Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
June 2017: 7 people
May 2017: 8 people
April 2017: 23 people
March 2017: 9 people
February 2017: 12 people
January 2017: 37 people
December 2016: 2 people
November 2016: 2 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (8)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > channel

channel
channel
The Big Heavy Model Boat Launching Blues by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 8 hours ago
Fully set up, I'm guessing Constellation weights between 100 and 110 pounds (I haven't had the opportunity the get an accurate measurement yet). Taking her to events with pools requires lifting her into the pool. I haven't figured out a way to do that easily, or safely, or more importantly, alone. I built her to sail in open water, so the 2 or three times I have to ask for help at a pool isn't a big deal. I'm sure that most of the time I'll be launching her at a ramp or shoreline, and that I'll need to move her from the parking area to the shoreline, however far that may be. There's times I may be faced with a bulkhead, but like the pool, there's no easy fix for that with a model this size. My first plan was a hand-truck set-up like the picture of my friend Ray from RCGroups, and his SC&H model of Surprise, a very similarly sized model to mine. The hand-truck is plastic and the cradle is wood, and you can see it's pretty bulky to hold a 100 pound model. Ray said his issue with it was it floated. When launching he had to push it down to get the model clear, and when retrieving he had to hold on to it or it would fall over, while trying get hold of a big model with spars sticking out everywhere. If the water was choppy or boaters were making wakes, it was that much more difficult. He also didn't like that he had to go into knee-deep water, at least. Dan, also from RCGroups, and the fellow that developed the sliding-brace-winch, has an SC&H brig he's modeled as the US brig Syren. It also came with the same hand-truck Ray's Surprise did. Dan wasn't all that enamored with it either. He pointed out how when you lean it back to move the model, it put you in among the rigging risking damage or even injury. Dan altered his hand-truck into a cart and has not looked back. In my mind, it's a boat. I have a 16 foot sailboat, and to move it, and launch it, I use a boat-trailer, so it would make sense to make a boat-trailer for the model. I scribbled an idea on paper, but then turned to some old 3D modeling software so I could see it better. My model has a 4 foot long ballast tube bolted to the keel. So I figured a U shaped channel to cradle that tube and support the model would be the basis of the cart. While Dan's cart has worked great for him, I didn't care for his 3-wheeled arrangement. Like an actual boat trailer, I opted for a single axle right under the model. I figured this would be more easily maneuvered and handle terrain a little better. I figured on making the cart from angle steel I dould bolt together. I over-designed the thing a bit, drawing a framework that would cradle the model that the more I looked at, the less I thought I needed. Going back to my real boat trailer, It just had center support and a pair of carpet cover skids (bunkers) to hold the boat up-right. Simple is always the best approach - and I had just the right material to build this cart from - a steel bed-frame. This L-angled steel had the strength to easily carry the model while using a minimum of material, and it certainly wasn't going to float! Two girders would form a U shaped channel to cradle the ballast tube. I figured a rod axle would need support or it could bend with a 100 pound model bouncing on it, a third angle would be set across for the axle. A couple of upright posts with padding would hold the model upright. Nearly all the weight of the model rests in the channel, so there's not a lot of strain on the uprights. I didn't have a cutting wheel so tried cutting the bed frame with a reciprocating saw. Bed frame steel is hard, it ate both blades, and two more I bought before finally getting the three main pieces cut, though I had no trouble drilling it. I used the u-bolt portion of a set of wire-clamps to hold the axle. A bit of flat steel to brace the axle so it wouldn't try to twist. It's all held together with nuts and bolts. I wanted short pieces of steel for and aft to hold the loose ends of the channel, but I wasn't gonna try to cut that stuff again, so I just used some scrap 2x4. To hold the handle I tried mounting a wood block with a hole forward, but then I remembered I had a flag-pole mount from when I replaced a rotten post on the porch. It took some searching, but I found it and screwed it on. The wheels are shopping cart wheels bought new from Ace Hardware online for about $5 each. I looked into inflatable wheels to give a softer ride, but they were too expensive for me. I watch the local thrift shops though, and if something shows up with nice wheels, I'll grab it. A fender washer goes on the axle first, so the wheel doesn't rub against the axle support; then the wheel, another washer, and a hitch-pin holds it all on. I can pull the hitch pins and remove the wheels making it easier to stow the cart. The uprights are simple 3/4" pine with some pipe insulation for padding (as opposed to tennis balls in the 3D model). They're bolted to the axle support, but I want to alter that a little so they can be folded in to make the cart flatter for transport. The handle is an old wood closet pole I've had for a long time. A bit too old it would turn out, but that's a later story. I painted it white for visibility as it also serves as a guard to protect the model's bowsprit from cell-phone wielding idiots that seem to be the most common form of life on this planet now. I painted the cart blue, because it wasn't black, white, or red; the other colors I had. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready in time to the museum event, and didn't go, but I wanted to sail the model before it got cold, and see if this thing worked.

No power by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Nick, we're working into this on a sort of Archimedian Spiral! But we'll get there 😉 You forgot to mention if you had the rudder servo plugged in and if it responded! If it did I assume it responded to the left stick as your ESC responded to the right stick! In that case .. Switch off the RX (boat power supply/ESC), switch off the TX. Always use this sequence to prevent ESC / motors going wild! 😡 Then ... plug the rudder servo into the channel that responds to the right stick - I assume Channel 1? Plug the ESC into Channel 2. Switch on the TX, switch on the RX (boat supply / ESC-BEC). Again, always use this switch-on sequence to prevent uncontrolled servo / motor movement! All SHOULD now work as required 😉👍 Cheers Doug 😎 @ Dave - Patience is a virtue 😉

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Eureka! You have a working TX/Rx and ESC. It would appear to be responding correctly to the Tx stick movements. Next step with everything as it is now plug in the rudder servo to the rx and see if the up down stick controls the rudder. It could be any of the remaining channels on the Rx. Please let me know if this works. Dave

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Nick Lets just do one simple task. Plug the esc and rudder servo into your Rx. Switch on the TX and ESC. You may want to disconnect the motor and protect the wires. If the rx light is on your rudder should respond to one of the sticks. You may have to plug it into different channels on the rx moving the esc if necessary. Please let me know if this works. Dave

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi Nick You are using your Tamco and it is working? I suggest you try a spare servo in each channel and identify which Tx sticks work which channel on the Rx. The servo should follow the stick movement in both directions. If you do not have a separate Rx battery you can use your ESC, you dont need a motor connected but do tape up the wires to prevent a short. Once you have identified the throttle output channel you can plug your esc into this channel. Plug the test servo into the rudder channel and make sure it is working Your throttle (ESC) stick does need to be in the centre position. If you are using a horizontal stick then I add the following procedure or follow my original guide. When you say rudder stick do you mean the horizontal stick movement on the tx? If so it is this stick you need to move to set the ESC. Say full right when the solid green light is on then full left when the red light is on. Stick back to centre and both red green should be solid. With the Tx switched on the bind process is automatic once you press the small button after switch on and whilst the red/green leds are flashing. Once pressed the green led should be solid until you move the stick fully when the red led lights and you move the stick in the opposite direction and return to centre when the red green lights show solid. Dave

Lindow common. by Graham Petty Officer   Posted: 3 days ago
I sailed on Lindow Common from 1963 until about 1967/8. Most Saturdays there was a guy there with a Gannet powered boat that was similar to a Sea Queen, the radio was huge, about a 12inch cube on the floor with what seemed about an 8foot aerial. I had a sea scout with a super fury, but no radio, just a touch of rudder and let it go,and go it did!! I think the whole lake was lined with timber and it seemed huge but when I called in there a couple of years ago it seemed much smaller than I remember. I to progressed to single channel bang bang steering with a number of boats that were really a bit too quick for this type of basic radio, the first had the transmitter housed in an OXO box and the receiver in a soap box. Happy days

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Looks like this is a 3 channel set. The battery can be plugged into any port with 1,2 and 3 used for servos etc.. When binding, the top port is used for the binding plug and the battery plugged into any other port. The lights should be flashing on the rx with the bind plug connected and go solid when the Tx is in bind mode and the process has completed. Normal use with an ESC and servo is port 1 and 2. Dave

No power by NickW Lieutenant   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Doug Yes my Rx is a R3FS but the bind channel on mine is at the top (just under the failsafe button) then descending ch3 ch2 ch1 Nick

No power by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Nick, If you really have the R3FS RX then what you say above is wrong! The Bind channel slot is CH3. The Battery connector is the 4th slot. See pic from the so called User Manual. I would first try to Bind the RX without the ESC, then you can forget about BEC or not 😉 For this put the binding link into Ch3 slot and the battery in the fourth slot. Then- 1. Install a charged battery in the TX and switch it off. 2. Insert the Binding Link into the Ch3 channel „BIND“ port of the receiver. 3. Connect the receiver battery to any port of the receiver, (leave the ESC out for now) the red LED starts flashing indicating that the RX is starting the tuning process.. 4. Press and hold the „BIND“ button on the transmitter, and switch it on. 5. Watch the LED on the receiver. If the LED stops flashing, the binding process is successful. This process takes up to 5 sec. 6 Release the „BIND“ button on the transmitter, take out the „BIND“ link. 7. Install the servo for testing, in CH1 or 2. 8. If the test fails, repeat 1 to 7 above. 9. If the test succeeds, remove the RX battery, plug the ESC into slot 2, rudder servo into slot 1. As attached wiring diagram, which assumes an ESC with a BEC. All should now work assuming your batteries are OK and the ESC-BEC is working! If not Go back to step 7; No ESC, RX battery in slot 4, servo in slot 1 or 2. If this works then your ESC (or at least the BEC) is duff! 🤔 Hope this does the trick, at least to find out where the snag is - if any! 😉 Viel Glück! 👍 Doug 😎

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Nick If your ESC has a BEC you use the throttle channel and the other channel for the rudder. The ESC can not be plugged into the battery connector as there will be no signal on that connector but all the lights will work as you are providing the correct voltage. The ESC should settle to solid red green. If green is showing this suggests the ESC is not finding a signal. I assume the batteries in the Tx are all ok and all connected in the correct way. If you have another TX/Rx you could check The ESC and Rudder servo to make sure they work OK using that set. Hopefully Doug will decipher the bind process but I would check the above first. The Viper has an on off switch and I assume this is working as you are powering everything. Dave

No power by NickW Lieutenant   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Dave, yes that's the very one....I'll have to try the battery connector in the 1st channel which is the bind channel....the red led comes on and stays on, the led's on the ESC flash and then it settles to green Nick

No power by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
NickW is this the radio set https://www.modelsport.co.uk/absima-sr2s-2- style='background-color:yellow;'>channel-2.4ghz-radio-control-system/rc-car-products/407387 If so it's a 2 channel set with a rx with 4 sockets. One is for the battery and I assume the rest are for ESC and Rudder. You have tried putting the connectors in the two furthest sockets from the battery socket. It could be only two are actually live as regards signal controls. As the lights come on the plugs are in the correct way. Doug I did find some Utube help on the set but it was all in German or could have been 'Dinglish'. I do hope you will be able to help with the translation. Happy days dave

No power by NickW Lieutenant   Posted: 4 days ago
I have the SR2S model - also has AFHDS - automatic frequency hopping digital system....it's a 2 channel Tx, purchased off fleabay new in box. It comes with a manual in English, which says it's factory matched with the Rx

Controls by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Yes Manufacturers seem to ignore the model boat fraternity. I use Taranis Tx as I can program it to do exactly what I want which is a boon with multiple servos to control. I do all the mixing on the Tx and output to the my chosen Rx channels from 1 Tx stick. I suspect you will have to make your own ratchets. The vertical sticks probably have all the bits but the horizontal will not. Have you considered using one of the knob controls?

Changes in latitudes by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 7 days ago
After the sail I tried to figure out how to make the chain plates. The links below the channel are easy enough, but the doubled rod strap that wraps the deadeye was (and is) giving me headaches. I was originally going to bolt the chainplates to the hull, but instead I intend to use round-headed brass wood screws, and I've installed oak strips inside the hull to give them something to bite into. You may recall I'm modeling the ship as she was new, when her portrait was painted in 1856. There's nearly nothing showing what her stern looked like but one etching done of her in dry-dock in Boston in 1859 when she returned from her first cruise. Several painting of her contemporaries show very similar stern ornamentation. I already had the moldings applied based on the drydock drawing, now I made the three rosettes she still carries today - her "constellation of stars." My first attempt was too think and bulky, so I started fresh with a bit of boxwood, and used styrene to apply details. Once done, it got a coat of primer and then I pressed it into clay to make molds for the casting resin. If I had a "Constellation Restaurant" my butter pads would all be molded like this :) Checking into the fashion of the day for depicting stars and things astronomical, I painted the stars gold on a royal blue background. They were then epoxied to the hull and quarter galleries. Soon after, I lost my job of 18 years, and about a year later had to move out of the house and in with my girlfriend. The models literally went on the shelf. She sat on top of a cabinet for nearly a year when I got an invite from the director of Historic Ships Baltimore to bring the model to the Baltimore Port Expo celebrating National Maritime Day.