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>> Home > Tags > cabin roof

cabin roof
roof
water proofing
waterproof
cabin
cabin roof
Palaform Griffon 600 - Police by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I have just bought the Palaform Griffon 600 which arrived last week. I am considering 2 things: 1. Either copy all the depron parts onto 2mm light/medium balsa adding lightning holes to reduce the extra weight. This would make a far stronger model for not too much added weight. The instructions call for adding extra batteries to increase weight if using outdoors anyway. 2. second option would be to replace some parts with balsa, then glass cloth top deck depron, bottom of hull depron and either replace cabin sides/roof with a sandwich of 1mm balsa/1mm ply or glass cloth depron. In both options, the prop tunnel will be built as per kit. Any thoughts or advice would be appreciated.

Progress on the hull - At Last! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
After many distractions and accumulating 'stuff' to go in and on the boat I finally got around to tidying up the hull this week. After flattening with 180 / 240 wet and dry I sealed with Ezekote flattened again then sprayed with a professional grade primer / filler from the auto branch. As usual this showed up all the pits so I filled them with Revell Plasto and primed again. After going round this loop a few times I was (reasonably) happy and flattened with 600 W&D. Then sprayed on Royal Blue from a giant rattle can, also from the auto pro market. Flattened off with 1200 W&D between coats. I have Tamiya Royal Blue acrylic for my air brush as well but couldn't be bothered to set up the compressor🤔 Can worked pretty well though. 👍 Last pic shows the 'Before'! Will leave the final finishing, nameplate and lacquer coat until I have finished the internal fitting out and the cabin. Have decided to plank the cockpit with mahogany😲 just ordered from Krick! First attempt at planking - Wish me luck! I like the blue hull so much I think I will just mark the waterline with a red (or white?) boot topping stripe. Comments welcome. Cabin will be white with a blue roof. Now to continue with the new prop shaft, old one is showing signs of wear at both ends and rust at the wet end 🤔 Anyway it's got an imperial thread which is useless when all my brass props are metric. More soon, I hope 😉 Cheers Doug 😎

Sprinkles by Commodore-H Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Sprinkles, a scratch built, U.S. Coast Guard PWB (patrol boat waterways) is just about done. Operating features include; working running and searchlight, rotating radar and blue emergency beacon. Water monitor on cabin roof can traverse and squirt water 10-15 feet. Bending tubing for the water monitor was difficult, it is actually a composite of several types. Nozzle was made on Unimat. Pump is a Sig "gas passer" Propulsion is from two 600 size motors geared 2:1 with 9.6V Nimh and 3 blade 45mm Graupner props

34" sea commander Aerokits kit by boaty Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Garth, I have my second Sea Commander which I still use , but the first one I sold 13 years ago. I never actually built a Sea Commander but the one I have now and the previous model I picked up cheap and restored them. You do get things like this that come up on Ebay occasionally and though restoration appears sometimes to be challenging I find a lot of satisfaction when the work is completed. My first Sea Commander I found underneath a table on a stall in Ellesmere Port Market and it was about to be binned. The stall holder was glad to accept five pounds for it and it turned out that the hull was quite solid and all I had to do was to make the cabin roof, sand it all down, paint it then fit the motor and radio. I hope you get your Sea Commander, they are lovely boats from yesteryear and even a new build is very rewarding. Boaty😊

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
We got some good news today, apparently a neighbour had contacted housing association when it happened last week, so when I rang they said all repair and replacement costs will be covered as long as I send copies of invoices for work done. Also have managed to recover sea commander with minor damage to cabin roof, both Fairey's and one launch undamaged. But big disappointment as the old Queen was crushed, have to wait and see what else is left that can be salvaged. The boys are rigging up a temporary roof at present so should be weather proof by tonight. I forgot to take my pain killers this morning so now suffering and can't walk. Be glad when the quack decides what to do about my problem, I'd rather have no legs than all this pain. Will update tomorrow, cheers all Colin.

Stabilit Express by Midlife306 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
I think those doublers will need explosives to get them off... I've hit a bit of a roadblock with the big K7, I need to get Donald built up so I can position the steering wheel & dash correctly, the animatronic resin upper torso & arms I bought came with no instructions or info on what servos to use. I got some micro servos & they didn't fit, Dremel out & all fits now but I'm now struggling with connecting the servo arm to the rotating neck. I'll suss it out eventually but I need a rest. I've been doing bits on my 1/12 scale K7 in the background, if all goes well it should be ready for paint in a couple of weeks. As normal I've been waiting for parts to arrive from China, the brushless motor & esc arrived today for the blue rigger, I can make a start on that soon.. I've just finished printing the parts for the cabin for a Springer tug hull I got from Sonar & I've just started printing the first parts of a WW2 landing craft, its 1/16 scale nearly a metre long, I guess I'll be making a tank for it when it's completed. Then there's the Robbe Diabolo, on the instructions it says to use self tapping screws to hold the plastic dual rudders in place. No good to me as I've upgraded to dual aluminium rudders, these buggers need bolts! Trouble is the waterproof electronics box is used as a doubler for the central transom, when it's glued into place there isn't any room to access where the rudder bolts come through the doublers, ohhh the joy of problem solving.... So I'm keeping busy but my butter is spread a bit too thin. Cheers Wayne

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Thanks Dave, yes the old lady is now stable and solid enough to work on. Have a few new bits to make, two cabin roof's and may even re-deck her as the balsa deck has lots of damage and filler would not look good so get family to grab a few handfuls of coffee stirers as they make great deck planks. I am going to put dads 27mhz radio system back in. Then decide which motor is best suited. By the way I still DON'T HAVE A PC. The shop said it has gone past repair so I'll have to save up for a replacement. Unless I find one on free cycle.

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

The electrics, drive & radio by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
The switch panel and wiring loom was made, tested and dry fitted a while ago and so it only needs securing to the bulkhead with four fixing screws, the two NiMh batteries were strapped down to the bearers with cable ties as close to the chines as possible and the XT60 connectors mated. I have read that placing the heavy batteries as far away from the keel as possible improves the handling, all other heavy items are centered along the keel for symmetry and should help the boat to sit evenly in the water. I’m not sure if I will need to do any ballasting, hopefully the maiden voyages should give me an indication. The prop shaft was greased and fitted, and with the prop, thrust washers and lock nuts in place, the clearance was adjusted and locked with some Loctite so the motor could then be installed. The initial motor alignment was made with a solid coupler which was then replaced with the universal joint, I took the precaution to grind a flat on the motor shaft so that the locking grub screw has better grip on the shaft. The grease tube was then fitted to the shaft clamp and secured to the side of the switch panel. The ESC was fixed to the back of the bulkhead with another couple of cable ties and the input cables, again XT60 types, and the three pole XT60 motor connectors mated. I have also fitted a Turnigy in-line volt, amp and watt meter in the circuit before the ESC so that I can log readings in case of spurious fuse blowing issues or unexpected battery life problems. The water cooling tubes were then run from the water pickup, through the ESC and then back to the transom ‘exhaust’ outlet, all water connections are fitted with spring clips to ensure water tight connections. I have used quite a large bore silicone tubing to ensure maximum water flow and made sure that all bends are kink and compression free. The R/C receiver is fixed to the rear cabin wall with some Velcro pads for easy removal, the two aerials were fitted in some plastic tubing at 90 degrees to each other as recommended for 2.4 gig systems and as high above the waterline as possible. The receiver is connected to a separate 4.8 volt NiMh battery via a changeover switch that also has a charging connection and LED power indicator, and I have also fitted a battery voltage indicator, just because they are cheap and convenient although the R/C system that I have has telemetry that reports RX voltage as standard. The battery charger I have chosen can handle the 16 cell series configuration of the drive batteries and so they can be charged in-situ when the main power switch is toggled over to the charge position. The RX and lighting batteries are charged separately. All of the servo and lighting switch cables are routed through the hull to the receiver through pre drilled holes in the bulkheads at high level for neatness and to retain the integrity of each compartment just in case 😲!!. The servo and cables and the water cooling tubes are strapped to a supporting bar between the bulkheads for neatness and security. With the TX switched on first, the RX is then powered up and the main power switch toggled to the ‘operate’ position, the ESC then gives a reassuring series of bleeps that confirm that all is well. The ESC was set up using a Turnigy programming card specifically for that model of controller and if required I can tweak the settings once the boat has had a few sailings. The last things to do now are to fit some strong magnets to hold the hatches and roofs down securely and then finally raise the RAF ensigns 😁

RAF fIRE TENDER MAST DETAILS ?? by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Here is my version. PM me if you want this and i'll send pictures and pdf with material list and detailed build instructions1/16th scale Fireboat Mast. MATERIALS LIST. Item A:- 1.6 Brass rod 45mm long. Item B:- 5mm dia brass Finial. (from dolls house shop) Item C:- 3mm Brass tube 47mm long. Item D:- 1.6mm x 4mm brass strip 64mm long. Item E:- 2 Off 3mm brass tube 68mm long. Method of build. Start by drilling Item B 1.6mm , then drill bottom 3.1mm x 2mm deep. Solder Items A,B, and C, together to form mast top. Then drill through Item B 90 degrees to mast with 1.2mmm drill for rigging line to pass through. Item D then needs shaping, by tapering on one edge only. 2mm at end to full 4mm x 26mm from end. Do this to both sides. (see sketch). Now drill centre 3.1mm and each end 1.2mm at 3mm from ends. Item E. Flatten one end to 10mm and opposite end to 8mm. Bend 10mm end to 120 degrees. Bend 8mm end to 150 degrees. Now trim 10mm end back to 5mm. Carefully radius 8mm end and then drill 2.2mm at 3mm from end. Now solder 2 x Items E to item D and locate mast top into centre hole and solder in place. The completed mast is held in place by two angle brackets which I slotted through cabin roof and glued with epoxy. These brackets need to be drilled and tapped m2. For the fixing screws 3mm from the top edge, then radius to smarten up.

Fairplay X - Plastic Magic! :-) by saintsalvio Commander   Posted: 6 months ago
A GRANDE RICHIESTA! as you asked me how I did it! It is very simple! ehm not so much but: you take the lobster (minipig submarine u16 new) take out delicately the pincers (the two motors) paying attention to isolate the cables for each motors, than take away from the body the fruit (the intere block including internal battery, receiver and jack to charge) than I substitued the two motor pillars of the original fairplay kit with the two mini sub pillars very similar in sembiance and proportions, painted than reconnect the cables of the two motors with tiny cable joint to the "fruit" fixed on the exact balanced centre of the ship hull (you can see by the photos: it is right between the two main internal hollow septs). You can use the front submarine lights to enlight the fairplay lower cabins. Take care it is a nonconventional very difficult and nerve raking work but with a little help (from my friends? Noo nobody here) from the lady luck instead you can obtain the result of a mad - merely responding to command - foolish steering - lovable tugboat. hope this pics can help (Excuse me but I sealed the fruit before fixing to the hull with a lot of electric tape and sealing paint to waterproof it! So I haven't images of it naked but it is a quite simple structure! 😱 P.S. Excuse for my neapolitan-deformed english I can't do better!

The mast & rigging. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
I had previously adapted the mast with lighting and fixing studs and so it’s ready to be fitted to the wheelhouse roof, but I decided to add some rigging detail in the process. Along with some other items, I had previously bought some threaded brass ’eyes’ and wooden rigging blocks by mail order from RB models in Poland. Very good prices and remarkably quick delivery from overseas. http://www.rbmodel.com I drilled the horizontal bar of the mast to take a couple of small brass eyes, and bent the lower part of the exposed thread back at an angle, onto these I fitted some wooden rigging blocks with brass sheaves which I had previously stained mahogany and lacquered. Another slightly larger eye was fitted to the centre of the mast and another to the wheelhouse roof for the forward stay rope, I used some thin white elasticated thread that I found in my local Hobbycraft store for all the rigging. The stay rope end were finished with small brass hooks formed from some thin brass wire and secured with some small diameter heat shrink tubing, I think this makes for a much neater look than just tied knots. The top rigging ropes were made in the same way. The completed mast was then bolted down through the wheelhouse roof on the threaded studs and the two lighting wires passed through separate holes in the roof. This should allow me to detach the mast and fold it down for transport if necessary. The lower end of the ropes from the rigging blocks were formed into a loop with a spot of superglue to fix them and then some small white heat shrink tube used to cover the joints. The loops fit neatly over the cleats on the cabin roof so that they can easily be released. I’m hoping that being elasticated all the rigging will stay taut and remain presentable 😁 I must remember to order some ensigns flags from 'Mike Alsop Scale Flags' for a finishing feature as recommended by pmdevlin in an earlier blog post 👍

Using old motors by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Wow! A real collector 👍 Now that I have a Watt-meter I shall run some tests on my Target (after restoration!), test the reversing circuit and put it back in my Sea Scout where it belongs. The Sea Scout looks a bit sad after 25 years on the shelf. 🤔 She also has the commonly reported problem of de-lamination on the transom, also the Cabin roof curls at the edges. Any tips how to repair and cure this are very welcome. I'm thinking of stripping and varnishing her. What do you recommend? The grey lump half hidden in the cockpit is a siren, the servo with 2 micro switches is for this and the nav lights. Second servo is to swivel a water jet nozzle, pump is the black conglomerate at the rear of the engine compartment. A horrible piston pump but it worked,enough to surprise small boys who got too close 😉 Rudder servo on it's side, like everyone else has had to do. Current motor Decaperm, performance Sedate 🤔 Cheers 😎

The scramble nets. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
The scramble nets were a particular challenge that I wasn't looking forward to making and at first I looked for something ready-made and I found a manufacturer of sports and bird netting. They make a net for golf driving ranges that looked to have almost the right dimensions and construction so I called them and requested a sample, which they very obligingly supplied. However, when it arrived the ‘rope’ looked far too thin for a realistic scale and the squares slightly too large and furthermore it could only be bought by the square metre with a minimum order of 4 metres so it would have been very expensive for the small amount I actually needed 😱. And so as I couldn’t find anything else remotely similar or suitable I resigned myself to making the nets from scratch. After some research and scale calculations I decided I needed a 2mm diameter twisted black polypropylene cord for the nets and I found some on good old eBay for a few pounds for a 30 metre length. The next hurdle was forming the netting squares and I initially tried to produce a net by tying ‘square’ knots which are used to make real ‘cargo’ and ‘climbing nets’. I found a helpful YouTube video demonstrating how to tie the knots, at which I had some success, but with such a small diameter cord and big fingers I soon gave up on that idea 😡. The successful method involved marking out a square grid on a piece of ply and nailing brass pins on the edges from which a net of cord was formed, and where the cords crossed I used a hollow needle, which I made from some brass tube and rod ground to a sharp needle point, to form the joint. The needle was used to pierce the twist of the vertical cord and draw the horizontal cord through the twist, this was repeated to form a neat and accurate net structure. After adjusting the cords to form accurate squares I applied a small drop of superglue to each joint to lock the cords together. The completed net was trimmed at the sides and the hot tip of my small soldering iron used to melt the polypropylene cord ends to neaten them up. The net was secured to the rails on the cabin roof by passing the cords through a short piece of black heat shrink tube and then passed under the rail and back through the heat shrink tube. I used the clean tip of a small soldering iron to shrink the tubing down around the cords as using my heat gun for the job would also easily remove the paint from the roof 😱. I made a bar for the bottom of the net from some 4mm dowel drilled with 2.5mm holes at the same spacing as the net, this was stained mahogany and given a few coats of lacquer as a finish. The cords were passed through the dowel and secured in a similar fashion as the top fixing with heat shrink. The end result of this process is a scramble net of more or less the correct scale as the real thing that, when rolled up on the cabin roof, looks pretty good…..at least to my eye 😎. A lot of effort and thought went into making the first one…..now all I’ve got to do is make another one for the other side 😓.

The radio aerial & handrails. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Only the aerial base is supplied in the set of white metal fittings so it needs a rod added to complete it. First I bored out a hole through the base using a 2mm bit in a pin drill and then I used a short length of 2mm brass rod for the aerial. This rod was tapped with a 2mm thread and a nut filed to a round profile used as an end stop on the thread. I left sufficient thread below the base for fixing through the tapered aerial base, cabin roof and the reinforcing piece on the underside of the wheelhouse roof. The upper end of the rod was fitted with a hand turned knob as a finishing piece and for safety and the piece was sprayed with etch primer and two coats of white gloss. Finally I tapped a 2mm thread into a small piece of brass which was glued to the underside of the roof for the piece to screw into. The handrail bases were bought on-line from Polly Model Engineering and are 3½" gauge stanchions, normally used on steam locomotives, along with some 3/32" stainless steel rod and 8BA fixing nuts and washers. The fitting of these was quite straightforward but the two rails on the wheelhouse roof need to be bent to follow the roof curvature. The rods are fixed into the stanchions with a drop of thin superglue.