Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
August 2018: 3 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 13 people
February 2018: 8 people
January 2018: 25 people
December 2017: 4 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (14)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > cabin roof

cabin roof
roof
water proofing
waterproof
cabin
cabin roof
Cabin by muddy Admiral   Posted: 8 days ago
Continuing with the cabin, trying to keep it light in weight. The sides and inner former's made up, started on the front windscreen's. Forgot the procedure about cutting the windows and then fitting the veneer, fitted the veneer and had to cut out the windows veneer and 3mm ply all glued up. Once the apertures were marked out, purposely drilled though from the veneer side just trying to avoid any splitting of the veneer, it worked. Fitted the front screens and reinforced the framework with 5 min epoxy, a quick sand down and all was well. Next item was the roof, as i wanted a light as possible upper works decided on .8mm ply, it looked and felt a little fragile, but once the Titebond glue was applyed all held down with elastic bands, also using 3 strips of 3/8" x 1/8" Obechie longitudinally down the top of the cabin roof to help stop ant edge "Barrelling" at formers. Regards Muddy.

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 9 days ago
Knowing v little about radio waves and antenna construction, I'm happy to accept your line. My assessment was purely on trying to identify the teardrop's purpose and matching its shape to similar units in RAF use. It was usual for ships then - merchant and military - to have a DF system and it just seems logical for a vessel with search and rescue responsibilities to have one! Positioning of nav lights was subject to complex rules in the 1950s and still is! One thing, that I don't think has changed, is that the for'd steaming light must be mounted a significant height above the red/greenside lights. The cabin roof would not be enough! Interesting that we both have similar lengths of experience associated with similar naval vessels. Maybe we crossed paths sometime gone!!

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi Astromorg, Hmm! Your assessment throws up some interesting questions! 1 If the 'teardrop' is a DF antenna what frequency band was it intended to detect? It's way too small to contain the multiple antenna elements necessary to detect, and determine the angle of incidence, of any frequency in common use at that time. I've also never seen a microwave waveguide that shape. If DF I would expect a rotating loop antenna in that era. 2 It's my conviction that the tear drop on the Vickers Wellington is a streamlined VHF antenna. Or just possibly a radar detector much later in the 'grand ruckus'. 3 Why would a Fireboat need a DF set anyway? 4 Some photos clearly show a forward facing lens (white disc) in the teardrop. 5 Such boats when tied up to a mooring buoy instead of the dock would require a 360° visible light. Hence mast-top is the favourite mounting place. 6 Visible angle is primarily a question of the lamp and lens construction and not necessarily the mounting position. 7 A stern light providing the 'fill in all round' is a contradiction of the purpose of running lights which are so constructed and mounted as to help the observer to determine which way the vessel is moving. Forward and aft lights visible 180°? red and green 90°. Which combination you can see helps indicate which way the vessel is moving; towards or away from you. Conversely the single anchor light should be visible from any angle. It can be yellow to distinguish it from a running light. Current regulations also recommend the use of deck lights while at anchor. 8 I agree re position halfway up the mast for the forward running light, BUT, as the masts on these vessels were often folded down the permanently fixed forward running light on the cabin roof would make sense. But then, that's only my opinion! And what do I know?😲 I only worked in communication engineering for 45 years, the last 32 of 'em in Integrated Naval Communication Systems, on all types of vessels from Fast Patrol Boats through FACs, OPVs, corvettes, frigates, conventional subs and up to Escort Aircraft Carrier. Cheers, Doug 😎

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 9 days ago
I would suggest that the light at the top of the mast, while appearing to show all round may actually be masked internally to give the necessary visible angle of 112.5 degs either side of dead ahead. The stern light in the transom will give the 135 deg angle to fill in all round. The teardrop-like unit on the for'd cabin roof looks more like the style of radio direction finder used by the RAF on their aircraft - the one on top of a Wellington bomber is particularly obvious. A useful fitting for an RAF crash boat? Positioned as it is it could not give the required 225 deg beam if it was a steaming light. Normal position for a steaming light would be halfway up the mast at about the yard position, but aside from a small unlabelled bracket on the original masthead drawing, I can find no evidence of a light ever being photo'd there. Combination masthead lights for steaming or anchor are common enough today. Perhaps that was how it was?

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
The mast top light is most likely the Anchor Light and the one on the cabin roof a running light.😎 I figured Robbob would have the gen Gen 👍

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Looking closer you can see a small forward facing light built into the mast support at the front of the cabin roof. It has a small vee shape on the top to hold the mast when folded down.

Cabin/Superstructure by muddy Admiral   Posted: 10 days ago
Upperworks, this launch has a long cabin and a well deck ( Gin Parlour ).. Sides were traced out and cut from 1.5mm ply, internal formers are 3mm ply, spacers and struts Obechie, the cabin front is formed with Balsa which will be covered in 1.5mm ply, all the external faces have been veneered in Mahogany, except the roof which will be probable a piece of ply. The old favourite 1 inch ring saw came into play again for the cutting out of the windows. Applied the veneer after cutting out the windows, have found this easier and it tends not to split and crack the veneer, so one has to recut the window openings but its a very quick and easy job if you use a 1/2 inch drum sander in something like a Dremel hobby type drill. I,m afraid we have the oposite of Rain stopped play , its Sun stopped play at the moment.. You may notice the "Old Batteries" and cans, used as weights to hold down / compress the veneer, also the Jig saw, bolted to a piece of ply and then clamped into the B&D Workmate, I aint got room for a bandsaw which i would love, so this lash up has done me proud for a few years. Regards Muddy....

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Elsrickle Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 10 days ago
Is there a white navigation light on the centre on the fore cabin roof.

The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Did you mean me John? Or Mike? I had considered planking but my mahogany planks are very very thin about 0.5mm x 5mm wide, and I would still have had the problem of 'warping on' a plywood base skin. So I persevered with the mahogany veneer and I'm happy now with the result of making it in two pieces. matching the edges for the centre line joint took the most time 🤔 More power to your plank cutters Gents👍

The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh! by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Could you plank it or would matching the joints be hard to do?🤔. I suppose they could be veed to disguise them?🤔👍

Emerald - "Round the Word" ocean racing yacht. by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
Main Sheet Modification: Yachts of this nature, would be fitted with a Traveller, which would be used to help shape the Main Sail. Also, the route of the main sheet, has a lot of twists and turns to get out of the cabin and up to the Boom. Plus, it has to pass through the tube and bend at its edge. The starting point of the control would be from the cockpit, especially if it is a Single Handed yacht. The ideal place for the traveller, would be on the roof of the cabin. To keep physical disruption to a minimum, I decided to use the original boom running gear pulleys. The termination of the MainSheet would now be at the traveller on the cabin. 1. The cleat was removed from the cockpit, and the eye bolt was replaced by an S hook, screwed to the cockpit deck( see picture 1). 2. A hole was drilled in the cockpit, adjacent to the cabin hatch, and in a direct line with the main Sheet control system. This will allow the main Sheet to pass directly from the cleat. Through the pulley assembly (withought going round the pulley), and straight aft to the cockpit. 3. A brass tube was glued into the hole, flush with the cockpit surface and extending inside, towards the mainsheet control system (see pictures 1 and 2). 4. The Traveller was formed from a length of brass rod, (approx 300mm long), formed to the same curve as the cabin roof. Slide the pulley onto the rod so that it runs freely. Make a 90 degree bend at each end, the length of the traveller apart. These 2 legs will pass down into the cabin roof, leaving about 10 mm for the pulley to run from end to end. Plus about 10mm at each end of the rod, which will be bent up against the inside of the roof and glued. (see picture 3 & 4). 5. Mark the cabin roof where the traveller is to be mounted. I chose to mount the traveller directly under the boom pulley. I have made a revised sketch which is taken from the original plans for guidance. See picture 5. Note: make sure the pulley is mounted on the rod between the two bends. 6. Drill the holes in the cabin, pass the ends of the rod through the holes. I put a 10mm piece of wood under the traveller rod, next to the hole. This allows you to hold it securely, while you bend the rod out, on the inside of the cabin. Apply plent of glue or resin to secure it. Do the same at the other end of the rod, and leave to set. With the cockpit removed, and the mainsheet control system in place, take the free end of the main sheet and pass it through the new hole in the cockpit. The cockpit can be secured by the 4 locking pulleys. Now pass the mainsheet through the S hook and up to the boom. Adjust the S hook to suitable angle. When the yacht is rigged, the mainsheet is passed up to the end of the boom pulley, along the boom, over the pulley and down to the traveller pulley. With the tx/ex active, pull the mainsheet right in, and the trim set right out (this allows for final tightening).Secure the mainsheet to the eye of the pulley, ( I use a figure of 8 knot ). Now adjust the trim on the joystick to pull the main Sail tight. Finally, run the servo right out, and back in a few times, to make sure it works properly. Move the boat round so the wind cones from a different angle, and watch the traveller as the sail is pulled in and out. Now you are ready to sail. May your wake be long and straight. Ray 😎

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Unless described as flat, paint was more often a brighter satin than matt and rarely actual gloss. White will always have been an off white as the components of paints were such that it was not possible to get a really bright white. I know that for a fact as my grandad always made his own and until PEP in the mid 60s (Plastic Emulsion Paint) there was no such thing as brilliant or appliance white. Unfortunately getting an decent off white is not easy these days since Plastikote went acrylic and their previously excellent paints started eating themselves on recoating. I now use enamels exclusively. They are densely pigmented, flexible and modern enamels dry pretty quickly. I am using a black enamel primer on my Crash Tender, which I will then spray with black "gloss" from the same range, which, once thinned with white spirit, will dry a little less than glossy. I still don't have a matt brick red for the undersides, but it can be made matt-ish with a careful rub down with 1000 grit wet and dry used wet and soapy, but be careful not to sand through, so very lightly does it, even 1000 grit can cut well when new. Decks were said to be Cerrux Light Deck Grey, anti-slip, which means a textured surface. That would be darker looking due to the surface texture's way with the light. The cabin sides were described as "smooth", i.e. same as the decks but not anti-slip. The roofs? Well, on Vosper's drawing "white" is crossed through and "Grey" written in. But, some pics do look white, the best pics look darker by a whisker than the sides and the roofs are clearly textured as they show evidence, as do the decks, of filth which will sit in the texture. You choose. NOBODY has yet given us chapter and verse. The fact is, an already very handsome boat looks so very pretty with white roofs. But they too should be off white if you can get it! Good luck. Fittings, btw can be had from SLEC in Watton in white metal. Basically the old Yeoman fittings, masters now owned by IP Engineering who bought them to cast when they owned Vintage Model Boat Company. Now they've sold that to SLEC, but I don't think SLEC have white metal casting facilities, so probably cast by Ivor still. I have just had a set for my birthday and they're excellent. They do need careful cleaning up as in mould lines need to be filed/scraped/sanded to a decent finish and then given good primered surface. No hook though, but it does include nav and riding lights. This site also has masts for sale in plastic, but I made my own in brass as I will the hook and davit. I have also just had a set of crew figures cast from my patterns and they will be available soon...a driver(Helm), a boss with binoculars and a lazy slob laying around in the after cockpit. Needs a roll-up to finish his look. No idea of price yet as don't know how much rubber to mould or resin to cast for a set. Yes, 1/16th scale. All this to finish a model I had 55 years ago! But I reckon it deserves it. Martin

Robbe Smaragd by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
On the original kit, there were no portholes or windows. It was all done by transfers. Grey pieces of paper, slid onto the cabin sides. I cut the holes to the shape of the transfers. Then I planked the sides around the window frames, from deck to roof. Then I used some old cd cases, to cut and shape the window glass. It worked quit well. 👍

20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 1 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Agree 'Steamgerd' 😉 I also find the aerosol paper glue very good. It doesn't soak and stretch the paper. Used it for the new cabin roof for my Sea Scout. The glue sticks can sometimes be a bit 'lumpy' if they are not absolutely brand new! 🤔 Above all, apply to the wood and not to the paper.👍 Cheers, Doug 😎

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Pete, Hope the eyeballs are better 👍 Think I've now got the ultimate configuration 😊 (or the possible, tentative, subject to committee approval and board resolution, potential penultimate configuration 😲) See attached pdf. All new stuff is in red. Thinking is as follows, according to the mast diagram you sent me- L3; NAV & Towing in parallel 2 ccts; one for the port & stbd in the cabin roof, one for the white rear NAV & Towing, yellow, on the mast pointing aft. L4; 2 white deck working lights plus new LED for the cabin light - white or yellow/amber. Your choice. I might be inclined to go for yellow as bridge lighting tends to be not too bright so it doesn't impair the night vision of the watch. Could be why it was a bulb in the first place - softer light ? R2; Anchor light at mast top only. Makes no sense to combine with running (NAV) lights etc. R3; The three new white running lights on the mast pointing forward. L2 and R4 remain as they are for searchlight and horn. Now working on the corresponding wiring sketch. More tomorrow. Cheers, Doug 😎