Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
December 2018: 5 people
November 2018: 11 people
October 2018: 9 people
September 2018: 13 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 10 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (17)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > aircraft

aircraft
aquacraft atlantic
caldercraft
chris craft
chriscraft
hobbycraft
hovercraft
keilcraft
rc craft
aircraft
Brooklyn Steam Tug by Joe727 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 36"/11900g Brooklyn Steam Tug Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 120mins Single Propellor (4 Blade 100mm) Geared to a 550 dc (4 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (6v) 13Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Tamar T15 (5Amps) ESC - Comments: I built this from a Dumas Tug Kit, nice kit with lots of detail. Two SLA batteries provide ballast along with lead weight. Gearing is from an older type model aircraft type. ESC is a marine type, forward, backward drive, big 4" Dumas prop. This tug is back in dry dock for addition of led navigational lighting. The initial build was undertaken while I was battling stage 4 cancer, it keep my mind occupied during chemo and surgery recovery, stayed positive! Model building is very meditative to me, try it if you have't, Have fun. Photos to come once out of dry dock.

servo by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
HI Rick, long time since i have seen an Africa Queen, seem to remember that i used an aircraft flexi lead, this went round the stern and along to the servo. They come in 3ft lengths and replace the pushrod. Mark

aeronaut classic by sandgrounder Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 13 days ago
i did wonder about the shaft it is a little flimsy so thanks for confirming that and the prop, i a still pondering a motor as there seems so little room i looked at a out runner from a aircraft but maybe that would be too quick

USS Coeur de Lion by rpbidgood Petty Officer   Posted: 16 days ago
This ship was a lightship tender named "Coeur de Lion" that was armed and drafted into the Union during the civil war to counter blockade runners. This model is scratch built and is inspired by a paper model designed by Magnus Mörck. A sidewheel steamer equipped with the typical walking beam machinery, it was rebuilt to carry three guns. A line of iron plates along the gun wales added a measure of armoured protection. After the war it was returned to lightship service. On my model the paddles are independently driven, mainly because I have a Robbe Navy F14 transmitter with twin sticks. The walking beam is operated by a servo modified for continuous rotation. The original ship towed a barge that flew an observation balloon and could be described as the first 'aircraft carrier' the fifth picture shows the barge I have made - I hope one day to emulate the real thing by raising and lowering a suitable balloon. I have included some pictures of the rest of my paddle fleet.The 'Rachel Erin' is a freelance sternwheeler 'quarter wheeler' tug that uses a worm drive to the paddles. She does not steer well. The last ship is an enlarged version of Graham Goodchild's Santa Anna.

My other hobby by boaty Admiral   Posted: 20 days ago
Good to see other PPLs and former PPLs on the Model Boats website. I took mine at Liverpool Airport known now as JLA (John Lennon Airport) in June 1984 and completed it in January 85. Trained with Liverpool Flying School aka Keenair in Cherokee 140s and a PA 38 Tomahawk. Later I moved into Air Nova which was also a Liverpool club and the actor Lewis Collins was also a member of that Club. At the time I was a member of Merseyside IVC (Inter Varsity Club) thus had plenty of passengers. One of them was Victoria Field, my former psychology lecturer who later became famous as a psychologist and writer. Eventually Air Nova moved to Hawarden Airport near Chester but the Club folded shortly after. I then joined the in house Club based at the field and I ceased flying in November 2016. Best flights were going over Snowdon VFR and down the Dee Valley. I also flew over Colwyn Bay to have a look at the boating lake though I haven't sailed there. I also saw the lakes at Llandudno West Shore and LLanfairfechan. The latter I am considering for sailing my fast electrics. Downside to PPL flying was the crosswind component of the aircraft being 17 knots , At Hawarden there is only one runway the 04/22 and Liverpool the 09/27. I did have to cancel many times due to this. Thankfully sailing model boats is much more enjoyable as we don't have that many snags to deal with and if the motor stops we don't have to do an emergency landing.😎😁😁 Boaty

My other hobby by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Just recalled one of my weirder experiences on a commercial flight! Was also on the memorable trip to Uganda end of the 80ies, just after Idi Amin had left the stage! Was on a hop from Nairobi to Kampala (Entebbe). Aircraft was a venerable Boeing 727of Kenya Airways. Had a funny feeling climbing aboard as I saw the oil streaks over the wings and underside of the fuselage. The smell inside and state of the floor was more like a public toilet than a commercial aircraft.😡 After taking my window seat I was joined by a large 'native' Momma, who took up the remaining two seats in the row, and then I realised why the floor was as it was.😲 She plumped herself down with a big grin all round and carefully settled a large wooden crate with slats on her expansive lap! The crate was full of LIVE CHICKENS!!!!!!!!!!!! At first my ghast was absolutely flabbered😲 I expected that next someone would start building a fire to roast one, but it turned out to be quite funny and even useful! When the 'In flight meal' arrived it looked to me like old British Rail sandwiches (banana shaped) that they had sold on around 1960! I spent the rest of the flight feeding them to the chickens to the delight of 'Momma' and others around us, not to mention the chickens 😁 If you fly around long enough, and to off beat places, all sorts of odd things can happen! 😉 Priceless memories 😊 Cheers all, Doug 😎

My other hobby by Rookysailor Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
Yeah! Doug, I think about it now and wished I had continued. In 1979 my wife (at that time my fiance) and I, went to Doncaster light aviation club to see a Piper Cherokee that was for sale.(very cheap), when I saw it, I realised why the price was so low....all the interior had been fitted out in.............PINK FUR!!!! it was Cr**. Then a friend of mine asked if I wanted a 1/4 share in a Grumman Traveller stored at Barton in Manchester, it sounded good, but only getting the aircraft on days the other's didn't want was not good with me, so I bought an E type, with kept me amused for a while😊 Cheers Peter

My other hobby by Rookysailor Commander   Posted: 22 days ago
Greetings Hellmut1956. Missed my PPL by two hours in 1978. Was asked by the service engineer name Bob at Blackpool Aerodrome if I fancied having a lesson two or three times a week, as he wanted to teach but needed to collect the hours required. I had a band at Pontins holiday camp, and Bob used to come in the bar nearly every night, and asked If I liked the idea of learning to fly👍 The question was 'How much', no charge just sign my teaching sheet, so 30hrs in a Cessna 150, very nice , but the season ended Oct 30th 1978, and I needed two more hours, but without an aircraft! why bother..... Wished I could have had a video recorder to keep the memories. Peter😊

My other hobby by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
I've gotten a chance to fly a few times. And loved every time! But it's been on big jumbo jets! Never had the opportunity to fly on a small aircraft! Now that sounds like great fun...….

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 25 days ago
Doug, you are probably correct and good thought regarding the polarised caps , but I was just thinking that if the battery input was going through a fuse system as it appears in Rowens photos (difficult to see) it may have caused a slight problem. I have seen mentions of up to 12" between batt and ESC being no problem at lower Amps. You might notice that one of the inputs was from a guy from Castle Creations (USA) which I thought would give a bit of weight to the information. I have always gone with the ESC manufacturers suggestions regarding wire length and have never had a problem in boats or planes (mainly in planes,-18 most 'converted' to electric from IC -3 capable of pulling 1200W) It's great to be able to chuck ideas and info around, as we can all pick something out of it all which will solve a problem, or perhaps stop us from toasting an electronic component or whatever. BTW, I saw somewhere that extending the wires could cause stuttering and that was one other reason for mentioning the info, as I know Rowen's had a problem with that. I'm sure it will be ok as is,- if its working fine, and it's not going to be run flat out every day it will probably last for years. Probably me thinking on the cautious side as my personal approach to building is to use the K.I.S.S method (may not be the flashest but usually keeps me out of trouble) Regarding the quality of ESCs, you will find that many have the same internal bits just with different cases and colours, (same with chargers) HK is bad for this. Many I have seen use an Atmega chip and you can tell differences by the programming method (some you have to do 1 step and disconnect power before the next step, others just with stick forward center back center etc. Most boards are made in China (Castle Creations and a few others being exceptions) and what you get depends on the quality of assembly/soldering etc in the plant they are made in (if you want to see how many of these items are made in China check out Made In China.com and search ESCs for example. I have cheap ESCs I've used in my planes for years with no probs which look like the HK Red Brick ESCs (except blue) and they are better than the TGY branded ones at 3x the price, and really let the power through !. Even CC have apparently made boards for HK with different cases as have Hobbywing. It's really a case of "you pays ya money and ya takes ya chances". In saying that you are pretty safe with Hobbywing, Tamya, SkyRc, or Castle Creations (USA) but there are other better non China ones around but a a much bigger price. Hope we aren't overloading you Rowen, you might have to get into the 'anti-freeze' to soothe the brain in that cold weather. Another site for you to check out which I have found to be very good, with prices to match HK is RCEcho.com (Hong Kong) Have bought most of my aircraft ESCs from them (around 28 from 30A-120A with no probs)

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Hi Rowen, You don't need capacitors at all, and certainly not in series with the wiring. Whereas I can heartily endorse all that jbkiwi says about the possibilities of modern TXs, I've only scratched the surface of what my Spectrum and Turnigy sets can do, I can see no justification for the extra capacitors on ESC leads. The length of the wires inside a typical model can not have a significant effect on the total resistance. Given a typical resistance of 1m of copper wire with ca 1mm² cross sectional area of 0.02Ω (less for larger gauges) it ain't gonna make a happorth of difference whether you have 4" (10cm) or 40". Maybe a little more warmth but the capacitor can't change that. I also can't see where the spikes he mentions should come from. Also bear in mind that the ESC does not apply pure DC to the motor but a pulse train with a pulse repetition rate of around 8 to 10kHz. That's why the motors whistle and scream. Adding capacitors to this could distort the pulses or reduce their peak value. If the ESC is so bad that it produces big spikes when the pulses are switched on or off (which I doubt theses days) then junk it and buy a decent one. On no account fit a capacitor in series with the wiring, unless it is a special Coaxial Capacitor, which are very big and relatively expensive. See pic. I've only seen them on large electric motors on board ships where the much higher currents and longer cable runs involved than in models may play a role. A very small value capacitor, in the picofarad range might help to short out any potential high frequency RF interference but I've never experienced the need to fit them. In this respect it could be more important that the length of the cable is not close to the wavelengths typically used by RC sets (12.5cm at 2.4GHz) so that it does not act like an antenna. Cheers, Doug 😎 jbkiwi have looked at the link you posted but I'm not convinced considering the small lengths we use in our boats. Yes there will be some overshoot spikes in the pulse train but so severe as to damage anything is in my opinion highly unlikely, given a decent quality ESC in the first place. Something else on that link just occurred to me. There is a pic of what looks like electrolytic (polarised) capacitors between the wires. This is fine for aircraft ESCs which only run forwards, and thus produce positive going pulses. In our boats with reverse the pulse will switch over to negative going. Which after a while could have an explosive effect on the electrolytics. It blows the cans off and produces an interesting snowstorm effect. Good party trick😁 but maybe not so super inside a model boat😡 IF you do fit them to a reversible ESC be sure to use tantalum capacitors which aren't so fussy.

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Doug, Am using the HobbyKing 50A Boat ESC 4A UBEC along with their programming card. The diode explanation makes sense so will fit one. jbkiwi My battery -ESC and ESC -motor wires are short, probably around 4" each. The addition of capacitors as suggested is intriguing as have never heard of it before. Think it is easier to keep things together in a boat, whereas with an aircraft pitch trim becomes a factor. Am using 2S batteries with a 50A ESC, with the motor max current of 30 A. Have you any idea what size of capacitor I should use? The Tx/Rx combinations are almost infinite as the ESCs are programmable too. Just wish the ice would go so can experiment! Thanks both for your help, with this hobby you never stop learning.

All hooked up, nowt happens... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Mornin' Martin, I've never used a trigger throttle (and never want to!) but I suspect that yanking back is Full throttle, which means you need to push it forward for programming!! Corresponding to stick back (or down) on a normal two stick set. Which is motor stop on such an aircraft ESC with no bacckuds. Cheers, Doug 😎 PS: just checked the manual for a typical Flysky Pistol Grip set (usual Chinglish gibberish🤔) but it confirms that trigger hard back is 'Full Ahead' !! BTW: since you appear to be using an aircraft ESC on a Car/Boat radio set (not a good idea!) make sure that before you switch on the RX that the throttle trigger is pushed right forward. Otherwise the motor will go off half cock straight away. If you release the trigger it will probably go to the 'Half Ahead' position. So mind your fingers.😡

A577 by colindavies Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 5/10] 20"/700g A577 - Comments: This model belongs to a friend of mine who had this in his attic where it got damaged and its condition deteriorated, he asked me if I would refurbish it. This is a static model and I have submitted this to help to show the variety of craft that the RAF Marine Branch operated in the 68 years of its existence. The Armoured Target Boat was the brainchild of the Air Ministry's "I've had a good idea" Department. The requirement was for a target boat that could be bombed from the air with practice bombs. The 40ft Armoured Target Boats were developed from the slightly smaller 37.5ft ATBs which had been designed by Scott-Paine and others at British Power Boat in 1932. A couple of years later, in 1934, whilst bringing the first of the 64ft HSLs into service, it was realised by the Air Ministry that the condition of the aircraft had been advancing and that it was necessary to provide additional protection to improve the first type of Armoured Target Boats (the 37.5ft type). T.E. Shaw suggested to Scott-Paine that he should increase the length of the 37.5ft type to 40ft and fit twin rudders. In addition the Air Ministry prepared a new armour plating arrangement which gave separate protection for the crew and engines and coxswain. There was a further alteration to the forward bulkhead which resulted in it being changed to vertical instead of raked fore and aft to overcome the new conditions for bombing. A long series of trials were carried out with the ballast with the 40ft type launch and eventually it was approved. The 40ft thus became the standard type Armoured Target Boat (ATB). The first batch of 15 craft of the 40ft type were ordered in 1935 with further batches being ordered in 1936, 1937 and 1938. A further addition was the introduction of a 3rd engine, this helped to maintain a good speed on the ranges, and helped to counterbalance the the boat as it had been found that in a tight turn the 37.5ft ATB had a tendency to roll over.

Vosper by Biscuit Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 10/10] 42" Vosper Single Propellor (3 Blade 50mm) Geared to a Os 40 fourstroke (3 Blade) - Comments: I always liked the sound of a fourstroke engine so I thought I would replace the brushless motor in this boat with an aircraft Os 40fs which I converted with a water cooling jacket that I turned up on my lathe. I also made a reverse gearbox with a clutch, the gearbox is operated by a servo and works well, I also fitted a water pump so could still cool the engine while ticking over stationary, boat has been weathered and is fitted with lights and a searchlight that swivels around operated by another servo, there is also a cooling fan above the engine just to help keep things cool.