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>> Home > Tags > adhesive

adhesive
adhesive
Range Safety Launch? by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Post 2 Range Launch? The bath test has shown up a leak……………….. Have not tried to find where yet but it is hopefully in that small bay as it did not flow over the rib section. Strange I had not thought leaks to be much of a possibility in a boat! Wishful thinking again. Anyway it has put work back a bit. You will notice that the bath water was ‘used’ condition. I was not allowed to waste water due to the shortage so had to use the bath with Radox and herbal Oils in it. I trust it does not affect the paintwork…………… Any opinions on Leak Checking? I did check how it ‘sat’, and the waterline at its current weight. There is something in those images that RN Munich will pick up on! Have received some of the parts………….just like Christmas for me. ( I was a spoilt only child). Two issues strike me. a. It may be of interest if I give sources of the parts b. I think I have a problem with ‘scale’………….. Currently the purchases fall into two groups, electrical and deck fittings. The electrics are not posing a problem yet, but the size of deck fittings certainly is! Taking the larger ‘electricals’ first, I have gone for pre built units. Someone with more ability could build the units themselves. Kits are available. Also far fewer units could be used to start with and added later if needed. As a result of my previous, though small, experience with the Richardson Tug I used Action Electronics and Component Shop in Bangor, Wales for almost all of the electrical bits. They are helpful and efficient with good quality products. I am still using Mtroniks DigiSound for the sound unit, but Action Electronics now makes one as well. I have used a new source for the transducers/exciters. I have previously used Dayton Audio, sourced through SoundandVision Netherlands and costing around £35.00 for a pair of TT25’s plus mail. This time I used Mr RC for similar item, made by them for about £53.00 the pair mail free. They too came from the Netherlands! Not tried yet, but have noted that the Dayton Audio ones had a foam ring on the face which was self adhesive and easy to place. Mr RC require Gluing in place. Going to look for the leak. Next post should be on the electronics which I hope will have arrived by then. BTW, The 46 Firefloat Mk2 blogg by ‘Elsrickle and Fire Boat (Crash Tender) on our site are great sources of information. NPJ.

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hi Pete, That was just a selection of my larger 350 scale kits! Forgot HMS Prince of Wales battleship😉 I also have a vast collection of everything from 720 to 72, including the Revell Flower Class corvette. I started an XL spread sheet to keep track of them with scale and size data, number of shafts, and where practical and already measured max load capacity! Re: wood decks; I have them on my Graf Spee and HMS Belfast both 1:128, and have bought them for Hood, Bismarck and the corvette. In my experience the self adhesive starts to pull up at the edges, always in the most awkward place to get to to fix😡 I learned to use a gel type gluper sue for first time fitting and thin runny stuff for repairs so it creeps under the edge a bit. Yes please, the info on the decks would be useful especially Titanic. i have a premium version with lots of etch parts but no wood I think. Why do we do it? Cos we're nuts! Prerequisite for scale modelling 😁 Happy modelling, Cheers, Doug 😎 PS my favourite carrier photo attached; Capn of the Nimitz wanted to go water skiing 😁😁

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 15 days ago
Doug: Why do we do it? So many kits, so little time. I just looked at my list...736 kits, not counting the last year’s worth of purchases. I’ve convinced myself that it’s a nest egg. My downstairs stash of 1:350 ships also has the Tamiya HMS Hood, Big E & USS Missouri. I’ve got the RMS Titanic, too & the RMS Lusitania as well. Subs of all types, a resin USS Long Beach & Bainbridge to compliment the Big E. Remember the famous “Nuclear Navy Trio” photo? I’ve attached a copy in case anyone hasn’t seen it. The 1:350 Normandie is an astounding resin cottage industry kit that I got at a very good discount but it still cost twice as much as my first car! I can send you the link to it if you like, but make sure you’re seated before you look at the price. BTW, I found sets of pre-cut, self-adhesive wood decks for the Titanic & Hood, too, I believe, & a few others, but I can’t remember which ones. They really make a model pop, for sure, but I’d be inclined to use contact cement or something so they don’t “pop” off the model. If you’re interested I can send info about those to you, too. Pete

Totnes Castle 1894 by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Companionway & skylights. I took a strip of clear plastic, this cam off packaging of some sort. Strips of wood stuck on with contact adhesive. (evo stick) Scored the corners bent around fitted in place. It fits so will remove & paint wood white. Then stick hard wood strips on the out side.

Fibreglass the hull- continued by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Now the Chine rubbing strakes are fitted, dry and filled and I have attended to the minor lumps and bumps the next job is to give another coat of resin, taking the issues of the first application into account I intend to apply a thin coat, this has the effect of filling in the pattern of the glass cloth. Another two days have passed and it’s time to do some rubbing down. I have found that the surface is very hard, more so than I recall some of the other fibre glass projects I have done but these have been using Polyester resin. It’s a first for epoxy, so is epoxy a better choice than Polyester? According to my mini research –  Epoxy is more versatile  Epoxy has fewer fumes  Epoxy is stronger  Epoxy shrinks less Conclusion Epoxy is the better choice for repairing/covering either wooden hulls or repairing fiberglass boats. It has excellent adhesive qualities, wets out fiberglass fabrics and it is tough. It has great thin film cure characteristics, cures in cool temperatures. After the first coat I wasn’t 100 % happy with the finish but I just thought that some dust had landed on the surface before the resin had dried, (this was proved not to be dust but because of the matting pattern still been visible it disguised the real problem) however this was easily sanded out with wet & dry. Now the hull and deck were looking really smooth with very little sign of the matting pattern it was time to give a final coat. I had decided to coat both the deck and the hull in one go so I mixed enough resin to do the lot. Starting with the deck I started to apply the resin but to may horror it started to pin prick all over the deck surface, panic, panic what was causing this? So was it the brush which I had previously washed out with cellulose thinners after applying the last batch of resin. I decided to remove the resin and use a new brush (I had 90 mins cure time to do this) so cleaning of with paper towel and finally with a wipe with thinners I started to apply resin again – but it happened again as I sat in despair I looked into the pot of resin wondering where to go next when I saw a film on the top of the remaining resin It was then I noticed a ridge in the cups side. It was the wax coating that had melted into the resin and subsequently appeared as pin pricks in the newly applied surface. At this realisation I removed all the resin again and took a breather hoping I had found the problem. Another day and a light rub down of the deck to make sure the surface is ready to receive its final coat. Resin weighed (in a glass container this time) and well mixed I started to apply again and fortunately it was OK and all surfaces were coated.

Vanity, Victorian Cutter by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Thanks, I used to make top end model furniture for the Home Miniaturists. It's my way of finding a connection with my cabinet maker Granddad, who was a big model boat fan too, in fact he was a founder member of the Victoria Model Steamboat Club. She is 48x9x11 plus bowsprit. Height of rig is about 4 feet also. And yes the fitting on the keel is a piece of ally box section cut in half so it becomes U section, drilled through at equal spacing for the fin keel. Then the U section is screwed with brass screws and Marineflex sealer/adhesive to the keel, which is all solid hardwood. I did my sums and gave up, so once she was waterproof I put her in my son's fish pond and kept piling stuff in until she floated on her marks. Rigging won't be that heavy, but I made an allowance for it. Once it was floating right it turned out to need 14 1/2lbs. of ballast. BUT, that's inside. On the end of a 15" inch(ish) fin it will be less. I have 2 half bulbs cast by my other son in his back garden from my patterns. They will be bolted to the fin and faired in. Cheers, Martin

Final fitting of cabin roof skins by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Now that the internal detail of the cabin has been finalised and fixing points made for each of the panels and floor pieces (all parts of the cabin detail are to be removable) I can now finally fit the cabin roof skins. Since the leading edge has an overhang which because of the lifting design hasn’t the same framework support I have decided to reinforce the joint with stainless steel pins.to ensure a perfect fit, I made a tiny jig out of brass angle that ensured all the holes in each piece lined up. I then placed pieces of silicon sheet on the parts I really didn’t want the skins to stick to the cabin framework. Fist all the pieces were position and pinned to ensure a good fit, they were then removed adhesive applied and the skins finally placed and pinned, most of the pins will be removed when it’s dry. The centre panel has an opening for the hatch so this was put in prior to fixing. After a day’s drying it’s time to see if the whole thing works as envisaged, thankfully it does. The roof will now have to be dismantled so further work can be carried out it, will also get a covering of glass matting to add overall strength.

H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Whilst waiting for the ice to melt, decided to make up the deck and transom flaps. The deck was made from styrene sheet, again for lightness. Made the deck beams out of square styrene sections to avoid traditional, heavy, full width bulkheads. Hoped the stiff MTBH hull would resist twisting without bulkheads. First impressions are that this is the case and when the deck is finally bonded to the hull, should be even better.. The transom flap was made from thin aluminium plate and added simulated stiffener ribs in styrene. Understand that about a 2 degree flap down inclination works best on this model. My original plan was to operate the flap using a servo with another radio channel, however once the best plane is achieved it is unlikely the flaps will need further adjustment. Unlike the real vessel, the operating weight will remain fairly constant. So, abandoned the servo idea to use adjustable bottle-screws instead. The flap angle can still be adjusted, but not in motion. These screws are much simpler, lighter and cheaper than a servo. One challenge was to make the very small hinges required for an adjustable flap. After much thinking and investigation, decided the simplest and neatest way would be to use thin, self adhesive aluminium tape, as used on forced air heating ducts. Would stick the self adhesive surface to the underside of the flap and then onto the inside face of another thin aluminium sheet, which could then be fitted to the transom using double sided tape and small screws. This seems to work so far, it also avoids drilling through holes into the transom .

wood glue by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
The Mossie I understand but the all metal Spitty ? Gorilla Glue and a good exterior PVA I've got. It's really strong and weather proof .I use it for garden furniture making and repairs. Lost the label sorry so don't know the name.👍🤔 Any similar glue will be as good as long as it's an outdoor type. Used diluted it penetrates well and thicker has a good grab if spread thinly. I also use UHU hart,plain balsa cement,contact adhesive,a plastic glue and Plastic Magic which will glue any plastic I've tried it on, plus Cyano and lots of other odds and sods. They all have their uses if used correctly. Gorilla is good for gluing mixed materials. Their wood (PVA?👍) glue is excellent too.

wood glue by BigAlio Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
I use EVERBUILD 502 ALL PURPOSE WEATHERPROOF WOOD ADHESIVE. very good and good value £ 5.48 a litre

HMS HOOD by Trumpeter by Rookysailor Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
Not received yet Steve, but had an email telling me it's on it's way along with tracking details. Looking forward to getting it though, yours looks brilliant, is the adhesive very sticky, or can you position it before making permanent ? Peter

Cabin detail Pt 1 by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
I wanted to try and recreate the detail as per the available photos and drawings that I had so the first thing was to try and make the cabin have walls and a door, so previously I had cut away bulkhead B2 and extended CF2 to the bottom skin and put the door opening in. Now for the actual piece of cabin floor, the entry is slightly strange as there appears to be an inset step from the from the sick bay up into the cockpit but then it is relatively straight forward, it was made from 2mm ply. Planking was something I have never done so a lot of research was done prior to starting. I decided to use a lime wood plank with a black 0.3 black card divider (caulk) all glued with aliphatic adhesive. I found the process quite enjoyable and the results on the test piece for a first attempt were quite pleasing. I then wanted to reproduce the nailing of the planks so I devised a small tool to ensure a consistent pattern Its simply a piece of obeche with four holes, 4 brass pins and a black divider line, this is simply placed on the join line and then tapped with a light hammer and filled with the tip of a black pen. The first attempt looks slightly misaligned but proved the system worked, I have made a more accurate one for the real floor. After the planks were set it was sanded flat which unfortunately leaves the wood grain blackened by the black card dust, however using a plastic eraser it’s easily removed ready for sealing. I thought that the door opening needed some sort of finishing/dressing so I decided to manufacture a mahogany door frame and handrail around the cabin.

Glue by glyn44 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi All, Any one suggest a glue that can be used for tacking assemblies together so I can test fit them, see how they look etc. And then remove and disassemble allowing adjustments to be made, allowing the glue to be easily removed when required and the permanent adhesive to be applied.Masking tape not always suitable. Thanks.

Formers in-planking starts! by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Always good to hear of different makes of adhesive that others use. In a warm room most of these types of wood glue set very quickly to a hold state, developing full strength over 12 hours. A far cry from the days of Cascamite! which I recall seemed to take 24hrs, a lifetime when you are 5 years old.

Formers in-planking starts! by BigAlio Commander   Posted: 6 months ago
nice to see im not alone in using ever build 502 adhesive i find very good and bonus is its cheap. Just looked it up on ebay £5.48 a litre delivered item no. 112586677548