Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
December 2018: 4 people
November 2018: 11 people
October 2018: 9 people
September 2018: 13 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 11 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (12)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > bow

bow
bow
HMS BRAVE BORDERER by bubbletop409 Seaman   Posted: 3 days ago
You are correct in your thinking. The component is called a spray rail and is mounted at the chine line from bow to stern. The spray rail provides additional lift so planning can be achieved at a slightly lower speed, and at the same time deflects the spray down and out from the side of the boat at speed.

Being Sociable. by Newby7 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 10 days ago
Hi Gary Thanks for thinking of the up load it's nice to hear from people on this site I started the build of the Puffer frames are cut and mounted on my building board looking good so far now that I have it set up I'm looking at bow and stern to see how to proceed will try and up date but I'm bad I don't do pictures . Rick

Smoke generator by landie Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 11 days ago
Mine is still in the "pile of bits on the bench" stage but when I figure out how to package it I'll post some pics. The model it's going into is HMS Cadiz, battle class destroyer which is around 1:96 scale so there's not a huge amount of space available, especially as the funnel is currently above the radio gear and batteries so I'll need to pipe the steam from the spare compartment I have nearer the bow.

Assembling the keel & adding bulkhead formers. by rolfman2000 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Coming along nicely Robbob. As the saying goes "Don't talk to me about balsa bow blocks" 😆 And yes, you don't have to do those yet lol. I may just follow you with one of these to run alongside my original Veron one from 1966/7. Hope they have them for sale soon . Best wishes, Dave W 😊

Assembling the keel & adding bulkhead formers. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
With the box assembled and the glue fully cured the next stage is to glue the inner keel parts together and fix it to the underside of the box. The keel consists of four pieces that need to be jointed whilst on a flat surface, the instructions suggest that the parts are best assembled whilst laid over the plan with a transparent protective sheet between to ensure accurate alignment. A gap is left in the keel for the prop shaft and this gap is laminated over by some additional keel pieces on either side. I chose to deviate from the instructions here and fit these pieces after the prop shaft was in place to ensure a snug fit, I have it on order from Model Boat Bits along with the prop and rudder. The assembled keel is glued in place along the centre line of the inverted box and when dry the bulkhead formers can be added. The positions of all the formers are clearly marked on the box and the underside formers are added first followed by the side formers and lastly the bow formers, and the assembly set aside to dry. I’d almost forgotten how easy it is to work with balsa, it takes glue and pins readily and assembling this model is a joy, however, shaping the solid balsa bow blocks to the correct profiles will be an interesting challenge. But I don’t need to do that for a while yet.

Proboat UL19 by boaty Admiral   Posted: 20 days ago
Just had a new Proboat UL19 Hydroplane delivered. Has anyone had any experience with one. It says 4 to 6S lipo but it mentions not to run flat out all the time on 6S and advises to reduce power in the turn to save the electrics overheating. Never had this info with my Backjack 29 and new Sonic Wake as both don't overheat when at full throttle. For some reason the UL19 has a larger prop fitted than the two other boats and the Blackjack has an Octura prop which I got from Prestwich Model Boats and goes very well. The motor in the UL19 is the same as the one in the Blackjack. My theory is that as the UL19 is a hydroplane which when set up is heavier at the bow and will need an extra burst of power to get it up on the plane. Boaty😁

Gusty Cat by tomarack Commander   Posted: 23 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 39"/7000g Gusty Cat Single Propellor (3 Blade 35mm) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HK ESC - Comments: Gusty Cat is model of Thames sailing barge staysail class with auxiliary motor (no bowsprit)

Brixham trawler IBEX by sam Petty Officer   Posted: 30 days ago
Edward, Yes - thinking out problems is half the fun😊 My first build was a Vic Smeed Starlet - just completed. Pretty straight forward but I over engineered it to try out some ideas - thinking the ideas through was great fun. So although I will not start the Cariad until January I'm trying to explore problems now. The angle of the rudder shaft is one that I think I have a solution to. Take it right through the deck then put a handle onto it, hinged at the shaft so that it does not rise and fall as it is turned. Then a Bowden cable from each side of the cockpit to power the steering. I will enjoy building a mock up and trying it out! As to the rudder, I am thinking of a detachable extension - downwards. I'm also thinking about placing the prop to one side - perhaps more authentic but also well clear of the rudder. One thing that I'm still thinking through is the access hatch. I see some builders move the dingy to the centre and create a hatch here but I like the clean decking on the original, with the dingy to the side. A hatch to the side would work for everything but the top screw for the detachable keel. Some more time dreaming up a solution. Thanks Sam

36" Thames River Police Launch by Robbob by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Rookeysailor. The kit is, I understand, due for release by Vintage Model Works any time now. I think that they are awaiting some of the white metal fittings from the manufacturer that are included in the kit. RE: price, probably best to contact Mike Cummings at VMW to confirm the above and the pricing. rolfman2000. I'm afraid you'll still need to carve the bow, but I bet you can get a better result than uncle Cyril now! I hope you enjoy my blog. Robbob.

36" Thames River Police Launch by Robbob by rolfman2000 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
The original Veron kit of the Thames police launch was the first kit I ever made, and as I was only 12 at the time, my Uncle Cyril was called in to carve the balsa blocks on the bow (and a right mess he made of them too). So I had to do a bit of filling. But the boat is still sat in our garage some 53 years later, and is still available. I often thought of bringing it up to date with a new one, so maybe the time has arrived. I'll keep a watch on this build, and bide my time. Thanks Robbob. Next wishes, Dave W 😊

36" Thames River Police Launch by Robbob by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
After the successful build of the ‘Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a ‘Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately £2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of £48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more ‘hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as ‘strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone ‘off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by kevinsharpe Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Lyle. Note your comments on planing strikes or the hard chine hull. I have a 52" Veron FPB. Powered by two Graupner 900 motors. When she gets up on the plane loads of wash coming over the rear deck. Am I right in thinking that if I fit a strake to each side of the hull at the bottom of the vertical skin and flush with the bottom of it it will assist in planing and keep wash away from the rear deck. If I fit them I intend to flare them towards the bow. Regards Kevin

Landing Ship Tanks (WW2) by camyaj Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
Went to Tobruk from Toulon on one and returned during mid 60's run by merchant navy and a lot of chinese depending which engineer was on we got to swim in the bow section. Not if the scots engineer was on as he had the hump due he got nowhere with his ''see you jimmy '' as we were all either Scots Greys or Black Watch. No tanks just soft skins and armoured cars plus our 2 choppers. Also used in Aden but that was a short trip up the coast that was everything and Carriers big flag waving exercise

Landing Ship Tanks (WW2) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Mornin' John, For floating out the LCTs! This later version had a big ramp over the bow (no bow doors) and a floodable well deck for LCTs, LCPs and LCACs (known as 'LCacks'!). A huge hole right through about 2/3s of the ship 😲 Was awesome to behold, once I'd stopped meself falling into it! Tanks and trucks over the bow ramp, assault troops via LCPs and LCacks out of the blunt end! We fitted VHF/UHF/HF COMMS and datalink systems. When the Brazilian Navy carrier NaeL Minas Gerais, see pic (ex Colossus class HMS Vengeance) was finally scrapped the radios and digital intercom system we had fitted to her in the 90s was transferred to one of these Newport class LSTs. 2nd pic shows her in Rio de Janeiro harbour,Guanabara Bay, where I worked on her. Behind her are three Niteroi class frigates (Vosper MK10s) which we also fitted with HF/VHF/UHF COMMS and Digital Intercom. Good times!😉 3rd pic shows her sad end on a scrapping beach in India, the last of the WW2 RN Colossus class😭 Abraços, Doug 😎

Landing Ship Tanks (WW2) by Nerys Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
I have a hankering to build an LST and although I could probably build a reasonable representation from photos, I would like to get hold of some plans. There seem to be plans available for the smaller landing craft like LCTs and LCMs but nothing for LSTs, the only ocean going landing craft of WW2. Over a thousand were built, all in the USA, despite being a British conception, only 113 were actually built for the Royal Navy. They were 328 ft long with 50 ft beam and were fitted with ballast tanks, similar to submarine types to enable them to run well up onto a beach to unload their cargo of tanks and other vehicles. They only needed 3ft6ins water under the bow to beach. Doors opened and a ramp came down. Really they were the forerunners of the RoRo ferry. My interest in building one is because my late father, a Lieutenant Commander, RNR, captained LST 368. all through the North Africa, Sicily and Italian campaigns. Would be pleased to hear if anyone can help me locate plans. Cheers, Nerys.