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>> Home > Tags > brass prop

brass prop
prop
prop shaft
prop tube
propeller
propshaft
propshaft alignment
propshop
racing prop
brass sleeve
brass tube
brass prop
Range Safety Launch? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Evenin' Neville, Yes go for 3 blade cast (not soldered) brass props, one LH, one RH. Jury is still out on which should be port and which starboard😉 Size I'm not sure of, my 28" twin shaft PTB has 35mm props, which I may reduce depending on the sea trial results, so I'd guess your 44" boat may need something larger, perhaps 40-42mm? Hope the drivers of larger Fireboats and such pick this up and can advise! All the best, Doug 😎

Deans Robert E. Perry Libertyship by Mikep Lieutenant   Posted: 7 days ago
Started building Deans Marine Libertyship Robert E. Perry finished Lenth 54 1/2” beam 7 1/2” weight 35 lbs. Power is Deans motor Falcon 3671 6 volt 1500rpm 3.19mm shaft and prop 147-18 brass propeller 50-L-4bl-M4. Kit is very nicely done all fittings and hardware are included with the kit. The hull is detailed and I have lined the inside of the hull with 2 x 2 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin to give it more rigidity. I have installed the motor and prop shaft along with the rudder which I replaced since the kit supplied rudder was cast resin and only had a 3/32 dia shaft, I’m sure it would work fine but felt better with something a little more substantial. Added 5 lbs of ballast I used shot and installed sub floor in hull.

Martin's Taycol Conversion Boards by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Fantastic stuff, Doug. That gizmo on the right with 0.05 and 6.0. Is that Amps and volts? Is that really just 0.05 amps with the motor running?! Does that really mean just 0.3 watts? Would the model even move? Ah, but then that's off load, innit? Stick a 35mm 3 blader on it and what would it draw in the wet stuff, I wonder? OK, I'll get a bloomin watt meter. Least I can do I suppose Impressive on the videos, too. Ain't it quiet? My Taycols growl at me, but then so does the Mrs.! I'm gittin' excited now. You have to need some brass bashing, so I can thank you properly for all the work. Cheers, Martin

Emerald - "Round the Word" ocean racing yacht. by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 15 days ago
Main Sheet Modification: Yachts of this nature, would be fitted with a Traveller, which would be used to help shape the Main Sail. Also, the route of the main sheet, has a lot of twists and turns to get out of the cabin and up to the Boom. Plus, it has to pass through the tube and bend at its edge. The starting point of the control would be from the cockpit, especially if it is a Single Handed yacht. The ideal place for the traveller, would be on the roof of the cabin. To keep physical disruption to a minimum, I decided to use the original boom running gear pulleys. The termination of the MainSheet would now be at the traveller on the cabin. 1. The cleat was removed from the cockpit, and the eye bolt was replaced by an S hook, screwed to the cockpit deck( see picture 1). 2. A hole was drilled in the cockpit, adjacent to the cabin hatch, and in a direct line with the main Sheet control system. This will allow the main Sheet to pass directly from the cleat. Through the pulley assembly (withought going round the pulley), and straight aft to the cockpit. 3. A brass tube was glued into the hole, flush with the cockpit surface and extending inside, towards the mainsheet control system (see pictures 1 and 2). 4. The Traveller was formed from a length of brass rod, (approx 300mm long), formed to the same curve as the cabin roof. Slide the pulley onto the rod so that it runs freely. Make a 90 degree bend at each end, the length of the traveller apart. These 2 legs will pass down into the cabin roof, leaving about 10 mm for the pulley to run from end to end. Plus about 10mm at each end of the rod, which will be bent up against the inside of the roof and glued. (see picture 3 & 4). 5. Mark the cabin roof where the traveller is to be mounted. I chose to mount the traveller directly under the boom pulley. I have made a revised sketch which is taken from the original plans for guidance. See picture 5. Note: make sure the pulley is mounted on the rod between the two bends. 6. Drill the holes in the cabin, pass the ends of the rod through the holes. I put a 10mm piece of wood under the traveller rod, next to the hole. This allows you to hold it securely, while you bend the rod out, on the inside of the cabin. Apply plent of glue or resin to secure it. Do the same at the other end of the rod, and leave to set. With the cockpit removed, and the mainsheet control system in place, take the free end of the main sheet and pass it through the new hole in the cockpit. The cockpit can be secured by the 4 locking pulleys. Now pass the mainsheet through the S hook and up to the boom. Adjust the S hook to suitable angle. When the yacht is rigged, the mainsheet is passed up to the end of the boom pulley, along the boom, over the pulley and down to the traveller pulley. With the tx/ex active, pull the mainsheet right in, and the trim set right out (this allows for final tightening).Secure the mainsheet to the eye of the pulley, ( I use a figure of 8 knot ). Now adjust the trim on the joystick to pull the main Sail tight. Finally, run the servo right out, and back in a few times, to make sure it works properly. Move the boat round so the wind cones from a different angle, and watch the traveller as the sail is pulled in and out. Now you are ready to sail. May your wake be long and straight. Ray 😎

Hellen Fishing Boat by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
Hi All This year I bought an unstarted kit, but, sold it to a club member. A month later one of the club member wish to swap for a faster boat and as my Sea Commander required a repaint and fittings. I thought a swap for a very good working Hellen was a good deal. So are making a dingy and replacing the broken prop with a brass one I had my second Hellen for the year. Three weeks ago another Hellen pops up on Gumtree(aka EBAY), so it was to cheap not to buy it. While waiting for it to come, I made a new stand, a dingy with oars and a set of fenders. When it arrive the mast where laying on the deck broken, but , the posted pics show that. The motor is a 11 to 1 geared MFA Como 919 D which runs OK. A spare new plastic prop. Started on the repairs, like the keel and deck around the mast bases. The aft mast was broken in half, so I brass sleeved it. The aft sail was missing and the forward sail was all glued up, so I bin it. So this is the boat pics so far. Canabus

Cabin roofs by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Theoretically this should be a very straight forward process and a change from rubbing down the hull so let’s look at the instructions – what instructions! First of all fit some thin card to the sides of the cabin walls to allow for a clearance fit (cornflakes packet) then some minor trimming of the spars to give an exact ,(not tight) fit across the side supports, I decided to pin each of the parts together as well as epoxy in the joints. I always find the best approach is to use a jig to drill pilot holes for the pins ensuring that the pins do not split the wood and the construction is accurate. The frame is then glued up and placed back in the boat and left to dry next job is to fit the corner strengthening pieces, the easiest way I found was to put a card support for the corners to rest on whilst they set still in the cabin structure. Looking forward I had decided to retain the cabin lids with Neodymium magnets so I machined a slot in the corner pieces underside to house the magnets, to be fitted at a later date. Next job is to fit the roof skins which again will be pinned using the 0.7mm brass pins. The roof skins are now epoxied in place so I need to mark out the position of the secondary panels. Looking at the pieces and the instructions the spacer frames seem to be the same size but I was sure I’d read somewhere that these overhung by 2-3mm, reading Robs blog conformed this to be the case. So some trimming required before fitting and marking out the appropriate position then being glued into position. The mid cabin was assembled in exactly the same way

Windows, stoopid question. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Guys, many thanks for the responses👍 So, in chronological order:- Mike: I did chamfer but probably not enough 🤔 Yes I know about the lead in side of the die 😉 and I know the one step forward half step back technique 👍 I bought this tap n die set recently, made by Toolcraft so not cheap rubbish, maybe expensive rubbish?🤔 3mm is the smallest in this set and the holder (with ratchet action🤔) is big an' clunky and weighs 340gm so not the easiest tool to keep level. Maybe good for a 1/2" Whitworth but not so super for a 3mm which is the smallest in this set. My 'Fine thread' set only goes to 2.5mm 🤔 As you can see from the pics the die is solid and there is only one locating screw so I can't open the die slightly as you say, and I remember from my car restoration days. Cutting oil I also have, mostly used on my two lathes, both Proxxon, one for the BIG stuff and one for the twiddly bits, pics 4 & 5. Have just used the littl'n to drill a 4mm brass bolt screwed into a 35mm prop so I can reduce the thread to 3mm for the shaft, pic 6. IF only I can get a decent thread onto the shaft 😲 I'll put the shaft back into the littl'n and turn a taper on the end as you advise. My Milling machine is only a teeny weeny one with no possibility of mounting the die on it, pic 7. It's very useful for pre-drilling precision holes in in spray rails an' such to take the 0.5mm pins for fixing. Just used it to pre-drill the new keel for the cutter. I have tail stocks for both lathes but no possibility to mount a die holder. Will investigate that pronto cos I'm gonna be faced with this snag again soon; 2 new shafts for my Graf Spee and 4 for my HMS Belfast. Might also look for a different die set😲 In the meantime I'll try improving the chamfer👍 Martin; as you can see from above I do have lathes, and a good selection of silver steel rod, so many thanks for your kind offer but now you've pointed the way I'll have a go at making my own punch. That piercing saw set looks good so I'll spring a few € for that 👍 You never know I might be able to use some shortened blades in my ancient Minicraft jig saw, for which you can no longer get spares 🤔 Your MB III looks great, and I can see why you were taken for that German musician - Doppelgange! Thanks for all the advice Gents 👍👍 G'night. Doug 😎 PS Just put me name down at Frau Schmutterputz's, but I'd more likely be found in the roses or perhaps petunias singing- "I'm a lonely little petunia in the onion patch ...." 🤓😲

Titanic by JeremyBB Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
I built this 1/125th scale Amati kit of the Titanic over two years from 2016. It has enhanced etched brass details from Minibrass. Conversion for radio control involved making the hull waterproof with multiple layers of fibreglass cloth bonded with epoxy resin as well as the installation of a drive train and RC gear. With only a tiny rudder, steering is dependent on a mixer unit controlling the differential speed of the propellors.

Wheels by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Great job, and nice clear pic 👍 Thanks Hammer 😊 Now we can see the refinements of your construction. Good stuff. I also use a mini gas torch sometimes, in pistol grip form with adjustable flame. Pizo ignition, dead easy. Get 'em in good cooking accessory shops. Good for soldering oil tubes on brass prop tubes an such. Cooks call them Gourmet Torches and use 'em for their Crème Brulet 😊 Also various electric irons, 50 W with a 1/4" chisel bit for big stuff, standard 25W general purpose, temp controlled 25W,and a mini 1mm bit temp controlled for SMD work. Good for small LEDs etc. Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Also one electric iron 1200W ........ . . . . for ironing shirts! Ugh!! 😡

Main Cabin almost Completed! by captaindoug1 Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
looking good, my Brooklin that I built 25 years ago has pulled a 250 pound barge using a 4 blade brass prop. Keep up the build

PROPELLERS by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Rowen, I agree with John 👍 Unless you have your own brass foundry the best we can do is turn the hub on a lathe, prefabricate the blades (making sure that they are identical form and weights!), cutting / milling slots into the hub and then solder - which is weakpoint Number 1! Then wonder why it runs rough and cavitates cos it's outa balance and uneven pitch😡 I suggest you leave it to the pros like Rabeosch who for about 15 bucks or so will give you a robust cast, balanced and highly polished scale or sports finished article. Weigh up the hours you will spend fiddlin' about against the price of a decent pro job. Especially if you need two or three the same for one boat. Only time I fiddle about is when I need small scale props for my plastic magic projects 1/72 down to 1/350! e.g. 4 for a carrier like Ark Royal or Enterprise at 1/350. There ain't nowt that small on the market. Cheers Doug 😎

PROPELLERS by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Thinking of trying to make my own brass propellers. Has anybody any suggestions on the best construction techniques?

Fittings & Detail Parts by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks, Doug. I’m glad I posted my erroneous method for calculating scale speeds, otherwise I wouldn’t have learned the correct way to do it. Looks like I’ll be eating crow for dinner tonight with humble pie for dessert. It just shows how much I have to learn. I never would have guessed that the prop tubes in our HE tugs are plastic. At first it struck me as a poor material for the job, but from another perspective I guess it’s not so bad. At least the shafts themselves are metal & there’s a nice set of brass counter-rotating props on the business end. By the way...what’s a moorhen?

Fire Boat (crash tender) colours... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Evenin' Martin, just a quick thought before I hit the hay! For the non slip deck paint why don't you cover the deck with a suitable wet and dry paper? 😉 With a bit of luck you might even find some wet n dry the right shade of grey!! Don't know the size / scale you are building but maybe around 120 / 240 would do! Cut to fit, glue it down with a spray glue, I found some in the 'Creative Corner' of a garden centre near me. Also a good source of fine gauge steel, brass, copper, gold and silver wire and nylon thread, and anchor chains😉😊 Then seal with a spray-on flat sealer or varnish, then spray a satin colour you want. Humbrol H129 might be a good substitute for 'Cerrux Deck Grey'. See Model Boat Mayhem for references to Cerrux Grey 😉 I agree the cabin sides are a much lighter shade of grey, almost white. Just ripped all the innards and deck fittings off my PTB. Just got the bare hull and shaft tubes left. Just havin' a wee dram then up the 'apples and pears to Bedfordshire' before I get tempted to sand and paint through the night. It happens sometimes 😲 G'night all, cheers Doug 😎 ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

David Metcalfs Waveney - "The Scout" by Flack Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
For sale is my 1/12th scale model of the Waveney Lifeboat - "The Scout" Kit produced by David Metcalf. Built to a good standard with an array of working features: Working radar controlled through a voltage reducer Navigation lights, mast lights, front and rear searchlights, flashing blue light and well lights all controlled by an Action Electronics P62 quad switcher. The flashing effect of the blue light is controlled by an Action ElectronicsP73 multi flasher. Powered by two Turnigy 3542/5 1250kv brushless outrunners controlled by two Fusion Hawk 60amp electronic speeed controllers. Fitted with Raboesch propshafts and 3 bladed brass left and right handed propellors. Batteries and radios are not included in the sale. The model is available for pick up only with cash on collection from Stafford ST16 which is approximately 1/2 mile from Junction 14 of the M6 motorway. Price £700 ovno