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>> Home > Tags > brass tube

brass tube
prop tube
brass prop
brass sleeve
brass tube
Tow hook assembly by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
The white metal fitting has an awful lot of detail on it but lacks definition so some time spent on filling the body to better define the components. The anchor part has six hex dummy bolts cast into the base but I intend to drill these out and then use 8BA brass bolts to secure it to the woodwork. Looking at pictures of the assembly it is obvious that there is a handle arrangement missing so I made this from a piece of brass wire and epoxied in place. The two parts have a linkage to fasten them together so again using brass wire and a piece of scrap tube a linkage was made and holes drilled and tapped to secure the assembly. Finally, a couple of coats of primer followed by a “Gun Metal” finish and the items are finished. A pleasing result, however taking some time to do, now for the circular running rail, and supporting posts to complete this unit. Michael T

Ship rudders by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
Two wooden pieces, steel rod, each hinge 3mm i/d brass tube, shaped with filler and then each hinge covered and the shape made using Strips of five glass and epoxy finishing resin. File to suit. Pins for hinges clevis type 3mm.

more money than sense by jimdogge Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 30 days ago
last pictures l posted l painted the wave princess l changed my mind and decided to go for some planking on the decks and cabin roofs l have also done a little bit of tarting up using some brass welding rod and brass tube l am quite pleased with the out come so far. these piccys are about a month old now so she has had a god rub down and given six coats of clear varnish. l will post more piccys when l have installed the windows and frames.

BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
The only thing you might have to watch out for is back feed from the pump out the aux tube (when moving) if you don't set up the y joints (must be y not T ) to create a venturi effect from the pump side. Doesn't matter standing still but at speed a T junction might reduce the flow as the flows will be fighting each other slightly. The beauty of the twin system is that if you are running a lot at high speed you could turn the pump off to save power. The best place to position water intakes is I have found is directly behind the prop (I usually just squash the brass tube slightly, fair it, cut it off at 45 deg and set it to just sit in the prop wash). At lower speeds especially, the prop will help to push water into the tubes rather than just relying on speed alone. Never had a problem with pickups interfering with rudder effectiveness as long as you fair the pickups nicely

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The weather has quickly turned colder, giving an excuse to get back to this model. Stripped out much of the interior and the prop. shafts to replace the nylon propellers with brass. These items all needed removing for painting, so decided to paint the hull before reassembly and then moving onto the superstructure. Fortunately, examining similar naval vessels and several U Tube videos, confirmed the hull as light grey, the deck a darker one of the 50 shades of grey and the lower hull below the waterline black. Used thin Tamiya masking tape to define clean colour separations, followed by regular tape, masked the hull into colour sections and sprayed using “rattle” cans. After the colours applied a light overall Matt coat to subdue any shine. The results are satisfactory. Will now reassemble and move onto building the superstructure and the other fittings. Prior to the season closing decided to experiment with my new Flysky Tx/Rx package, shortly to be fitted to this model. This Tx has a servo limiting function, which was hoping could also be used to restrict ESC output. Would like to make the full speed motor response correspond to full Tx control position. Currently can over power the model; which lifts the stern, causing it to come off the plane and then dig the bow in. Was thinking that if full throttle could be set at around 90% forward control movement and 40% sternwards the model would retain adequate performance, but without being overpowered or very sensitive to control lever movement. As the Brave was not available, tried the idea on my Daman Stan 4207 model. This is brushed motor powered and a good performer. Obviously the settings for the Brave will be different, but at least could try to see if the idea would work – it did! This Tx function is easy to use and adjustments can be made whilst the model is on the water. Once the ideal settings are achieved they can be programmed and then retained in the Tx. Will try this on the Brave when back on the water next Spring.

Rudders and Propellers by teejay Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

BRAVE BORDERER by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
I've used small brass shafts in brass bushed tubes with oilers in my MTB and they've lasted for 20yrs of average use, although they get a bit noisy when short of oil. Best would be brass shafts in brass tubes with Teflon/Nylon/ bronze etc bushes (a center bush as well if poss - have used these in ic power boats for years with hard steel shafts for the power). Brass is good as it's self lubricating to a degree and with a good quality oil can run quite smoothly and quietly, and is very simple, and when looked after won't corrode like steel or miniature ball or roller bearings (unless stainless).

Launch ELAINE, by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Keep you outta mischief won' it Colin! 😉 I like the fine adjustment of those burners. Found 'em great for soldering oiler pipes to brass prop tubes- WITHOUT setting fire to the boat 😲 Phew!! Reckon it'll cope with your motor no sweat - YOU might though😁😁 Have heard Santa's coming early this year 😉 He must have a new E-Sled 😁 Now back to the fish cutter gear box!! Cheers, Doug 😎

Complete! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
So, having had a few days off during the week when "The Boss" has been at work has given me enough hours to finish The Waveney off! Its been a hard week of making the small bits n bobs from scratch using a combination of balsa, carbon rod, brass rod, plastic tube, plastic sheet etc to make the radar array, antenna mast, extra cockpit details ect. The deck winch was made from large Servo output discs! The RNLI flag printed off Google! This has been followed by alot of detail painting and laquering. Anyway, I think I have just about exhausted as much detail as can be had at this scale and and happy to call completion! Only job to do now is get it in the Hot Tub and add the 2 Kg of ballast to get her on the waterline. On water photos and video to follow in the last update on this thread! as for next projects? I have the Aeronaut Pilot boat sat in the pile and the Fairy huntress 23 plan and wood pack on route from Sarik Hobbies!

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi folks, I've been filling in spaces in the Vincent epic with making deck fittings for the Chris Craft Special Runabout. I can't find or, probably, afford to get them nickel plated, so I will give the brass fittings to a chum who does casting of white metal, then I can a) get more than one of some and b) burnish them to look like chrome and then lacquer them. I'm assuming there might be a measure of interest in how these are done. I'm afraid I can't tell you how to do these without a lathe, because I've always had or had the use of, a lathe. They can be bought for a fraction of the price of a kit, off ebay. My No 1 son bought a lathe exactly like mine (a Peatol, which is same as the Taig), only on a huge base with a nice big motor, a tool rack to hold every supplied, additional tool they make for it and even the book on how to use it and make even more tools for it, virtually unused, for £200. Similar small lathes can be had for even less. It's the brass that costs these days! Anyway, the trick is to break down the shape to that which can be cut, turned or bent. You can do all those things, so all you need to be able to do is silver solder and soft solder. If you can't yet, learn, sharpish. Silver soldering has enabled to earn a living till I retired. It helped me bring up a family of 5, so it's clearly very useful. I won't describe it in boring detail as these days there's a Youtube for every damned thing if you can tolerate that ghastly delivery that so many of them have. I can't, so I'm happy to answer questions if anyone wants to be told straight what to do. Golden rules....make it totally clean with a Swiss file, have sufficient heat, use the right flux. In silver soldering, just sprinkle the powdered flux on, don't bother making a paste, it'll just fizz and shift your little parts. For this part, one of the various patterns of deck lights/flag pole holders that Chris Craft used, I started by turning the main shape of the bulbous bit to be rather like a thimble. I then cut gaps out of it in the vice with a junior hacksaw, so that it had three legs, oversized for now. Then make a teardrop shape out of 1/16th" sheet and cut a hole in it to match. Why the hole? Well, if this is to cast successfully, I don't need any undercuts or "hooks " in the mould so it has to be hollow. Also, I need to put the light lenses in after it's all finished as these units had riding or nav. lights in them. They also had a small jack staff in the top with a burgee or even a national ensign attached. To make the rather art nouveau-ish back end I made a cardboard pattern of what had to be cut from 1mm brass sheet to be folded, hammered a bit and rolled a bit to fit onto the back of the thimble section. I silver soldered the thimble on first, to make it easy to fit the back rolled and folded bit, which was itself then silver soldered on. After that, it's all down to filing to shape, then as you can see from the pencil lines, cut out the teardrop shaped holes in the back which leave a central spine shape. I would first drill a 3mm hole and then, with the piece in a vice use a dental burr in a minidrill and hand mill it out, but PLEASE make sure it can't slip or you could be the owner of a grooved thumb or worse. Finish with files and papers of various grades. More anon when I do the next bits, although you're already further on than I am! Cheers, Martin

Lifeboat and Davit Completed! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi Ed, just kiddin' 😁 Wouldn't need the fiddly bits anyway, made those from brass tube and tinned copper wire about 30 years ago 😊 Cheers, Doug 😎

Emerald - "Round the Word" ocean racing yacht. by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
Main Sheet Modification: Yachts of this nature, would be fitted with a Traveller, which would be used to help shape the Main Sail. Also, the route of the main sheet, has a lot of twists and turns to get out of the cabin and up to the Boom. Plus, it has to pass through the tube and bend at its edge. The starting point of the control would be from the cockpit, especially if it is a Single Handed yacht. The ideal place for the traveller, would be on the roof of the cabin. To keep physical disruption to a minimum, I decided to use the original boom running gear pulleys. The termination of the MainSheet would now be at the traveller on the cabin. 1. The cleat was removed from the cockpit, and the eye bolt was replaced by an S hook, screwed to the cockpit deck( see picture 1). 2. A hole was drilled in the cockpit, adjacent to the cabin hatch, and in a direct line with the main Sheet control system. This will allow the main Sheet to pass directly from the cleat. Through the pulley assembly (withought going round the pulley), and straight aft to the cockpit. 3. A brass tube was glued into the hole, flush with the cockpit surface and extending inside, towards the mainsheet control system (see pictures 1 and 2). 4. The Traveller was formed from a length of brass rod, (approx 300mm long), formed to the same curve as the cabin roof. Slide the pulley onto the rod so that it runs freely. Make a 90 degree bend at each end, the length of the traveller apart. These 2 legs will pass down into the cabin roof, leaving about 10 mm for the pulley to run from end to end. Plus about 10mm at each end of the rod, which will be bent up against the inside of the roof and glued. (see picture 3 & 4). 5. Mark the cabin roof where the traveller is to be mounted. I chose to mount the traveller directly under the boom pulley. I have made a revised sketch which is taken from the original plans for guidance. See picture 5. Note: make sure the pulley is mounted on the rod between the two bends. 6. Drill the holes in the cabin, pass the ends of the rod through the holes. I put a 10mm piece of wood under the traveller rod, next to the hole. This allows you to hold it securely, while you bend the rod out, on the inside of the cabin. Apply plent of glue or resin to secure it. Do the same at the other end of the rod, and leave to set. With the cockpit removed, and the mainsheet control system in place, take the free end of the main sheet and pass it through the new hole in the cockpit. The cockpit can be secured by the 4 locking pulleys. Now pass the mainsheet through the S hook and up to the boom. Adjust the S hook to suitable angle. When the yacht is rigged, the mainsheet is passed up to the end of the boom pulley, along the boom, over the pulley and down to the traveller pulley. With the tx/ex active, pull the mainsheet right in, and the trim set right out (this allows for final tightening).Secure the mainsheet to the eye of the pulley, ( I use a figure of 8 knot ). Now adjust the trim on the joystick to pull the main Sail tight. Finally, run the servo right out, and back in a few times, to make sure it works properly. Move the boat round so the wind cones from a different angle, and watch the traveller as the sail is pulled in and out. Now you are ready to sail. May your wake be long and straight. Ray 😎

Emerald - "Round the Word" ocean racing yacht. by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
Auto Bailout Modification. 1. I drilled small holes in the lower corners of the cockpit wells, opposite each other. These were then connected together with some small brass tube. This was to allow the water to flow from the front cockpit to the rear cockpit. (See pictures 1 and 2). 2. Two more holes were drilled in the rear cockpit, in the outer corners further aft. these were fitted with brass tube stubs. These were to take the plastic tube, which runs to the nozzles fitted into the hull (see picture 3 and 4). 3. To ensure the water would not flow into the boat, while stationary, the tubes were run through small eyelets on the under side of the deck(see picture 5). 4. Small holes were drilled in the hull and brass tubes were cut and bent, so that they would pass down through the hole in the hull, and lay flush against the hull, with the opening facing aft(see picture 6 and 9). 5. On the outer hull, the tube is built up, and covered in a cone shape, so the tube opening is the widest part of the cone and flush( see picture 7 & 8). 6. When the tubes are fitted to the stubs on the aft cockpit, and the cockpit secured in the yacht, the bale out is complete. Principle: While the boat is still and on an even keel, the cockpit floor is above the waterline, the tubes raise up to the deck level which prevents the water from flowing up and into the yacht. When the yacht starts to move under sail, the water flowing over the outlet nozzle is forced out by the cone, and creates a small vacuum at the nozzle opening, which draws any water in the cockpit through the tube and out through the nozzle. During a gust or strong winds, the yacht will heel over more. This will bring all the cockpit water to the lower side bailout tube, and be drawn out by the vacuum. When the yacht slows, and becomes even keeled, the cockpit will have been emptied. During heavy gusts, I found that the yacht will heel excessively, and if the waves are high enough, the cockpit will take some water over the deck. This is why I fitted the bailout device. So after a long sail in heavy weather, a long cruise back to shore on a broad reach and more even keel, will ensure the cockpit is dry. Happy Cruising

I just had to get it! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Good buy Ed, very similar to mine👍 Maybe a bit heavy for handrails an such, I use a 50 or 25W electric iron with a 1/4" or 1/8" bit respectively. The torch I use for heavier things like brass oilers to brass shaft tubes. Practice makes perfect! Try it on some scrap bits. Have fun, Doug 😎 PS you may find the Missus nicking it to caramelise brown sugar!😊

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Ah, old car days, eh? Nothing phased us. Can't touch them now. No idea what it all is under that plastic cover. Spookilly, I've just done a pattern in 1/32nd scale for a Maranello GTO1964. One of my favourite cars messed over by Maranello for Le Mans. Your fish cutter seems to be throwing some problems up, but nuttn' a spot of resin can't fix. I don't buy that propellor blade rumour. We have no decent pics of the thing, but you can clearly enough see there aint no twist in the legs like a prop would have. I've just made mine in brass and simply flattened the tube in the vice to get a similar section and soldered to other tubes. All I have to do is make rings and attach the blocks for the ensign ropes. Also cut and attached the toe strips either side of the decks in Venetian blind slat, some leftovers from decking the Vanity cutter model. Now I need to cut some mahogany and attach to the side of the decks as the rubbing strake. Finaly will be making gutters for the smaller windows (NO frames there) and frames for the wheelhouse windows, then I can paint it. I have decided on white roofs after a peer at the good photos again, where the vents all seem to be white. But non-slip was clearly a pain to clean as the roofs and decks are bloody filthy! Vincent's having a break for a while. Call it my annual leave, which I never normally have. Cheers, Martin