|||
Current Website Support
86
Contributors
10
Subscribers
You are Not Registered
Donate for your silver medal πŸ…
Β£10
Β£15
Β£25
Β£50
Subscribe for your gold medal πŸ…
Β£1
Β£3
Β£5
Β£10
You Will Be Helping Towards:

  • Domain Fees
  • Security Certificates
  • iOS & Android App Fees
  • Website Hosting
  • Fast Servers
  • Data Backups
  • Upkeep & Maintenance
  • Administration Costs

    Without your support the website wouldn't be what it is today.

    Please consider donating towards these fees to help keep us afloat.

    Read more

    All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

    Many thanks for your kind support
  • Join Us On Social Media!
    Model Boats Website
    Model Boats Website
    Home
    Forum
    Build Blogs
    Media Gallery
    Boat Clubs & Lakes
    Events
    Boat Harbour
    How-To Articles
    Plans & Docs
    Useful Links
    Search
    Search
    Blog
    Keel
    Printed out the frames /ribs drawings and outlined each in orange so I could easily see the correct lines. Cut those out and pasted to some plywood. The plywood is Baltic Birch 1/4" -5 ply, very nice quality that I get from a local
    woodwork
    ing supply store. it's a bit nicer than from the local warehouse hardware lumber yard, but that would work also. Used some spray rubber cement, sprayed only the paper back and stuck on the plywood. Spraying just one surface allows quick removal of the paper once cut. I don't have a bandsaw of scroll saw, so I use a sabresaw/hand jigsaw mounted upside down on a surface that secures to my drill press. Works pretty good. My shop is so tiny that I just don't have a space for larger tools. Maybe someday. Keel board was glued up, will show more tomorrow on that. Joe
    1 year ago by Joe727
    Response
    aeronaut classic
    Nice 'shiny' build SG πŸ‘ Love the
    woodwork
    πŸ‘πŸ‘ What varnish did you use ? Did you buy or build the seats? if build - How??? Been pondering how to do that for my Sea ScoutπŸ€” Happy 'Wetting' in 2019, cheers, Doug😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Day Two Springer
    Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic,
    woodwork
    ing, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    1 year ago by Joe727
    Response
    Internal wiring & bottom skins
    Hi Rob, I'm really pleased to see construction detail, I suppose in preference to a finished boat, you may ask why? well looking at your pictures, the last two in particular they show the precision of your
    woodwork
    ing skills with a distinct absence of any filler, really nice. Looking at the first picture (top view) is there any reason why the battery and ECS can't go in front and behind the motor addressing the issue of short wiring runs (not that I have a clue about wiring and electronics) PS. however it looks like its too late as some wiring is already installed and by now the skins are probably on now Keep up the good work
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Response
    Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug
    Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic,
    woodwork
    ing, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    1 year ago by Joe727
    Response
    Anteno 2 tug
    Lucky man to have access to a full size booth DickπŸ‘ Your hull looks very good, even though it's a bit of a shame to cover up your super
    woodwork
    ! I used 2pack on my Sea Scout as well😊 Then polished with fine (anti-hologram) cutting polish. The lacquer gave her a beautiful hard, smooth finish. And is UV resistant as well, which is good for the deck varnishπŸ˜‰ have a great Christmas, cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Tow hook assembly
    The white metal fitting has an awful lot of detail on it but lacks definition so some time spent on filling the body to better define the components. The anchor part has six hex dummy bolts cast into the base but I intend to drill these out and then use 8BA brass bolts to secure it to the
    woodwork
    . Looking at pictures of the assembly it is obvious that there is a handle arrangement missing so I made this from a piece of brass wire and epoxied in place. The two parts have a linkage to fasten them together so again using brass wire and a piece of scrap tube a linkage was made and holes drilled and tapped to secure the assembly. Finally, a couple of coats of primer followed by a β€œGun Metal” finish and the items are finished. A pleasing result, however taking some time to do, now for the circular running rail, and supporting posts to complete this unit.
    1 year ago by mturpin013
    Response
    aeronaut classic
    Evening Sifi, Nice job, lovely
    woodwork
    πŸ‘ Tip / Suggestion; to give your decks that 'final touch' how about spraying with a clear lacquer? I use one from the auto branch, e.g. used with touch up spray cans (esp. metallics) to melt/blend in to the original finish. Gives the varnish a finish like glass - sea attached pics of my Sea Scout. Cheers, Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Elizabeth Cabin/superstructure
    The cabin has now been finished off with a well deck, the well deck is made of balsa mostly, and the floor is oly, the well deck floor is lined as planks ( urghh ), firstly scored with a blunt Stanley type knife blade the the plank lines infilled with pencil, the floorboard nail marks are just scored with a sharp pin with a little cyno rubbed in the hole to colour the pin prick, decided to make this as an all in one removal unit, it still has to be glazed and fittings plus furniture, as in windscreen , door's consul etc: .. The deck and all other
    woodwork
    has been varnished and the cabin roof painted white, awaiting suitable weather to paint the hull, as this is done outdoors.. Muddy....
    2 years ago by muddy
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Gwyneth
    I have never added to my fleet by buying in before, but looking at the Bring and Buy stall at the Blackpool show recently I couldn't resist this little boat. I like fishing boats anyway, but this boat was beautifully built, clinker on frame, planked decks, good standard of
    woodwork
    , altogether, a worthy addition to my fleet. I sailed her for the first time today and was well pleased with her performance. (5/10)
    2 years ago by Nerys
    Blog
    Vintage Model Works 46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Here's the history bit so pay attention... Many years ago as a boy in the fifth year of my north London secondary school, circa 1971, our
    woodwork
    class was given the option to make something of our own choice. Having mastered the majority of joints, wood turning, finishing techniques and the making of table lamps, stools and bookshelves etc. this seemed a good idea, so myself and a fellow classmate and model making chum asked if we could construct a model boat. The teacher, on hearing that it was to be from a kit and not from scratch was a little surprised but agreed. So my friend and I jointly invested about 20 quid in an Aerokits 34.5 inch RAF Crash Tender from Blunts' model shop in Mill Hill (long since gone like many others) and we set about construction during lesson time and sometimes at break times. I recall we used "Cascamite" to glue it all together on the advice of the
    woodwork
    teacher because neither 'Scotch' glue nor PVA was suited to marine construction. Good progress was made over the course of our last year at school but it was never fully completed, only requiring painting, running gear and detailing. My friend decided that he needed to withdraw from the project as he was enrolling in a college away from home to study for a career in the merchant navy and I agreed to buy out his share and continue with the project. And so it was that I carried on with the painting and installing the running gear which consisted of a 1.5 cc marine diesel engine, water pickup, prop shaft and rudder and a MacGregor radio system with a stick for steering and a single button for speed control. The engine and radio came from Michael's Models in Finchley (also long gone) for Β£20 as my elder brother, who had started a Saturday job there, was able to get a staff discount for me. The diesel engine was noisy and smelly and a pig to start with a leather thong around the flywheel and I decided to abandon this means of propulsion (I foolishly ran it for slightly too long 'dry' and melted the soldering around the brass water jacket!). By now I had graduated from my part time job in Woolies to an engineering apprentice with Post Office Telephones and my new income of 20 quid per week could support my modelling and electronics hobbies after my contribution to the household for my keep. So off to the model shop to buy a Taycol Supermarine electric motor, two 12v volt lead acid batteries and a suitable charger. The diesel came out and was sold on Exchange & Mart and the mount and coupling re-made to accommodate the new Taycol motor. What an improvement that was! I can't remember now what speed controller or servo I used but whatever it was did the job, and it went like the clappers on Friary Park boating lake (also long since gone) even though the radio control system was a bit crude with the non-proportional steering and 'blip' throttle control. The boating took a back seat when I acquired my driving licence and my first car (a rusty old Cortina Mk 1) and I also got involved in sound recording for radio. I decided to sell the boat and bits for Β£60 through Exchange & Mart and bought an Akai 4000DS tape recorder and a 'Chilton' audio mixer, built a home studio and along with a good mate of mine started making radio commercials for the new commercial radio stations including London's Capital Radio. We even won a 'Campaign' advertising award for one of our efforts! And so after several years as a 'phone engineer I moved into professional recording for A/V and broadcast and then into TV production. Fast forward to today. Semi-retired with grand kids and with more free time on my hands I still had an interest in model making so in Jan 2016 went to the Model Engineer exhibition at nearby 'Ally Pally'. It was there that I saw an RAF crash tender just like the one I built all those years ago and got into conversation with the chap on the stand. This re-ignited my model making interests and I researched the hobby and that model in particular.
    4 years ago by robbob
    Response
    First Dip !!
    Lovely
    woodwork
    Canabus, especially around the stern πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘ Hope you're not going to cover it up with paint!! 😲 Hat off! πŸ˜‰
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Painting
    Steve, I am not an intimate of Fairey boats, but traditionally, motorboats have their deck planking in straight lines, whilst yachts have it following the edge of the boat and joggling into the King plank, so you may only need to mark straight lines, but Fairey might prove the rule by being the exception. Bearing what you say in mind I think the old pencil trick may be sufficient, but once you've done that and put a finish over the top be very careful if and when you rub down, lest you go through to the pencil lines as that will be very difficult to correct. Doug, I reckon our Grandads must have been from the same school of
    woodwork
    . His other big beef was people who varnished teak. The only time I ever saw him genuinely annoyed was when he and Nan paid an unexpected visit just as Dad had teak veneered an oak gate leg table that Dad'd brother had made years before as a wedding present for Mum and Dad (he was also a cabinet maker). Having sawn the ogee shape off the edges and teak veneered it he varnished it and hung the leaves from the washing line to dry. Grandad saw them hanging up and asked, "What the bloody 'ell's that?" "Oh just modernising the table", said Dad. "You don't varnish teak, boy, you oil teak, only bloody railway carriages are varnished, and they're all bodge jobs" He really went on alarming. Dad just couldn't bring himself to ever varnish a bit of teak veneer again! KES is still one of the main schools in Lynn, btw. Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Media
    Gypsy Sloop Jr.
    When I was in high school back in 1957 I built a kit of the Comet Gypsy Sloop Jr. in 2016 I found the drawings on-line for the Gypsy Jr. The boat was entered in
    woodwork
    ing class at our county fair where it received a blue ribbon. it has a working wheel that turns the rudder. Now I have under construction a 32 inch version that I would like to radio control. I'm not too sure how to set up or what type of servo to install.
    2 years ago by Popeyepapa
    Forum
    Mahogany in Scale
    Maybe I should write one, eh, Colin? For the scratchbuilders among us. A treatise on brass bashing and
    woodwork
    . Nobody would be interested. I've just epoxied my Sea Hornet, which I'm modifying as a Chris Craft Custom Runabout. One cockpit, big hatch. Cost me 99p off ebay a few years ago. I just had to scrape all the old red paint off it as it wanted to fall off anyway! Then a huge rub down, a wipe with cellulose thinner and a coat of epoxy applied with a square of styrene sheet because I couldn't find an old credit card on the quick, just as good though. Next, rub down and 2 coats of cellulose primer surfacer, then the top coats. This one is to be one of the painted CCs. There were quite a few. But the deck will be veneered in the correct style and varnished. Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Another useful site for all 'Woodies' ;)
    Doug, I do most of that with veneers, which just require a sharp scalpel. No need for too much precision
    woodwork
    , but if there is, you just treat the timber as metal, using metalworking tools to cut and work it. it really isn't difficult. What MIGHT put some people off are all those shiny deck fittings and hull furniture. They have to be done by hand in brass, then polished, then sent off to be plated. Each of my Rivas had over 150 separate pieces of polished brass and nickel silver to be plated! Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Response
    Elizabeth
    Very nice
    woodwork
    , muddy. I've done Riva decks like that and it IS worth it in the end. Lovely looking boat. Well done. Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Another useful site for all 'Woodies' ;)
    Nice boatπŸ‘ Get the Missus to give you a bunk up to it! 😁 It's not so much the finish, I might manage thatπŸ˜‰, but the precision
    woodwork
    that daunts me - and I suspect many others.πŸ€” Cheers, Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Dumas Chris-Craft Cobra
    Very nice job, luvly
    woodwork
    πŸ‘πŸ‘ At first I thought that was a swan sitting on the hatch in the first pic😲😁 Cheers, Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Thanks Doug. You’re amazing! Somehow I’ve managed to pick up The Curse Of The Pink Eye. I can see OK this morning so I’m replying quickly before The Goo blinds me again. Over the weekend I went through a cycle of β€œblink, blink, blink...I can see again! I can SEE!!...blink...I’M BLIND!!...blink, blink..., repeat. A few minutes ago I looked in the bathroom mirror & saw a hideous monster with horrible red eyes & wild gray hair. I’m definitely NOT going in there again! it’s the powder room for me today. I don’t know what that thing is but they should put his face on medicine bottles & toxic household chemicals to frighten children. Thanks for your hard work, Doug. I’ll look at your results as soon as the yellow
    woodwork
    er’s glue in my eyes runs out. I hope pink eye can’t be spread through cyberspace. Wash your hands thoroughly after reading this just in case. Here it comes!
    2 years ago by PittsfieldPete
    Blog
    Gina 2: A Messy Business - Hull Restoration
    First five pics show 'square one'. 😲 Dave_M reckoned she'd been plastered not painted.😁 Before attempting to strip the hull I figured I had better stabilise it so it wouldn't fall apart when I removed about 1mm of ancient paint. So I applied a couple of layers of resin and FG tissue inside. Pic 6. Not so easy between those somewhat rustically built bulkheads! They weren't even shaped so that the planking fitted properly! Sanding was obviously out of the question so out came the heat gun. On medium heat (ca 300°C) about four layers of paint started to bubble up and fly off, gently persuaded with a not too sharp 3/4" wood chisel. Pics 7 to 10 show the results; almost more filler than wood and Horrors! Upper Stern / gunwhale made from a chunk of thick cardboard cut from a 3M sticky tape reel 😑 This was promptly replaced with a carved chunk of hard balsa. Pic 11. I will later add a mahogany step deck on top of the block, and a mahogany cap rail to finish off the hull. Last two pics show current status after filling, sanding and applying a coat of EzeKote to the outside. Shame the
    woodwork
    was so bad, she might have looked quite nice with the wood cleaned up and varnished πŸ€” In between these jobs I also stripped and EzeKoted and primer/filled the hull of the PTB I'm renovating as well. Saves getting the same tools and materials out twiceπŸ˜‰ But that's another B....log! As Bamber Gascoigne (What a moniker😁) used to say "I've started - so I'll finish"!! Oops! Forgot the last picsπŸ€” Last three are today's status 😁
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Warped wood
    As my Father-in-Law would have said about that Sea Scout, "Bugger tha's a rumun" in his best Norfolk. he was a
    woodwork
    er for a hobby, too. I didn't realise your bridge was a "chip" of sorts. I will definitely have to ask for help on that. Once I've made one, I'll be OK. is that Veroboard, as we used to call it? Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Warped wood
    OK, Doug, you just sold me on Lord Nelson spray varnish! is it enamel? Obviously it's external capable, but I never heard of it. it would seem to have done your mahogany a treat! I have brush painted and rubbed down cellulose sanding sealer on all the
    woodwork
    on Vanity, but will need to varnish it all eventually and whilst I find brushing varnish with a fine sable an almost therapeutic activity, there's always the risk of it building up in internal corners which is almost impossible to shift. Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    Way to go man!!! At the risk of becoming monotonous πŸ€“ Brilliant
    woodwork
    and fittings πŸ‘ Did you make the pulleys yourself? Looks like stainless, if so Hat Off Sir πŸ‘πŸ‘ PLEASE DON'T PAINT THAT LOVELY CLINKER BOAT!!😲 It would look Soooo good varnished to your usual standard, and I'm pretty sure from the photos of the original that only the canvas cover was blue. Surely the boat itself was varnished. More power to your rigging, Cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    I really like the job you did on the
    woodwork
    .Looks great.Nice job on the rudder too.
    2 years ago by Donnieboy
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    I've said it before and will probably say it again; 'Brilliant
    woodwork
    ' πŸ‘ And an excellent tutorial, 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    HMS HOOD by Trumpeter
    Hi Peter, Thank you! Happy to help. But I don't claim to know everythingπŸ˜‰ I stay out of discussions on things which are not my forte; e.g. yachts and other sailing craft, apart from admiring the
    woodwork
    involved, or subs - where I am still at the bottom of the learning curve, but I've been a fan of WW2 warships for years and enjoy researching the history and building them. Been fiddlin' with computers since the end of the sixties! They got a lot smaller since then 😁 I envy you being able to visit the Heywood show 😑 Sorry the 'Extra Time' site has been deleted by FIFA (I couldn't afford the million 'Fee' they wanted😁) Happy building and sailing, cheers Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    Beeuuutiful
    woodwork
    πŸ‘ Which varnish did you use? Love the contrasting woods πŸ‘
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Cabin detail Pt 1
    I'll second that πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘ Lucky you didn't use the 'black' sand paper wet! I did once and it permanently stained the wood black, not just surface effect 😑 Since then I only use dry cabinet paper for finishing raw wood in sensitive areas. With your extended bulkheads I'm wondering where you are going to fit 'the works'! Or is this to be a static display model? Whatever, beautiful
    woodwork
    , salutations, Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Rudder, water pickup and skeg
    At this point I decided to fit the rudder tube, water pick up and skeg. I was able to mount the boat in the machine vice by gripping the keel; this ensured that the holes are drilled absolutely true and square, 2 x 8mm holes are needed to take both the rudder tube and water scoop. I purchased the rudder assembly from a well-known supplier but I didn’t like any of the proprietary water scoop tubes on offer so decided to make my own. Whilst the boat is in the vice I also decided to machine the slot for the skeg to fit in. This required drilling a series of 2mm holes and then opening them up into a slot using a long series slot drill again giving an accurate slot which the skeg can locate into. Water scoop Having dealt with the
    woodwork
    , I turned my attention to metalwork. To bend the ¼” brass tube successfully it has to be annealed, (cherry red and quenched in water), then inserting a tight fitting spring inside the tube to stop any kinking I gently pressed it round a former to the correct shape. Springs removed I filed the end to the correct angle which gives an oval opening, but the end didn’t look finished, so I machined a thin spacer and then squashed it to suit the oval end and silver soldered it to the end of the tube, this gives a much better visual appearance.
    2 years ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Thurl pin rack
    Thanks for the reply Fred. I have looked on MMM site and found the Thurl pin rack made in white metal, can't say that it appeals to me, so I am going to make my own. It's nice of you and Doug to take an interest and I appreciate it, it's a very nice model but there is a lot of work involved in the
    woodwork
    and making of the bits. Thanks again Alan
    2 years ago by AlanP
    Response
    DIVA
    Nice
    woodwork
    .Looks great
    2 years ago by Donnieboy
    Forum
    Clamps and such
    Alligator clamps, small
    woodwork
    ing clamps?
    2 years ago by Ron
    Response
    progress
    πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘ Beautiful
    woodwork
    and detailing, congrats. Wish I was was that clever with wood πŸ€” BTW; where's the cat hiding? Keep up the great work, Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    What paint type
    Hi Dave, I'm sure that Bondaglass is excellent. Unfortunately they don't have a distributor in AustraliaπŸ€” Shipping cost quoted to Germany is 11.95 which doubles the price of a can. To Austria, just down the road from me, they quote 33 pounds!! For Australia the info is 'Contact us'! I checked that Deluxe materials have outlets in Australia and found two πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug 😎 PS lovely
    woodwork
    , would be shame to hide it πŸ˜†
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Sea Queen refurbishment
    Hi Colin, that's absolutely terrific. I'm very happy for you 😊😊😊 New PC too, greatπŸ‘ Shame about the Queen and Bounty. Your mention of Bounty had intrigued me, had hoped to see some pics - lots of intricate
    woodwork
    and rigging!!! 😑 Not my forte I'm afraid! All the very best, Doug 😎 PS: you're right about 'others', Granny always used to say "Never mind, worse things happen at sea" Good luck with the quacks. πŸ‘
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Richards 48'' Swordsman
    Very neat πŸ‘ But I thought all you
    woodwork
    ing aces were 'joggling' fans ?? πŸ˜‰ Cheers Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Warning
    That reminds me of when I was having a
    woodwork
    lesson at school(a very long time ago) when I went to pick up a plane that had been put down on it's side. My thumb went up the blade! Now that was bloody! Obviously this leopard has not changed his spots even after 60 years! Any one got a 16th century suit of armour going cheap? Chris
    3 years ago by octman
    Response
    Shelduck
    Thanks Doug, I never noticed the wavy line.. There's a good saga to the paint job, but not a nice one, and ton's of rubbing down. it was getting close a Bass Broom and bucket job..lol..😀 Well spoted that man.. And thanks for the praise concerning the
    woodwork
    . it's all new to me, I,m on a big learning curve here. Regards Muddy ....
    3 years ago by muddy
    Response
    Shelduck
    PS: I noticed that the waterline (transition yellow to red) follows the wave line! Small tip: to accurately set the true waterline and keep it straight set the hull up on the building board dead level and vertical according to the plan. Use spirit level to check port / starboard for horizontal! (I.e. athwartships in marine jargon!) Make a small right angled jig to hold a soft lead pencil (or simply use a small try square). Attach the pencil to the jig / try square at the waterline height from keel according to plan. Then just trundle round the hull marking the WL with the pencil point. Tip 2: use narrow (ca 10mm) Tamiya masking tape (from the plastic magic department) to mask off the line itself. The rest can be masked as usual with cheapo decorator's masking tape and newspaper. Spray away to your heart's content. The Tamiya tape gives a wonderful clean line with no paint creep. Please don't be offended, nobody's perfect and I'm still in awe of your
    woodwork
    ! πŸ‘ cheers Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Shelduck
    Beooootiful! πŸ‘πŸ‘ I'm jealous of your
    woodwork
    ing skills. Seems a shame to cover all that lovely
    woodwork
    with paint! πŸ€” Tidiest planking I've seen for a long time. Compliments 😊 I guess these last posts are what is called a 'prequel' ??? πŸ˜‰ Look forward to the video! 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    More work on solent lifeboat
    Coming on well πŸ‘ Wish my
    woodwork
    was that neat πŸ€” It'll look splendiferous when painted. Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    ''Vanity'' leaves the building board
    Hi all, I have this afternoon released my model of the Victorian Class C Cutter, "Vanity", from her building board. First surprise was how light it is! I really can't believe how light. Being a plank-on-edge craft she is very deep draughted and with such a light weight she should be able to carry her ballast internally which is much the preferable way for me. Now the really hard stuff begins. Preparing the inside of the hull to take the strains of the various bits of standing rigging, somewhere to fix my patent dual sail winch and get the deck all levelled and cambered correctly. She had a very complex deck, with teak covering boards joggled round the bulwarks, which were simply extensions of her doubled oak frames, then narrow boards (on the model 3/16th") deck panks which follow the covering boards as all good yachts should, but unusually, Vanity did not have a King plank and so there is no joggling of the inner ends of the planks, but they must, of course, all meet perfectly. The deck furniture was also rather splendid as she had a roundhouse aft, glazed and several companionways and deck lights, plus the usual Samson post and bitts. Her tiller was a huge lump of mahogany about 6 feet long. The level of
    woodwork
    throughout was like this:-https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1493829043 That's how she looked when I lived aboard her in Burnham-on-Crouch She was like this when sailing https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1493829032 Cheers, Martin
    3 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    And now it is ESC time
    Good evening Martin, Early 1990 just after the 'Wende' I was at a shipyard in Wolgast on the Baltic coast, opposite the island Usedom. The hotel on Usedom was superb, newly renovated to western 4* πŸ˜‰ Woke up to sunrise over the Baltic. πŸ‘ But when we drove into Wolgast to visit the yard the roads were all gone! Yep, we drove round a corner and CRASH we dropped about 2 feet cos all the road and subsurface had been dug out ready for new roads sometime (Irgendwann!πŸ€”) No signs, no warning! Saw some of the 'concrete boxes' at Peenemunde etc. Awsome! Strangely, the reason for the visit was a class of 8 500ton Patrol Boats for Brazil! I got the COMMS contract! 😊 wasn't invited to anybodies Dacha though πŸ€” Many thanks for your advice and prompting, although I'm not a great
    woodwork
    er and yacht lover like you I can appreciate the work that goes in and the beauty that comes out. in many ways we seem to be like minded. Cheers, your friendly neighbourhood MONSTER 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Where do yachties go?
    A cry from the heart indeedπŸ€” Thinks 'Old Yachties don't die ..... they just sail away!' Seems to me, from the magazines, ads, websites etc, that the italians are more into that sort of high class / skill
    woodwork
    these days. Commiserations, πŸ€” Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    And now it is ESC time
    I don't know? I'm a bit two left handed when it comes to
    woodwork
    ! OK for cupboards and fitting out the kitchen etc but not so terrific for miniature stuff. See my comments on 'Using old motors' re the Taycols, I also have one which I plan to refurbish, it has no bearings πŸ€”, and experiment putting it back into the old Sea Scout that Dad built, only boat he ever finished! Cheers Doug
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    glass cloth or tissue?
    Thanks, Doug. No, the
    woodwork
    really isn't good enough for varnishing and as it's a scale model it has to be painted. Good old British yacht black, with a coppered bottom. I still have a piece of her copper somewhere. it was perfect after 120 odd years! I'll go with the tissue then, thanks for the info. Apparently you can thin epoxy with meths, but I've never found it that thick and I used 25 litres on my full sized canal boat restoration! Supplied free by West as a kind of sponsorship. Hot weather helps, but, as you say it can go off a bit quick if you're not careful with the mix. A guy at the boatyard once mixed way too much to repair his GRP boat and it started to go off in the pot, which then caught fire. A large set of tongs was handy in dunking it in a barrel of water! Cheers, Martin
    3 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    glass cloth or tissue?
    Hi again! I used tissue on my destroyer (1.35m) with success, light and strong and minimal filling and sanding of lumps and bumps :-) Don't make the resin mix too thick and sticky or it won't soak in properly. Brush a thin mix into the wood to seal it first. Start at the keel and work up. Not too much hardener or it can go brittle, apart from going off too fast ;-( Shame to cover up all that lovely
    woodwork
    though πŸ€” Can't you use a suitable coloured wood filler then varnish it? 'Wood' πŸ˜‰ look wonderful. Cheer Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Planking
    PS To give up now would be a great shame and waste of all the effort, materials and time you already put into building the framework πŸ€” To make it easier, especially if you plan to later strengthen the planking with glass fibre (highly recommended unless building a klinker built boat or vintage yacht), use very thin flexible planks or strip. I used 0.5mm 3ply on my destroyer. This is then still stiff enough to give you the hull form you want but not too difficult to bend to shape. For extreme curves steam it to make it more flexible. The kitchen tea kettle is enough for this. ;-) Use clamps rather than pins or small nails and don't try to do too many planks at once! Patience is a virtue, especially in model building πŸ˜‰ Glue and clamp the planks on the relatively straight sections first. I used waterproof white
    woodwork
    ing glue without problems. it gives you time for adjustments and remains flexible when set, which epoxy does not! Then when the glue is set, the next day or whenever time or the 'other half' allows πŸ˜‰ glue and clamp the curved sections (bow and stern). The tip above to make trial templates from thin card, e.g. cereal packets or similar, is also worth it's weight in gold! Just make sure that the card is not so thin that it straightens out the curves! Otherwise your wood planks cut to these templates will be too short 😭 Planking is not really so difficult, it just needs time and patience 😎 These days you can also buy inexpensive plank cutters these days. Mostly used for cutting deck equal width planks but maybe useful for hull planking!? Please post a pic of the framework so far so we can see how far you've got and what the hull form looks like. Cheers from Munich 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Fantastic Plastic
    I'm more comfortable working with wood as I was taught
    woodwork
    ing skills at school back in the dark and distant, but plastic certainly has it's merits as it's versatile and far more malleable, and forgiving, as I have discovered during my build, even brass work is getting easier for me 😁. Rob
    3 years ago by robbob


    About This Website
    Terms of Service
    Privacy Policy
    Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info