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>> Home > Tags > balsa wood

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VALIANT by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 48" VALIANT Capable of 4mph and a runtime of 90mins Single Propellor (4 Blade 70mm) Geared to a 540 (4 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 14Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through MTroniks Viper marine (25Amps) ESC - Comments: This tug was built by a modeler in Bristol during the early 1960's it was given to me at the Abergavenny Steam and vintage show in 2016 by the makers grandson who told me it had been on display in his mums house from 1970 when his grandad died till 1987 when she died then put in his parents attic till it was given to me. it had a couple of holes in the hull and the upper works had been broken so required fixing. not having any pictures I used all the original bits that came with it so I hope it looks as it should. It's made mostly from balsa with some wooden bits and replacement planking from coffee stirrers otherwise all original. It requires 2 x 12v 7ah lead acid batteries and about 5 kilograms of ballast. (Silver Sand in 500grm packs). On the only test run I've managed to tow a 16 foot fishing boat with three men on my local fishing lake.

Ciao Bambina by Penfold63 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
So here’s my partly completed Riva Aquarama, to be named Ciao Bambina, a scratch build from plans, with laser cut marine ply as the base structure. I started her in April 2016 and got to the stage of balsa wood stringers as per the plans and got into a real pickle, breaking pretty much every strip and gave up after six days of struggle. I then focused on Plan B, which was Project 2, a smaller Riva Aquarama, and again a scratch build, for an event planned with friends at the end of April 2016. I’ll come back to Ciao Bambina once I have completed my Sea Commander and the smaller Riva I think. The stringers will be made with laminated 3mm strips Okichi or similar, which is the way the Sea Commander has been done, so I have learned something from the experience. Balsa doesn’t really work on a big stringer! I will update as I progress the project.

Ciao bambina by Penfold63 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 1/10] 34" Ciao bambina Twin Propellors Direct Drive - Comments: This is Project 1, a scratch build Riva Aquarama from Plans, with laser cut marine ply as the basis for the bulkheads etc. Started on 5 April 2016 and in the space of 6 days got to stringers, which is where it all seemed to go wrong. Try as I might I couldn’t get them to bend around, using balsa wood and various techniques. I left it to one side to concentrate on Project 2, and haven’t picked it up since, hence the poor rating I have given it. It will be finished at some stage, probably after I have completed my Sea Commander and the other Riva boat. I will update with more pics as I go along.

Clamps and such by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Ron I forgot you build small models in balsa. My choice would be elastic bands 1/4" wide as used to hold the wings on model planes or similar. Protect the open bottom with a solid plank and wrap the bands all round every few inches. Get some scrap balsa and put between the band and hull planks, add just enough to hold the joint. Leave to dry then remove and get a box to keep your bands etc for next time. On larger models I have used luggage straps tied to length and packed with scrap wood. Very good for holding planks etc on hulls as the bands/straps can be made with the packing to give pressure in more than one direction at the same time.

Vosper MTB385 by reilly4 Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Scratchbuilt WW2 1/24 Scale Vosper 73' Type 1 MTB. Built in 2016, in company with a friend's 1/24 scale BPB MGB. The Vosper hull is built from balsawood and fibreglass. The upper deck and superstructure is from balsawood. The weapons and fittings are from brass, aluminium and plastic. The 20mm and gunner can rotate.

80' Elco PT Boat by Zdenek Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 7/10] 30"/1600g 80' Elco PT Boat Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 40mm) Direct Drive to a Turnigy Typhoon 500 Heli (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Turnigy Marine 60 Amp (60Amps) ESC - Comments: A scratch-built stand-off model based on Model Boats free plan (design by GG). Material mainly balsa wood (hull) and plastic (styrene) on superstructure. Propulsion unit differs from the original design. This is a second set up, not really tested yet. Original set up was Speed 700 Turbo, 12 V NiMh battery pack 4100 mAh, it was 500 g overweight. The only "special feature" are working position lights. It was a pleasure to built and it is pleasure to sail her.

CG-40564 by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 35"/4500g CG-40564 Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 45mins Twin Propellors (4 Blade 50mm) Direct Drive to a 775 JOHNSON-TYPE 6-12V (4 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HOBBYWING (15Amps) ESC - Comments: DUMAS 1:14 USCG 40' UTB. REPRESENTING US COAST GUARD UTILITY BOAT CG-40564, WHICH CAPSIZED DURING A RESCUE ATTEMPT ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER BAR ON 17 JAN 1961. HER CREW WAS FORTUNATELY RESCUED. SHE WAS ASSISTING CG-52301, A 52' TYPE F WOODEN MLB, WHICH FOUNDERED WITH THE LOSS OF ALL HANDS. IT REMAINS THE WORST SMALL BOAT RESCUE DISASTER IN COAST GUARD HISTORY. THIS IS AN UNUSUAL SCALE BALSA PLANK-ON, COVERED BY 2 OZ FIBERGLASS. I USED MINWAX POLYURETHANE FOR AN ALTERNATE TO RESIN, WHICH TURNED OUT WELL, AND CAN BE DONE WITH MINIMAL VENTILATION. WITH BIRCH PLY DECK & CABINS, 1/8" SCRIBED SHEATHING COVERS THE DECK BOW TO STERN AND MAHOGANY TRIM LEFTOVER FROM ANOTHER DUMAS KIT IN MY SCALE SHIPYARD. STOCK D/C FITTINGS WITH SOME SUPPLEMENTAL PREMADE AND HANDMADE ITEMS. SHE FEATURES TWIN RABOESCH 4-BLADE WIDE FLUKE WHEELS AND MATCHING RUDDERS; WORKING HATCHES WITH STOWAGE AREA FOR ANCHOR & TOWLINE, LIGHTHOUSE 9V LED NAV LIGHTS AND FLASHING LED LAW ENFORCEMENT BLUE LIGHT (RC CONTROLLED). I'M ADDING A MOUNT FOR A SCALE BROWNING M2 50 CAL THAT I WAS ABLE TO PRODUCE ON MY 3D PRINTER. THAT'S AN ADVENTURE IN ITSELF. THIS WAS MY FIRST REAL PLANK ON BULKHEAD, AND BALSAWOOD CAN BE A LIL TRICKY, BUT WILL ALWAYS BE THE STANDARD OF WHICH I COMPARE ALL MY SUBSEQUENT BUILDS. MY FATHER BUILT RC AIRCRAFT, AND ALWAYS PREACHED THAT YOU SHOULD OVERBUILD IN ORDER TO SURVIVE A CRACK-UP AND FLY ANOTHER DAY! THAT'S MY CREED WITH BOATS. OVERBUILD!!! THANK YOU DAD! BTW-FYI-MR. ARNOLD PALMER WAS A US COAST GUARDSMAN (YM3) 1950-53

Totnes Castle 1894 by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Cut off most of the excess foam with a knife. Then into the garden standing up wind, removed the rest with a blacksmith's rasp. Took about 5 minuets. Started on the deck will be making my own ply, consisting of 1/16" balsa with hard wood veneer on the bottom & deck planks on top.

Tilgear by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Hi Marky, Sounds kinda expensive to me over here in Munich! Here there is an online shop called Balsabar https://www.balsabar-shop.de/ They supply in 100mm by 1000mm lengths. Just put together a bundle equivalent to yours (with 1000mm length) and came to € 37.25 = £ 34.10 BUT x 0.45 to get the same volume of wood gives £ 15.35 !! Almost half the price! Is this indicative of material prices in general in UK these days? 🤔 Cheers Doug 😎

Balsa Boat 1970's made to Model Boat plans. by Novagsi0 Captain   Posted: 6 months ago
Old boat of my fathers built from scratch in balsa wood, and fibre glassed inside. Use to run a small diesel engine, I took over it and initially put an Orbit 805 motor in then later a better spec model car motor 545/550 water cooled. Finally I swapped it for a 1.25cc glow engine and this video demonstrates the speed with the glow engine. Was almost too fast for the hull, tight turns caused it to nose dive, and plane/wobble badly on its side. Great fun and cheap to run.

Richards 48" Swordsman by rmwall107 Lieutenant   Posted: 6 months ago
Hi, another month on and things are still progressing. I have finished planking the deck and have started on the rubbing strake. I am using 3x5mm balsa for the strake and I will be staining it teak. I have bent the strip for the bow and stern, I soaked balsa in hot water for about half an hour. Whilst the strip was soaking i cut strips of masking tape and evanly spaced them around the bow and stern sections ready for the soggy balsa. Then working evenly side to side from the center point, I bent the strip and secured it in place using the pre-installed masking tape. Note work evenly from the center my first effort i worked from the center and concentrated on one side, when i went back to the otherside the strip snapped in the middle (the point of most stress) probably because the wood had Dryed and cooled by the time I went back to it. The strakes are currently relaxing to shape for a few days before I remove the tape.

Dolphin 16 (19) by AllenA Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
[Score: 7/10] 19"/1100g Dolphin 16 (19) Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 20mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 30mm) Direct Drive to a Graupner Speed 600 8.4v (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Chinese 320amp (10Amps) ESC - Comments: This is the Meccano Magazine January 1967 issue plan, built in balsa. I didn't do a build blog as the construction is well covered on the net. Started with an A4 plan and used Excel to enlarge it onto 9 A4 sheets. I chose something simple as I haven't built a boat for thirty years. Really enjoyed the build and re-learning how to overcome the problems that always arise. She is oversized being 19" long and having a 7.5" beam. She sits nicely on the water and begins to plane. Will upgrade the the battery sometime. The decking is worktop edge strip pre-glued but in future will use the unglued strips. The cabin was adapted to extend over the whole boat as there was little space for modern electrics. I will add in and out air vents as the motor will need to breathe. Also, the true model should have an upper deck and windscreen and this will be easy to add sometime in the future. Really surprised and pleased with results from aliphatic wood glue. The finish, which I am not completely happy with, due mostly to my own impatience, was achieved with Ronseal multi purpose wood filler, lightweight fibreglass laminate with Eze-Kote. Paint is Acrylics and Marine varnish. The electrics are: Acoms AR 201 Reciever, Servo Acoms AS 12, Cheap Chinese ,supposedly, 320 amp ESC and 7.2v Nimh battery pack. The Graupner Speed 600 8.4v, bought it cheaply some months ago, was already in one of my boxes and you can see the adaptation required to fit it into the boat. All the Acoms controls I picked up at a boot sale including an Acoms Techniplus Alpha Transmitter on 27mhz. Inside I used Hammerite Smooth Gold as I couldn't buy silver. Modern Hammerite is thin and squeamish and took 3 coats to provide reasonable coverage. One final rant I do like the new silicon wires but they are a nightmare to solder to a motor. I think I will use soldered connectors in future. So there we are, first model in 30 years and now so many models to build and so little time. Lessons learned...... don't be impatient.

Ship's Boats by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 8 months ago
Building a model ship often means building several models because most ships have boats. Constellation had six. My method for building boats is nearly the same for building larger hulls and real boats - planks over forms. I have a 1:12th scale drawing of Constellation's boat's in particular from the National Archives. They not only printed me a copy, but gave me a .tif image which I easily re-scaled to 1:36. I reproduced the lines as forms extended to a baseline so the boat could be built upside down. I drew each boat's patterns and arraged each to fit on a sheet of copy paper. I print this on a full sheet label so I can rough cut them, stick them on the form material, and then cut the forms. I had a few sheets of 1/8" balsa sheet and that's what I cut the forms from. A pine plank was used for the building-board, and marked where each station would go, then the forms were glued on making sure each was 90° to the form and square to the center-line. A note on the build-board, it doesn't have to be as wide as the boat, and should, in fact, be narrower. Then you can access inside the sheer and planking and removing the boat from the forms will be much easier. A small plank of 3/4" stock will let you get rubber bands completely around the model, and it will also fit in a vice which is very convenient. The edges of the forms are shaped so the planks will lie flat on the surface, and not teeter on the corners. Using balsa makes this easy work, though you have to be careful not to snap them off the build board. I started with the ship's 1st cutter, which is a lap-strake, or clinker-built boat. (Only the launch is carvel planked) It's frames are 1/16" thick bass strips 3/32" wide. Each frame is dipped in ammonia and bent over it's form. I put a dab of glue at the ends that would eventually be cut off to hold it to the form, but for the frames on the wine-glass and hollow forms at the ends I used rubber bands to pull them into shape. Part of the reasoning behind using balsa for the forms is if anything gets glued that shouldn't, it's the form and not the model that will give-way first. The stem, stern-post, and keel are 1/16" bass, assembled together while flat. First the top corners of the keel were planed off to make a sort of rabbet. The transom is also bass as it stays in the boat. The transom is cut taller to reach the build-board, and partially cut at what will be it's top to make it easier when it's time to detach the boat. It's glued to the stern post and the build-board, the keel is glued to each frame, and the stem is glued to the build-board. This pretty much forms the rigid skeleton of the boat. There's two ways to represent lapstrake planking on so small a model. One way is to sand each plank so it's half as thick at it's top edge as its bottom. The planks are butted on the boat, thick against thin, giving the impression of overlapped planks. I chose to actually overlap the planks because the inside of the boat is open to view. Since each plank of a lapstrake boat overlaps the one below it, each plank has to be spieled, or shaped to fit, and the boat must be planked from the keel to the sheer. I divide the length of the widest frame from the keel to the sheer into the number of planks I want, then divide the lengths of the stem and the stern by this number. You'll find the planks will get narrow forward, and flare wider back aft. You may have to experiment a bit with the number of planks so maintain at least 2 scale inches forward and not more than 5 scale inches aft, or the planking will look nonsensical and out-of-scale. I planked the cutter in 1/32" thick bass. The first planks are the garboards, next to the keel. The next plank I places a strip of card along side and used a piece of plank against the edge of the wood plank to mark the card. The marks are actually the bottom edge of the plank. Each plank is shaped on it's bottom edge to the plank before, and it's top edge is straight. Then I dip it in ammonia and clamp it in place, where "clamps" are rubber bands, blocks of wood, pins, clothes pins, whatever works. Again, a narrow build-board allows the rubber bands to pull in as you reach the sheer rather than pulling them away from the boat. Once your brain gets wrapped around spieling, the planking will move along. But don't try to do too much too fast or you'll just get frustrated and ruin everything. Take lots of breaks. The planks need to be sanded thinner at their ends, almost to nothing, depending how much of a rabbit was cut into the stem. At the stern they run right off the transom and are cut flush. You can notch the transom into step for each plank to fit into, of fill the little gaps where they overlap with putty later. Since they're getting painted, I used putty. When the planking is done up to the sheer, it's best to add rub rails and strakes while the boat's still on the forms. I then finished the cut in the transom, cut off the stem near the build-board, and nipped off each frame where it was glued to the form. Then carefully lift the boat off the forms. Some form may have come off with it, and some spots may need to be reglued. I installed frames between each of the ones the boat was built on, putting a frame about every scale foot. Seat clamps, floor boards, seats, oar notches, lifting eyes, mast steps, etc, are all added bit-by-bit. before you know it, you've got another model boat. I'll get into the launch next.

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 8 months ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

joint decision by marky Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
after trawling through the plans section my grandson and I have decided the next build will be a eezebilt 50+RAF fire tender maybe try it in ply rather than balsa ,the wee mans 7 and seems really interested so I will let him do as much as possible he will probably be less messy than me so wood hunting at the weekend ,I will have a look through the scrap bins at the work and salvage as much as I can first