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>> Home > Tags > brushed

brushed
brushed motor
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brushed
HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – Inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.

aeronaut classic by Manofkent Petty Officer   Posted: 15 days ago
I built the Aeronaut Diva and even with a 350 size brushed motor the performance is brilliant. It gets up on the plane early on and hiesvlije stink.

Ship rudders by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Mornin' Toby, I'm back😁 Pardon the delay, just finished tidying up the wiring and final running tests on Colin's Taycol Supermarine motor and converter board - to make it run off a standard brushed ESC! The rivets look great👍 and the last pic was much better as well😊 Soooo many rivets 😲 guess you have to do them in batches, and then go pull up a tree or something, or you'd go doolally 😡 And I thought I was patient doing all the portholes and stanchions on my 4' 6" 1936 destroyer - that was ONLY hundreds! Rivets? Didn't even contemplate that!! I think you should continue this in a proper Build Blog - there's lotsa good stuff you're doing here👍 And at the end you can make a pdf file of the whole story with just a few clicks😉 Be a nice memento👍 Look forward to the Launch Report. During my career I attended the launches of several naval ships I had worked on,designing the COMMS systems. The funniest one was a glass fibre minehunter at the Intermarine yard in Italy near La Spezia. The ship was still in dry dock, like a huge bath. They turned on the 'taps' and slowly up came the ship! Keep up the good work, cheers, Doug 😎 BTW; were you sitting on the saw to help keep awake? 😁😁

Smoke generator by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 20 days ago
Been thinking how I could build a compact sealed electric smoke generator with a pump to push the smoke through the exhausts, along with the cooling water on my HSL. Are the model train smokers not big enough for your purposes. You could just copy one of those and enlarge it perhaps. From what I remember from my train days they were not too complicated. How about an upside down ic glow plug with a variable voltage regulator in the bottom of a tube with a low temp oil ? You could possibly use a small brushed ESC for the regulator and come up with a controlled drip feed replenishing system. Just seen a site SMOKE EL in Germany which makes smokers for ic and electric planes but they look expensive and complicated,- work well though,-vids on site.

fuse holder by DodgyGeezer Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
Depends how fast you want it to go! Electrical kit is either rated continuous or intermittent. Continuous ratings are usually conservative - you can exceed them somewhat - but they also assume decent cooling. The inside of a boat is usually sealed, and so is poor for cooling unless specific provision is made. Chinese ratings tend to be a bit unreliable - and watch out for cheap kit with phenomenal specs that are only achievable if you plunge them into liquid nitrogen! I typically run my 12v rated brushless motors at 7.2v. That way they just get a bit warm in a sealed boat and need no cooling. For brushed motors the brushes tend to be the weak spot if you put a lot of amps through them. Check your motors for heat after a run and you'll soon find out if you're mistreating them... If you're thinking about Taycols, the smaller ones were definitely brush-limited. Though the bigger ones are typically rated at 12v, the initial review for the Standard reckoned it could take 20v or more. Open frame motors are easier to cool. But I wouldn't like to guarantee the paxolin bearings if you did that...

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Mornin' JB, Guess I'll have to remain 'agnostic' on this issue for now - I'm still to be convinced. This might explain a phenomenon I've noticed during testing of the Taycol Supermarine I've just renovated for Colin. More on that later in the 'Supermarine resurrection' blog. I'll do some experiments using my digital scope and see if I can trap and measure these elusive spikes for various wire lengths😉 Can't comment on the guy from Castle, don't know them, except to say that I found his comments a bit vague and without explanation. There are also contradictory posts on that link; some say before the ESC some after. Can't really see the point of putting the caps in front of the ESC, switching spikes SHOULD only appear on the output side I'll look at that on the scope, and after all a fuse to protect against fouled prop and jammed motor is standard fit between battery and ESC, or should be! So some wiring extension for that is essential. Also I would expect the battery to flatten any spikes that do appear at the ESC supply side. As you say the internals of several 'manufacturers' ESCs are often the same. Nothing new, branding and badge engineering has been going on for decades for all sorts of things and no RC kit manufacturer / distributor produces his own components. Important factors are; quality of his own assembly and where does he buy his components - originals or cheap copies? 28 ESCs! Wow 😲 and I thought I had a lot! As reported I have so far had good results with the Quicrun series, both brushed and brushless. Next one to test is their Dual Brushed version. Prior to going brushless I used a lot of Graupner ESCs - made in Korea., never managed to blow one of them either, not even the little micro and pico jobs. Thanks for raising this issue - I like a good debate and we can all learn something from it I hope👍 Plus; piquing my curiosity is always dangerous 😁 Greetings to Down Under from 'Up Over', cheers, 😎Doug PS Further thought just struck me (Ouch😡); if this is really a dramatic problem why have I never seen any warnings about it in any ESC instructions? Yes, I'm THAT guy who actually reads the instructions!!

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 25 days ago
Rowen, here are a couple of things that may be of use to you (and others). The battery alarm will save you worrying about running out of steam as they can be set to beep at varying voltages to warn you of low battery, just put one on each batt balance lead and when one goes off (when an individual cell drops below the set voltage) it means start heading back. These can be picked up on Ebay for a few dollars. I use them on my planes as well and are audable from around 100m (these twin horns are the best) Secondly, re your ESC switches, these electronic switches (AliExpress) are great for this sort of thing (as long as you have enough aux switches on TX ) You can link them with a Y cable to work together or use them independantly for anything, (lights, pumps etc, - they can be operated by TX rotary switches as well) The ESC and 2000kv motor (HK) are the ones I am using in my ASR model and will work smoothly down to a crawl, the purple 1980 kv seems to have superseded these but I think they will be as good. The props are from Ali Express and are resin and available in L and R hand, are only a few bucks and perform perfectly while looking quite scale(ish). I painted them with an acrylic bronze which seems to have stayed on pretty well. Model weighs 2.8kg and will run at more than 10mph flat out with this set-up (using the 26mm L+R) props) which is silly speed and that's with 2x 2s 2200mah lipos (which will last till you get sick of it and still have 60% left) I was just looking at your Daman set-up and noticed the wiring method from the batts to the ESCs. You might want to make your batt to ESC connections direct to your ESCs (as per original ESC lead length)as your capacitors may get a thrashing (spikes) due to the extra length/ resistance you have there. There is a general rule that you don't lengthen the batt to ESC wiring without adding a 220mf capacitor of same voltage as the ESC for every 4"of extra wire length (ESC to motor - not so much). Might want to check this out in case you fry your ESCs You probably have thought of this but thought I'd mention it, 'just in case' Might help with your modulation as well. Have chucked in a vid of the HSL manouvering (first trials so wasn't perfect) and also the MTB (brushed) which I have just converted to a twin system (was twin but single Electronize unit) plus a sound unit. You may know that you can use as many RECs (bound to the same TX) for various purposes on the same boat (have run 2 boats together from the same TX) Might get you round the mixed brushless/ brushed problem with a bit of thought. Have you thought of changing your old HK silver 6DF TX to twin throttles, it's a piece of cake(as is the TGY 6x), just remove the aileron/rudder centering spring and make a friction plate as per throttle stick, and use the elevator channel as your other throttle. Set your ESCs and you can then use a twin system giving you perfect control. Saves a lot of hassle.

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Ref the PTB Rowen, I 'inherited' it for a reasonable sum and it came with two what I believe to be 2200s! Can't tell for sure as the labels are worn blank. Previous owner said it was 'too much a handful for him'. We'll see - sometime next spring 😉 If I fit a third motor I was thinking of a brushed 385. What did you fit? Cheers, Doug

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Finally the new brass propellers arrived, delayed about a month in one of Canada's regular postal disruptions. After minor modifications to the boss profile (the brass are more streamlined and thus longer than nylon) to give clearance with the rudder leading edges, they were easily installed. Could now refit the electrical equipment previously removed to get access to the shaft couplings. Inevitably took the opportunity to make “improvements”, so then could not get anything to work! After much frustration determined the problem was not from my improvements, but from the cheap and nasty slide switches provided with ESCs. These must have got damp during the test runs and corroded internally. Suggest when using these switches they be consigned to the garbage and replaced with proper toggle ones. Had decided to use the centre brushed motor/propeller for manoeuvring and low speed operation and then the outer brushless for high speed. Brushless ESCs do not modulate smoothly and motor operation is erratic. This was particularly evident when going from forward to reverse and vice versa. Using a lever control Tx, it was also easy to inadvertently operate the brushless control along with the brushed making the model response unpredictable. After some thinking, decided to insert a small relay into each of the white signal wires for the brushless motor ESCs. These relays would be controlled by a RC switch operated by another channel on the Rx. Hoping this way the brushless motors could be switched on and off whenever desired. The two relays would retain the ESCs as separate circuits and avoid any interference between them. The idea worked, can now operate the brushed motor confidently knowing the brushless will not be inadvertently triggered. This means low speed manoeuvers can be gently undertaken using the modulation and control ability of the brushless motors and, by selecting the auxiliary control, can add the high speed capability of the brushless. Am also hoping that when the Li-Pos trigger the low voltage cut-outs in the ESCs, this will retain a “get-home” facility on the brushed motor as that ESC operates independently. Much to look forward to when next on the water.

All hooked up, nowt happens... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
You're as BAD as me Boaty 😉 but I had a Rover 2000 with fully reclining seats back then - no problem 😁 Re 3 wires on a brushless. Simply put, this is analogous to a 3 phase AC motor (such as used in bathroom extractor fans etc). If you apply a single phase AC voltage to an AC motor it just twitches backwards and forwards in the same place as the voltage crosses from the positive to the negative half cycle. Thus 3 phases are applied giving 3 'shoves' in sequence to keep things moving. A starter capacitor is also needed to give the motor a 'belt' to shove it off. Similarly with a brushless: the ESC senses where the motor armature is in relation to the magnet poles and applies a DC pulse to the next armature coil in sequence. When you shove the throttle up the pulse width lengthens applying a longer shove and thus more energy and speed. Pulling the throttle back with a reversible ESC just turns the pulse train upside down so that negative DC pulses are applied to the motor, reversing the magnetic field created in the armature and thus the rotation. Simple really. It's the sensing and timing done inside the ESC that's the tricky bit, which is why we had to wait about a hundred years from the invention of the AC motor (Nikolai Tesla) until we could use them in models - thanks to micro-electronics. Here endeth today's seminar 😁😁 Happy brushlessing Folks, cheers, Doug 😎 Hmmm, perhaps that's why electric toothbrushes use brushed motors! 😁😜

All hooked up, nowt happens... by boaty Admiral   Posted: 26 days ago
Hi Westquay It sounds Doug has got it right. I only went over to brushless 3 years ago when I returned to fast electric. All my existing models at the time had brushed motors installed and I did become confused with the "new technology". Having three wires from the motor to the ESC was a bit difficult to comprehend but as the boat was an RTR it was helpful due to having an instruction manual with it. It just takes time and experience to get use to such changes but it will be right in the end. My only experience of a non starter was back in 1976, this being the only time I had a date with a married woman. I had a Lotus Elan then and there was no room in the back and it would have been a waste of time calling the AA to resolve it.😁😎 Boaty

Wild Duck Sailboat article by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Mornin' John, Hows things 'Ol Mate'😉 Basically on a PC the 'Photos' App built into Windows 10 should do the job. Pic shows the opening window displaying the last photos I downloaded / Stored. i haven't experimented much with it yet but it should find any photos / pics on any drive, stick or memory card on your PC. If you are using a Smartphone I don't know, although most seem to have a 'Gallery' function built in! It will depend on which phone you have and which operating system it uses. Best thing to do there is look at the Apps already installed or in the Google or Microsoft App Stores. More later when I've fiddled with the 'Photos' App a bit more. Better shift to a new thread then as well, afore we're arrested for hijacking😲 (again😁)! At the moment I'm putting the finishing touches to Colin's Taycol Supermarine. Just reassembled it with new bearings and ran some tests using my prototype converter board. Runs fore and aft perfectly on a normal brushed ESC.😊 Will update the 'Supermarine Resurrection' blog shortly. All the best, Doug 😎

Ashes the scratch built Motor Torpedo Boat by Sakibian Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
I found this hull at thingiverse last year. I printed the hull from a local shop and rest was handmade. Firstly I bought a 2426 4200kv brushless 2-3s which was too powerful and too heavy for the boat size. The length is 38cm. And the 30Amp esc was also too big for it's size. After that I tried small 180 brushed motor with 20A brushed esc w/brake. It was perfect (still it's heavy😂). The bridge and deck is made by 1.75mm pvc,torpedos are made of wooden pencil. Small battery space takes a 2s 500mah lipo. 30mm 3blade propeller. YouTube video link is here: https://youtu.be/KZdmZ8_Z0IE

Brushless motors (again) by steve-d Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Again, as not wanting to nick someone else's thread. Huntsman 31 currently has a geared (belt) brushed motor which was probably quite a good spec. many years ago. I don't remember how quick it was but having watched brushless boats running this morning in Southsea I have decided now is the time for change before I start painting. I've been reading various threads and gleaned some info but it is still a minefield. Whilst this boat (original) is twin screw I am not yet ready to go that far so will stay single screw. A thread suggested 3639 -1100KV which is fine as a spec. but there are a zillion different makes and models for that spec. Cornwall models seem to offer 6 or 8 so I am looking for more specific advise for make and model of each piece of the power system...motor, ESC, battery, charger. I'm not going to say 'money no object' just that I don't 'need' to buy bottom spec. I suspect there will be as many different suggestions as 'Cornwall' have motor makes but something good will come out of it. Many thanks Steve

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The weather has quickly turned colder, giving an excuse to get back to this model. Stripped out much of the interior and the prop. shafts to replace the nylon propellers with brass. These items all needed removing for painting, so decided to paint the hull before reassembly and then moving onto the superstructure. Fortunately, examining similar naval vessels and several U Tube videos, confirmed the hull as light grey, the deck a darker one of the 50 shades of grey and the lower hull below the waterline black. Used thin Tamiya masking tape to define clean colour separations, followed by regular tape, masked the hull into colour sections and sprayed using “rattle” cans. After the colours applied a light overall Matt coat to subdue any shine. The results are satisfactory. Will now reassemble and move onto building the superstructure and the other fittings. Prior to the season closing decided to experiment with my new Flysky Tx/Rx package, shortly to be fitted to this model. This Tx has a servo limiting function, which was hoping could also be used to restrict ESC output. Would like to make the full speed motor response correspond to full Tx control position. Currently can over power the model; which lifts the stern, causing it to come off the plane and then dig the bow in. Was thinking that if full throttle could be set at around 90% forward control movement and 40% sternwards the model would retain adequate performance, but without being overpowered or very sensitive to control lever movement. As the Brave was not available, tried the idea on my Daman Stan 4207 model. This is brushed motor powered and a good performer. Obviously the settings for the Brave will be different, but at least could try to see if the idea would work – it did! This Tx function is easy to use and adjustments can be made whilst the model is on the water. Once the ideal settings are achieved they can be programmed and then retained in the Tx. Will try this on the Brave when back on the water next Spring.