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>> Home > Tags > brass prop

brass prop
prop
prop shaft
prop tube
propeller
propshaft
propshaft alignment
propshop
racing prop
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brass tube
brass prop
Rubber stopper wick & element by Joe727 Admiral   Posted: 23 hours ago
In the previous post in the video, note that a black rubber stopper is inserted into a brass tube soldered to the tin container. Starting with the element again, select proper length of heater wire by applying voltage to lengths as show previous. Crimped wire to one end. Next photo shows a rubber stopper, I use my drill press to drill to straight holes to allow the voltage supply wire to pass through it. Then I put together a wick with a brass rod (1/16") to provide support and to secure it to the stopper. Brass rod with wick is pushed thru the stopper, drill a pilot hole for the brass rod centered in the stopper. See photos, the supply wires will come thru the stopper at each side of the wick. Put one wire through the stopper, then I wrapped the heating element around the wick. This is tricky and took several attempts to get it done cleanly. The supply wire for the end is then fed back through the stopper. This is a weak part of the design as it must run back to the stopper without touching the heater element. It does work, but I will try to improve on this. This entire assembly fits into the tin can and is the correct length to just submerge the bottom portion of the wick and not the wires. I forgot to do a sketch showing a section through this, but will try tomorrow. Joe

Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build by andyhynes Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 day ago
I have the hull. I have the fittings from battlecraft and excellent they are too. I also have 4 brass props plus the A frames. All i need is the time a space to start this build. First i need a larger shed. Too much work and no play! makes Jack a dull boy😊

Build by Joe727 Admiral   Posted: 7 days ago
The heating elements in the hairdryer had two different wire gauges as elements. I removed the lighter gauge thinking they would probably draw less current. I am attempting to use 6 volts as that is what my boat is. 1. First Photo: Took a length of element and stretched it out as shown, started with a longer piece about 8". If you are at 12v probably longer. Use some alligator clip jumpers and attached to one end, ran it to negative terminal of my 6v SLA. Took another jumper and attached to a point on the wire, say about 7". JUST TOUCH the other end to the battery positive to see if it glowed, it did not. So just moved about 3/8" at a time till it glowed - See Photo. CAUTION, make certain you have a nonflammable surface to work on, I used a tile scrap. IT GETS HOT FAST AND WILL BURN, DON'T ASK ME HOW I KNOW. That's why I just touch the terminal till it glows then stop, let it cool for a while. 2. Cut element to length, than take your 16 gauge wire and the crimp tube shown in earlier post. Insert both into the tube and crimp it. I used a side cutter and carefully just squeezed enough. Make sure that the element will not pull out. Do the other end. Because I am using only 6 volts, I had flattened out the wire to give me more wraps on the wick. See photo and note. 3. In the lid of the box, I located the fan at one end, the exhaust stack at the other. Drilled a hole matching the fan opening and secured with two screws, drill small pilot holes so as not to crack the plastic. Drill hole to match brass tube OD, tube is about 1" long or so. Super glued brass tube in place. Excuse the sloppy copper sheet work on the inside of the lid, it was an experiment at the time. I added this a a bit of a heat sheild as the wick and element would sit below this. 4. Next photos show the interior of the box, not the best photos of the process as this was already built.... The mint tin set inside the plastic box was an idea to do two things; first isolate the heating element from the plastic,and two, provide a smaller vessel for the fluid. You may want to just use a metal container instead of the plastic box, again I was just using what I had on hand. The wick is laying in the tin with the element propped up at on end to keep it out of the fluid. Photo shown does not show much fluid in place. This needs some work, but worked for this test. Experiment, just be sure that the lower portion of the wick is in the fluid and the element wire wrap is above the fluid level. For the test, I used some mineral oil and a bit of glycerin, smoked very well. It's late so I will run it and photograph tomorrow. Cheers, Joe (Excuse the Imperial rather than metric)

Motor, mount & prop-shaft. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
The prop-shaft, coupling and motor mount that I ordered from ModelBoatBits has arrived so it seems a good a good time to make up a supporting wedge for the mount to fix to. I do have a rigid brass motor alignment aid that I used when building the Crash Tender but do you think I can find it in the workshop?....nope! 😡 I expect it will turn up when I need it least! 🤞 Not wanting to waste time I used a length of heat shrink tubing over the motor coupling to make it as rigid as possible, a trick I had seen done elsewhere, and this enabled me to position the motor on its mount in the desired position and measure the angle that the mounting wedge needs to be made to. I used an offcut of beech that I had in the workshop which I cut to size and then shaped it on the rotary sander that I bought in Lidl, fantastic piece of kit !!. The wedge was then drilled to take the nylon motor mount and also the fixing screws that pass through the beech block, through the balsa base of the box and into the ply reinforcing plate that I put in during early construction of the hull. After cleaning up the hole through the keel the prop-shaft was keyed with some abrasive, smeared with some epoxy and then pushed through to mate with the motor coupling. I used the excess epoxy resin around the shaft inside the hull and used some packing tape to stop it running out when I inverted the hull to seal the lower end. A quick spin on the motor confirmed that the alignment was spot-on and the hull set aside while the epoxy set. The next step will be to plank the deck.

Railings by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
I have made just a couple of bits for different models. As well as used it to make something for my granddaughters dolls house. But I keep a supply just in case I need it for the model boats and cars. This is the mast I first made from it on my 28" RAF Crash Tender. I shrunk the plan parts on a scanner and made it from 90% balsa. The water trial was a bit of a failure as the brass prop was too large and 4 bladed. I have since invested in 3 smaller ones 30, 25, and 20mm 3 bladed brass but not got around to another sea trial yet. Also as you can see she still needs to be finished with painting. I will get round to it one day.

Propshaft Lubrication by scout13 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 23 days ago
I have always used wheel bearing grease. I have a brass tube fitted to the prop shaft which is the same diameter as a grease nipple so slides into the grease gun Yours Brian

Electric Barbarella by Krampus Admiral   Posted: 24 days ago
Ahoy Maties! It's been a long time since my last posting. Happy 2019! I just completed my new scratch-built boat "Electric Barbarella". I tried to recreate (with some liberties) one of my favorite boats of all time, the 30-footer Chris Craft Sportsman built during the 1970s. It measures 24 X 8.5 inches. It is powered with a 9.6 NiMH 4200 mAh battery "nunchuck" pack (like the one used for paintball guns), brushless motor attached to a 30A Mtroniks Hydra controller and a 30mm M4 3-bladed brass propeller. The hull (my own on-the-go design) was made out of Balsa wood which later I fiberglassed. For the superstructure I utilized 2mm ABS plastic sheet material. To my surprise the boat turned to be a very stable and forgiving platform. I really feel a very close connection to this vessel as it is my first own hull design.😁

Island Master by IslandMaster Seaman   Posted: 30 days ago
[Score: 9/10] 56" Island Master Capable of 5mph and a runtime of 120mins Single Propellor (3 Blade) Direct Drive to a 2.25"D. x 4" can style (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (24v) 12Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Robbe maxi 540 (10Amps) ESC - Comments: A 84lb. monster with a 4 3/4" brass prop and kort nozzle. Started in 1964, scratch built from original plans from the builder. More to come!

Day Two Springer by Joe727 Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. If you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe

Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug by Joe727 Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe

New bits by steve-d Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Right, just been given some nice bits. Brushless outrunner FUSION 3535/05 1500kv ESC Top Edge 60A water cooled SC060B Plus a coupling. So now to go shopping. Which make of Lipo3 and from where? What type and size of brass prop? Where to buy silicon wires and the fancy gold terminals? Steve

aeronaut classic by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Simon, I used the lacquer on the blue and white as well. It 'flattened' the paint and made it real hard and smooth 😊 The whole time consuming but satisfying process is described in incredibly boring 😉 detail in my blog- 'Jessica - Sea Scout restoration' (or was it renovation ??😲 Go easy with the lacquer on top of the varnish, not too heavy in one coat, or it may cause hairline surface cracks as it dries due to surface tension. 😡 Motor is a Propdrive 2832, 1000kV driving a 35mm 3 blade brass prop from Raboesch. Running on a 3S Lipo using a Quicrun 30A ESC and Turnigy iA6 RX. Pic attached of 'Engine Room'. Link attached to videos of the sea trials in May this year, Ostpark Lake and Biergarten, Munich. https://youtu.be/b0BWJ3duzDw https://youtu.be/zPgYicA0yGw She's 24" LoA with an all up weight of about 1.5kg. BTW: the lacquer is also supposed to be UV resistant! 😉 All the best, Doug 😎 PS Here the link to my Sea Scout Build Blog https://model-boats.com/builds/view/28209

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Finally the new brass propellers arrived, delayed about a month in one of Canada's regular postal disruptions. After minor modifications to the boss profile (the brass are more streamlined and thus longer than nylon) to give clearance with the rudder leading edges, they were easily installed. Could now refit the electrical equipment previously removed to get access to the shaft couplings. Inevitably took the opportunity to make “improvements”, so then could not get anything to work! After much frustration determined the problem was not from my improvements, but from the cheap and nasty slide switches provided with ESCs. These must have got damp during the test runs and corroded internally. Suggest when using these switches they be consigned to the garbage and replaced with proper toggle ones. Had decided to use the centre brushed motor/propeller for manoeuvring and low speed operation and then the outer brushless for high speed. Brushless ESCs do not modulate smoothly and motor operation is erratic. This was particularly evident when going from forward to reverse and vice versa. Using a lever control Tx, it was also easy to inadvertently operate the brushless control along with the brushed making the model response unpredictable. After some thinking, decided to insert a small relay into each of the white signal wires for the brushless motor ESCs. These relays would be controlled by a RC switch operated by another channel on the Rx. Hoping this way the brushless motors could be switched on and off whenever desired. The two relays would retain the ESCs as separate circuits and avoid any interference between them. The idea worked, can now operate the brushed motor confidently knowing the brushless will not be inadvertently triggered. This means low speed manoeuvers can be gently undertaken using the modulation and control ability of the brushless motors and, by selecting the auxiliary control, can add the high speed capability of the brushless. Am also hoping that when the Li-Pos trigger the low voltage cut-outs in the ESCs, this will retain a “get-home” facility on the brushed motor as that ESC operates independently. Much to look forward to when next on the water.

Tarpon hardware help by Gordon-B Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
Looking for more help please. I have settled for the Graupner Speed 600 8.4 Volt (4.8-9.6V) with the Mtroniks TIO Marine 30 Amp ESC driving a 3 blade brass 35mm prop. I need advise on what size of NiMh pack to use and will it be under propped with the 35mm 3 blade?

coastguard by Northumbrian Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I bought the hull from a member on here stripped the insides and redone it to take the rudder servo i made the motor mounts from ply & used epoxy to set them in it runs nicely on the two 45mm brass props the superstructure will be made from lite ply