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    Blog
    HMS Bustler
    HMS Bustler deep sea rescue tug ,built at Henry Robb Shipbuilders Leith where I served my time . Hull is 6mm ply with 2mm ply deck ,
    superstructure
    and bridge were constructed earlier from 18mm mdf . Ship will be a static model ,one day I will bite the bullet and attempt Rc
    7 months ago by marky
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Northlight Clyde Puffer
    The Clyde Puffer is a Caldercraft kit of 1:32 scale. it is a representative model of a typical small coaster from the Western isles of Scotland, known to many ship lovers as a 'Clyde Puffer'. it has a GRP hull which has full external detail, riveting, strakes etc. and a plywood
    superstructure
    and decking plus over 200 white metal fittings. As usual for Caldercraft you need to have your thinking cap on as the A0 plan and the 'instruction book' do not match up but of course they do expect you to have a little bit of experience in model building. it has taken me about 6 months to build, but working on and off over this time. it has a large hull which is easy to house the motor, ESC, RC and batteries, etc. (I installed 2 lead acid 6 volt batteries, one on each side amidships) which gives stability and ballast. Being a large deep hull it needs a lot of ballast, even in its short length. I have only tested her in the big white test tank at home so do not know how it will perform on our lake. I have sailed her many times on our lake and she certainly sails well. I installed an electronic switch for the navigation lights and gives a good effect during the darker afternoons/evening. (Motor: MFA) (ESC: Viper Marine 15) (9/10)
    3 years ago by ads90
    Media
    Neptun
    Was given this as a hull which had been started 25 yrs ago, along with some
    superstructure
    parts. Without other materials to finish it off, I gave it what I could find and here is where it is today. Motor is 340 Graupner geared 3:1 & 7.2v 2400 NiMH Can not provide any specific sailing details until it has been in the pond which could be awhile...se my front and back yard!
    6 months ago by Ron
    Forum
    Help identify
    Hi Sid, If the number is correct she's based on an RAF 60 foot General Service Pinnace. http://www.rafboats.co.uk/pin60gsmk2spec.html But the hull shape doesn't fit! See attached pics of number 1261, closest I could find to 1258 but from the same batch. Nearest I could find that fits the hull and
    superstructure
    shape of the model at the bow is the 65ft Walton HSL (High Speed Launch). http://rafboats.co.uk/hslw65.html See pics attached pics of #2642. She was a 'One Off' which never went into production. Hope this helps, or does it just add to the confusion!?πŸ€” Cheers, Doug 😎
    6 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Basic hull construction completed
    Hi Stuart - I'm scratch building a Swordsman, albeit larger than your Huntsman as I'm building at 1:12, so 33" long. I haven't worked on it for a few weeks but am at a similar stage with the hull in that I'm just about to sand the concave into the bow to form the flare. This is a stressful part and I might delay it and start on the
    superstructure
    ! From the photos it's difficult to tell if you have overdone it or not due to the different materials breaking up the lines. it looks OK head on and from the side but when looking down towards the keel it does look a little excessve. I'm going to be building a Huntsman 31 as well soon but again at 1:12 so will be from plans, either existing or my own. I've got three Fairey builds on the go at the moment and another on the drawing board, well PC. Chris
    6 months ago by ChrisF
    Blog
    PS Enterprise
    The stern section of the
    superstructure
    is built.
    7 months ago by rcmodelboats
    Blog
    PS Enterprise
    The Top deck is now complete. The hull is partially painted and the construction of the
    superstructure
    has begun and the rudder is now attached
    7 months ago by rcmodelboats
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    Hallo Gary, Your curious response to my post prompted me to look back at your history. In your very first post on the site four years ago I ran across this about a tug project of yours - "My reason for trying to build this particular kit in the first place, is it is 39 inches in length with a beam of 10 inches, with a one piece large
    superstructure
    making it ideal for a steam engine." All very fine but it underlines the snag many of us have, especially naval modellers with 10to1 LoA / Beam ratio, that we simply don't have the beam and
    superstructure
    height necessary for steam power plants. Regards, Doug.
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Paddle Tug Iona - the hull
    Thanks Chris... yeah independent paddle control is very useful for navigating into 'dock'. Your "Loch Ranza" looks pretty good too. These Graupner kits are hard to come by. I like paddle steamers as a project, and picked up a part built 'city of Bath' from my local club. Hull & decks complete otherwise I have to build powertrain /
    superstructure
    . Planned in for later in the year.
    7 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Forum
    Bustler
    While waiting for the new bandsaw blades to arrive to start the hull I started on the bridge and
    superstructure
    ,made from 18mm mdf .will start a build blog soon .πŸ‘
    7 months ago by marky
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona - the hull
    So... here is a compressed build blog of my paddle tug Iona... and I'm playing catch-up as the vessel is 95% complete and has been sailed already, but there may be some interest in what I've done. Iona was scratch-built off plan and has turned out to be the cheapest build so far out of 3 I've made, mainly because I was able to source materials from the leftovers box! it's a 'mixed-media' boat 😜using traditional methods of plank on frame hull, with paddles made on my 3D printer, and other parts turned on the lathe. So starting with the hull, frames were drawn out, transferred to some scrap 9mm ply and cut out on my bandsaw, along with the keel. These were assembled on a build board with some right angle brackets / measuring tools and test fitted before being stuck in place with epoxy. This was quite difficult as the shape of the hull is critical and comes right at the start of the build. I did remake 1 frame to correct alignment. The deck stringers need to bend in 2 directions, so some steaming with a carpet steam cleaner attached to some tubes worked and the wood clamped in place to dry. Outboard sponsons (?) were fitted to make a frame for the paddle boxes to fit on. Then a large sheet of ply forms the bottom of the hull, and the only job left to complete was the (tedious) planking. This was my 1st plank on frame ship... and it took ages. I think it came out reasonably OK but I'm not a perfectionist and I know if I'd spent more time it could be better... but I didn't! Next blog will feature building the paddle boxes and
    superstructure
    .πŸ€“
    7 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona- paddle boxes &
    superstructure
    Building the paddle boxes was remarkably easy, once the 1mm ply had been steamed for bending. I decided to build the boxes first and make sure the paddles fitted inside later, the idea being that all this would come apart for maintenance should it be necessary. (it usually is!). There are few models to be found on the internet to use as reference and hardly any images of the original tug. And to confuse matters, PS Iona also existed as a passenger ship, as well as tug, and looked a bit different. The
    superstructure
    is really simple and quick to build, with some more planking! Am liking planking small areas now. The funnels came from some scrap plastic tubing in the garage... just the right diameter too, a lucky find. These will screwed in place from below once I have the other funnel parts made. I plan to run the tug on batteries rather than steam, as I am a relative novice to model boat building. The whole deck will be fitted with 1mm ply as a base before... more planking! Before all this is glued in place, I thought it best to water test the ship first and see how much ballast I am likely to need.
    7 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    Building the Cabin. Part 1
    The
    superstructure
    of the launch is very simple, and from a practical point it was designed to give the crew a large field of view across the river and fast access in and out to deal with emergency situations. Consequently the construction is quite basic and would be quite straightforward if permanently fixed to the boat but this cabin needs to be removable to give access to the battery location and motor. Because of this the cabin needs to be a strong and rigid structure of its own and yet fit invisibly to the rest of the model, it’s also only a three sided structure because of the open access at the rear and that alone will be a point of weakness to the structure. I started by glueing the internal bracing strips to the insides of the deck sides as described in the instruction sheet and some strips that form the base for the sides that sit on the deck, these also needs to be sanded to an angle to sit flush on the deck and also create a vertical face that some further strips are fixed to which meet the inside walls of the deck well. Although all the parts for the cabin are accurately laser cut I chose to do a dry β€˜test fit’ using pins and elastic bands to hold the side panels and roof braces together. This 'dry fit' was neccessary because I had previously decided to fit false obeche panels over the balsa sides and floor of the well to get a better surface to finish in the way I intend, balsa does not have any pleasing grain and does not look good even when stained, so I pinned all these panels in place to account for their addition to the internal dimensions of the well deck. When I was happy that the geometry of the side panels and front window panels was correct I glued all the roof braces in place and added some reinforcing fillets to make it more rigid, temporary braces were glued across the front and rear of the assembly to keep the whole thing rigid and square during further assembly. The pins and rubber bands were used to pull in the side panels while the aliphatic glue set. All of this was done with the cabin on the boat so that the correct β€˜dry’ fit converted to a permanent fit. Part 2 will continue with the addition of the front window panels and roof.
    7 months ago by robbob
    Response
    HMS EXETER
    Cheers Doug for the compliment - she is 1:96 scale. I obtained the original plans from Greenwich maritime museum - the plans that they hold are as she was 'proposed to be built' in 1928 - the same as her sister ship HMS YORK - but amongst the drawings they supply are the correct hull lines - which are the ones I used for my hull - then I used literally thousands of images from all over the place to do the rest of the
    superstructure
    . Also, I used the aid of a small online plan of her rigging which shows a fair amount of
    superstructure
    detail of how she was built.
    7 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    SS HUNAN drawings
    Very good so far. The hull has been tested and the prop and rudder tested and now am creating ballast by making lead blocks to suit. The Glasgow archives had plans and photos and the staff was very obliging. Also I have found that the Swires ship business archive is held in London and they have a plan showing the changes which were made in 1953 or 1958. I cannot determine yet which because the image in the email reply was not of high definition. The staff there to date have been helpful. Then I will have to decide on whether to proceed with the later fitting out ore finish the
    superstructure
    in its original as fitted. Built in 1932 and scrapped in 1962 clearly it remained in its original fitting twice longer than the time from re- fitting to being scrapped. Likely this would account for the lack of photos in its second fitting. Don't have all the details but it largely appears to be an addition of poop deck
    superstructure
    and to such on the rear main deck. Needless there will be details lost or added in the area where these rooms were added. So will have to compare and decide and finish the build. If I can see a copy of the drawing for the revised fitting I will likely make a list and images for the benefit of others in treated in building this vessel. Toby
    8 months ago by Toby
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Winter seems to encourage modeling, have spent many hours in hibernation working on the deck and
    superstructure
    details. A supplier offers a full set of Perkasa fittings, most of which would work on the Brave B. At one point considered buying a set. They are made in both resin and cast metal. Eventually parsimony prevailed, so only purchased a small number of hatch covers and other intricate shapes that would be difficult to make well. The items duly arrived and the quality is good. Was surprised by the weight though, so am pleased had embarked on making the other items from the usual materials. There should be an overall weight saving, along with a reduction in my surplus styrene and wood stock. One of the design tenants of the Brave class was flexibility. The vessel could operate as a MTB, MGB or Raider, or with a mixture of these capabilities. The weapon mountings were designed to allow armaments to be installed and moved around to suite the requirements of the role. Have reviewed many Brave class photographs trying to establish a β€œstandard” armament configuration, to reproduce. Not only does the configuration define the weapons installed, it also establishes the ammunition and flare storage cabinet arrangements. Eventually decided upon the 2 x 40mm Bofors gun arrangement with 2 x 21” torpedoes and 4 x extended range fuel tanks. The model is now essentially complete. No doubt as I keep examining it will add further small details and refinements. Only disappointment so far is that it does not achieve the original weight target of 6 lbs, it is 9.5 lbs. The 6 lbs may possibly have achievable using one screw and motor etc., but once three are installed, not likely. The real test is when finally back on the water. Will close this blog then with a concluding report.
    8 months ago by RHBaker
    Media
    Moorcock
    I bought the Moorcock from a fellow boater and decided to rebuild her as the Moorcock. The hull was stripped bare and the prop-shaft tube removed and completely remade with a new prop. The hull was then repainted and the life boat and davits added The
    superstructure
    was cleaned up and remade with a Robbe spring loaded grappling iron added to the rear deck.She is powered by a 24v scooted motor salvaged from a garbage bin and has 4 x 12v 7amh SLA's to provide power. She is a good strong vesel to sail and is often used as a recovery tug.
    8 months ago by GeoffA
    Blog
    Reassembly
    Continuing on, I finished mounting the light bar, all lights are functioning. For some reason my iPad does not like LEDs and they don't photograph when lit. Made an exhaust stack out of brass tube, mitered the top, soldered and painted. Hull dry now so I mounted the
    superstructure
    onto the hatch, reinstalled the tow bits, switch and batteries, RX, motor, etc. Getting close to sea trials, maybe this week schedule permitting. Cheers, Joe
    8 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Paint / epoxy work
    Hello, No photos today as I prime painted the
    superstructure
    and did some cleanup on the skeg with some epoxy. Starting to plan on how to build the railings around the pilot house, mocked up a quick piece tonight, but too tired to photo, will get to tomorrow. Joe
    8 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Pilot House Structure
    Coming along nicely.That's the thing with Springer hulls.The
    superstructure
    is not confined to one style.One of our members in the club had one hull but three different
    superstructure
    s.He was able to change them throughout the days sailing.
    8 months ago by Donnieboy
    Directory
    (Tug Boat) North Rock
    Got a lot of info on the Billings D.M.I. Samson tug from the members . the thing is I saw a drawing of the North Rock tug boat & thought I would rebuild the Samson & build the North Rock tug .Researched original after I painted her & found out the it was white
    superstructure
    & black hull to late (8/10)
    8 months ago by GARTH
    Media
    Electric Barbarella
    Ahoy Maties! it's been a long time since my last posting. Happy 2019! I just completed my new scratch-built boat "Electric Barbarella". I tried to recreate (with some liberties) one of my favorite boats of all time, the 30-footer Chris Craft Sportsman built during the 1970s. it measures 24 X 8.5 inches. it is powered with a 9.6 NiMH 4200 mAh battery "nunchuck" pack (like the one used for paintball guns), brushless motor attached to a 30A Mtroniks Hydra controller and a 30mm M4 3-bladed brass propeller. The hull (my own on-the-go design) was made out of Balsa wood which later I fiberglassed. For the
    superstructure
    I utilized 2mm ABS plastic sheet material. To my surprise the boat turned to be a very stable and forgiving platform. I really feel a very close connection to this vessel as it is my first own hull design.😁
    9 months ago by Krampus
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    After completing the cowl, turned to the rear structure covering the gas turbine and other engine spaces. This can readily be made from styrene sheet. The sides and top were cut out, reinforced with β€œL” shaped angle and fitted together with CA glue. No particular challenges, other than determining where the various section transitions occur. Luckily had two different sets of plans to compare, so the nuances could be established. It was not until the rear structure was fitted into the cowl, the assembly fitted to the removable deck and placed on the hull, realized just how important this milestone was. Once everything is firmly located the accuracy of build becomes readily apparent. Any inaccuracies show up as an obvious misalignment. Was able to check the alignments and squareness using eye, rules, squares and a spirit level and was pleased with the outcome. A subtle sanding of about .020” off the base of one side of the
    superstructure
    and everything became square, parallel and correctly aligned. Quite a relief! Have always stressed the importance of accuracy throughout a build. This supported that recommendation. Once the
    superstructure
    was completed realized my plan to lift the deck off to gain access to the electrical control switches was impractical. Have thus cut a small access hole in the rear deck to facilitate access. Still undecided how to best disguise the hole, but at least access is now relatively easy. From now on, until the test program can be continued on the water, will add detail to the model. Doubt there will be much to describe is that of interest, or that has not been covered by others. Will continue this blog once there is anything significant to report. In the meantime, best wishes for Christmas and 2019,
    9 months ago by RHBaker
    Response
    Oh, NO Water Everywhere!
    I remember a few years ago that I was excited to get the boat finished and I went to the pond.Put the boat in the water and ran it for awhile.Brought it back in and opened up the
    superstructure
    only to find quite a bit of water in the bottom.I was in a rush and forgot to grease the stuffing tube.One thought for you.
    9 months ago by Donnieboy
    Blog
    Oh, NO Water Everywhere!
    Captain's Log: Ok, I like to float Tug Brooklyn! Last night I did this. I filled the tub with water. Then placed Tug Brooklyn. I left it alone for about half an hour. When I came back. I started looking at her. She looked different in some way. I hadn't realized she was taking on water. anyway I looked at her water line. And her water line was below the water! I then took her
    superstructure
    . Off of her when I looked inside. I was shocked to find. She had taken on more than 12 ounces of water! I then started to panic! I went and got my syringe. Which I had purchased just in case water ever got into her. And started pumping out all the water she had in her! I'm not sure where she's leaking from! Or why she is leaking! There's only one opening in the Hull. And that's where the shaft comes out of! Going to have to do another float test. to see where the water is coming in from! I'm glad I discovered this before next boating season!
    9 months ago by figtree7nts
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Hi Did you consider building the
    superstructure
    using plastic sheet as plastic would bend around the curves. Regards Kevin
    10 months ago by kevinsharpe
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the
    superstructure
    and engine covers. The
    superstructure
    is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The
    superstructure
    is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.
    10 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Help! identifying a small ferry
    Well have done some research and discovered this a representation of Mv Fairmile but without any of the forward
    superstructure
    forward of the aft passenger cabin. The livery seems to be inspired from the local life boat. So rather nice boat I will restore and use but no pattern to follow.
    10 months ago by Bryan-the-pirate
    Media
    RMAS JOYCE A193
    This is one of the limited edition Sirmar kits that was produce in the early 1990’s.this model was made by a friend of mine who’s a dockyard fitter and turner it was made about twenty eight years ago. Based on a tug that I worked on in and around Portsmouth harbour. This model has a working voith unit opening engine room skylights. Working lights, removable deck hatch to get at the unit like the real boat, the
    superstructure
    and gun whales are made from plasticard. The fender was made by a friend to the same type as used on the tug. The wheelhouse is copied like for like. The towing hook is copied from photos and slips like the real one. in all my years I haven’t seen another one like this . Sirmar made twenty numbered hulls as kits .
    10 months ago by Nutbourne
    Forum
    happy hunter
    I haven't done a great deal to the happy hunter over the last months but the
    superstructure
    and masts are almost finished.I want to get the ballast in it next .I,ve got 2 -6 volt batteries in and tried about 1kg of lead at each end -this isn't enough .I would welcome thoughts on what weight will be needed in addition to the batteries -I,m thinking a total of 4kg.Also any ideas on getting the lead moulded to the right shape for the bottom of the hull would be appreciated
    10 months ago by spitfiresooty
    Directory
    (Tug Boat) Ferdinand Keulen
    Fibre glass hull. Wooden and plastic
    superstructure
    . Built issuing the hull and plan. (5/10)
    10 months ago by Toby
    Blog
    Elizabeth Cabin/
    superstructure
    The cabin has now been finished off with a well deck, the well deck is made of balsa mostly, and the floor is oly, the well deck floor is lined as planks ( urghh ), firstly scored with a blunt Stanley type knife blade the the plank lines infilled with pencil, the floorboard nail marks are just scored with a sharp pin with a little cyno rubbed in the hole to colour the pin prick, decided to make this as an all in one removal unit, it still has to be glazed and fittings plus furniture, as in windscreen , door's consul etc: .. The deck and all other woodwork has been varnished and the cabin roof painted white, awaiting suitable weather to paint the hull, as this is done outdoors.. Muddy....
    10 months ago by muddy
    Response
    coastguard
    Good morning Doug the CoG will be determined when the
    superstructure
    is completed then lead ballast will be added the batteries are in the best place possible any lower and they would have been obstructing the propshafts have a nice day Bob 😜
    10 months ago by Northumbrian
    Response
    coastguard
    So far so good Northumbrian,πŸ‘ although I might have placed the batteries lower in the hull to lower the CoG and thus improve stability (roll-rate reduction) πŸ˜‰ Look forward to the
    superstructure
    updates, looking for some tips for my fish cutter
    superstructure
    rebuild πŸ˜πŸ˜‰ Cheers, Doug
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    coastguard
    I bought the hull from a member on here i stripped the insides and redone it to take the rudder servo i then made the motor mounts from ply i used epoxy to set them in it runs nicely on the two 45mm brass props i will make the
    superstructure
    from lite ply
    10 months ago by Northumbrian
    Directory
    (Tug Boat) Loch Ranza
    I bought an unfinished Graupner paddle steamer kit which was in a bit of a state and spent many happy hours making her look loved. The hull and paddle wheels were in an acceptable condition but the deck and
    superstructure
    left lots to be desired. The previous owner had purchased the motor which was 50.1 geared and pushes the boat along well all other bits including 'smoke' brass portholes and new
    superstructure
    added by myself. She was a delight to finish and looks an absolute dream on the water. (Motor: MFA 919D series) (8/10)
    10 months ago by ChrisG
    Forum
    Boat hull
    I have for sale this group hull for a coastguard type boat, I bought it with the intention of restoring it etc but it will never happen, it's just the hull with prop tubes, no
    superstructure
    , Β£20 collection from Nelson Lancashire or could possibly post at cost
    11 months ago by 2435mick
    Forum
    B-25. 11'' Bing 1918 Tin Submarine Restoration
    Ahoy Mateys, 1918 Bing tinplate clockwork submarine restoration. Only got the hull, no motor,
    superstructure
    or rudder so all that had to be made plus hole filling and dent removing its been an interesting project,much easier building my own from scratch! I'd say it was 70% original and that's good enough for me. Cheers. www.mclarenclockworksubmarines.com
    11 months ago by mactin
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Kingfisher
    Built from plans downloaded on the internet. Hull is planked with a wood deck planked over ply. The
    superstructure
    is also made in wood, mostly 3mm ply. (ESC: viper 15) (8/10)
    11 months ago by solo1274
    Blog
    Tug ''Joanna E''
    Partial rebuild project. It is a 1/24 scale Thames Tug which has a
    superstructure
    that is wrong and out of scale. I intend to rebuild the
    superstructure
    and make it more like a Thames Tug but not replicating any particular Tug as there are too many discrepancies in the build up of the hull which I do not want to alter as I am on a tight budget. I am building her and naming her in tribute to my long suffering partner to my hobbies, Jo. Photo of her as is. More photos to follow as progress is made.
    11 months ago by Ballast
    Forum
    Your ideas on how to stabilize a flat-bottomed freighter.
    Think a bilge keel should be the first step. My next suggestion would be to add some of the ballast to a removable fin keel, bolted to the underside of the hull. This will increase the righting moment, but not the weight. This can be seen if you examine U Tube videos of cruise ships and liners. They have so much
    superstructure
    they are inherently unstable. Have built several freighters and always fit captive nuts into the keel or underside. These are intended for trunnion display mounts, but have always been prepared to bolt a keel on if needed. The nuts can easily be sealed when sailing.
    11 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Help required on Boat i.d.
    Can anyone assist, been to the model boat show at Blackpool today, bought a hull and plan for what I thought could be an interesting build, only problem is when I googled the boat.....no feedback, the hull/plan and some
    superstructure
    is of a : M.P.C. 85 freelance general purpose corvette built by Vosper, if any help I can post a photo of the hull and
    superstructure
    . many thanks, PeterπŸ€”
    11 months ago by Rookysailor
    Forum
    Help required on Boat i.d.
    Thanks Peter, πŸ‘ I think we're closing in on it. I can see a distinct 'heritage' in the hull shape from the Vosper MK5s built for Iran, except for that peculiar hull slope down!!😲 Could be a later derivative with the heli deck and hangar added on the stern. The MK5 was also further developed into the RN Type 21 frigate. The guy who made the hull didn't seem to follow the plan too carefully did he! Pic 3 looks like the forward
    superstructure
    with bridge and missile platform, forward Sea Dart probably. Pic 4 looks roughly like the aft
    superstructure
    and mast/stack base. I'm still digging, more later. Cheers, Doug 😎
    11 months ago by RNinMunich
    Media
    USCG POINT GLAS
    The 70-year US Coast Guard semi-deck. All-metal construction, 2 x MIG 480 motor, standard servo, model illuminated on two circuits. One light mast, position lights and cabin. The second lighting circuit in the hull of the ship and the outdoor lighting around the
    superstructure
    . There are no labels on the model yet, I'm waiting for the fabrication. Battery 1 x LiPol 4000 mA. The total construction took me half a year. I made the hull made of laminate from my friend in Slovakia. The
    superstructure
    s themselves are made of laminated boards. Part of the light bulbs are 6V lamps and the strobe with positional lights are the LEDs of the light triggering through two RC switches.πŸ˜‰
    11 months ago by Inkoust
    Blog
    Fairey Hunsman renovation part 5
    Started on
    superstructure
    , as I had some free time, the cabin and sides will not be removeable and access to installation will be via the rear of cabin's floor area. lite ply profiles cut to an old Vic Smeed design.
    11 months ago by CB90
    Response
    Friday's Child Fairey Huntsman 31
    They are a great looking craft, I am restoring one myself, please be aware that red paint may contain lead, so wear a mask while sanding. My restoration is of a old Fibre glass hull I intend to install twin rudders and motor shafts and go brushless, I am building the
    superstructure
    from scratch with some help from old plans. I want to have a swordsman type cabin.
    11 months ago by CB90
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    The weather has quickly turned colder, giving an excuse to get back to this model. Stripped out much of the interior and the prop. shafts to replace the nylon propellers with brass. These items all needed removing for painting, so decided to paint the hull before reassembly and then moving onto the
    superstructure
    . Fortunately, examining similar naval vessels and several U Tube videos, confirmed the hull as light grey, the deck a darker one of the 50 shades of grey and the lower hull below the waterline black. Used thin Tamiya masking tape to define clean colour separations, followed by regular tape, masked the hull into colour sections and sprayed using β€œrattle” cans. After the colours applied a light overall Matt coat to subdue any shine. The results are satisfactory. Will now reassemble and move onto building the
    superstructure
    and the other fittings. Prior to the season closing decided to experiment with my new Flysky Tx/Rx package, shortly to be fitted to this model. This Tx has a servo limiting function, which was hoping could also be used to restrict ESC output. Would like to make the full speed motor response correspond to full Tx control position. Currently can over power the model; which lifts the stern, causing it to come off the plane and then dig the bow in. Was thinking that if full throttle could be set at around 90% forward control movement and 40% sternwards the model would retain adequate performance, but without being overpowered or very sensitive to control lever movement. As the Brave was not available, tried the idea on my Daman Stan 4207 model. This is brushed motor powered and a good performer. Obviously the settings for the Brave will be different, but at least could try to see if the idea would work – it did! This Tx function is easy to use and adjustments can be made whilst the model is on the water. Once the ideal settings are achieved they can be programmed and then retained in the Tx. Will try this on the Brave when back on the water next Spring.
    11 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Thanks for the offer, Marky, but it's specifically the Waverley we need drawings for, or rather the
    superstructure
    . Sarik have a set, but hardly exhaustive. I suppose general dimensions and all the hundreds of photos will have to do, unless any of you guys know differently. I was going to ask on Paddleducks but they are talking closing down for lack of use and age of the membership, so no point asking there. Doug, can you imagine the repetitive stress problems of twiddling a pin chuck that many times? I have a lovely old fine feed pillar drill, but it's in bits being cleaned and repainted. Cheers, Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Thanks for the link, Doug. Nice job and lots of people on it. I think my mate is going to do the finish as it is now with grained wood effect
    superstructure
    and shit brown vents. He'll probably want me to do a bras pattern for the stanchions and get them cast by my chap round the corner. I wonder how many half mil. drills he'll break! Cheers, Martin
    11 months ago by Westquay
    Blog
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi all this is my first blog, last year I post my intention to do a project about an RAF D boat that my Father served on and as a precursor to that build That I was going to do this S/E boat as the hull design is shared by both, and as plastic kit modeller the kit great the first stage was to put together the decks and
    superstructure
    as normal, with the exception of all the bits that would be easily broken as most kit aircraft modellers aerials and guns tend to brake ,so long ago I got into the habit of making these out brass rod or bar using a mini drill and a set of needle files, holding the drill in my left hand and the files in my right, when started this I saw the number of stanches I needed so I came across this little beauty a mini bead lathe it is a great bit of kit and not expensive less than Β£50 and plenty of types and accessories available so all the stanches aerials hand rails, gun rails, horn, and some of the components for the rudder and tiller were made on this lathe. so good time being had in my first radio control boat. the next post will show all the parts for the rudder/tiller setup ( I have reposted blog because I think I did not do it properly first time round)
    11 months ago by teejay


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