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>> Home > Tags > brass tube

brass tube
prop tube
brass prop
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brass tube
Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Captain   Posted: 2 days ago
The rudder assembly was made using a 200mm prop shaft squared of on the lower 3/4 of the shaft to allow for secure fixing for the rudder made from three layers of 4mm ply. The rudder was fixed to the shaft using 2ton epoxy and held in place with three pieces of brass strip which are bolted through the rudder The prop tube bearings were cut of the ends and fixed into the hull for the rudder shaft , I have also installed rubber o rings to insure no water can come in through the rudder posts.

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by reilly4 Captain   Posted: 5 days ago
Hi Rowen, I have had water cooling on all my patrol boats running at 12Volts, whether brushed or now brushless. For the brushed motors I have used aluminium tube coils with water pickups between the propellers and rudders. I did try water jackets a couple of times but found too much friction loss and therefore lack of flow. For the newer brushless outrunners I use a brass tube soldered to a brass plate across the front of the motor fitted between it and motor mounting bracket. I agree with Doug with regards to the disconnection of the red wires on the ESC's. This is now common practice, especially if you have an external receiver battery.

Adding rear deck details by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Has been a few days since I have had a chance to get anything done due to day shifts over Easter. Anyway, a good day of progress today. Finished painting the Anchor and mounts on the rear cabin. The rest of the day has been concentrating on the rear deck. This includes 4 bollards, cleats and railings. All scratch built using a conbination of plasticard, plastic tube, brass tube, carbon rod and aluminium wire (included in the kit). The cleats are resin and where from eBay. The railings arnt glued into the deck yet, easier to paint off the deck and add at the end. I am modifying the centre deck as the model I am building had a deck plank with a metal grid on it. I had some wire mesh and laminated that to some ply, should be quite effective once painted and rubbed back to expose the metal wire.

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Your boat is beginning to look suspiciously 'Museum Standard'!👍 Yep, shame about Kingston, but can understand why Robin didn't want to build for Frank's kits anymore (or anyone else's for that matter) wouldn't fit in with his No Hectic policy! Re 'tin bashing! Here's a couple of examples of my last attempts from several years ago, from my H Class 1936 destroyer, scale 1/72. I note that they need the years of neglect cleaning off 🤔 I'll pass it off as North Atlantic Convoy duty muck😁 First two pics 20mm Oerlikons, made from 0.5mm brass sheet, 1mm copper for the carriage frames and 1 and 2mm brass tube. Guns can elevate 😉 Recoil 'springs' are shrink sleeve, but I now have some suitable real springs. Will try to finish them off when Hotspur comes up for refit completion. Pic 3 is one of the depth charge throwers port side. Core is a 1/4" wood dowel, the rest is 0.5mm brass, tinned copper wire and 2mm brass tube for the firing cylinder. I used John Lambert (RIP) plans for both. Pic 4, the thrower on deck and copper wire ladder rails, crewman shanghaied from Monty's 1/72 Airfix 8th Army. A Desert Rat on board! Under the black square is the hole for the aft torpedo mount. Underneath is the speaker for the "Whoop Whoop". That part of the 'deck' is just painted aircraft silk! Must get back into practise now I've got nowt more important to do 😁 Cheers Doug 😎

Devil in the detail! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Doug, Looking at my rudders comparing them to some pics I’ve found online, my rudders are too big and therefore I will reduce them in size, no biggie, 10 minutes work should see that done. Back to the struts. I would have made them from brass, however as my propshafts are in brass tubes for the whole length, I feel that the plastic versions I’ve made should be ok for aesthetics as the brass tubes seem rigid enough, hopefully no chance of any whip? I’m planning on running this on 2S lipo to give a scale speed, all depends what the watt meters says when I test the motors with props in water. Having the option to go to 3S if needed. I don’t plan on having a great deal of rudder throw and will programme in some expo to soften the rudders throw. Of course, if needed, I am more than happy to make adjustments and incorporate recommendations as given by the lovely people on this forum. It’s still a learning curve for me as I bring 45 years of aircraft experience over to the boat world! If anyone requires any aircraft advice, I’m your man!

Devil in the detail! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I'm with you there Skydive 👍What Boatshed means is the part of the rudder in front of the stock. Thinks: are you building an Offshore Power Boat or a scale Lifeboat? If the former then follow Boatshed's recommendation. If the latter and the rudder is 'scale' then leave it alone. Any braking effect, which usually is only significant in a fast racing boat model or other fast planing types, can be diminished by reducing the rudder servo throw at the TX. One should also consider how the original behaved, maybe they did 'dig in' maybe not. There has to be a reason why such rudders were developed, and surely not just to annoy modellers 😁 One more minor point that struck me - Ouch 😭 Your prop struts! "not that it provides a huge amount of support but adds to the scale appearance." Even in a model they can be important. To help reduce potential whipping of the propshaft, especially if the model is overpowered. Actually in the originals they were vital, especially in larger vessels. The purpose of these struts, in larger vessels 'A' frames, is to provide support to the end of the shaft which carries the prop weighing several tons and, more important, to carry the bearing for the outer end of the shaft! Actually in the originals the shaft tube, or 'Stuffing Box' would not extend significantly beyond the hull. Thus the strut or A frame was vital for the shaft end bearing, fitted immediately in front of the prop for maximum stability. Attached pics of my HMS Belfast (sorry don't 'ave nutt'n smaller with this feature🤔) show the arrangement. Have witnessed such construction in various shipyards around the world. Last one in UK was the first T45, quite an experience! 😲 In the end she's your boat, if it feels good do it! 😉 I would leave the rudder alone if it is 'as fitted'. 👍 I make my struts and A frames from brass sheet and tube. Cheers Doug 😎 PS Stick with the brass Donnie! 👍

Devil in the detail! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Some people are 'Gluttons for punishment' Ed 😁😉 Reminds me of the Krick "kit" for my Type 1A U Boat though! Basically it was four 110 x 12 x 3cm planks, a bag of assorted brass tubes, two vac formed half shells for the conning tower, instruction book with photos and a plan from which you had to take templates for the hours and hours of sawing, planing and sanding to form the hull shape. Which I later discovered in the Deutsches Museum here (Science and Technology) was wrong!🤔 So out with the plane and sander again! But that was 30 years ago, cheers Doug 😎

Skeg by mturpin013 Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Skeg Having seen the trouble others have found with the suggested method of production I decided to go straight for the robust version. I did a number of measurements to determine the size and shape of the arm and went for 2mm brass sheet. The tube was machined from 12mm dia brass with tapered ends to 8.5mm and an 8mm bore to suit the tube. Next I machined a 2mm slot the length of the tube to locate the brass arm in. Keeping the pieces spotlessly clean (not forgetting to clean the solder rod as well) the items were fluxed and wired together to keep then in a true vertical position whilst they are silvered soldered. A keen eye on temperature and a light touch and clean flow with the solder is recommended to keep final dressing to a minimum.

Rudder, water pickup and skeg by mturpin013 Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
At this point I decided to fit the rudder tube, water pick up and skeg. I was able to mount the boat in the machine vice by gripping the keel; this ensured that the holes are drilled absolutely true and square, 2 x 8mm holes are needed to take both the rudder tube and water scoop. I purchased the rudder assembly from a well-known supplier but I didn’t like any of the proprietary water scoop tubes on offer so decided to make my own. Whilst the boat is in the vice I also decided to machine the slot for the skeg to fit in. This required drilling a series of 2mm holes and then opening them up into a slot using a long series slot drill again giving an accurate slot which the skeg can locate into. Water scoop Having dealt with the woodwork, I turned my attention to metalwork. To bend the ¼” brass tube successfully it has to be annealed, (cherry red and quenched in water), then inserting a tight fitting spring inside the tube to stop any kinking I gently pressed it round a former to the correct shape. Springs removed I filed the end to the correct angle which gives an oval opening, but the end didn’t look finished, so I machined a thin spacer and then squashed it to suit the oval end and silver soldered it to the end of the tube, this gives a much better visual appearance.

Dumas 1203 Coast Guard Lifeboat (RNLI Waveney conversion) by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
So here we go again! I have decided to give other projects a rest for a time in favour of this little gem. Pick up off eBay for less than £100 NIB posted, couldnt resist! Its the Dumas (kit no:1203) 44' Coast Guard Lifeboat. I dont know if this kit is still produced by Dumas and having looked at the Die cutting of the parts, certainly seems like an old kit? However, I love my building and the challenges, so I am sure it will turn out nice at the end. Finished length 33". I shall be converting this to a RNLI Waveney Class Lifeboat and will possibly go with 44-003 named "Khami" which was based in Great Yarmouth and Gorleston, which is local to me here in Suffolk. Sadly very little turns up on this boat via Google, but at some stage may pop out to the Great Yarmouth Lifeboat station and see if I can hunt anymore info on her. I shall not be using the recommended Dumas running gear for 2 reasons, 1st its a geared set-up (I am going with MFA540 brushed direct drive) and the cost of over £150! Photos show the box artwork, plans and the included wood. Last photo shows my electrics less propshafts and props that are on order. Note the Star Wars 3.75" figures that with poetic licence could be painted to represent crew. However, at this point the model is approx 1;16 scale and the figures would be 1:18 scale so maybe too small. There are 1:16 scale lifeboat figures available but pricey? My one issue at this point is going to battery choice? do I go with a small 6v lead acid or perhaps 2 Tamiya type 7.2v NIMH in series. anyone who has built anything like this may want to advise. LIPO not an option as the Mtroniks ESC do not support LIPO. Space inside the hull may also be an issue? Another issue is going to be fabricating some propshaft struts for the rear next to the props. There is quite a bit of prop shaft exposed outside the hull, so these would be integral to support and strength of the propshafts. Is there anything available off the shelf (they are included in the running gear set, but dont seem to be available on there own) of do I need to fabricate from brass tube and sheet/strip brass?

Speedline 1/12 Severn Class RLNI Boat kit for sale Incl. all options by iluvlabs Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
***** SOLD ***** I have for sale an unstarted Speedline 1/12 Severn Class Lifeboat Kit. Full set consists of all optional extras, including Bow Thruster. Not included: Motors and RC gear. Price £750 non-negotiable. 1/12 scale Severn class lifeboat The model in the photographed above was built by Terry Small for his mammoth article in Model Boats’ annual kit review, Dec 2007. Phil Locke built his on line so you can see for yourself what’s involved and what become of the model, now probably the most famous RC model lifeboat on the planet. (See www.philsrcmodels.co.uk). I am delighted to say that I now own this model and will be taking it around the shows during 2011. The kit builds into a top quality ‘museum standard’ model that you will be proud of. It is available complete or as individual ‘sets’ which can be bought separately. This means you can spread the cost of the kit or use whatever ‘sets’ you wish and make as much as you like from scratch. The model has an overall length of 58” and is 18” wide. The kit comprises of a number of ‘sets’, each of which can be bought separately. The ‘sets’ making up the full kit are as follows: HULL AND WHEELHOUSE SET £260 The hull and wheelhouse set comprises of three GRP mouldings, the hull, the main section of the wheelhouse and the inner wall of the wheelhouse. The hull is complete with the deck already moulded on and is strong and rigid, the way a big model should be. The bilge keels and rudders, both laser cut to profile from 5 mm Perspex are included as are the three trim-tab re-enforcing plates across the transom and the two exhaust outlet recesses in the transom. DETAIL SET £330 The ‘Detail Set’ is the very heart of this model and because there are so many parts, its impracticable to list every item covered. The set comprising several large sheets of laser-cut Perspex components, one sheet of acid etched Nickel Silver components and three sheets of acid etched brass components there are over 600 precision made items. Every part is pre-shaped with a high degree of accuracy ensuring a perfect fit throughout the model. The Severn class has over 1,600 stainless steel screw heads on show just fixing vent covers and closing panels and wherever one of these screw heads is to be found, a pre-drilled hole can be found, all 1,300 plus of them! Many items, such as the flying bridge windscreen frame, are made from acid etched brass to give them the inherent strength that such a delicate item needs on a model of this size. The Trim tabs are made this way but from heavy gauge brass enabling them to be used as the basis for working tabs. All the air intake and exhaust vents, brackets, plates, mast brackets and plates, flying bridge instruments and displays are included. The glazing for the flying bridge windows is included in the set as are all the Perspex covers for the instruments and display screens on the Flying Bridge, all pre-cut exactly to shape. A major feature of the Severn is the Hyab Crane that lifts the ‘Y’ Boat on and off. This is included and is made from etched brass and laser-cut Perspex. The ram cylinders and the ramrods are cast Pewter. The crane is strong and movable and forms a good basis for a working option. Included with the detail set is a CD containing lots of reference shots of a real Severn. CASTINGS SET £50 All the cast items on the model have been newly mastered and cast in either in lightweight resin, Pewter or Zinc where extra strength is required. The set includes the winches, cleats, fairleads, bollards, deck vents, valves, escape hatch spray guard, deck vents and forward vent air vent shields. New correct pattern life rings have been included also. The Anchor recovery davit has laser-cut Perspex detailing. The fisherman’s anchor itself is included in the casting set even though it is made from laser-cut Perspex. The valve handles and anchor flukes are also in the casting set, even though these too are Perspex. (I had to put them somewhere)! The set includes a cast resin Radar scanner. HANDRAILS, STANCHIONS & KICKING BOARD SET £70 The Severn class lifeboat has ‘kick boards’ bonded directly to its deck which carry the two ball stanchions and the hand railings. Our set includes extruded section aluminium kick boards, pre-formed and shaped by hand to fit the deck contours. They require only trimming and fettling before being glued directly to the deck. The “impossible to make” long curved kickboards that follow the deck steps are included of course. The two-ball stanchions are scale and are CNC made from brass. The triangular mounting brackets are made from etched brass and brass tube. The rectangular plates for the hand-railings are included in the set. 12 or 14BA bolts are used to bolt them directly to the kickboards. These are not supplied with the kit but are available from us should you need them. RUNNING SET £60 The Running Set consists of two short prop-tubes carrying the prop shafts through the hull and two A frames with stainless steel legs. Both tubes and A frames have twin bronze bushes fitted. Two ‘scale pattern’ 4 bladed brass propellers are supplied. WINDOWS SET £75 The window set is again a kit in its own right and contains all the parts required to build all the wheelhouse windows. Each window is assembled from five separate components, all made from laser-cut Perspex. The finished windows are ultra realistic and are a major scale detail feature of the model. VAC FORMING SET £10 This sheet of 1mm thick High Impact Polystyrene vac formings comprises of all the inset boxes in the wheelhouse, the four triangular mountings on the Wheelhouse roof for the ‘Y’ boat, the fendering protection plate at the bow roller, the radar box motor box, four round fenders and the four life raft boxes. HEXAGONAL HEADED SCREWS SET £78 On the full size boat there are a lot of hexagonal-headed stainless steel bolt heads left unpainted and on full view. Mostly, they secure panels and vents along the wheelhouse side, engine covers and the like. These are an important feature of the model and are represented by specially made dummy hexagonal headed screw bolt heads. They are machined from brass and then Nickel plated. These enable you to achieve coloured panels with unpainted bolt heads with amazing accuracy and relative ease. FENDERING SET £40 The rubber fendering surrounding the edge of the hull is especially made for Speedline Models and is of true scale section. Made from the same type of rubber as the real thing, it even smells right! BRASS ROD SET £50 This is a collection of various size annealed (bendable quality) brass rod for the handrailings , mast, grab rails etc. Y class RIB £44 The ‘Y’ boat is an essential part of the Severn and has been modelled as a complete boat, not just a tarpaulin covered one. The model is fully detailed and is a scale lifeboat kit in it’s own right. Many kits have actually been RC’d themselves. Full Kit £1038 Carriage P & P in mainland UK is £20 for the kit. Please enquire about overseas shipping cost. Postage for individual sets bought separately is charged at cost..

Prop shaft by Vickers1979 Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi all I was thinking of making my own prop shafts I have the brass tube and steel bar to thread but unsure as what to use as the brushes any help would be great.

Too Powerful Brushless ? by reilly4 Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
Graham, I have attached the same table that Doug sent me. This has the relevant information you seek. According to the table attached the Graupner 500 kV ECO has a specified output of 1440 watts and 80Amps. Strangely the 400 kV ECO has a specified output of 2010 Watts. So the 1440Watt output is questionable and may be a typo based on the other entries in the table. more likely to be 2440Watts In any case you need a 5mm diameter propeller shaft. For shaft alignment i use a brass tube that slides snugly on the propeller shaft and then on the motor shaft. When the tube rotates/slides well on both then the shafts are aligned. I then fit the motor mounts, check and tweak the alignment if necessary, remove the tube and replace with a universal coupling. If the motor or propeller shafts are a different diameter then I insert the relevant size smaller tube inside the larger of the tubes. This method is simple and has served me well, including for larger IC engine powered boats belonging to friends. Haig

Too Powerful Brushless ? by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi I use 4mm stainless steel shaft with a brass or roller bearing at the motor end and a Teflon bearing at the bottom. Grease I use Dow Coring Molykote Compound 111. A squirt in each bearing and install the shaft with a finger over the inner bearing( the air escapes via the oiler tube) and cap off the oiler. I the picture is the shaft support on my Huntsman which is a slide fix for the prop shaft tube. Canabus

Too Powerful Brushless ? by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Very nice but I think our friend's prop tube comes through the keelson .The wedge shaped keel extension piece to which the tube is secured so that support would not suit. However a "U" tube or two could be fabricated and wrapped round tube and secured to keelson with a couple of small screws and a good glue.Ali .copper or brass would do. Brass best to avoid electrolytic corrosion with the brass prop tube. Also brass screws. BTW just looking at shaft is not enough to check if straight. Hold to a known straight edge or rolled on flat surface. This will show up even the slightest curvature by allowing light under the ends when rolling with the fingers in the middle. Or slide a piece of paper (cigarette paper best ) against ends .If it goes under there is a bend in the test piece 👍