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>> Home > Tags > bulkheads

bulkheads
bulkhead
bulkheads
Assemble the hull by Ianh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
The Bulwarks were out in place on the jig and glued with ZAP 30 minute epoxy. I used the cabin sides to align the bulkheads. By the way Clamps you will need a lot of these

The Building Board by Ianh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
I made this from a 54" long piece of Melamine shelving. shallow cut a centre ine down the middle 1/16" wide. The board was then marked into 2" squares using a laundry marker. The design concept was from a fuselage jig I had made by SLEC. The holes required for the brackets are M5 with captive ( T nuts) underneath pulled up into the bottom of the board. The red tape down the centre is masking tape ( the high quality stuff) this was to stop the boat glueing itself to the board. As the the keel has a skeg we needed to raise the keel to ensure parallelism I used an Enginerers Marking out block and two doorstops on this.The angles can slide and you then clamp the Bulwarks on I used thirty minute epoxy for this although I would like a longer working time epoxy. Bulwarks 3 and 4 with the motor base was also epoxied together. This was then located on the keey ( Dryfit along with the other bulkheads. A word of advice here use the cabin sides to ensure alignment. Check with a rule and squares before gluing anything.

Must get the skins on before I pull all of my hair out!! by MouldBuilder Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
This build is proving to be much more difficult than I had expected. 😤 I think I started this project thinking that all of the parts were ready to fit and glue. As I went on, it became clear that this is not the case. Due to this, and as detailed in the earlier post, I have had to break down the glue joints of the hull frame, and reposition after deepening some of the assembly slots. I have re-assembled the bulkheads, stringers etc. and then started to fit the side skins. This has proven to be the most difficult task so far. You need six arms. After several failures, removal of all of the fixing tape and then starting again, they finally started to look reasonable. I watched a time lapse video on you tube and he seems to do it fairly easily. Oh well. 🤔 Now that I was happy with the fit of the sides, it was time to start on the bottom skins. I started by trying to form chamfers along the keel centre joints so that they look reasonable. Then I once again applied tape to hold them in position whilst glueing with my other three hands, I wish. This only took two attempts. I must be getting better. I still have most of my hair also. Next, I tried to mount the motors onto the angled bulkhead. The front location was very loose so I made a couple of thin silver steel rings to improve the fit. They work very well. 😊 Next job was to fit and align the prop shafts. I decided to make these solid joints and avoid the use of universal joints. The first motor went straight on with perfect shaft alignment. The second was not so good. After two hours of fiddling with a packer, I finally achieved perfect alignment. Next job was to give good joint strength and make the hull water tight. Rightly or wrongly I use a lot of glue to give that perfect seal. I used epoxy for all of the skin inner joints and Stabilit for the outer seams and joints. I used the Stabilit around the shafts as well which looks a little messy at the moment, but I will tidy all of this up next. I will paint the inner Stabilit with white paint to hide a little. This weekend I will do a water test to ensure it is water tight.😱 I think after that I will fit all of the electrics, servo and speed controller. Then I will spray the hull and the main deck prior to fixing together. I would be interested to know what others think about when to paint, before or after assembly, especialy regarding the hull. Enough for now.🤐 I will try to speed up the build a bit now as I am expecting the new 46" Crash Tender to arrive soon. Wood!!! Love it.😊

welding by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I really like your approach to the assembly using a jig to ensure squareness and consistency with the bulkheads. its looking good keep it up

Gelyce class "Islay" by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi, many years ago I was approached by the man who ran the Chateau Margot delicious wine factory to make a model of Water Pipit, one of the smaller Gelyce class yacht tenders built by Camper and Nicholson. They di some at 50 foot and a few at 38 foot. Currently out there and nicely restored is Islay, which I think may be Water Pipet in a later itteration, since it was once restored and subsequently neglected by Ugo Baravalle, at the time Italy's 5th richest man and a gent who actually offered to show me round his vast collection on Elba very graciously. I never heard from the wine mazn again and so couldn't tap him for a deposit to finance the trip to Italy. Project cancelled, Baravalle apologised to, life went on. Now, I find I would rather like to do the model for myself, with all the lovely golden interior work. To do this, the construction would have to be more like the original steamed timbers and double diagonal planking, rather than my usual 3mm ply bulkheads. So, my question is...has anyone ever built a hull in this way, as a shell, more than a glorified Aerokits/Veron kit? I haven't, so I'm looking for any hints, tricks, warnings you may have. Here's the boat. You can see the appeal. Cheers, Martin

bulkheads by Kipper Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
The first pic that Green has posted, does show a 'Schottel' drive unit at the left of the plan, no wonder he is confused.

W1 by jbkiwi Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
This is my scratch built 36" RNZAF British Power Boat 64' HSL (arrived in NZ 1940). I actually went on board this vessel in 1968 when it was still in original form (the RNZAF having disposed of it in the 50s) This vessel is still around and has been recently re modelled (2nd time since early 70s) and I was lucky last year to have met the present owner and go on board (2nd time in 49yrs!)and take a few photos. The vessel was modified a number of times by the RNZAF over the years (air intakes, removal of the fore deck machine guns, wheelhouse turret etc so I sort of went in the middle. I found a few drawings of the type in an old mag which had side and top views plus the bulkheads and their positions, so I took them along to a copying shop and kept enlarging them until I had the desired proportions. This worked out quite well and using a few methods from other models I had built, managed to frame (ply) the hull and then fully strip plank it in balsa. It was then fiber glassed. The deck is ply, lined and varnish stained. The wheelhouse is varnished balsa and is removable for access (wheelhouse roof is also removable along with engine cover and foredeck access hatch, - small foredeck hatches open as well.). The wheelhouse interior has detail such as controls, instrument panels, skipper, steps to wardroom etc but is not too detailed as it is not seen. The boat has full lighting by remote switch, lights are all LED. All cowls rotate. The propulsion side has dual everything (motors, ESCs, sound units), would have had 3x but ran out of space! Motors are 28mm 2200Kv water jacketed in-runners (cooled by remotely switched pump) using 30A Chinese ESCs (have 5A BEC, Fwd and Rev). Twin sound units are 'GT Power' car units which have around 40 different sound selections, from Cosworths to diesels and are computer programmable (as well as manually on the unit ) for various functions. I am using one of the v8 sounds (8 cyls short in my application) which I think is as near as you are going to get to 3 Napier Sea Lions (for which there is obviously no sound available) They 'start' 'Idle' and are fully proportional in fwd and rev and can sound quite realistic (will attempt to put up a vid later). Batteries are 2x 2200mah 2s 20c LiPos which will last around 2hrs at least of sailing (they also run the sound units) Still have a few small things left to do (have just made wheelhouse air intakes) but don't want to get too fiddly. Just want to keep it a practical model.

Bending thin plywood by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Slightly more comfortable - The bending is done simply by soaking in hot water for 10 - 15 mins and then forming around a suitable paint tin/circular object and left a couple of days to dry. The skins must be absolutely dry before fitting as further drying out when glued to the bulkheads will twist the whole hull.

bulkheads by reilly4 Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
The plan at the top of the thread shows a specific Water Tractor tug plan specifically designed for the VS drives, including the large straight keel at the stern. I suggest Green72West should either use VS drives or use another type of hull for Schottel drives.

bulkheads by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Gerd, It's not my plan! The plan is from 'green72west' who started this thread and seems to be confusing Schottel and Voith-Schneider. Either that or he wants to use two Z-Drives instead of the Voith drives. His intention is not clear. Either way he doesn't need to cut chunks out of the keel, that's nuts😲 Cheers, Doug 😎

bulkheads by Dampfgerd Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Doug Your plan show a Voith-Schneider-Propeller

bulkheads by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Haig, seems to be a common mistake to get Schottel Drives (Z-Drives) and Voith - Schneider confused with one another! First two pics show a twin Voith propeller on a tug hull (as on the plan above) and the operating principle. 3rd pic is cross section of the Z-Drive as produced by the Schottel company. It is a 360° rotating 'pod'. Newer versions have electric motors built into the pod and don't need the mechanical Z transmission from inside the hull. With such pods under bow and stern even bow and stern side thrusters are redundant 😊 4th pic is the Graupner version, Mk II. https://www.graupner.com/Schottel-Drive-II-new-version-/2335... Cheers, Doug 😎

bulkheads by reilly4 Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Why do you need Schottel drives? The Voith Schneider drives in that configuration can move the boat in any direction? Schottel drives will require fairly big penetrations through the hull, and apart from the installation complications, should (in my opinion) be unnecessary. This is a link to a fairly comprehensive brochure with photos of the real thing that will help in understanding the concept etc. http://www.gemimanevrasi.com/Tug_Boat_Technology/Voith%20Wat...

bulkheads by Dampfgerd Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Bauer- Voith-Schneider-Propeller https://www.bauer-modelle.com/Voith-Schneider-Propeller-VSP-...

bulkheads by green72west Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
I have hopefully posted photos of stern/bow shape of bulkheads + side view of the hull. there are 20 frames in the hull. how can I install x2 graupner schottel [2335] at the bow. I will have to leave out the keel under hull. thankyou Green. the plans are 1/50th scale.