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>> Home > Tags > battery

battery
battery life
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batteries
battery
Sea Hornet by canabus Lieutenant   Posted: 4 hours ago
Hi Jim I will be watching this built very close, as I have built one from original plans and also did the 25% as a future project. Because of the very limited engine and radio hatch, I design them larger, but, you are on the right path. I installed a 28mm brushless motor, 3S 2650mah Lipo battery with a 2 blade 32mm brass prop. I don't think the 25% bigger a one would require any more power as it a rocket. My hatches run down the deck planking lines, the original hatches are only for show. The engine starts from the front seat and finishes at the rear windscreen. I made up the cockpit floors etc. before I skinned the sides, a lot easier, also the floor is split over the keel with the seats one piece. Can-a-bus Canabus

Bademenuss by Krampus Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 9 hours ago
Altered a Krick Lisa M model kit seeking realism. Inspired on 1970s 40, 42 and 43 Hatteras, Uniflite and Viking Double Cabin American yachts. 9v LED navigation lights system. Approx. 1/20 scale. Real boat could be nearly 39 x 13.7 feet. Similar real-life Hatteras 40 Double Cabin yacht measured 41 x 13.7 feet. Runs with NiMH 9.4v battery, an HPI Racing 1145 Gt 550 Motor 14.4V, and a 40mm 3 blade propeller.😁

Sailing for the First Time by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
In April 2011 I set a deadline to sail the model for the first time on July 10th. I had places to go and other things to get done, so I figured that was far enough ahead to have her ready in time. There were a lot of things that needed to get done if the model was going to sail; * Shape the still rough cut yards; fore course, fore tops'l, crossjack, and mizzen tops'l yards. * Complete the yard trusses with mast bands and banding to attach them to the yards * A gammon "iron" for the bowsprit. * Rudder control & steering. * New winch drum for braces (the originals with wood drums warped badly). * Sails for planned sailing suit; 3 tops'ls, spanker, and jib. She was basically jury-rigged, with all three course yards linked together to a single winch. July 9th's forcaste was for perfect weather, light northerly wind, blowing up the creek so if there was a problem, the model would drift back to me. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready by the 9th and the 10th was light, variable, fluky, 90°, and humid. The top mast fids were pulled and the topmasts lowered. The model with some tools, her ballast, and what I thought I might need were all placed in the truck the night before. The radio and main batter were put on charge. Next day we drove the couple of block down the street to the Sloop Cove public dock on Stoney Creek. The rig was raised, ballast attached, electronics connected and tested, and she went into the water. With her ballast and extra lead I had she still sat 2" high in the water. I set her out, but the iffy light wind sent he back, then she threatened to get tangled with a powerboat on a lift until I managed to squeek her out into open water. She sailed a bit, but just when she'd get moving the wind would shift or reflect off something and catch her aback. Then suddenly she stopped responding at all. Something of a gust caught her and she headed for a dock. I headed over, which meant swimming, and not being a great swimmer realized I should have brought my flotation vest from my sailboat along. It being so hot, the swim wasn't exactly unwelcome, but it was a lot of work. The model sailed right into the end of a dock about 100 feet away, bounced on her forestay, and basically parked there. I got her back to shore looking like a drowned cat myself, but there was no damage at all to the model. As it turned out, the main battery failed.

what fittings for a plane prop by canabus Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi All Have a look on the Hobbyking site, the motors generally have prop size, thrust, battery and hairy plane weight.

what fittings for a plane prop by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi Sonar If you are buying a motor and prop together chances are all the fittings will be provided. You mention an ad so are you buying a model plane? If so a suitable motor and prop should be suggested. As an ex flyer this can be difficult to get right and the overall weight plays a big part in your choice. If it's too heavy it will fly like a brick so motor prop and battery need to be chosen to suit the type of plane. Just like boats some are fast and others slow and the prop needs to be right for the plane. If you have decided on a particular model it would help to know what it is, please? Dave

SG&K 1920 Gentlemans Runabout Mk2 by canabus Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi All I have started my redesigned runabout by increasing the length to 860mm. The motor and ESC will move to under the removal dash for better weight balance. Increase the engine hatch to get the Lipo battery, receiver and servo into. This will be hidden by the deck planking and the original hatch size will get it back to scale look. Brushless motor 3639-1100kv,3S battery, 60A car ESC and 37mm 3 blade prop.

Masts, mast steps, inside the hull, the rudder by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
The model's lower masts are made of white cedar. These were cut square, a taper hand-planed in, made 8-sided, then round. The bands are the same brown paper tape the hull was covered in. A visit to the real ship in Baltimore to get measurements, and look at some artifacts netted me some bits of live oak original to the ship. The Navy began stockpiling live oak for ship-building in 1816 with the Gradual Increase Act. It was from these stockpiles that Constellation was built. These trees were as much as 200 years old when cut, so this wood I have could be as much as 400 years old. I wasn't sure how to incorporate this bit of the ship into the model, and opted to make the mast steps from it. One piece is the size of a business card and stamped USS Constellation 1854. I'll stamp the year she's finally finished and my name into that and install it as her builder's plate. The masts step on what I call her mechanical decks. These are simple 3/8" plywood panels where her mechanics and controls will be mounted. Beams were epoxied into the hull for them, and they are held in place with brass wood screws. The aft deck is where the mizzen steps and the rudder servo is mounted. The battery lies on it's own deck just abaft the main mast as low as it can possibly be inside the hull. The cross-section drawing shows deck beams, decks, ballast rods, the external ballast, etc etc etc. The rudder is made from Plexiglas as shown in it's drawing. A brass tube passes through the stern that the rudder's head just fits into. There's no room behind the rudder head for a bell-crank setup to work, so I again went with real boat tech and installed a tiller, made of copper plate soldiered to a set-collar. There's a couple of pictures of the aluminum tubes for the ballast rods in there. You may want to right-click on an image, like the drawings, and "View Image" then click on it to see it full size and legible. Use the browser's "back" button to get out of that.

Dirty Deeds by Krampus Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
Trial run of "Dirty Deeds" at the Kochelsee, an alpine lake near the town of Murnau, Germany. Fiberglass barebones hull made in the UK, rest is scratch-built inspired in 1970s Bertram 38 with other elements from Bertram 42 and Bertram 46 convertibles. Originally running with 9.6v NIHM battery, now running much better with 10.8v. Re-powered boat at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA7YPn8sOj4

Berrinche by Krampus Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
22.5 inches RC boat inspired on 1970s Chris-Craft Commander 36, 42 and 45 footer boats. Model equivalent to a real-life 36 footer vessel. Barebones fiberglass hull from a UK manufacturer. Powered with a brushed 500 motor, 30A controller, 9.6v NIHM battery. Video made during first trial at the Eibsee lake in Bavaria, Germany.

Gentlemans Cruiser by muddy Captain   Posted: 9 days ago
Hello Doug, know what you mean about ring saw's, when i was apprentice we had a type of ringsaw that was retained on its former or mandrel by a couple of 6BA screws, it wern't the best idea but they did work but blade life was limited when cutting into Trunking and switchgear even with a cutting paste/oil. But Black and Decker appeared at about this erra with their ring saw and it was a much better idea, but being new they were expensive. Bought this set about 15 years ago from Machine Mart, think they are "eastern" copies and ok on/in wood. Like your setup of the wood bits but i only have a battery drill here not a bench or pillar drill, so dont know if they would be suitable. In my case it was more of how much, and instant availability. Thinking back and i still use this method sometimes is to simply wrap sandpaper, about a 180 grade around a piece of 1/4" dowel or larger to suit the required radius, and it is surprising how quickly the "clean-up/radi" appears ..lol..Cheers Muddy ....

Lindow common. by philpjuk Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 10 days ago
Only had one button!as you said,once for right twice for left and once again for straight.Not galloping ghost,I flew that in a "sparky"it was sort of mechanical pulse proportional.Mine had a motorised wooden drum with a triangle of tinplate fastened to it so it reached around drum at one end and finished just short of the other.A moveable wiper slid along the drum so you could get anything from no signal to continuous.As you say the reciever relay pulsed a mighty midget against a spring.It had many problems,the battery drain was high,the thing was continualy twitching and if you flew out of range you got full rudder and a spin!Things are so different now,reliable gear at reasonable prices.But I still cannot remember how that throttle worked!.

Gentlemans Cruiser by muddy Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
Hello, The keel was cut on the 13th of May 2017. Power tools are the secret, i would not like to be without the Proxxon table saw, and or the B&D jigsaw plus a Battery drill, makes life a lot easier. The longest job so far has been the Deck planking, it's more like anger management..lol... Hope this helps, regards Muddy....

Gentlemans Cruiser by muddy Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
Running gear or furniture.. Once the skeleton or frame was completed it's a good idea to dry fit all the running gear, Drive motors shaft's and prop's, plus the radio gear and battery boxes/trays, and even sound unit locations. Then start the skinning. This hull has very curvy bottom skins, in that they turn from the transom to the bow 90 degrees sharply. Tried some test pieces of vertical grain ply, ( 1.5mm ) but it was the same as horizontal grain.. Skins were placed in as large as pieces as possible at about 45 degrees to the keel, or planking in ply.. Not a pretty sight, but makes life a lot easier. The skins were dry fitted with brass pins first, mainly to assist in the cutting of the skin shape. When the bottom skins were completed and rough trimmed the side skins were applied and these were vertically grained, again makes life a lot easier and they fall onto the stringers, means less brass pins and elastic bands. Not forgetting to drill some 1" holes in the breast-hook and No; 1 former, as i always pour in a little Fibre glass resin to help seal the bow section and add some strength. Regards Muddy....

"OUR LASS" by GYJOE Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 11 days ago
Hi All, I'm building the Trawler "OUR LASS",Access to engine,battery not much room.As anyone who has built this model put an extra hatch In the shelterdeck?if so how did it work out Regards Joe

Fairy Huntsman by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
As this is a refurbishment chances are it was fitted with an IC engine in which case you need to remove all the gunge and heavy mounting blocks from inside the hull as well as checking the propshaft and bearings. If you can get the weight reduced then I would expect a speed 600 motor with a 30 to 40 mm prop should suffice. A 20/25 watt ESC powered by a NiMh would also be suitable and keep the weight down. If you use racing props the current will be greater than if you use brass 3 blade props, and the bigger the prop the greater the current. As a general rule the prop should have a diameter of no greater than that of the motor. The voltage of the NiMh must not exceed the max voltage the ESC can handle. A higher voltage will reduce the current draw so a 9.6v may be better than a 7.2v and give a longer run time. If you already have batteries for other models I would use those but SLA's are heavy and may hinder planing. If you already use LiPos then make sure your ESC can stand the voltage and has a built in cut off to protect the battery.