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>> Home > Tags > boat building

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Springer Pusher Tug by AllenA Commander   Posted: 19 hours ago
I think it's about time I added a recovery boat to my harbour. Something quite simple will do. I have seen the ZippKits Springer/Pusher and fancy this as the nights draw in. Has anyone any experience of building the ZippKits model or any suggestions as to an alternative would be welcome.

KeilKraft 1974 by marky Commander   Posted: 3 days ago
if you go into the plans section go to thethe one called tamar life boat it was origanally posted by Sonar at the bottom of the tamar section click on back to home this goes to a eezibuild home page that has all the plans ,building tips and loads of pictures ,the plans are a free download or print ,they print in the original size so A3paper has to be taped together ,I am currently building the 50+RAF fire boat

Re Boat Harbour entries by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
You beat me to mentioning this, Doug You are quite correct the Boat Harbour section of the Forum is for members to show their finished models as well as give details of the power set up etc. A picture is really needed to show off the model in all its glory. If you are able to posts in the Build Blog section are very welcome and do produce encouraging and helpful responses from members, who also benefit from seeing how others tackle their builds. There are other specific sections where members can post to share experiences or seek help for specific topics. Some members use Tablets or Mobile devices to view and it could be Stephen may need to make it easier for these users to access the relevant sections and post pictures. All posts are welcome but pictures do add greatly to the impact, and I suggest that any member who has a problem posting, sends Fireboat, Stephen a pm so he can address the issue. happy building and posting Dave

Cabin Repair by canabus Commander   Posted: 14 days ago
Hi All Started on fixing the bits I broke in removing the old paint. The forward window had a gap in the middle to the deck, so I added timber behind the bottom of the window and filled in the gap. Masking tape to the deck and combing, a lump of filler, sit the cabin down and wait for the filler to dry. Remove cabin, masking tape, trim and sand down. As the aft of the cabin sits over the deck a fair bit, I added a plywood piece back to the combing so to strengthen the aft cabin area and replaced the bottom section under one of the windows. Remodelling this boat and building the SG&K 1920 Gentleman's Runabout is keeping me busy!!! This retirement is great, but, I still liked my old job. Canabus

Sea Queen refurbishment by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 19 days ago
RNinMunich, I presume you are situated in Munich. We can get helium in several places here in the UK. Even one high street shop, ARGOS. It is also available through AMAZON. Don't know if that's of any help or even if you were serious as to where you could get it ?? I am 66 (almost 67, in 4 weeks)and have been boat modelling since the age of nine and have also progressed from IC and Taycol to brushless but still use all types. Have also gone into purchasing ready to run, but still get a buzz from the building the model from a kit, have even shrunk and enlarged from plans to build other size models. I haven't tried the 3D printers, not sure about that side of it yet. I find this site a very interesting and helpful place. But I am not as adventurous as some with all the detail they go into. Please keep adding info to this site.

Sea Queen refurbishment by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
I have always embraced new technology and agree some of the older skillsets are fast disappearing as it is now possible to design and build almost anything from an electronic gizmo. I embrace these new techniques and have delved into 3d CAD and printers and can now make most of the bits I need. I started like many born just after the war with plastic kits followed by balsa and tissue planes, model trains, cars, boats then into electronics and early RC. I get great pleasure from the building either scratch or kit but I do worry that many prefer to just buy the finished product. I still have my IC engines and planes from my flying days but for all but the fast racers, brushless more than meets the power requirements for our scale models, but I don't deny or object to the many who still enjoy IC and have access to permitted venues. Battery power has improved over the years and Lithium batteries are capable of delivering massive power at little weight. Provided they are handled and treated correctly they are safe to use but rather like fireworks incorrect handling can be unpredictable and dangerous. This refurbishment really goes back to basics and will result in a model being restored and enjoyed for many years and Colin has certainly shown us some new techniques. I doubt if some of the off the shelf newer models will survive quite so long. Dave

Sea Queen refurbishment by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi All, Good luck all you Retros. My Sea Scout renovation (and Taycol Target conversion) were enough for me in that direction. Nostalgia is fine, up to a point, but I'm trying to embrace the present and the future. Maybe it's a result of spending 30 years trundling round the world discussing with navies and shipyards and surveying ships under refit or new construction and noting the massive advancements in construction technique and installed equipment. A vastly different perspective to most perhaps, but somehow we have to go forward as well as respect the past. We all stand on the shoulders of the greats who went before us, but they showed us the way - not the destination! OK I admit I have also built/bought ships of WW2, out of admiration of their histories and those of the men who fought in them, and also admit that my first attempt, HMS Hotspur was built copying the construction techniques of Aerokits (at 14 I didn't know any better), but my next project will be modern: T45 the new Daring Class. (Saw her in the fitting out dock at BAE😊, the modules under construction in the halls were also most impressive - looked huge from the ground 😲) I also have a few experimental odds and ends in the 'kitchen': foam delta wing flying-boat, hovercraft, airship (where do I get the damn helium? Hydrogen I can produce - simple hydrolysis, but don't want to send the flat into orbit 🤔) Please don't get me wrong, and all jump down my throat, but I'm missing the progress and the connections to modern technology (e.g. 3D printing - exception: Midlife👍) which will encourage youngsters to follow in our footsteps and stand on our shoulders! 🤔 Maybe rolfman got it right; 'It's an age thing!' My challenge at almost 66 is to combine the best of the past with what is possible NOW! OK, I'm off my soapbox now 😉 Happy building (however you want do it) and always a hand-width water under your keel 😊 Cheers Doug 😎 PS I forgot to add: I am in no way denigrating the superb workmanship I have seen in various Build Blogs; for example I recently spent an entire day reviewing with wonderment Robbob's build blog, magnificent and I learned a lot. But where do we go from here?

SG&K 1920 Gentlemans Runabout Mk2 by Alan999 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi Canabus I am watching your boat building with hot interest I am building Chris Craft Riva from scratch so your boat is similar. Good luck Alan

Sea Queen refurbishment by canabus Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Guys Looks like we have the same boats!!! I have a Sea Hornet(built from the original plans), Crash Tender 48", Sea Commander and I bought a Precedent Huntsman 31(fibreglass hull)with building instructions. The instructions were sold as plans, but, with a lot of time with a photocopier they could be turn into plans. Or scan into AutoCAD and resized!!! My mate has a Swordsman which he finally finished after over 40 years(with plans). All the boats are running brushless motors. Canabus

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

Smoke Generator (Water Vapour type) by andyhynes Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
I recently required a smoke generator (ultrasonic Type) it is not in working order but I have rigged it up to test and bypassed the circuit board powered by 2 X 12 volt batteries and managed to get the vapourising unit to function, and the 12 volt fan motor with a separate supply to also work. With some work to replace the 12v to 24v converter CN6009 it should satisfactory. This unit appears to be a DIY job but very similar to MMB Foggy Smoke Generator which is available. Note the component required CN6009 I have sourced on ebay. Soon as it arrives I will set it up and test its suitability for a 1/24 scale TID tug boat model I am building. Problem might be size of smoke generator and other components required to fit in the hull in addition to a 12 volt 9ah battery scooter battery, there aint much space. There are smaller smoke generators available which burn oil (fan powered) which I have in one of my other models (Blazer Tug Boat) which is OK with no wind and close up but at any distance hard to detect if any smoke is being produced. The Oil recommend for this unit is Baby Oil which smells OK but I have wondered if I could use another oil based fluid which would produce more smoke (Any suggestions)?

Ship's Boats by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Building a model ship often means building several models because most ships have boats. Constellation had six. My method for building boats is nearly the same for building larger hulls and real boats - planks over forms. I have a 1:12th scale drawing of Constellation's boat's in particular from the National Archives. They not only printed me a copy, but gave me a .tif image which I easily re-scaled to 1:36. I reproduced the lines as forms extended to a baseline so the boat could be built upside down. I drew each boat's patterns and arraged each to fit on a sheet of copy paper. I print this on a full sheet label so I can rough cut them, stick them on the form material, and then cut the forms. I had a few sheets of 1/8" balsa sheet and that's what I cut the forms from. A pine plank was used for the building-board, and marked where each station would go, then the forms were glued on making sure each was 90° to the form and square to the center-line. A note on the build-board, it doesn't have to be as wide as the boat, and should, in fact, be narrower. Then you can access inside the sheer and planking and removing the boat from the forms will be much easier. A small plank of 3/4" stock will let you get rubber bands completely around the model, and it will also fit in a vice which is very convenient. The edges of the forms are shaped so the planks will lie flat on the surface, and not teeter on the corners. Using balsa makes this easy work, though you have to be careful not to snap them off the build board. I started with the ship's 1st cutter, which is a lap-strake, or clinker-built boat. (Only the launch is carvel planked) It's frames are 1/16" thick bass strips 3/32" wide. Each frame is dipped in ammonia and bent over it's form. I put a dab of glue at the ends that would eventually be cut off to hold it to the form, but for the frames on the wine-glass and hollow forms at the ends I used rubber bands to pull them into shape. Part of the reasoning behind using balsa for the forms is if anything gets glued that shouldn't, it's the form and not the model that will give-way first. The stem, stern-post, and keel are 1/16" bass, assembled together while flat. First the top corners of the keel were planed off to make a sort of rabbet. The transom is also bass as it stays in the boat. The transom is cut taller to reach the build-board, and partially cut at what will be it's top to make it easier when it's time to detach the boat. It's glued to the stern post and the build-board, the keel is glued to each frame, and the stem is glued to the build-board. This pretty much forms the rigid skeleton of the boat. There's two ways to represent lapstrake planking on so small a model. One way is to sand each plank so it's half as thick at it's top edge as its bottom. The planks are butted on the boat, thick against thin, giving the impression of overlapped planks. I chose to actually overlap the planks because the inside of the boat is open to view. Since each plank of a lapstrake boat overlaps the one below it, each plank has to be spieled, or shaped to fit, and the boat must be planked from the keel to the sheer. I divide the length of the widest frame from the keel to the sheer into the number of planks I want, then divide the lengths of the stem and the stern by this number. You'll find the planks will get narrow forward, and flare wider back aft. You may have to experiment a bit with the number of planks so maintain at least 2 scale inches forward and not more than 5 scale inches aft, or the planking will look nonsensical and out-of-scale. I planked the cutter in 1/32" thick bass. The first planks are the garboards, next to the keel. The next plank I places a strip of card along side and used a piece of plank against the edge of the wood plank to mark the card. The marks are actually the bottom edge of the plank. Each plank is shaped on it's bottom edge to the plank before, and it's top edge is straight. Then I dip it in ammonia and clamp it in place, where "clamps" are rubber bands, blocks of wood, pins, clothes pins, whatever works. Again, a narrow build-board allows the rubber bands to pull in as you reach the sheer rather than pulling them away from the boat. Once your brain gets wrapped around spieling, the planking will move along. But don't try to do too much too fast or you'll just get frustrated and ruin everything. Take lots of breaks. The planks need to be sanded thinner at their ends, almost to nothing, depending how much of a rabbit was cut into the stem. At the stern they run right off the transom and are cut flush. You can notch the transom into step for each plank to fit into, of fill the little gaps where they overlap with putty later. Since they're getting painted, I used putty. When the planking is done up to the sheer, it's best to add rub rails and strakes while the boat's still on the forms. I then finished the cut in the transom, cut off the stem near the build-board, and nipped off each frame where it was glued to the form. Then carefully lift the boat off the forms. Some form may have come off with it, and some spots may need to be reglued. I installed frames between each of the ones the boat was built on, putting a frame about every scale foot. Seat clamps, floor boards, seats, oar notches, lifting eyes, mast steps, etc, are all added bit-by-bit. before you know it, you've got another model boat. I'll get into the launch next.

fire boat by marky Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
hopefuly get the parts on Monday i have never built anything radio controlled before as i came late to this addiction so its all a learning curve i am going to do the build with my grandson so may get another one cut and we can work in tandem .i only have a few more years of the facilities left ,i am hoping to stockpile lots of different boats someone at the work has a clyde puffer so i will scrounge a copy of that ,stockpile and spend my dotage building away to my hearts content

fire boat by marky Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
its the eezebilt 50+RAF fire tender 20"long all the plans are in the plans section under free plans inc tamar lifeboat posted by Sonar at the bottom of the Tamar plans is a link to home page if you click the link it lets you access all the eezebilt plans ,building tips etc .

Any members in Bavaria or nearby? by Krampus Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Dear crewmembers, I'm based in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. This town is about 1 hour south from Munich. I'm looking to initiate a scale boat modeling group with folks within the region. Language, background, etc is not an issue. Just passion for the hobby and desire to show-off your boats or just to chat about anything boat-building. Please drop me a line if interested!