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>> Home > Tags > battery power

battery power
gas power
portland model power boat association
power block
power boat
power source
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battery power
46" Fireboat - what engine(s)? by Vapour Apprentice   Posted: 13 hours ago
Hello folks. Brand new here, so go easy! I have searched but not quite found what I am after. Apologies if I've missed the obvious. Having just finished a 36" Fireboat with my son, I am now thinking about the larger 46" version. The little boat is running a Radient Reaktor motor / ESC combo which is 3000kV with a matched ESC and 2S1P LiPo battery. Performance is pretty good, although we're still ironing out some cooling issues and vibration (old model resurrected). I am going to do the big boat 'properly' so am looking for recommendations for power, ESC and batteries. I am looking for overscale performance and tend to run on choppy water with currents (i.e. rivers😁). Thanks in advance, everyone!

Smoke Generator (Water Vapour type) by andyhynes Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 12 days ago
I recently required a smoke generator (ultrasonic Type) it is not in working order but I have rigged it up to test and bypassed the circuit board powered by 2 X 12 volt batteries and managed to get the vapourising unit to function, and the 12 volt fan motor with a separate supply to also work. With some work to replace the 12v to 24v converter CN6009 it should satisfactory. This unit appears to be a DIY job but very similar to MMB Foggy Smoke Generator which is available. Note the component required CN6009 I have sourced on ebay. Soon as it arrives I will set it up and test its suitability for a 1/24 scale TID tug boat model I am building. Problem might be size of smoke generator and other components required to fit in the hull in addition to a 12 volt 9ah battery scooter battery, there aint much space. There are smaller smoke generators available which burn oil (fan powered) which I have in one of my other models (Blazer Tug Boat) which is OK with no wind and close up but at any distance hard to detect if any smoke is being produced. The Oil recommend for this unit is Baby Oil which smells OK but I have wondered if I could use another oil based fluid which would produce more smoke (Any suggestions)?

Servos & motor having a wobbly by EricMB Lieutenant   Posted: 14 days ago
Hi Doug and Dave, very sorry for the radio silence, day job getting in the way! Really appreciate the input, interesting to hear about your experience with the progress of technology, I guess in using digital RX and TX setups there are different issues that arise! So, to your kind advice - I unplugged the servo Dave, and no difference, which made me think it was the motor. I disconnected the ESC (and hence the power), added a battery input to the RX and all was ok! That made me realise that the power section was the problem, confirmed by a suggestion a fellow model Boater made about checking the battery - instead of chucking out 7.2v, it was giving about 5.3v! Recharged and hey presto - problem solved! Flat battery giving out interference!! Here's the system now behaving as it it should; https://youtu.be/VbGxC0VIo3A Thanks again for all the help and advice - very much appreciated. Regards, Eric

The electrics, drive & radio by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
The switch panel and wiring loom was made, tested and dry fitted a while ago and so it only needs securing to the bulkhead with four fixing screws, the two NiMh batteries were strapped down to the bearers with cable ties as close to the chines as possible and the XT60 connectors mated. I have read that placing the heavy batteries as far away from the keel as possible improves the handling, all other heavy items are centered along the keel for symmetry and should help the boat to sit evenly in the water. I’m not sure if I will need to do any ballasting, hopefully the maiden voyages should give me an indication. The prop shaft was greased and fitted, and with the prop, thrust washers and lock nuts in place, the clearance was adjusted and locked with some Loctite so the motor could then be installed. The initial motor alignment was made with a solid coupler which was then replaced with the universal joint, I took the precaution to grind a flat on the motor shaft so that the locking grub screw has better grip on the shaft. The grease tube was then fitted to the shaft clamp and secured to the side of the switch panel. The ESC was fixed to the back of the bulkhead with another couple of cable ties and the input cables, again XT60 types, and the three pole XT60 motor connectors mated. I have also fitted a Turnigy in-line volt, amp and watt meter in the circuit before the ESC so that I can log readings in case of spurious fuse blowing issues or unexpected battery life problems. The water cooling tubes were then run from the water pickup, through the ESC and then back to the transom ‘exhaust’ outlet, all water connections are fitted with spring clips to ensure water tight connections. I have used quite a large bore silicone tubing to ensure maximum water flow and made sure that all bends are kink and compression free. The R/C receiver is fixed to the rear cabin wall with some Velcro pads for easy removal, the two aerials were fitted in some plastic tubing at 90 degrees to each other as recommended for 2.4 gig systems and as high above the waterline as possible. The receiver is connected to a separate 4.8 volt NiMh battery via a changeover switch that also has a charging connection and LED power indicator, and I have also fitted a battery voltage indicator, just because they are cheap and convenient although the R/C system that I have has telemetry that reports RX voltage as standard. The battery charger I have chosen can handle the 16 cell series configuration of the drive batteries and so they can be charged in-situ when the main power switch is toggled over to the charge position. The RX and lighting batteries are charged separately. All of the servo and lighting switch cables are routed through the hull to the receiver through pre drilled holes in the bulkheads at high level for neatness and to retain the integrity of each compartment just in case 😲!!. The servo and cables and the water cooling tubes are strapped to a supporting bar between the bulkheads for neatness and security. With the TX switched on first, the RX is then powered up and the main power switch toggled to the ‘operate’ position, the ESC then gives a reassuring series of bleeps that confirm that all is well. The ESC was set up using a Turnigy programming card specifically for that model of controller and if required I can tweak the settings once the boat has had a few sailings. The last things to do now are to fit some strong magnets to hold the hatches and roofs down securely and then finally raise the RAF ensigns 😁

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Nick I am fairly certain your problems are mainly battery related. Do you use the Tamiya (white plug and socket) type battery connector? If so these can make a bad contact which then causes all kinds of unusual problems. We did get a good connection with the ESC working correctly. Subsequently the same set up had no power. This could be a flat battery or a bad connector not making contact. If you push and pull the connector and the set comes to life you have found the problem. Charging the flat battery should get you up and running again. Getting late now so perhaps we can have another attempt tomorrow Cheers dave

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Nick Just a thought we have been working on this for a few hours, is it possible your battery has run down and needs charging?. If nothing has changed from when it was working and there is now no power this seems the likely scenario Dave

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Hi Nick If your ESC has a BEC you use the throttle channel and the other channel for the rudder. The ESC can not be plugged into the battery connector as there will be no signal on that connector but all the lights will work as you are providing the correct voltage. The ESC should settle to solid red green. If green is showing this suggests the ESC is not finding a signal. I assume the batteries in the Tx are all ok and all connected in the correct way. If you have another TX/Rx you could check The ESC and Rudder servo to make sure they work OK using that set. Hopefully Doug will decipher the bind process but I would check the above first. The Viper has an on off switch and I assume this is working as you are powering everything. Dave

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 26 days ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

Sea Hornet by canabus Lieutenant   Posted: 28 days ago
Hi Jim I will be watching this built very close, as I have built one from original plans and also did the 25% as a future project. Because of the very limited engine and radio hatch, I design them larger, but, you are on the right path. I installed a 28mm brushless motor, 3S 2650mah Lipo battery with a 2 blade 32mm brass prop. I don't think the 25% bigger a one would require any more power as it a rocket. My hatches run down the deck planking lines, the original hatches are only for show. The engine starts from the front seat and finishes at the rear windscreen. I made up the cockpit floors etc. before I skinned the sides, a lot easier, also the floor is split over the keel with the seats one piece. Can-a-bus Canabus

Dirty Deeds by Krampus Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Trial run of "Dirty Deeds" at the Kochelsee, an alpine lake near the town of Murnau, Germany. Fiberglass barebones hull made in the UK, rest is scratch-built inspired in 1970s Bertram 38 with other elements from Bertram 42 and Bertram 46 convertibles. Originally running with 9.6v NIHM battery, now running much better with 10.8v. Re-powered boat at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA7YPn8sOj4

Jet Sprint Boat by philpjuk Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Dave,sorry the problem with sponson lift is with a prop driven strimmer powered boat,it is always the same sponson that lifts and this is due to prop torque.As it is a "pickle fork" type boat I am going to make it asymetric putting the hull nearer the lifting sponson and move the fuel tank and radio battery from behind the motor to the front.I asked the question to see if anyone thought I may have trouble with my jet boat,(this is a mono hull).This is all my fault,I insist on fitting engines with far too much power into every thing!cars,motorbikes and boats,(I have bought a coventy climax fire pump to fit in my 11 foot sailing dinghy!).

Motor suppression by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi all, have just finished testing the Caroline. Dry weight including battery was 13.2 Kilos. placed in paddling pool and she sits nice and level, I attached a set of fishing scales to the transome and tethered them to bench at end of pool. Slowly increased power and at full throttle gave a reading of 7kgs on the scale, at half throttle still showed 5kgs and water was lifting over poolside. Although pool is only 1ft longer than boat enough power to lift bow, in fact she tried to climb out. So well pleased with results👍. Battery lasted 1.25 hours at half throttle. So looking forward to her maiden voyage on Worcester Model Boat club open day, I feel like a 5 year old looking forward to xmas😊. My son is going to help me on the day as she's such a big lump, should realy have a slipway launch. Hope some of you will be there to watch. Going shopping now, fire boat needs a new battery for fire fighting pump. Best wishes Colin. (photo WITH BLUE BACKGROUND was before refurb)

Jet Sprint Boat by Rod Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Wayne This boat is being made for going up river rapids through boulders etc so it will be getting somewhat knocked around so I would be happy if it only receives a few scratches lol I take you point though but I havn't purchased the running gear yet Can't quite make my mind up on battery power or petrol engine I've got a bit of time yet to make a decision Cheers Rod

12 volt motors to esc,s by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Doug I do believe the FR15 uses the BEC to provide a 4.2v supply to the PIC chip. If you don't switch on the ESC it won't work. Just seen Sonars post so seems all is OK Dave

Wiring in a rx, an ESC and a battery (pack) by Haverlock Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
first take a deep breath and calm down its not rocket science. Question does your ESC have a battery eliminator ? if so take away the dry batteries to use in something else. Now your nicads connect to the POWER side of the esc. make sure you have the correct polarity. The servo plug from the ESC plugs into your receiver whichever is your throttle channel. If you have a modern set then you can put it on the wrong way round with no worries since positive is the centre post. The output of the ESC connect to your motor. If its a brushed motor no need to worry about polarity for now. With your ESC there should be some setup instructions if there are none ...... Usually its connect and switch on receiver then switch transmitter on with throttle full listen for beeps then go to low throttle. Switch receiver off. When you switch on in future make sure transmitter is switched on FIRST ok having gotten this far it only remains to check the direction of rotation of the motor. Take off the prop ( saves fingers) and put a piece of masking tale around end of prop shaft. Switch on transmitter switch on receiver and try the throttle. If the motor spins in correct direction fine if not Brushed motor swap the motor leads over Brushless motor swap any 2 of the 3 motor leads over. Job done have a cuppa then decide to sort out the rudder.