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>> Home > Tags > cabin roof

cabin roof
roof
water proofing
waterproof
cabin
cabin roof
LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
Hello, Doug! I’m happy to report that my eyes are finally healed & I’m ready to get cracking on my tug’s LED lighting improvement project. Needless to say it’s so fantastic to be able to see again. The infection was so bad that I had to move around the house for weeks with at least one hand on the wall or I was in danger of falling or walking into the china cabinet. I lost what’s called “stereo vision” & had no depth perception. It was a nightmare to say the least, especially considering that the source of the infection remains unknown. But I just had a checkup at the ophthalmologist‘s office & I was given the happy news that all traces of the infection are completely gone. Hallelujah!🙏🏼👁👁 BTW, did you complete your tug’s mast LED lighting project? I recall that you had finished up the mast itself & had its LEDs working. Were you able to reinstall the mast in the pilot house roof & get everything back together without any problems? At one point you had mentioned possibly making a plug & socket arrangement for the mast so that it could be removed for safer transport to the lake. Were you able to follow through with that plan or was it just is easy to simply re-install the mast? finished for your dog? If so, how did it come out? I hope all is well with you & that your many projects are all turning out successfully.

Cabin roof hatches by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
I look forward to seeing some jigs and fixtures and of course the finished article

Cabin roof hatches by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Apropos 'Inspiration' Michael'! Great stuff 👍 Hinges like that are just what I want to make on my Sea Scout. I plan to make mine from 0.3mm brass and working!😲 Will also use my mini milling machine as s precision drill press as you did👍 Cheers, Doug 😎

Cabin roof hatches by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Rear cabin hatches I have decided to make these two roof hatches detachable (not working) purely to ease the painting and rubbing down process. The hatches on the rear cabin are supplied in pieces to be glued together, so to make them detachable I drilled a hole through the base of each and glued an 8BA screw in place, these can then be secured after final painting to the roof. The hatch also has a dummy-hinged lid and small white metal hinges are supplied, however they do need some attention, such as drilling all the holes and trimming the edges. Here we go again, time for a jig! Repartition can be achieved with the simplest of jigs; all I used was coffee stirrers pinned to a block of wood and one as a locking device. The jig was then placed under the milling machine and the first hole centred, drilled and then the next hinge is placed in the jig and drilled and so on, move to the next hole until all holes are drilled. Before fitting the hinges there needs to be a separation line for the lid and hinge plate so a scored line about halfway through the ply. The hinges are fitted with epoxy and brass pins through all the fixing holes. Mid cabin hatch This is a single hatch, again a square of ply is supplied, but this is improved by adding sides, which can locate on runners, again the runners are not supplied. This hatch is also attached with a single screw epoxied into the top and a nut, after final painting. Forward cabin hatch Again, a single hatch and dealt with in the same way as the mid hatch.

Calculating scale speed by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Thanks Doug I hope that your not getting too stressed by my motor restoration, I'm looking at buying another supermarine, boxed unused, box looks awful but motor is still all shiny. If I can get the price down to my level it will be for the vintage history display. What esc would you recommend for the one you are restoring. Not getting much done at present as I am trying to sort out building work on new wetroom before I go for my operation. So I will be back on the models after my knee surgery is done. Checked the launch this morning using my satnav strapped to the cabin roof. After a 300 meter run at full speed it read 7.01mph. So that really was pleasing to see. Got to go sparky just arrived. Cheers Colin.

Sadolin by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Gardener, Don't know the Sadolin stuff, I use Billing Boats stains meself, BUT whatever you use, esp on balsa, apply a coupla coats of sealer first. Then at least one or two coats of clear satin varnish; e.g. from Lord Nelson range from Holland. THEN AND ONLY then, apply your stain til you get the depth of colour you want. After that seal with matt, satin or gloss varnish / lacquer according to taste😉 That's the way I did my Sea Scout 'Jessica' renovation, see blog on this site for results!!! Coupla sample pics attached. The whole process is described in the Blog. Otherwise the balsa will soak up all your stain and still not look right 🤔 A 'preserver' as such is not normally necessary if the wood is properly treated inside and out; sealer, stain, varnish etc! Or just EzeKote resin inside. Stain no needed inside of course. Good luck and above all have fun with your endeavours. 👍 Keep us 'up to date' ('on the running' as my German friends would say; 'auf den Laufenden'!) 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS I like Danish Blue meself 😁😁 On the other hand; I wouldn't have used balsa for speedboat deck in the first place. I use a close grained marine ply 0,8 or 1.0mm. Takes the stain better and looks more realistic. Balsa is too coarse grained for stain and varnish on scale speedboats. Thick coat of paint ... OK. On the cabin roof and after deck (which I had to renew) I used 1.5mm mahogany veneer. If I had to do it again I would use a close grained 0.8mm marine ply (birch or pear) and cherry stain (also Billing) as I used on 'Jessica's deck.

Life Rings by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
The white metal fittings supplied with the kit are somewhat lacking in detail and some are overweight to say the least. I decided to produce some life rings to my specification I had tried to find suitable replacements on the web without success. So how to produce the ring part. I first tried with plywood but the finish achievable was not acceptable (can be seen in the pictures) so I then decided to use Bamboo (Ikea phone stand) for those who have followed from the start the same material as the grating on the foam tanks. First I cut some rough circles out of 10mm bamboo sheet and drilled a 10mm hole so it can be mounted on a 10mm screw mandrel. This allows the piece to machined on one side and then reversed and machined on the other side. The tool I used was ground with a 22 mm radius to produce the shape on one side of the ring and then when reversed and machined again the tool actually “parts off” the ring on the inner diameter leaving the ring free on the now remaining peg, the finish on the bamboo was good enough without any further sanding. The next step was to put a slot in the OD at 90degree intervals to hold the “rope” in position while the rope is bound in four places. The easiest way was to make a jig to hold the ring and to keep the rope in place while it’s glued into ring, it can then be removed and bound in four places each turn being super glued to keep it in place. Next job is to give a coat of sanding sealer that stiffens the rope and seals the wood. The rings are theoretically held to the cabin roof with clamp type brackets so again to ensure consistency I machined a piece with a suitable profile. I then cut radial slices to create individual brackets. The rings will actually be fastened to the cabin roof with 2 x 8BA bolts this is to enable them to be removed for painting of both the ring and the roof. At a later painting stage, I will be giving them two coats of grey primer and three coats of white, then hand painting the rope loops with red paint. The finished rings are much lighter and hopefully look more realistic.

How to Create water tight seal? by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Any suggestions for creating a water tight seal? I am using clear hockey tape around the cabin roof which seems to keep water out, but over the open cockpit is where I am placing a cover which is suppose to keep water out of this area. I also poured polyurethane on the floorboards of the cockpit to provide a good seal and caulked the seams too.

Cabin by muddy Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
Continuing with the cabin, trying to keep it light in weight. The sides and inner former's made up, started on the front windscreen's. Forgot the procedure about cutting the windows and then fitting the veneer, fitted the veneer and had to cut out the windows veneer and 3mm ply all glued up. Once the apertures were marked out, purposely drilled though from the veneer side just trying to avoid any splitting of the veneer, it worked. Fitted the front screens and reinforced the framework with 5 min epoxy, a quick sand down and all was well. Next item was the roof, as i wanted a light as possible upper works decided on .8mm ply, it looked and felt a little fragile, but once the Titebond glue was applyed all held down with elastic bands, also using 3 strips of 3/8" x 1/8" Obechie longitudinally down the top of the cabin roof to help stop ant edge "Barrelling" at formers. Regards Muddy.

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 3 months ago
Knowing v little about radio waves and antenna construction, I'm happy to accept your line. My assessment was purely on trying to identify the teardrop's purpose and matching its shape to similar units in RAF use. It was usual for ships then - merchant and military - to have a DF system and it just seems logical for a vessel with search and rescue responsibilities to have one! Positioning of nav lights was subject to complex rules in the 1950s and still is! One thing, that I don't think has changed, is that the for'd steaming light must be mounted a significant height above the red/greenside lights. The cabin roof would not be enough! Interesting that we both have similar lengths of experience associated with similar naval vessels. Maybe we crossed paths sometime gone!!

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Astromorg, Hmm! Your assessment throws up some interesting questions! 1 If the 'teardrop' is a DF antenna what frequency band was it intended to detect? It's way too small to contain the multiple antenna elements necessary to detect, and determine the angle of incidence, of any frequency in common use at that time. I've also never seen a microwave waveguide that shape. If DF I would expect a rotating loop antenna in that era. 2 It's my conviction that the tear drop on the Vickers Wellington is a streamlined VHF antenna. Or just possibly a radar detector much later in the 'grand ruckus'. 3 Why would a Fireboat need a DF set anyway? 4 Some photos clearly show a forward facing lens (white disc) in the teardrop. 5 Such boats when tied up to a mooring buoy instead of the dock would require a 360° visible light. Hence mast-top is the favourite mounting place. 6 Visible angle is primarily a question of the lamp and lens construction and not necessarily the mounting position. 7 A stern light providing the 'fill in all round' is a contradiction of the purpose of running lights which are so constructed and mounted as to help the observer to determine which way the vessel is moving. Forward and aft lights visible 180°? red and green 90°. Which combination you can see helps indicate which way the vessel is moving; towards or away from you. Conversely the single anchor light should be visible from any angle. It can be yellow to distinguish it from a running light. Current regulations also recommend the use of deck lights while at anchor. 8 I agree re position halfway up the mast for the forward running light, BUT, as the masts on these vessels were often folded down the permanently fixed forward running light on the cabin roof would make sense. But then, that's only my opinion! And what do I know?😲 I only worked in communication engineering for 45 years, the last 32 of 'em in Integrated Naval Communication Systems, on all types of vessels from Fast Patrol Boats through FACs, OPVs, corvettes, frigates, conventional subs and up to Escort Aircraft Carrier. Cheers, Doug 😎

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 3 months ago
I would suggest that the light at the top of the mast, while appearing to show all round may actually be masked internally to give the necessary visible angle of 112.5 degs either side of dead ahead. The stern light in the transom will give the 135 deg angle to fill in all round. The teardrop-like unit on the for'd cabin roof looks more like the style of radio direction finder used by the RAF on their aircraft - the one on top of a Wellington bomber is particularly obvious. A useful fitting for an RAF crash boat? Positioned as it is it could not give the required 225 deg beam if it was a steaming light. Normal position for a steaming light would be halfway up the mast at about the yard position, but aside from a small unlabelled bracket on the original masthead drawing, I can find no evidence of a light ever being photo'd there. Combination masthead lights for steaming or anchor are common enough today. Perhaps that was how it was?

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
The mast top light is most likely the Anchor Light and the one on the cabin roof a running light.😎 I figured Robbob would have the gen Gen 👍

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Looking closer you can see a small forward facing light built into the mast support at the front of the cabin roof. It has a small vee shape on the top to hold the mast when folded down.

Cabin/Superstructure by muddy Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
Upperworks, this launch has a long cabin and a well deck ( Gin Parlour ).. Sides were traced out and cut from 1.5mm ply, internal formers are 3mm ply, spacers and struts Obechie, the cabin front is formed with Balsa which will be covered in 1.5mm ply, all the external faces have been veneered in Mahogany, except the roof which will be probable a piece of ply. The old favourite 1 inch ring saw came into play again for the cutting out of the windows. Applied the veneer after cutting out the windows, have found this easier and it tends not to split and crack the veneer, so one has to recut the window openings but its a very quick and easy job if you use a 1/2 inch drum sander in something like a Dremel hobby type drill. I,m afraid we have the oposite of Rain stopped play , its Sun stopped play at the moment.. You may notice the "Old Batteries" and cans, used as weights to hold down / compress the veneer, also the Jig saw, bolted to a piece of ply and then clamped into the B&D Workmate, I aint got room for a bandsaw which i would love, so this lash up has done me proud for a few years. Regards Muddy....