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>> Home > Tags > adhesive

adhesive
adhesive
Formers in-planking starts! by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Always good to hear of different makes of adhesive that others use. In a warm room most of these types of wood glue set very quickly to a hold state, developing full strength over 12 hours. A far cry from the days of Cascamite! which I recall seemed to take 24hrs, a lifetime when you are 5 years old.

Formers in-planking starts! by BigAlio Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
nice to see im not alone in using ever build 502 adhesive i find very good and bonus is its cheap. Just looked it up on ebay £5.48 a litre delivered item no. 112586677548

happy hunter by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi Doug I agree the commercial stuff is not nice. I was suggesting the hobby plastic weld solvents freely available and used by fine scale modellers for joining plastic kits etc. It is sold under a variety of names, the SHG catalogue lists: PLAS1 Plasweld – Liquid Polystyrene solvent adhesive Plasweld special solvent weld will bond Styrene, ABS, Butyrate, Acrylic and other types of plastic materials. Easy to apply using a brush. Bonds in seconds. The Ultimate Plastic Building Tool , 50ml bottle 2.00 POLY3L Precision Poly cement 28ml with needle applicator 3.25 POLY4 Polystyrene Cement 12ml tube 2.00 POLY4L Mek Poly Liquid Polystyrene Cement 30ml Bottle 2.75 PLAS7 Plastic filler. Special filler for plastic modelling 2.50. There are many other suppliers in the UK and overseas. Like most glues it is recommended that you work in a well ventilated area and avoid breathing the vapours as far as possible. I do hope you weren't exposed to the substance for too long!

happy hunter by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Spitfire With plasticard it helps to heat in warm water when forming curves. Make a wooden (Balsa) template heat the plasticard, bend to shape and hold in place until cool. I recommend you use MEK plastic adhesive with plasticard, the merest touch will allow capillary action to carry the liquid between the joints, I use a fine (old) paint brush. The glue is quick drying and actually welds the joint. Like superglue a little is best, too much and you risk melting the whole job.

Too Powerful Brushless ? by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
I have to agree with Peter's comments. I would also suggest that you look at the coupling and fitment of your prop shaft. It could be that the whole unit is seizing together. You also need to check it is true and free running. You need a prop and locknut followed by a thrust washer then at the inboard end a thrust washer locknut and coupling. There should be a gap between the thrust washer and bearing of a few thou', we used to use a Rizla paper, Make sure all joint are tight and that the shaft turns freely and smoothly. The motor need to be securely mounted to a good solid base and 100% aligned with the coupling and prop shaft. Personal experience tells me you don't get a second chance with brushless, you have been fortunate if it is only the prop tube has suffered. Is your hull wood, plastic, fibreglass? Whilst Araldite is a fine adhesive you may need to use Stabliz Express or UHU Acrylit Plus which provide an exceptionally strong joint. E-bay have sellers of UHU in the UK. Good luck and please keep us posted

What is this material? by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
What adhesive can be used on it?

What is this material? by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
My friend bought a damaged Marblehead sailboat. He is not sailing it in competition, only as a fun R/C sailboat. He wants me to put a thin birch ply deck on it and make the repairs needed on the rudder post area. Does anyone recognize the material used for the deck? See the golden brown coloured photos. The boat originally had an iron shrink material used on aircraft models. After I know the material, then I can determine the adhesive to use for attaching the birch ply deck. Thanks!

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Have moved on to the deck furniture and equipment, including the funnel. Most of it can be made from the usual assortment of scrap materials and odd and ends. Decided to start on the funnel. Planned to make up a wooden replica and wrap a thin styrene sheet around it, finally inserting styrene formers into the shell, gluing them into place. Made the replica up from scrap wood blocks and shaped it into the correct shape. The outcome looked so good was tempted to use as final as making funnels seems quite a challenge. Anyway proceeded to plan and shape thin styrene sheet around the replica, using a heat gun to overcome the memory. Once this was done, fitted shaped styrene internal formers to hold the styrene to the correct shape and glued with adhesive. After the styrene glue had dried and the excess material trimmed, now had two usable funnels - wood and styrene. The wood version is nominally smaller and fits slightly better, so decided to use it. The Teakwood was originally operated by the J I Jacobs Company, which had a buff funnel with a black cap as markings. Stumbled across a picture of the vessel when she was chartered to the British India Steam Navigation Co. Evidently BI usually painted chartered vessels in their livery. Although the picture does not show the traditional and attractive BISNCo white hull cheat line, it does show the funnel markings. These are black with two narrowly separated white bands. Rather preferred this scheme so adopted it. The picture was taken in the mid 1960s and it also shows a pristine looking ship, my worries about the model looking unsoiled seem groundless. One of the pictures shows a strip that extends back from the wheelhouse almost to the funnel - this is a support for the awnings that fit over the bridge wings.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Having corrected the bow problem, returned to the superstructure. The original plan was to try to reproduce the whole of the superstructure, right back to the rear of # 5 hold in one continuous piece of styrene. It would be cut and then filed out to fit the front panel right through to the rear on both sides. This would avoid any joints and discontinuities and it was hoped would capture the flowing lines more accurately. Measured and found the piece would be over 42'' long! Decided this would be difficult to cut accurately and would probably never fit. Gave up on the idea and made the piece up in three sections; the front and both sides. The sides would be from an assembly of styrene strips and various precut shapes, the front from one styrene piece. After making several measurements and then templates, made a complete front panel from a cereal packet and from it cut the proposed panel out. Left the solid areas oversize so could file and sand to the correct size and shape. Once was reasonably confident the panel would fit, heated and bent the corners around a steel rod to get the correct radius. Throughout this kept offering the panel up into place making sure the radius and dimensional adjustments were satisfactory. Finally glued it into place. Once glued in place, cut the lower edges to follow the hull bulwark contour. Used a similar technique for the sides and finally glued them into place and together. Sanded to remove traces of adhesive. Fitted LED navigation and wheelhouse lights, but left the wheelhouse structure off as the funnel size and shape will determine the navigation deck cut-out. This will be added after the funnel has been researched and made.

Prop Shaft Grease by Trillium Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Dave, I guess I have not run my models long enough yet since I have had no wear in either shafts, bearings or seals. I did have one seal in a Raboesch assembly, in a twin shaft model, which didn't leak but seemed to be deteriorating. Raboesch supplied a replacement free of charge. I had used Goop adhesive to attach the seal/bearing cap so it was a 5 minute job to soften the adhesive with a heat gun and fit the replacement. Roy

Safely Packed ??? by kmbcsecretary Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
That's Amazon for you I had a similar one not long back but with a tin of Evo contact adhesive (other makes are available) when the box arrived I couldn't think of what I ordered that needed that big a box but they never but any protection under the goods they are always at the bottom of the box under miles of brown paper? It's OK its all recyclable!

treatment by johnmont Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi All,up to now,Ive built exclusively in wood,now I find myself contemplating plastic.What surface prep do I need before glueing,painting etc.I presume that some mouldings/castings will have a release agent on the surface.Epoxy seems to be the adhesive of choice,do you agree?Many thanks all,in advance

Electronics Down Below (5) by NPJ Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
This time I will try to remember to put in the ‘source’ information on the bits and pieces I use........... In the most recent piece I should have included exciters/transducers are Dayton Audio DAEX 25VT -4, 4 Ohms – 20 Watt pair, obtained from Sound Imports Netherlands and very quickly as well. The sound unit is a Mtroniks Digisound 5M diesel sound, available all over the place. Now to look at where I am at. Exciters are in place as high up the Hull as possible, but remembering the Deck level. Used the adhesive pads as supplied after wiping that part of the Hull with Meths and Silicone adhesive to keep in place as well as using the wiring tidies from Modelsport Ltd., for the cabling. (Pic 1+2) Before I start the motor and controller wiring I changed the platform ‘up front’ (pic3) with a piece of thin ply which I have given a couple of coats of varnish to waterproof. Then I thought to myself “why am I waterproofing this when, if it gets that wet, it will have gone to the bottom and be useless anyway”! (Pics 4) However, the platform gives a little more choice in terms of layout of other components and my plan for them is not really settled yet. I am concerned about the stern and possible swamping, but it currently seems the best place for the upgraded battery. (Pic5 ) Whilst talking batteries, I have gone for a separate battery supply for the receiver and hope to use the Bec supply for running other less critical items. Also the fitting of the battery in the stern bay drew my attention to the rudder servo for a couple of reasons. First is I am still considering increasing the size of the rudders and I am assuming that will increase the strain on the servo. The servo supplied is a standard issue and not water resistant so I have gone for an upgrade as shown(Pic6) That gives torque increase of 17Kg/cm over the Hobby Engine S1040C and has metal gears, metal control arm and waterproof for 20grams extra weight. Second is the closeness to the new battery position. So I was going to alter the servo arm setup anyway and the new metal arm suits this well. Maybe my ‘tutors’ will consider all this to be a little ‘over the top’ but I do so enjoy messing......................... New Servo DS 3218 by AYANI from Amazon. (Pics 6/7 ) Following that distraction, back to the front end and the Motor/Mixer placing and wiring. Now a little time ago I drew a plan to see what could go where and it came out that most of the ‘bits’ would go in the front bay with motors to be wired once power was brought forward, followed by the Esc/Mixer. (Pic 8) At that time I bought a P94 dual esc/mixer from Action Electronics and got the 20 amp version to be on the safe side................. My ‘guardians’ did point out this was ‘over-kill’ but I had already got it. Now, when placing the unit on the mounting board I found that the heatsinks made it too high to fit in the Hull! So being a spoilt brat only child I ordered the 10 amp version and as usual it came very quickly from up here in Bangor. ( Will keep the other one for the next project............Happy Hunter??) Unboxed it and it looked just the same, heatsinks and all. (Pic 9/10 ) So at that moment there was a bit of a set-back so I rang Component Shop at Bangor, they said “take the heat sinks off and you have a P94 lite”! Such a simple answer and such a nice chap. (Pic 11 ) Now a quick 'measure up' before I have a glass of wine (Pic 12) and does it all fit...? Well it appears to at the moment! (Pic 13) Next time really going to screw down the components under the forward hatch and wire it up. NPJ

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Thinking back over this part of the project, felt it might be of interest to others considering modifying a hull to summarize my experiences: 1) Cutting and modifying a hull to a different profile seems intimidating, but using planning then care, using a simple selection of workshop tools and adhesives, it is quite within the skill of the average modeler. 2) This is the second proprietary glass-fibre hull I have used. Both required a “spindle” of bulkheads and longitudinal stringers to hold the hull rigid and to which can also be fastened the electrical / mechanical equipment needed for the model. 3) Have tried two approaches for the spindle. The first was to totally assemble it off the hull, get it as rigid as possible, fit it into the hull and epoxy into place. The second was to fit the keel reinforcement to the hull then epoxy the bulkheads and remainder of the spindle to it. That spindle remained relatively flexible until finally installed. 4) On reflection, think it is best to fully assemble the spindle, taking care to get it true and then fit it to the hull. The relatively flexible hull can then be adjusted to fit the more rigid spindle and kept true. 5) Used the relatively flexible spindle arrangement on the Teakwood and have spent many hours getting the bulwarks and deck frames leveled and lined up satisfactorily. The more rigid spindle would have helped mitigate this by ensuring the frame was accurate before trying to adapt it to the hull. Have now finished all the modifications needed to the hull and the result shows that this type of transformation can be successfully completed..

1/30 scale decals/stickers by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hola Bob, why not print your own? You only need a half decent inkjet printer. 😉 https://www.photopaperdirect.com/products/A4-Gloss-Vinyl-Sel... Cheers Doug 😎