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>> Home > Tags > anchor

anchor
anchorage
anchor
Catheads by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi Norm, Why a winch? I believe the catheads are only there to hold the chain away from the side and stop the anchor bashing the hull until it is fully weighed. Hang over from wooden ship days. Or "Small projection from ship’s side just abaft hawser pipe. Used for suspending an anchor when cable is disconnected and used for mooring to a buoy." See pic of 1/192 version from John R Haynes, Cheers Doug 😎 http://johnrhaynes.com/catalog/fitting-list/product/JRH18/?

Winches by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Sorry Norm, Got a bit carried away 🤔That's HMS Hood, but I strongly suspect that the capstan / anchor chain arrangement would have been very very similar. After all Hood was only 10 years or so later and much from the Dreadnought was used again and/or improved. Suspect that, as you said, foredeck arrangements were virtually identical on the Nelson class. Cheers, Doug 😎

Winches by Gdaynorm Captain   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi Doug, What a beautiful model. Whose? Keep seeing things differently. The 14pdr gune set up on the main turrets on that model seems a bit different from the photo I have of a rear turret. I will stay with what I have done and say a prayer or three. Have started on anchors, see pic. The shot you gave me of the bow shows the ab nchors very well. They were huge! Don't look too closely at my pic. There is all sorts of cleaning up to do! I am surprised the anchor chains seem to be hauled across the deck planking. Nelson had steel runways for the chains to run across.

deepdivers Rescue tug - Assurance class? by deepdiver Commander   Posted: 20 days ago
Thanks to Doug for all his help in finding the name of my Tug. So armed with this info I started to Goggle the name and below is the results. H.M.S. ATTENTIF W68 French Naval Tug. Allocated SNO Portland for towing Bombardons. Built 1938 Forges et Chantiers de la Gironde, Bordeaux. L114.75’. B27.75’. 672grt. 1000ihp 3cylTE steam engine. Armament 1x20mm AA, 2xMG. 1938 Delivered to French Navy. 19-6-1940 Arrived Plymouth. 3-7-1940 Seized and Req by RN. 9-1940 Based Devonport. 0-1940 Based at Aberdeen. 1-1941 Based at Milford Haven. 2-1941 – 1942 Based Aberdeen . 1942 – 1944 Based at Harwich. 5-1944 - 1945 Based Portsmouth. 6-1944 Towed 30ton crane 1206 Cardiff to Plymouth. 5-6-1945 Released from Overlord tug pool. 7-8-1945 Returned to French Navy, pennant A671. 1946-7 Renamed Locmine. 6-3-1964 Laid up at Brest. The Bombardons were large 200 ft (61 m) by 25 ft (7.6 m) cross-shaped floating breakwaters fabricated in steel that were anchored outside the main breakwaters that consisted of Gooseberries (scuttled ships) and Phoenixes (concrete caissons). 24 bombardon units, attached to one another with hemp ropes, would create a 1 mi (1.6 km) breakwater. During the storms at the end 1944 some Bombardons broke up and sank while others parted their anchors and drifted down onto the harbours, possibly causing more damage Fred

H.M.S. Attentif W68 by deepdiver Commander   Posted: 21 days ago
[Score: 5/10] Twin Propellors (4 Blade 45mm) Direct Drive Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 7Amp/h Batteries - Comments: I think that this is a Assurance class Tug of world war two vintage, It has tank steering, sound unit and a water vapor smoke unit, H.M.S ATTENTIF W68 French Naval Tug. Allocated SNO Portland for towing Bombardons. Built 1938 Forges et Chantiers de la Gironde, Bordeaux. L114.75’. B27.75’. 672grt. 1000ihp 3cylTE steam engine. Armament 1x20mm AA, 2xMG. 1938 Delivered to French Navy. 19-6-1940 Arrived Plymouth. 3-7-1940 Seized and Req by RN. 9-1940 Based Devonport. 0-1940 Based at Aberdeen. 1-1941 Based at Milford Haven. 2-1941 – 1942 Based Aberdeen . 1942 – 1944 Based at Harwich. 5-1944 - 1945 Based Portsmouth. 6-1944 Towed 30ton crane 1206 Cardiff to Plymouth. 5-6-1945 Released from Overlord tug pool. 7-8-1945 Returned to French Navy, pennant A671. 1946-7 Renamed Locmine. 6-3-1964 Laid up at Brest. The Bombardons were large 200 ft (61 m) by 25 ft (7.6 m) cross-shaped floating breakwaters fabricated in steel that were anchored outside the main breakwaters that consisted of Gooseberries (scuttled ships) and Phoenixes (concrete caissons). 24 bombardon units, attached to one another with hemp ropes, would create a 1 mi (1.6 km) breakwater. During the storms at the end 1944 some Bombardons broke up and sank while others parted their anchors and drifted down onto the harbours, possibly causing more damage

Winches by Gdaynorm Captain   Posted: 22 days ago
Doug, Have you any info on Dreadnought's anchor winches? She now has all,I think!, of her portholes, well over a hundred. Anchors next, then guard rails around the focsle.

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Thanks kmbcsecretary, I just saw the Anchor I need!

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Admiral   Posted: 22 days ago
thanks figtree7nts and Donnieboy i purchased the anchor from cornwall model boats, i tend to use these for most of my fittings orders as 99% of time they have in stock although they had to order the rigging blocks in for me due to the quantity needed.

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Great job on the eye splices. and of course the rigging! Question where did you get you anchor from?

ODIN by kimbo Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 24 days ago
[Score: 10/10] Capable of 7mph and a runtime of 60mins Single Propellor (4 Blade 95mm) Direct Drive to a Power 1000 (4 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 12Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through electronize ESC - Comments: All, lights, smoke, sound, radar, stern winch, anchor, fire monitor all work

Getting ready by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 26 days ago
The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum moved their Model Boat Expo back to May and I'm getting Constellation ready to sail. It's a tradition now that I have some progress to show each time she sails, so this time I want to set the courses. Since her last sail the aft bulwark was added and new winch drums made, and a wedge added to the cart to keep her from sliding back. Putting her on and off her ballast was a pain by myself, so I ground off the threads on the rods for about a centimeter so they act like pins and hold the boat in place while I thread in the other rod. That little hack was much simpler than figuring out some sort of cradle to fit on the cart. I looked at all sorts of ways to control the courses, and the simplest method was sort of a yard at the bottom, but one that wasn't obvious. I used a length of vinyl coated clothes hanger and sew pocket onto the clews on the backside of the sails. In the center of the foot, I sewed a sleeve. The rod goes through the sleeve and onto the pockets. If I need to reduce sail, I can easily pull out the rods and bunt up the sail. I also figured I'll set the two gaff-headed Spencer sails. So far I sewed hoops on the forward one. Their a line on it to brail it up if I need to lose it. The t'gallants and royals will get hooks on the halyards, and some sort of easy release on their sheets, so I can take them off, yard and all, if it's too windy. If need be, I should be able to brail up the spencers, bunt up the courses, and remove the t'gallants and royals all in just a few minutes, and have her down to just tops'ls, spanker, and jibs. If THAT's too much sail, well, then it's just too windy to sail. Hopefully I'll get to sail her with all 17 sails set! The other bit of "progress" for this sail will be to use both winches. Previously I used one winch to control the main corse yard, and the fore and mizzen were slaved to it. Last time I controlled the fore tops'l yard and slaved the main and mizzen to the fore. This time the main and mizzen tops'l yard will be controlled together on their own winch, and the fore tops'l yard will be controlled separately on it's own winch. This way, when I come-about or tack, I can back the fore against the wind to push the bow across. So, I was looking at images of the real ship to refresh my memory of how the main and mizzen brace were led when I noticed the main tops'l brace was anchored in the rig in one place when sail was set, and another place without sails. Looking around I found there was some sort of ring or band that slide up and down the mizzen topmast pushed by the tops'l yard parrel when it was raised and lowered to set or take in sail. I'd never noticed that sort of thing before, but looking at images of ship contemporary to Constellation, I found it was actually pretty common place, and I even saw it done on a few British ships of the 1850's and later. Always learning something new.

Progress by Gdaynorm Captain   Posted: 30 days ago
At least she looks like a warship at last. I wonder if her anchor winches would be different to those twenty years later. She had multiple booms for torpedo nets. I assume they were mounted to the hull a few feet above waterline and swung out from there. Were they wood or steel does anyone know? Must have been quite an operation setting them out!

Focsle by Gdaynorm Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
Actually you sent me the bow shot some time back. What I am missing is the layout of anchor winches and anchor chain runs. I guess they will be similar to Nelson. Pity Greenwich has got SO expensive!

SYLT by Inkoust Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The German coastguard model, 120 cm long, 2 x TURNIGY AC motor, 2 x 5200 mA battery, shines and lights the anchors. Riding in Prague in the Friendship Park, a small water area allowed only 1/4 of the boat's capacity😁😤

Adding rear deck details by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Has been a few days since I have had a chance to get anything done due to day shifts over Easter. Anyway, a good day of progress today. Finished painting the Anchor and mounts on the rear cabin. The rest of the day has been concentrating on the rear deck. This includes 4 bollards, cleats and railings. All scratch built using a conbination of plasticard, plastic tube, brass tube, carbon rod and aluminium wire (included in the kit). The cleats are resin and where from eBay. The railings arnt glued into the deck yet, easier to paint off the deck and add at the end. I am modifying the centre deck as the model I am building had a deck plank with a metal grid on it. I had some wire mesh and laminated that to some ply, should be quite effective once painted and rubbed back to expose the metal wire.