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>> Home > Tags > 12 scale

12 scale
1:12 scale
1/12th scale
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12 scale
Stabilit Express by Midlife306 Admiral   Posted: 20 days ago
I think those doublers will need explosives to get them off... I've hit a bit of a roadblock with the big K7, I need to get Donald built up so I can position the steering wheel & dash correctly, the animatronic resin upper torso & arms I bought came with no instructions or info on what servos to use. I got some micro servos & they didn't fit, Dremel out & all fits now but I'm now struggling with connecting the servo arm to the rotating neck. I'll suss it out eventually but I need a rest. I've been doing bits on my 1/12 scale K7 in the background, if all goes well it should be ready for paint in a couple of weeks. As normal I've been waiting for parts to arrive from China, the brushless motor & esc arrived today for the blue rigger, I can make a start on that soon.. I've just finished printing the parts for the cabin for a Springer tug hull I got from Sonar & I've just started printing the first parts of a WW2 landing craft, its 1/16 scale nearly a metre long, I guess I'll be making a tank for it when it's completed. Then there's the Robbe Diabolo, on the instructions it says to use self tapping screws to hold the plastic dual rudders in place. No good to me as I've upgraded to dual aluminium rudders, these buggers need bolts! Trouble is the waterproof electronics box is used as a doubler for the central transom, when it's glued into place there isn't any room to access where the rudder bolts come through the doublers, ohhh the joy of problem solving.... So I'm keeping busy but my butter is spread a bit too thin. Cheers Wayne

Sea Queen refurbishment by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Hi Canabus I agree but I retired for the second time in 2009 and have no wish to return to employment. I do scratch build so make lots of fittings. My purpose in buying the 3D printer was to speed up the production of masters that I could take a mould off to then produce in fast cast resin. Used this on the Olympic and Titanic and have the hull for the Mauretania at 1:96 so plenty of fittings required there. I also have fittings for the KD Perkassa so am not restricted to any scale. This is the real benefit of CAD design as you can quickly rescale to anything (within reason) and the SD printer will produce the masters. 3D copiers are still a bit in the development stage for hobbyists and I am waiting for the cost to become more reasonable. I have seen a demo but its only good for figures in 1:12 scale with an affordable 3d printer. You could use a professional print service but its dear and rather defeats the object of designing and printing at home. Stephen does produce a range of fittings in the site model shop so they are available. Dave

Precedent Huntsman 34" by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Sorry to throw mud in your water, but if it's a huntsman it could be 28 , 31, or 32 ft the same applied to swordsman. But who care's as most of the kit form boats where 1/11th scale. My wife uses 1/12th scale figures from her dolls house days in her Huntsman.

arun 54 by pipsteam66 Seaman   Posted: 29 days ago
hi,does anyone have or know where I can purchase a set of plans for the arun 54 lifeboat.i purchased the hul from models by design but they don't do the supersructure moulding.it is the 1/12 scale model.thank you.

What Gun? by cormorant Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
Further research suggests that the weapon is a 76/50 Bofors TAK76 Per Jane's, the gun was a private venture by Bofors begun in 1962, and was adapted from a 76mm/50 coast artillery gun, but modified to 3-inch (a very minor change in dimension) "because that ammunition was more commonly used by navies." The ammunition is described as a fixed cartridge weighing 11.3kg, which could mean it's not the US 3-inch/50 round, which apparently weighed 10.9 kg complete (however, I see some variation between sources). Muzzle velocity is 825m/s, nearly identical to the US round (2 m/sec difference). The turret is fully automated, fed from a motor-driven hoist to a below-deck magazine with 100 rounds. Two loaders move ammo from the magazine to the 5-round feed drum, which in turn feeds the vertical hoist. From there, a transfer arm in the turret moves the rounds to the loading tray and the rounds are then rammed home. RoF is 30 RPM. Traverse was 350º with elevation limits of -10 to +30º. Range was credited as 6.8 nautical miles (12.6 km). The turret is roughly 1.5 m high, with a penetration below decks of 2.9 m. Total mount weight was 6.5 tons. " Still can't find a 1/24 scale one!

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

1/10 scale figures 6" - 7" by GrahamP74 Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Well I wish you well! I too am in 12th scale and the detail is what I enjoy.. I do hope you are filling the deck with pots.. that's a lot of cork wires to get!! 🍾🍾🍾

1/10 scale figures 6" - 7" by Ballast Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Slowly but surely Graham, I am getting there !!! It's the detail that takes the time and being 1/12 scale there is a lot of it !!! I was hoping for a spring launch but it looks like late summer now !!! :(

Smoke Generator (Water Vapour type) by andyhynes Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
I recently required a smoke generator (ultrasonic Type) it is not in working order but I have rigged it up to test and bypassed the circuit board powered by 2 X 12 volt batteries and managed to get the vapourising unit to function, and the 12 volt fan motor with a separate supply to also work. With some work to replace the 12v to 24v converter CN6009 it should satisfactory. This unit appears to be a DIY job but very similar to MMB Foggy Smoke Generator which is available. Note the component required CN6009 I have sourced on ebay. Soon as it arrives I will set it up and test its suitability for a 1/24 scale TID tug boat model I am building. Problem might be size of smoke generator and other components required to fit in the hull in addition to a 12 volt 9ah battery scooter battery, there aint much space. There are smaller smoke generators available which burn oil (fan powered) which I have in one of my other models (Blazer Tug Boat) which is OK with no wind and close up but at any distance hard to detect if any smoke is being produced. The Oil recommend for this unit is Baby Oil which smells OK but I have wondered if I could use another oil based fluid which would produce more smoke (Any suggestions)?

1/10 scale figures 6" - 7" by GrahamP74 Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi! I've borrowed with pride an idea from ballast who is doing a blog on his 12th scale Cygnus. I have recently purchased two action figures from eBay and with a bit of paint and some yellow marigold gloves will be making them some oilskins. Not sure what boat you want them for but action figures can be painted to suit. Total cost for my figures was just over £2 (marigolds acquired from the sink....) Graham

The Launch by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
As soon as the cutter was off the build-board, I started on the launch. The launch is the largest of the ship's boats and the only one of them that's carvel planked. The build board was cut narrower for the reason spoken of earlier. Since the frame spacing was the same, I could reuse most of the marks. The stem, keel, sternpost, and transom plus a sternpost knee, were assembled. The forms were cut from balsa again, sanded to the line and rough beveled, then glued to the board. The ribs are 1/16" thick x 1/8" wide bass again. This time I didn't glue them to the forms at all, they're only helg by the rubber bands. Once they were on the forms, the keel assembly was glued to the ribs and the build board and planking commenced. When the planking was done, the stem and transome were cut free and hull lifted off the forms. The ribs between the ribs were added. The drawings of Constellation's boat didn't show anything more than their lines. I had little information as to their interior and hardware details. For the launch, I did know she carried a 12 pound boat howitzer and some information on that which gave me a little more about the boat's interior. Using Ivan as a guide (He's a 1:35 scale WWII Russian sailor and the model's first of some 30-40 eventual crewmen) I determined there needed to be a deck in the boat so that went in, but first I painted the bilges of the boat as I'd never be able to get in there after the deck went on. The launch was coppered. I used peel-and-stick aluminum duct tape to "copper" the bottom, and painted it copper. I have a 1:36 scale British frigate in the works, and this is how I intend to "copper" her as it's less than 1/4 the cost of Constellation's real copper. The launch has special tracks and rails in her for handling the gun. The gun can be shifted fore and aft, and the field carriage can be tossed in the sheets, and rolled forward on tracks of it's own for taking ashore. We're still a long way from Higgins boats here folks. 😉 There's more details to add, to boat boats; hardware, water casks, thole pins, oars, sails, etc etc etc. There's also 4 more boats to build; the 2nd cutter, whaleboat, and two quarter-boats just alike.

Ship's Boats by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Building a model ship often means building several models because most ships have boats. Constellation had six. My method for building boats is nearly the same for building larger hulls and real boats - planks over forms. I have a 1:12th scale drawing of Constellation's boat's in particular from the National Archives. They not only printed me a copy, but gave me a .tif image which I easily re-scaled to 1:36. I reproduced the lines as forms extended to a baseline so the boat could be built upside down. I drew each boat's patterns and arraged each to fit on a sheet of copy paper. I print this on a full sheet label so I can rough cut them, stick them on the form material, and then cut the forms. I had a few sheets of 1/8" balsa sheet and that's what I cut the forms from. A pine plank was used for the building-board, and marked where each station would go, then the forms were glued on making sure each was 90° to the form and square to the center-line. A note on the build-board, it doesn't have to be as wide as the boat, and should, in fact, be narrower. Then you can access inside the sheer and planking and removing the boat from the forms will be much easier. A small plank of 3/4" stock will let you get rubber bands completely around the model, and it will also fit in a vice which is very convenient. The edges of the forms are shaped so the planks will lie flat on the surface, and not teeter on the corners. Using balsa makes this easy work, though you have to be careful not to snap them off the build board. I started with the ship's 1st cutter, which is a lap-strake, or clinker-built boat. (Only the launch is carvel planked) It's frames are 1/16" thick bass strips 3/32" wide. Each frame is dipped in ammonia and bent over it's form. I put a dab of glue at the ends that would eventually be cut off to hold it to the form, but for the frames on the wine-glass and hollow forms at the ends I used rubber bands to pull them into shape. Part of the reasoning behind using balsa for the forms is if anything gets glued that shouldn't, it's the form and not the model that will give-way first. The stem, stern-post, and keel are 1/16" bass, assembled together while flat. First the top corners of the keel were planed off to make a sort of rabbet. The transom is also bass as it stays in the boat. The transom is cut taller to reach the build-board, and partially cut at what will be it's top to make it easier when it's time to detach the boat. It's glued to the stern post and the build-board, the keel is glued to each frame, and the stem is glued to the build-board. This pretty much forms the rigid skeleton of the boat. There's two ways to represent lapstrake planking on so small a model. One way is to sand each plank so it's half as thick at it's top edge as its bottom. The planks are butted on the boat, thick against thin, giving the impression of overlapped planks. I chose to actually overlap the planks because the inside of the boat is open to view. Since each plank of a lapstrake boat overlaps the one below it, each plank has to be spieled, or shaped to fit, and the boat must be planked from the keel to the sheer. I divide the length of the widest frame from the keel to the sheer into the number of planks I want, then divide the lengths of the stem and the stern by this number. You'll find the planks will get narrow forward, and flare wider back aft. You may have to experiment a bit with the number of planks so maintain at least 2 scale inches forward and not more than 5 scale inches aft, or the planking will look nonsensical and out-of-scale. I planked the cutter in 1/32" thick bass. The first planks are the garboards, next to the keel. The next plank I places a strip of card along side and used a piece of plank against the edge of the wood plank to mark the card. The marks are actually the bottom edge of the plank. Each plank is shaped on it's bottom edge to the plank before, and it's top edge is straight. Then I dip it in ammonia and clamp it in place, where "clamps" are rubber bands, blocks of wood, pins, clothes pins, whatever works. Again, a narrow build-board allows the rubber bands to pull in as you reach the sheer rather than pulling them away from the boat. Once your brain gets wrapped around spieling, the planking will move along. But don't try to do too much too fast or you'll just get frustrated and ruin everything. Take lots of breaks. The planks need to be sanded thinner at their ends, almost to nothing, depending how much of a rabbit was cut into the stem. At the stern they run right off the transom and are cut flush. You can notch the transom into step for each plank to fit into, of fill the little gaps where they overlap with putty later. Since they're getting painted, I used putty. When the planking is done up to the sheer, it's best to add rub rails and strakes while the boat's still on the forms. I then finished the cut in the transom, cut off the stem near the build-board, and nipped off each frame where it was glued to the form. Then carefully lift the boat off the forms. Some form may have come off with it, and some spots may need to be reglued. I installed frames between each of the ones the boat was built on, putting a frame about every scale foot. Seat clamps, floor boards, seats, oar notches, lifting eyes, mast steps, etc, are all added bit-by-bit. before you know it, you've got another model boat. I'll get into the launch next.

Model Engineer 12th July 1962 Scale Speed by AllenA Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
There was a recent discussion about scale. Looking through the Model Engineer I found an interesting article on scale speed. I am sure if I read it a few more times I will begin to understand linear scale speed, Reynolds numbers and Froude Numbers etc., but then again. Happy reading.

Proceedings so far by Midlife306 Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Alan, I encountered loads of problems trying to find scale steering wheels for my 1/12 & 1/4 scale Bluebird K7's, I ended up having to make them, take a look at my build log for details. Cheers Wayne

SG&K 1920 Gentlemans Runabout Mk2 by canabus Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi LHPEN Nice boat, does yours tail drag and bounce the bow up and down at full speed. All to ones I have seen on the net have this problem. The motor I am installing in my boat is about 10 times more powerful and rpm's is 12,210. I have use this motor in 3 boats and with no water cooling run OK . Speed is a bit over scale, but, I can lay off the throttle a bit. One boat I have changed this motor to a 3648-1450kv, straight bolt in(double the power and added 4000rpm). I have a few idea's to add into the build. One is the ugly rudder and an oiler for the rudder, also twin servo rods.