of linkage - as this has two strong points in its favour. The first problem it alleviates is - sometimes if on a single connection between rudder and servo and it is not set up quite right - a servo movement can force the rudder tiller arm to come back on itself under certain circumstances - i.e. when the distance from the centre of the servo to the outer hole on the servo arm isn't equal to the centre of the rudder post - to the centre of the linkage arm on the rudder. The second problem - you can get an odd strain on the gearing in the servo, because on some models there is a fair bit of force on the rudder blade - whilst the model is in motion & turning to port or
    starboard
    . The way to think of this, you are riding a pushbike and holding the handlebars with one hand and you are trying to turn a sharp corner - think of how much strain and effort you have to put in. Now, if you have a double linkage to either side of the tiller arm from your servo - that strain now is balanced and is evening out the strain in the servo. Admittedly, this problem where you wear the servo out only happens on very rare occasions - but - as the old saying goes 'belts and braces/better be safe than sorry'. John
    3 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    Mtronics W-tail marine mixer connections.
    Thanks John, that's what I was thinking of trying, finally getting my head around the details of the mixing at source. I have another old futaba set with mixing as well, which I used for a Lancaster and found that by controlling ort and
    starboard
    motors via mixing made it a really stable flyer. Just hope it will work as well on my boats as I have a couple of fast launches with twin motors to get restored and back on the water. Thanks for all the help from everyone and especially you and Dodgy. Cheers Colin
    3 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Propellers
    Looking at the stern of the boat and you have 2 rudders. The port prop should be counter clockwise and the
    starboard
    one clockwise.If you have only one rudder then the port is clockwise and the
    starboard
    one is counter clockwise.
    4 months ago by Donnieboy
    Blog
    LED Nav. Lighting
    Two days ago I put what I hope is the final paint on the hull, hatch and misc. parts. I like to let it sit for several days to cure, especially in cooler weather. I took the time to work out LED navigational lighting for my Brooklyn Tug and got that installed. I will photograph that tug later. Back to the springer tug, I had difficulty finding a good mounting spot for the
    starboard
    and port lighting so I decided to raise it on a light bar. Photos show the styrene structure in progress which will have the green and red side lights and a single white light on the top center post. Worked out the resistor values to reduce current and work off of my 6 volt supply, then soldered as shown. Fed the assembled LEDs through the plastic rectangular tunnel I created. The one photo I took with the red LED turned on is so bright that the camera just picked up a bright spot. I may have to reduce brightness but will test out in daylight first.... These LEDs are very bright and are 360 degree view! Ordered from "superbrigntleds.com" in order to get the full 360 as the ones at the local store were very limited to 18 to 60 degrees. Ordered red, green and white and they arrivedin about four days, great service. I have used this company several times and am happy with them, good to know. More to come, Joe
    4 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and
    starboard
    supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and
    starboard
    shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and
    starboard
    I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and
    starboard
    will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.
    7 months ago by teejay
    Blog
    Internal wiring & bottom skins
    Because I am keen to conceal as much of the wiring as possible I have decided to place the battery at the bow and the operational equipment at the stern, the engine on the original boat was central and covered with a soundproof box and this is convenient as the motor can be positioned and concealed in the same way. This means that some of the wires will have to run the full length of the boat and the easiest way to conceal them is to run them beneath the ‘box’ around which the hull is formed, and this needs to be done before the bottom skins are fitted. Holes were bored through the bulkhead formers under the port side of the hull and battery cables were run to the stern where the ESC will be and three motor wires from the ESC run to the centre, emerging near the motor position. For good measure I put in a servo cable and a separate draw wire just in case I needed to put more cabling in for any additional features, perhaps working navigation lights? Satisfied that I had all the cabling in place I was able to fit the bottom skins starting with the
    starboard
    side first. Before doing so I put a very slight 'hollow' in former F1 which should help blend the shape of the the hull where the ply skins meet the balsa blocks that will to be carved and shaped to form the bow. This can be seen in the last picture. The process of forming and fixing the skins is the same as for the side skins but in addition to the pins holding the skins in place I used some brown polythene ‘packing tape’ to pull the skins tightly against the bulkhead formers and strakes. The packing tape has a very high tensile strength and is ideal for this, and of course cheap and easy to remove. Once the aliphatic glue had set thoroughly overnight I removed the excess from the skins with a small block plane and finished them with my sanding plate. Before I fit the skin at the stern I will have to arrange the water cooling for the ESC, with the pickup just behind the prop and the outlet on the stern. I’ll cover that aspect in the next update.
    5 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    Fitting the side skins.
    The side skins are made from 1.5mm ply and require a slight curve towards the bow and I found that this is best achieved by gently warming with a heat gun, which seems to relax the glue between the laminations, so that when bent to a gentle curve and allowed to cool will set the shape very easily. The skins are supplied are slightly oversize and when the skins have been bent they can be roughly clamped to the hull and then marked for trimming, also while the skin is clamped in place the positions of the bulkhead formers can be marked on the skin. Back on the bench the skins were trimmed with a craft knife (with a fresh blade) and then drilled with a 1mm bit to allow pinning through into the formers and strakes. Aliphatic glue was applied to the hull formers and strakes and the skin positioned so that the drilled holes were in correct alignment with the formers and then clamped and pinned in place. Because the skin was pre-formed to the hull shape the clamps and pins are not under much tension and the hull was set aside while the glue set. When the port skin had fully set overnight, the pins and clamps were removed and the skin was finished with a plane to remove the excess down to the strakes and the F1 former at the bow and the sanding ‘plate’ used to finish it all off. Where the side skins meet at the prow there needs to be a wide flat area for the external keel to butt to and so the trimming and sanding there will be done at a later stage before the bow blocks are fitted and carved. The process was repeated for the
    starboard
    side skin and while the glue was setting I gave some thought to a means of concealing some of the wiring that needs to run the length of the hull 🤔.
    5 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    Thunder Tiger Avanti
    Has anyone done any significant modifications to a Thunder Tiger Avanti fast electric? I have one and all I have done is to replace the nylon prop with a metal one thus there is very little increase in performance and the reason for doing this was due to the nylon prop throwing a blade after striking an underwater object. Prestwich Model Boats have a suitable replacement motor complete with a better ESC than the existing Ace one and their system can handle up to 4S Lipos instead of the stock set up of 3s . I have located a source of a 4S Lipo which length and width is same as my 3S one but the height is a little more and it will fit into the battery box. To trim it out properly I would have to add some ballast to the
    starboard
    side. Due to the electrics including the battery all being in a small watertight box at the stern there is not a great amount of scope for a lot of mods. Boaty😁
    5 months ago by boaty
    Blog
    Emma C. Berry Sailboat
    I took my Emma out for a second "real" water voyage, tethered of course. Overall I am pleased with my progress. I need a more powerful servo to manage the sails and my rudder mechanism needs to be reworked so that it doesn't bind-up short when tacking
    starboard
    . https://youtu.be/_IXdwBZyCqE
    9 months ago by carpemoment
    Forum
    RC Mixer
    Hi, I'm doing some (a lot) of research before embarking on a Bristol Pilot build. My attention has now turned to controlling the twin fore sails. A helpful guy at my club mentioned using a 'mixer'. Anyone who has controlled two foresails and/or a genoa on a racing yacht may have some ideas here - any welcome. But my initial question is about terminology. Reading my Futaba handbook - a truly excellent translation 😡- I find two terms under the mixer section - 'OFS' and 'VR' - any idea what they mean? For interest, the problem is that the front sail overlaps the rear 'foresail' so we can not simply attach a sheet to the front sail to drag it to a 'tight' position as this may tangle with the rear foresail. The second problem is that if the foresail is out to the port, the drum winch must turn anticlockwise to haul it in, whereas when it is to
    starboard
    the winch must turn clockwise. I do love these problems, but desperately need help. If its only someone telling me not to be stupid and just lket the foresail hang loose - I'm not racing afterall👍 Sam
    6 months ago by sam
    Response
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    Hi Peter. It shouldn't need ballasting very much if at all. As I won't be able to adjust the position of any heavy components I'll use small pieces of lead to adjust fore/aft and port/
    starboard
    trim. Robbob.
    6 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    1-35 scale S100 schennllboot
    Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and
    starboard
    supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and
    starboard
    shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and
    starboard
    I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and
    starboard
    will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.
    1 year ago by teejay
    Forum
    34'' RAF Crash Tender Windows
    Ooh er😲 90° list to
    starboard
    !! 😁
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Hi, Doug. I’ve attached a zoomed-in photo of the “Anchor Enclosure” that’s built into the
    starboard
    bow bulwark of the Wyeforce. There’s an anchor in the box but I can’t tell for sure what kind it is. Maybe a navy-type with the fluke & bill pointed inward toward the deck? A better photo is needed to be sure, so I’ll keep looking. The enclosure itself would be simple to build & fit to the hull. I remember seeing a photo of the boat’s foredeck area that showed what may have been a hawse pipe running inboard from behind anchor enclosure & down through the deck, presumably to a winch belowdecks? Does that make sense? Pete
    8 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Media
    HMS Cadiz
    My dad built this over a long period of time, starting in the '80s. The hull is fibreglass and the rest is scratch built from plastic card, balsa, ply, wire and anything else he could adapt. Although he installed the motors, props and rudders he never completed the RC installation or tested it. I inherited his boat models a few years ago and wanted to "finish the job", getting the model on the water. After installing the RC gear and batteries over the last few months, this weekend was the first sailing outside the bath at the Valley Gardens boating lake. Happy to report that it sailed really nicely, seems to be reasonably stable although I did restrict it to calmer times when the MTBs and faster boats weren't running ! HMS Cadiz was a battle class destroyer, laid down and launched during WW2 although she didn't receive her commission until 1946 so didn't see combat with the Royal Navy, serving with the home fleet. Due to the changeover in pennant numbering she was originally allocated R09 and later, when the admiralty decided to revert to the D for Destroyer pennant numbering she was assigned D79. To reflect this my model has D79 on the
    starboard
    side and R09 on the port side. She was sold to Pakistan in the late '50s, and renamed PNS Khaibar. She was sunk with the loss of nearly all hands in 1971 in the indo-Pakistan war.
    8 months ago by landie
    Blog
    BRAVE BORDERER
    Been researching the squeal and stutter on other websites and conclude RFI is probably not the major contributor. Others attribute it to a mismatch in the ESC / motor timing, which seems more likely. Whatever caused it, resulted in the affected motor failing. Which came first, the failure causing squeal or squeal causing failure is open to conjecture. Much to my surprise the manufacturer has decided to replace the motor under warranty. In the meantime, the motors I had planned to use originally (2800kV Outrunners) came into stock, so purchased a couple. Until now have had to use the ESC default settings as did not have a programming card. This also arrived with the motors. Following advice from another contributor reprogrammed the motors with “softer” start and acceleration settings. Fitted and tried the new motors and settings. On the bench, the squeal and stutter have almost gone. The motors are also more tractable. As the brushless motors are now going to be used for high speed operation only, with slow on the centre brushed, thought could simplify the controls by putting the brushless ESCs on one control system using a “Y” lead. However, this introduced inconsistent and erratic motor responses. Reverted to the two previous separate controls, port and
    starboard
    . On the water the performance is fine, as is the reliability. The 2S battery gave almost half an hours operation. The bow lifts nicely with both 2 & 3 S Batteries; plenty of spray. Hopefully resembling a 50 knot vessel! Another adjustment is needed to the transom flaps to try to hold the bow down later as she accelerates. Feeling now to finally be making progress with this model. The squeal has not gone, nor has erratic motor operation. The squeal is high pitched screech, rather like treading on a budgie! When it happens, bringing the control back to neutral and advancing it again almost always overcomes it. The erratic operation happens also when starting and is rather like the motors are not getting a signal to react to the control. Again, returning through neutral briefly seems to correct it. The revised motors and ESCs have increased the weight to 6lbs for the hull including all running gear, excluding batteries and superstructure. Whilst still trying to control weight have concluded this figure is satisfactory as the performance certainly is.
    8 months ago by RHBaker
    Blog
    BRAVE BORDERER
    Decided to separate the two power systems; one to the port ESC and motor and the other the
    starboard
    . Hope this will reduce interference between the motor systems. Have also reverted to a remote battery powered Rx rather than the BECC system, again to reduce possible interference. The modifications did not resolve the problems. The squeal and stutter are still present, but much reduced. Sounds rather like a slipping coupling, but as these have been checked many times they can be eliminated. Apart from the squeal and the stutter, everything works well. The squeal /stutter occurs at start up, when it happens the control is returned to neutral, if the motor is immediately reselected, usually the problem goes away and the motor runs up cleanly. it only occurs when both motors are selected at the same time. Either runs up cleanly when selected individually. Interestingly enough, did some research on various Model Boats site and found some references to RF interference, no specific solutions though. Also examined some Aero modeling sites as they use powerful brushless motors with ESCs. There is some history of the problem there. Evidently when the mosfets (?) of the ESCs convert DC to AC, RF interference is generated. it can often be addressed by using ferrite rings on the ESC control leads. My latest ESCs actually have ferrite rings, so the problem must have been anticipated. This might account for the latest reduction in squeal and stutter levels. Am at a loss to think of any other modifications, so decided to conduct a water test. Maybe it is a characteristic of brushless motors, but their control response seems “ragged”, not smooth as with a brushed. Anyway, the squeal and stutter seemed reduced yet again, perhaps the water load damped them down. Was able to start exploring both the performance envelope and the viability of the brushed centre shaft motor. First impressions are that on a 2S battery the performance is fine, but it sparkles on 3S. On 3S the stutter and squeal are more pronounced though. intend to do further trials but, unless something unexpected occurs, now plan to use 2S power. The centre brushed motor idea works well, this layout seems a good compromise. Will design a simple switching circuit to ensure the brushless motors can selected separately. This will avoid the inadvertent operation of both brushed and brushless unintentionally as they are on the same control stick. The brushed can then be used for low speed operation. Returning to the problem of squeal and stutter – has anybody else experienced this and how was it resolved?
    9 months ago by RHBaker
    Directory
    (Naval Ship) Huntsman
    This really is a build project, it is hardly out of the box. It will eventually grace the
    starboard
    side davits on Bulldog. However she shall be a fully working boat in her own right, a spin off from the Diana Challenge in a boat mag years ago. More when I get a whole lot more done (5/10)
    9 months ago by ikseno99
    Blog
    Chris-Craft Special Runabout
    OK, you know and I know that this is an Aerokits Sea Hornet, BUT, with a little reworking, it becomes a very passable Chris Craft Special (sometimes Custom) Runabout. One cockpit, long engine deck. I think it suits the Sea Hornet shape and proportions very well. Generally, I think too much is expected to be going on with a basic Hornet and the deck furniture is too simplistic. Also, don't be tempted to call this one a barrel back They had one continuous curve right over the transom from chine to chine, whereas this hull and the Special Runabout had a break, albeit a small one at the deck level. Anyway, I redecked the Hornet with 1/16th" ply, leaving the engine hatch long. I also had to make a small hatch at the stern to service the tiller and its connection. Then I realised I would never be able to get to the two
    starboard
    screws that hold the steering servo in, so a wee hatch went in over them too. That will be held in with a small magnet and just popped up from inside the engine 'ole hatch. Because the hull needed filling and various repairs, I decided to paint it, but veneer plank the deck. many Chris-Crafts were painted and I think this one in a nice off-white with a varnished Mahogany and pear deck will look just the job with nickel plated deck furniture, made in brass and nickel silver and plated in nickel to look like chrome in scale. Chrome is a) difficult to get these days and b) too bright and garish on a model. The hull has been epoxied and rubbed down then brush panted heavily with cellulose primer surfacer. This rubs down a treat ready for a sprayed enamel top coat or three. Cheers, Martin
    9 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    ELCO 80 103 class Rudder positions
    I am after some information on the ELCO 80ft 103 class, I have gathered conflicting data on the positon of the three rudders relative to the propeller shafts. Some say inline, others say outboard of shafts. Port and
    starboard
    shafts of early examples were set 47inches from the centre line (keel). The Italeri plastic kit shows them in line. I have seen pictures of a latter boats were the rudders are not directly behind the propellers but not sure about early boats like the 103 class.
    9 months ago by CB90
    Response
    Range Safety Launch?
    If the boat has 2 rudders I usually install the props-clockwise on the
    starboard
    side and counter clockwise on the port side. If the boat has a single rudder-clockwise on port and counter clockwise on
    starboard
    .I find it produces better control when you reverse.
    10 months ago by Donnieboy
    Response
    Range Safety Launch?
    Evenin' Neville, Yes go for 3 blade cast (not soldered) brass props, one LH, one RH. Jury is still out on which should be port and which
    starboard
    😉 Size I'm not sure of, my 28" twin shaft PTB has 35mm props, which I may reduce depending on the sea trial results, so I'd guess your 44" boat may need something larger, perhaps 40-42mm? Hope the drivers of larger Fireboats and such pick this up and can advise! All the best, Doug 😎
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 5
    After some calculations I find I need to extend the reinforcing for the port &
    starboard
    shafts forward towards the bow. Created some wooden guides when drilling the prop-shaft holes and glued them in position temporarily, as you make expect the drill needs to be rather long, so I made one out of an old brass shaft basically sharpening it so it could cut wood. Next job will be to cut out for integrated shaft support brackets (2mm wide and minimum of 35mm long slot) and the tube shafts are 8.5mm in diameter.
    10 months ago by CB90
    Response
    20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 4
    Hi CB, Looks pretty good so far👍 Attached some pics of a restored ELCO 80 at Battleship Cove USA. Showing the props and rudders; Port, Centre,
    starboard
    . If you need any more detail pics just let me know😉 Cheers, Doug 😎
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Aerokit Sea Scout 'Jessica' Renovation
    Some of you may already know part of the story but, spurred on by Martin 'Westquay' and commanded 😉 by Admiral 'Dave' here goes 😎 Dad built her originally when I was about 12, so ca 53-54 years ago. She was 'No name' and free running with a Taycol Target, ahead only, and a 6V (very) wet cell lead acid. (Down to the garage again for a 'top up!) Anyway, to cut a long story slightly sideways 😉 MY daughter Jessica found the boat in the cellar when she was about 12! And immediately wanted to run it on the local lake in Munich, as I was doing with my HMS Hotspur (but that's another shaggy model story!). Sooooooo, she was cleaned up, resprayed pink (😡!) and white, Taycol Target field motor (no reverse) removed and replaced with a Decaperm 6V 7A with 2.75:1 gearbox. 6V 4000mAH SLA (weight half ton or so) Performance was rather sedate. Well it seemed like a good idea at the time! RX, battery and rudder servo were shoehorned into the aft compartment, Jessica nameplates stuck on and off we went. Jessie was happy with the boat and I was happy with the Biergarten. Can't remember where 'the management' was 😉 Jessie soon lost interest so I used the boat as a test bed for a while. So now, 25-26 years on; prompted by Martin, I took the old lady down off the shelf /I TOLD her not climb up there!😉) and started inspecting the damage. Photos attached. (Yes I know 35Megs is not for boats but I didn have nowt else then🤐) The ancient DIN Audio socket was for charging the RX bat, double throw switch on
    starboard
    quarter. The big 'ole was for the telescopic antenna borrowed from an old radio. Needs must when ... The funny looking 'thing' hanging out the transom is a dummy exhaust hiding the bolt holding the antenna bracket inside! Have also started dismantling and renovating the Taycol, which I want to put back in with a reversing circuit and a 2S or maybe 4S LiPo. That was day before yesterday. Yesterday I took out the junk (siren, water pump, servos & micro switches to operate them and the running lights) and wiped the dust off - last two photos, incl. THE JUNK. Stripped of all the junk & Decaperm she weighs 1214gm (about 2lb 11oz). Also tested (cautiously!) the Taycol with a regulated / current limiting PSU. She rattled and protested but ran 😊 Now being dismantled, cleaned up and brush gear refurbished. Might also fit proper bearings! Next step: clean up the old gal, check for leaks and load capacity. I will probably use the 4S LiPo ca 310gm, the SLA was 660gm, so lots of spare capacity, or maybe I can get her nose out of the water for once More soon Cheers from Munich 😎 PS to DAve and Martin: NO! I don't propose to go full authentic nostalgia with a wet cell accu 😉
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Thanks, Doug. I really like the idea of simply using the exact same white LED for everything, including all of the colored LEDs currently on the boat. Coloring each LED the appropriate colors is the ideal solution. Glass lacquer is a great idea, plus Tamiya makes a translucent or semi-opaque acrylic paint available in many colors. Paints are ideal because I can control the depth of color simply by applying more coats. Another plus is that I can replace the somewhat cheesy looking port &
    starboard
    sidelights with more realistic ones. I like it! Will you please rework things as necessary to account for white LEDs as I’ve described? Things are coming together beautifully. Thanks, Pete
    10 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Blog
    Emerald - ''Round the Word'' ocean racing yacht.
    Purchased new in kit form, from Robbe. 1998. Specifications:- Overall length: 1380mm. Overall beam: 360 mm. Draught: 300 mm. Mast height: 1800 mm. Overall height: 2200 mm. Standard sail area: 80 square dm. Sail area with Genoa: 94 square dm. Total displacement: 12 kg. Ballast: 8 kg. Scale: 1:10 Control Robbe Futaba F14 Marine transmitter / receiver. Channel 1 - Rudder servo. Channel 2 - Spare. Channel 3 - Genoa sail servo. Genoa switch module - fitted between the stick potentiometer and the transmitter channel 3 Socket. (Reverses the Genoa sail servo for Port or
    starboard
    tack.) Channel 4 - Main sail servo. Channel 5 - Auxiliary 3 position switch - up position. Channel 6 - Auxiliary 3 position switch - down position. Receiver channel 5 - Mono Memory relay module. To drive the Blister motor out, to raise the Genoa Sail Clew. Receiver channel 6 - Mono Memory relay module. To drive the Blister motor in, to tighten the Genoa Sail Clew. Recently recovered from the back of the shed, where it has been in hibernation. Now I am retired and have some free time, it is under a review and refurbishment. New paint on the deck and upper hull (above the waterline). Solid state relay modules added, to replace the micro switches, operated from a cam on a servo (replacing analogue channel 2 with on/off channels 5 and 6). Pictures show the sea trials after the 10 year hibination. The Genoa Module had failed in the carbon potentiometers. No replacement available, so found a local electronics repairers, who changed the potentiometers for £10.00. The carrying cradle was designed to hold the sails, and secure the yacht while rigging at the waters edge. Also acts as a dry dock, while working inside the hull. When the repaired module is fitted, and the Genoa sail is operational, I will post detailed video of the Genoa sail winch and Blister motor and their operation while sailing. Genoa Sail Pictures added.
    10 months ago by East-RN
    Blog
    Spotlight Completed!
    Spotlight is now completed! I have to solder the port &
    starboard
    Lights! Anyway that's a small project on it's own! Unlike Serenity the Brooklyn isn't going to have a working spotlight! it's not in the budget!😲
    10 months ago by figtree7nts
    Blog
    Fire Stations Completed!
    Yes, the fire stations are now completed! I was procrastinating cos I knew. It would be a pain putting the hoses together! I did everything to keep my fingers. From getting glued together in the process. There are four fire stations. 2 port side 2
    starboard
    side far and aft! Next thing to do. Is glue the forward ladder in place! But, I think I'll wait on that. I don't won't to snap it off while working on her! Note: Take you time with this step!
    10 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Thank you, O Great & Mighty Helpful One (AKA Doug). My doctor prescribed eye drops for me yesterday afternoon so the torture should be over soon. I looked at your spreadsheets & everything looks fine to me. 👍 By the way, I’ve been reading up on LEDs during our correspondence. One thing I learned that surprised me is that LEDs require different supply voltage depending on their color. Silly me thought that different colors were made by simply tinting a clear LED. But it’s confusing to me because the LEDs used for the port &
    starboard
    sidelights on my tug are actually are red & green in color, not clear, when they’re turned off. However, the aft deck lights are clear as water when off but yellow when turned on. According to various web articles I’ve read Hobby Engine was after the yellowish color of halogen lights, which they’ve done really well. Why are some LEDs clear when turned off but change to a color when turned on, as opposed to LEDs that are their given whether off or on?
    10 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Hi, Doug: Thank you once again for answering my questions. I especially like your response & comments about HE tug’s factory-installed motors. I think the “heart of the machine” for my tug is perfectly fine. I’d rather add detail to the model, over time & within reason, to make the boat look as realistic as possible without becoming so delicate that I’d be afraid to put it in the car for a drive to the lake. Continuing on, I’d like to get your comments about my latest idea for adding connectors to the wiring that runs from my tug’s circuit board to the various lights & components in the deck house & pilot house. This is something I can do with or without my proposed new LED Mast Navigation Lights to add the convenience of being able to completely disconnect & separate the Deck House/Pilot House from the circuit board/Deck House bottom cover assembly. This will make detailing the upper works much easier because it won’t be tethered to the circuit board by (16) wires. The circuit board holes where the (10) Search Light, Port &
    starboard
    Sidelight & Aft Deck Light wires are soldered are equally spaced at 0.10” (2.5mm). I can tag & desolder the wires, insert a 10-pin HS male socket & solder it to the board. Then I can connect the wires to the male plug. I can do the same thing with the (6) wires that run to the Pilot House Light, Smoke Generator & Smoke Pump. What do you think? if you find that powering & controlling the new LED Navigation Lights on the Mast the way I’d like to can’t be done, the circuit board connectors still make sense. Or am I AWOL from reality...again? Thanks, Pete
    10 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Blog
    Five windows left!
    I've painted the portside. Now to do the
    starboard
    side! Then, I'm done with the windows! Of everything I've done of the Brooklyn. The windows were the most challenging of all...…. Oh, As I paint each window. I then remove the tape I had place to protect the windows then selves! Luckily the windows are 10mm wide. So, I ordered 10mm wide masking tape! it worked like a charm. I think Doug, RNinMunich did a recommendation on using the tape. Thanks Doug!👍
    10 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Tamar
    As well as the nav lights there is a white running light and blue flashing beacon on the mast as well as a white stern light. At the forward end of the wheel house there a total of 6 deck lights. 2 in the deck itself, 2 facing forward on the lower front wheel house and 1 each on the port and
    starboard
    side.
    10 months ago by Manofkent
    Blog
    Fire Hydrants!
    Amazing what miniature washers and push pins. Can be turned into fire hydrants! The Brooklyn has four of them 2 port 2
    starboard
    ! your also suppose to use a plastic bead. But drilling the beads proved futile. As they would brake in half! Note: The dumas instruction call for drilling. The four beads that came with the kit! I tried but they were too brittle. And they boke in half. Forget the beads just use the pins and washers. To make the fire hydrants! But, if you want to try and drill the beads. You'll see what I mean!
    10 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Crash Tender davit info...
    I have done some more digging and I hope this confirms the colour scheme for the boat. please see the reply I received from:- Donald Smith RAF MARINE CRAFT HiSTORIAN Hello, Colour scheme for the above boat is as follows. Black topsides, red oxide anti-fouled bottom separated by a 2in white waterline. All decks dark grey anti-slip deck paint, cabin sides light grey, cabin roofs white anti-slip deck paint. Mast-white, monitors red, crash ladder and davit silver/aluminium. An RAF roundel is centred 5ft 4in back from stem and 2ft 1.5in above mean waterline. The centre red disc 4in Dia., middle white circle 8in Dia., and the outer blue circle 12in Dia. The bottom of the white bow numbers should be 2ft 7in above mean waterline. They are 9in high by 6in wide with a 1.5in stroke width and a 2in separation between each number. The forward end of numbers 3 or 4 on the
    starboard
    side is 12in back from the outside of the roundel (Port side similar). The main FIRE letters are 2ft 6in high by 2ft wide with a stroke width of 6in and a separation of 6in between letters. The base of the letters is 7.5in above mean waterline. Transom numbers are 10in high by 8in wide and a stroke width of 1.5in and a separation on 2in. Base of numbers to be 1ft 5in above mean waterline. Draft marks are 3in high with a 0.5in stroke. I hope this meets with your requirements. Yours faithfully Donald Smith RAF MARINE CRAFT HiSTORIAN.
    11 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Hey Doug! I’ve finally finished the long-awaited sketch! I’m sorry it took me so long but I had to work under very adverse conditions. Nearly every time I sat down to work on it one of my wife’s friends would drop in for a visit & there isn’t enough light in the closet to sketch by. Anyway, the sketch is attached. I verified that all four of the boat’s exterior lights are LEDs. The pilot house interior light is a light bulb as I’ve said before. You asked before if it’d be possible to replace the bulb with an LED. it can be done so I noted the bulb’s supply voltage on the sketch, too. Both wires running to the bulb are white (labelled “WHT” on the sketch). The Aft Deck light LEDs look crystal-clear when they’re turned off, but when they’re turned on they light up yellow! I didn’t expect that because the Port &
    starboard
    Sidelight LEDs are red & green respectively when they’re turned off. The Search Light LED is clear when it’s off & white when it’s on. I hope the sketch is helpful. As I said in my last post I couldn’t get the voltage readings on the SMD resistor inputs, but I wrote their 3-digit numbers & my stab at their values in my last post, too. I hope the nomenclature I used on the sketch is somewhat like what you’re used to. Being a mechanical guy I never did any electrical or electronics drawings so I just took a stab at it for the sketch. if you have questions or need anything else just ask. Thanks again, Pete
    11 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Forum
    Sea Queen
    Can anyone help!! I am in the process of restoring an Old Sea Queen and have nearly finished it. I need to know what the running lights look like (Port &
    starboard
    ) and any other fittings (Lights ,Horn etc) Sid🤓
    11 months ago by sidley70
    Blog
    Main Cabin almost Completed!
    Today I worked on the main cabin. I put the port lights in place. The mast is completed as well! The port and
    starboard
    lights need to be assembled! My good friend Cormorant. Had sent me some LED's awhile back. I'm going to use a red and green LED. as they are brighter than the one I have! Oh, I had ordered some slide switches from radio shack. They sent me gigantic switches! Not what I want to use for the LED circuit I'm making!
    11 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Crash Tender davit info...
    Hi Martin. I have a drawing that shows the davit but not in very much detail 🤔. It is designed to be swapped between attachment points on both port or
    starboard
    sides ( hence 'portable' davit) and when not required it is stowed in the centre deck with the ends locating in some sort of retaining points on the deck and then (presumably) secured to the wall of the cabin. I added some detail to the white metal casting that came with my Vintage Model Works kit and also modified it to swivel on a removable fixing bracket. See my build blog for more detail on how I made mine. https://model-boats.com/builds/view/23951 Good luck with the restoration. Robbob.
    11 months ago by robbob
    Response
    Tow hooks
    Hi Alan That is looking good. Would having two hook's increase the pull by having one tow rope going to the port side and the other tow rope going to the
    starboard
    side? Keep up the good work Fred
    11 months ago by Fred
    Blog
    Running Lights arrived!
    Yey, the running lights arrived! OK, I was going to put deck lights But, am not! I figure port
    starboard
    steaming ahead. and one Lamp is enough! also don't want to run all those wires! Still waiting for some resisters to arrive in the mail. And also waiting for some Slide DPDT switches to arrive as well!
    11 months ago by figtree7nts
    Blog
    H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER
    Decided to retry with the 2S battery and the original scale style propellers. Concluded that the speed is fine, especially in the windy conditions encountered and in a small pool that limited acceleration. The model had a very flat plane, must adjust the transom flap angle to see what effect that has. The forefoot did not rise much from the water surface. Was frustrated by the “stutter” referred to in the last blog, noticed this occurred on the two out shafts only and when the
    starboard
    was operated after the port was running. Swopped the
    starboard
    motor over with the centre one to see what effect it would have. As started to remove the motor noted that a connector was not tight and that the screw had corroded. Exchanged motors, removed all connectors then cleaned and refitted using a water resistant lubricant. The stutter seemed cured. Another lesson learnt, when dealing with these high currents every connection is tested and all defects exposed. The opportunity to retest using a 3S battery arose so installed it, all worked fine on the bank. Put the model in the water and a major short occurred. 2 fuses blew and about 6” of wiring melted and burnt through the insulation. At least there was no hull damage! Did an inquest and, apart from the damage described, also found the
    starboard
    ESC and motor had failed. These were the ones where the “stutter” originated, but cannot see any correlation between the two problems. Discussed the model with some of fellow scale modelers and concluded that the 4500kV motors are unsuitable for the scale propellers used. Every suggestion points toward motors in the 1 – 2000kV range. As now needed to obtain a new motor and ESC, decided to reequip both outer shafts with 2000kv motors and water cooled ESCs. Felt modifying these outer shafts would allow assessment of this new drivetrain combination, could then decide what approach to take with the centre shaft. Due to the mounting and driveshaft arrangement, the choice of motors was restricted to 28mm O/D with a 1/8” shaft size. Unfortunately, suitable items are on back-order from Hong Kong, so there will be no further updates for a while.
    11 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Fittings & Detail Parts
    Greetings, everyone: I’m looking for an online sources that offer fittings & detail parts, especially for modern tugboats. I have Hobby Engine’s 1:36 scale Richardson tugboat which is already pretty well detailed, but I’d like to replace its two deckhouse life rings with better looking ones & add a few others in appropriate locations. I’m also looking for a life raft drum & a few other detail parts here & there. Most of all I’d like to find navigation lights for the mast. The housings can be most any material but the lenses must be clear. I’m going to remove all of the “dummy” navigation lights on the mast & replace them with LED-lighted ones. The boat came with working port &
    starboard
    sidelights so they won’t need to be replaced. I’ve got a dredging barge designed (in my head) to use as a companion for tug. I’ve got all of the basic materials stockpiled for the barge itself plus a nice lattice boom crane for the dredge. I found a beautiful metal clamshell bucket that’s a work of art to use with the crane, too. Although I could scratchbuild things bitts & bollards I’d consider buying some as a time saver. I’ll need portholes for the deckhouse, ventilators, etc. as well. I live in western Massachusetts which is a beautiful area but there aren’t any hobby shops nearby that stock ship fittings of any sort. I used to buy fittings from A.J. Fischer & Bliss Marine but they both went out of business a long time ago. I’ve found several online shops that sell ship kits & fittings but they’re mostly for small scale sailing vessels. I’d appreciate any suggestions. Thanks, Pete
    11 months ago by PittsfieldPete
    Forum
    Intermittent radio problems
    Hi Rob, only other element left is the servo! Which would have been my first thought anyway! So- Put the original RX back, use the same TX and change the servo. Put the RX antenna as far forward as possible, i.e. keep it well away from ESCs, motors and the rudder servo. Also keep any servo signal cable well away from ESC / Motor power cables. Route 'em port and
    starboard
    . Sounds like the servo motor might be on it's last legs. Not man enough for the job? 🤔 BTW: brushed motors? Motor suppression? TX battery low? Cheers, Doug 😎 PS: 2mHz!😲 Wow! That's a wavelength of 150 million km😲 Where do they attach the other end of their antenna?? Jupiter? 😁😁😁
    11 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Chine rubbing strakes
    As the hull glass matting is really dry and has had some minor filling done it’s time to fit the chine rubbing strakes. which have been in the jig now for some days and consisted of a two dimensional curvature jig. in order to make sure the strakes were equally balanced on each side I made a cardboard template that followed the Chine stringers line and rested on the Gunwhale rubbing strakes, having drawn a line on the port side I flipped the template over and drew a line on the
    starboard
    side giving a perfectly equal curve on each side So now to prepare them for fitting. The jig had made a curve that was a really good fit without much spring. I decided to use some very small brass pins (0.5dia x 10mm long) to hold them whilst the epoxy sets. I pre drilled the whole length of the strake and lightly inserted pins along its length, then applied the epoxy and started to fix from the bow and followed the pencil line back to the stern. This was repeated on the other side, when set there was some minor filling to be done/filling pin holes.
    11 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?...
    Evenin' Ed, Yep!
    starboard
    MCR U/S 😡 What is it the explosives experts yell before they fire a charge or test a cannon? 'FIRE IN THE HOLD' Got a bit exciting for a moment, good example of what LiPos can do if unleashed the wrong way😲 All the motor and battery lead soldering melted and they just dropped off 🤔 Whatapong😡 Pics show the good port one and what's left of the stbd one, and the rest of the rat's nest in the boat. The ESCs are not much bigger than my thumb nail so I'm not really surprised one couldn't cut the mustard! Not sure if the wiring was faulty, cos apparently it did run before I bought it, or if the motor was defect or shaft stiff. Shaft seemed to move by hand OK though. Dunno🤔 Never mind, looking for beefier replacements on Conrad, they usually deliver in 1 or 2 days 😊 Now I'm pulling all the wiring out and will rebuild the Engine Rooms, MCR and COMMS Office 😉 While I'm at it I'll dismantle the shafts, clean and lubricate and fit oilers. Now to sort Martin's little snag!🤓 Cheers, Doug 😎
    11 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Good morning, guys. I got the pilot house roof off of my boat by using bits of advice from both of you. I looked closely at the seam where the roof attaches & sure enough found a very fine gap. Doug: I trimmed my fingernails just yesterday so my built-in scraper/screwdriver/seam separator, i.e. thumbnail, is too short to be of use for a while. Ed: Following your lead I carefully worked an ultra-thin blade into the seam & after about 30 seconds I had the roof off without damaging a thing. Excellent! I’m impressed at how well the roof presses in place. Only the paint had “glued” the roof on. Looking at the photo you can clearly see the ceiling bulb (white wires), which is the same kind used for HO scale & larger locomotive headlights, among other things. The blue wires near my thumb (notice the neatly-trimmed thumbnail) run up to the search light on the roof. You can also see the black & red & black & green wires running to the port &
    starboard
    side lights. I think I’ll add a multi-pin connector as part of my overall upgrade plan for the tug so that I can completely remove the roof if I want to without risking damage to those fine wires. Thanks again to both of you for your helpful guidance. You’re both awesome! Pete
    12 months ago by PittsfieldPete


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